User Tools

Site Tools


196403

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
196403 [2013/11/14 23:38]
sbw
196403 [2018/10/05 04:07] (current)
sbw
Line 32: Line 32:
  
 Hi, Hi,
-One can only hail with delight the move by Federation to secure communal club rooms for all the various walking clubs. In the past + 
-I have suggested cooperation between the walking clubs in setting up a club room (with atmosphere) to provide a suitable meeting place for all those who applaud the way of life that bushwalking symbolises.+One can only hail with delight the move by Federation to secure communal club rooms for all the various walking clubs. In the past I have suggested cooperation between the walking clubs in setting up a club room (with atmosphere) to provide a suitable meeting place for all those who applaud the way of life that bushwalking symbolises. 
 Having hailed this move with delight, quite sincerely, may I then go on to inquire, with a pang of regret, why we haven'​t heard of this before, and why it is necessary to go to Martin Place to secure, for rent, the communal club room. Having hailed this move with delight, quite sincerely, may I then go on to inquire, with a pang of regret, why we haven'​t heard of this before, and why it is necessary to go to Martin Place to secure, for rent, the communal club room.
-We, the S.B.W. are Sydney'​s lar6st.--c1Ub and,- as, suc1-1,, should. 
-rate some say in all these goings on.. But we, I fear, are becoming more of a social, rather than bushwalking,​ club, and there are several other clubs with a smaller, but more active, mmbership. ,These clubs are doing more walking and TALKING than us, and are undoubtedly having a larger influence on trends in bushwaiking. It is not really surprising, therefore, I suppose, that Federation presents us with a fait accompli. 
-Now while the idea is admirable, whether we had a say in it or not, surely we can do better than Martin Place  the very heart of the concrete jungle. There is only one place for bushwalkers to hold meetings, and that is in the bush. This, a typical Brooks suggestion, would prove quite impractical and so we are forced to consider some manmade shelter. Here the choice is wide, but I contend we should lean toward the old rather than the new, the austere rather than the ornate. 
-Nothing, I feel, could suit our purposes more admirably than an old warehouse ​ and I believe there are quite a few going begging around Kent and Sussex Streets ​ for here, we could develop a club room that would exude the aura of bushwalking. This would make for less formal meetings 
-and evenings more in that casual spirit Irm admire. 
-One thing that would be really worthwhile would be a practice skirun. Given a small amount of room, one could be built of second hand lumber for a lot less than our Treasurer has hidden away. Coir matting makes a good surface, for practice, on which all the wellknown turns, manoeuvres and falls can be tried out. There used to be one of these practice slopes in Sidney, unfortunately now defunct, hut it provided an exhilirating Friday night'​s entertainment. The combined bushwalking clubs are just the Aroup to reintroduce such a noble sport  but not in Martin Place. 
-The ingenuity of bushwalkers would be quite equal to the task of 
-devising other suitable activities, only given the space to operate in, 
-and the knowledge that a bit' of jumping around wasn't going to cause any excitement. 
-a 
  
-March1964 The Sydney ​Bushwalker 3.+Wethe S.B.W. are Sydney's largest club and, as such, should rate some say in all these goings on. But we, I fear, are becoming more of a social, rather than bushwalking,​ club, and there are several other clubs with a smaller, but more active, membership. These clubs are doing more walking and TALKING than us, and are undoubtedly having a larger influence on trends in bushwaiking. It is not really surprising, therefore, I suppose, that Federation presents us with a fait accompli.
  
- THE FEBRUARY GENERAL MEETING+Now while the idea is admirable, whether we had a say in it or not, surely we can do better than Martin Place - the very heart of the concrete jungle. There is only one place for bushwalkers to hold meetings, and that is in the bush. This, a typical Brooks suggestion, would prove quite impractical and so we are forced to consider some man-made shelter. Here the choice is wide, but I contend we should lean toward the old rather than the new, the austere rather than the ornate.
  
-Jim Brown.+Nothing, I feel, could suit our purposes more admirably than an old warehouse ​ and I believe there are quite a few going begging around Kent and Sussex Streets ​ for here, we could develop a club room that would exude the aura of bushwalking. This would make for less formal meetings and evenings more in that casual spirit we admire.
  
-May be it was the absence of the President, abroad on M.O. business, OT maybe the members were simply flexing their larynxes in preparation for the Annual Meeting ​ at all events the usually docile February meeting turned into quite garrulous occasion. +One thing that would be really worthwhile would be a practice ski-runGiven small amount of roomone could be built of second hand lumber for lot less than our Treasurer has hidden awayCoir matting makes a good surfacefor practice, on which all the well-known turnsmanoeuvres ​and falls can be tried outThere used to be one of these practice slopes ​in Sydneyunfortunately ​now defuncthut it provided an exhilarating Friday night'​s entertainment. The combined bushwalking clubs are just the group to reintroduce such noble sport - but not in Martin Place.
-The beginning, with VicePresient,​ Jack Gentle, in the chair was deceptively quiet. Minutes brought no comment, and (Correspondence being +
-deferred to later position in the evening'​s business) the Treasurer told  us income had exceeded expenditure during Januaryand we closed the Club +
-year with a current bank balance ​of 133. +
-Alex Colley asked whether the Christmas Party had actually reaped ​22 Profit, and Social Secretary Edna Stretton explained that about 10 had been paid in advance and dealt with earlier in the year, leaving about 12 to the goodAlex commented that it was still very good result. +
-In Correspondence we received a letter conveying Alan Strom'​s resignationexplaining that pressure of his other activitiespreoluded him from active walking and further, he had always regarded walbing as +
-secondary to the allied conservation interest. There was also correspondence +
-to Federation regarding the search carried out in the Burning Palms area in November, and a letter to Tom Moppett concerning the address ​on National Parks Association activities to be given to the Club later in the month. The Hobart Bushwalkers were keen to restore us to the list of agents re- +
-tailing their annual magazine but we agreed to advise them of previous problems in this field, and explain that there were other avenues of sale. +
-Wilf. Hilder presented the Walks Report, explaining some trip accounts were still to come. However, some outstanding December reports included +
-one covering Sandra Bardwell'​s trip of December 6-8, which was rescheduled +
-. owing to wet conditions and went from Oldham'​s Selection to MuMbedah Creek +
-and back again. There were many fire and timber roads near the Selection and some good waterfalls ​in Mumbedah Creek. Stuart Brooks'​ Sunday walk on December 15 proved fairly easy goingexcept for a couple of miles of scrub pushing. A jeep track now runs from the West Head Road to the ridge-south of Great Mackerel Beachand some attractive secluded beaches near West Head were found. The Rudolph Cup was postponed from December 15 to a date to be fixed.+
  
-Lack of Starters caused cancellation ​of January 10-12 weekend trip and the January 12 day walkwhile the weekender of January 17-19 was altered ​to Mt. Tomah South  Claustral Canyon ​ Calcutta Falls  Glow Worm Cave  Dunnet'​s Pass Camel'​s Hump  Tomah South. David Balmer had a party of +The ingenuity ​of bushwalkers would be quite equal to the task of devising other suitable activitiesonly given the space to operate in, and the knowledge that a bit of jumping around wasn't going to cause any excitement.
-14 for a trip including swimmingwading ​and wet abseils. Claustral Canyon contained two abseils ​of 35 ft and one of 60 ft, as well as a 10 ft jump into a pool.+
  
 +Stuart Brooks
  
-The only programmed walk for the Australia Holiday Walk was cancelled no starters. However, on the previous weekend Jack Perry provided an unscheduled day walk from'Campbelltown to O'Hare/​s ​Creek and back, which attracted 6 members and 2 prospectives.+===== The February General Meeting ===== 
 + 
 +Jim Brown 
 + 
 +Maybe it was the absence of the President, abroad on O.T.C. business, or maybe the members were simply flexing their larynxes in preparation for the Annual Meeting - at all events the usually docile February meeting turned into quite a garrulous occasion. 
 + 
 +The beginning, with Vice President, Jack Gentle, in the chair was deceptively quiet. Minutes brought no comment, and (Correspondence being deferred to a later position in the evening'​s business) the Treasurer told us income had exceeded expenditure during January, and we closed the Club year with a current bank balance of £33. 
 + 
 +Alex Colley asked whether the Christmas Party had actually reaped a £22 Profit, and Social Secretary Edna Stretton explained that about £10 had been paid in advance and dealt with earlier in the year, leaving about £12 to the good. Alex commented that it was still a very good result. 
 + 
 +In Correspondence we received a letter conveying Alan Strom'​s resignation,​ explaining that pressure of his other activities, precluded him from active walking and further, he had always regarded walking as 
 +secondary to the allied conservation interest. There was also correspondence to Federation regarding the search carried out in the Burning Palms area in November, and a letter to Tom Moppett concerning the address on National Parks Association activities to be given to the Club later in the month. The Hobart Bushwalkers were keen to restore us to the list of agents retailing their annual magazine but we agreed to advise them of previous problems in this field, and explain that there were other avenues of sale. 
 + 
 +Wilf Hilder presented the Walks Report, explaining some trip accounts were still to come. However, some outstanding December reports included one covering Sandra Bardwell'​s trip of December 6-8, which was rescheduled owing to wet conditions and went from Oldham'​s Selection to Mumbedah Creek and back again. There were many fire and timber roads near the Selection and some good waterfalls in Mumbedah Creek. Stuart Brooks'​ Sunday walk on December 15 proved fairly easy going, except for a couple of miles of scrub pushing. A jeep track now runs from the West Head Road to the ridge south of Great Mackerel Beach, and some attractive secluded beaches near West Head were found. The Rudolph Cup was postponed from December 15 to a date to be fixed. 
 + 
 +Lack of starters caused cancellation of January 10-12 weekend trip and the January 12 day walk, while the weekender of January 17-19 was altered to Mt Tomah South - Claustral Canyon - Calcutta Falls - Glow Worm Cave - Dunnett'​s Pass - Camels Hump - Tomah South. David Balmer had a party of 14 for a trip including swimming, wading and wet abseils. Claustral Canyon contained two abseils of 35 ft and one of 60 ft, as well as a 10 ft jump into a pool. 
 + 
 +The only programmed walk for the Australia Holiday Walk was cancelled no starters. However, on the previous weekend Jack Perry provided an unscheduled day walk from Campbelltown to O'Hares Creek and back, which attracted 6 members and 2 prospectives.
  
 Jack Gentle added a rider that the Lord Howe Island contingent over Christmas was most active and went walking daily. Jack Gentle added a rider that the Lord Howe Island contingent over Christmas was most active and went walking daily.
  
-In the absence of the Federation report, Wilf Hilder presented some notes: he advised that the tunnel through the first Narrow Neck was open again, and also that Federation was obtaining photo maps of some areas where the accuracy of recent surveys was questiondo ​Federation was also canvasiing ​the opinions of member clubs on the desirability of leasing some premises in the City as a permanent Club room. However, annual rental would amount to about Z700, much of which would have to be raised by subletting ​to other clubs. The room would hold about  50 people. Search and Rescue was proposing a change of policy, seeking advice of overdue parties immediately,​ so that a decision couldbe reached ​whether early or deferred searching was needed.+In the absence of the Federation report, Wilf Hilder presented some notes: he advised that the tunnel through the first Narrow Neck was open again, and also that Federation was obtaining photo maps of some areas where the accuracy of recent surveys was questioned. ​Federation was also canvassing ​the opinions of member clubs on the desirability of leasing some premises in the City as a permanent Club room. However, annual rental would amount to about £700, much of which would have to be raised by sub-letting ​to other clubs. The room would hold about 50 people. Search and Rescue was proposing a change of policy, seeking advice of overdue parties immediately,​ so that a decision could be reached whether early or deferred searching was needed
 + 
 +Some questions were asked regarding the Club room project and it was disclosed that the space was in Challis House, Martin Place. It was available for a three year lease, and would be a full-time occupancy. In order to test the meeting'​s feeling, Kath Brown moved we inform Federation that our Club required accommodation for over 100 people and we were therefore not interested in the proposal. Gordon Redmond explained that it was not certain that Federation would be allowed to sub-let; it was pointed out that as a larger club, the increased cost to Federation could mean a lift in our affiliation fees without real advantage to us. Alex Colley said office space in the City might become a drug on the market in a year or so, and the motion was carried.
  
-Some questions were asked regarding the Club room project and it was disclosed that the space was in Challis Houss, Martin Place. It was available for a three year lease, and would be a fulltime occupancy. In order to test the meeting'​s feeling, Kath Brown moved we inform Federation that our Club required accommodation for over 100 people and we were therefore not interested in the proposal. Gordon Redmond explained that it was not certain that Federation would be allowed to sublet; it was pointed out that t:Ls a larger club, the increased cost to Federation could mean a lift in our affiliation fees without real advantage to us. Alex Colley said office space in the City might become a drug on the market in a year or so, and the motion was carried. 
 Reaching General Business it was announced that the day walk for Sunday February 23 had been converted into a Swimming Carnival, with Nan Bourke and Brian Harvey joining forces as organisers with leader Helen McMaugh. It was announced that this was the last chance to put up Constitutional amendments for debate at the Annual Meeting. Also it transpired that this year the Federation Reunion would coincide with the Club Reunion. Some liaison with Federation had not resolved the clash of dates. Reaching General Business it was announced that the day walk for Sunday February 23 had been converted into a Swimming Carnival, with Nan Bourke and Brian Harvey joining forces as organisers with leader Helen McMaugh. It was announced that this was the last chance to put up Constitutional amendments for debate at the Annual Meeting. Also it transpired that this year the Federation Reunion would coincide with the Club Reunion. Some liaison with Federation had not resolved the clash of dates.
  
-Gladys Roberts reported that the Australia Day weekend at Era had been made hideous by the tomahawk work of the let EpPing ​Scout Troop who had been seen to chop down several green trees. She suggested writing to the Troop, but Jack Gentle proposed that the letter go to the General Secretary at the State H.Q, from which it would filter down to the offending ​Tropp.' ​Jack Wren moved an amendment that we ask the Scouting movement +Gladys Roberts reported that the Australia Day weekend at Era had been made hideous by the tomahawk work of the 1st Epping ​Scout Troop who had been seen to chop down several green trees. She suggested writing to the Troop, but Jack Gentle proposed that the letter go to the General Secretary at the State H.Q, from which it would filter down to the offending ​Troop. Jack Wren moved an amendment that we ask the Scouting movement what action was being taken. Wilf Hilder ​suggested the National ​Park Trust should be informed as well, and in this shape the motion was carried. Dick Child mentioned that he believed some enlightened Scout-masters were trying to do away with the axes and Jack Wren said it had never been Scout Policy to carry hatchets ​but many of them did.
-what action was being taken. Wilf Ender suggested the Natiozial ​Park Trust shouldbe informed as well, and in this shapethe ​motion was carried. Dick Child mentioned that he believed some enlightened:Scout- +
-masters were trying to do away with the axes and Jack Wren said it had never been Scout P olicypto ​carry hatchets ​ but many of them did.+
  
-Frank Ashdown said recently there hadbeen some criticism of members by a prospective member. Taking the opposite view, he thought ​Some prospectives were not sincerely trying to become full members but were doing several terms as prospectives,​ or gaining deferment of their application. They had been with us too long and the Club should ​'stick to its membership rules. Jack Gentle said the appropriate motion'would be a recommendation to Committee, and Frank moved accorettngly,​+Frank Ashdown said recently there had been some criticism of members by a prospective member. Taking the opposite view, he thought ​some prospectives were not sincerely trying to become full members but were doing several terms as prospectives,​ or gaining deferment of their application. They had been with us too long and the Club should stick to its membership rules. Jack Gentle said the appropriate motion would be a recommendation to Committee, and Frank moved accordingly.
  
-Support came from various quarters. Wilf Hilder felt the calibre of test walks should not be watered down. Colin Putt felt maintenance of admission standards was necessary to ensure that suitable people came into the 0lUb, and Jack Wren said members of a walking club should be expected to walk: he didn't suggest harder standards but adherence to those,established. We all (or most of us) then gave assent to this principle+Support came from various quarters. Wilf Hilder felt the calibre of test walks should not be watered down. Colin Putt felt maintenance of admission standards was necessary to ensure that suitable people came into the Club, and Jack Wren said members of a walking club should be expected to walk: he didn't suggest harder standards but adherence to those established. We all (or most of us) then gave assent to this principle.
-David Ingram followed up with a blast against the assemblage outside the clubroom during meetings and lectures: also against those others incapable of sitting reasonable still for l hours or displaying the normal courtesy to speakers and entertainers. Some of the trouble, he suggested, cam from those who must have a few drinks during the evening and in due course had to vacate the room again. Without proceeding to a motion, he suggested that the restless ones pack near the door to avoid disturbance. +
-The evening concluded with the usual (or unusual) crop of notices  +
-the warning from the Chair to select your nominees for the Annual Election ​ the announcement of the forthcoming Car Trial weekend ​ Mick Elfick to say that information of the Deua River/​Bendethera area was sought for conservation purposes ​ and Colin Putt to seek office workers for a big  publicity drive concerning an expedition to Heard Island. +
-By which time we were all in good speaking shape for March, and called it a night at 9.20 p m. +
-..+
  
-AeKNOTLEDGEMENT.+David Ingram followed up with a blast against the assemblage outside the clubroom during meetings and lectures: also against those others incapable of sitting reasonably still for l½ hours or displaying the normal courtesy to speakers and entertainers. Some of the trouble, he suggested, cam from those who must have a few drinks during the evening and in due course had to vacate the room again. Without proceeding to a motion, he suggested that the restless ones pack near the door to avoid disturbance. 
 + 
 +The evening concluded with the usual (or unusual) crop of notices - the warning from the Chair to select your nominees for the Annual Election - the announcement of the forthcoming Car Trial weekend - Mick Elfick to say that information of the Deua River/​Bendethera area was sought for conservation purposes - and Colin Putt to seek office workers for a big publicity drive concerning an expedition to Heard Island. 
 + 
 +By which time we were all in good speaking shape for March, and called it a night at 9.20 pm. 
 + 
 + 
 +===== Acknowledgement ===== 
 + 
 +In our previous issue we omitted to mention that the poem "​Bungonia"​ first appeared in an anniversary edition of the Catholic Bushwlker Annual. Ed. 
 + 
 + 
 +===== Wollangambie Creek [Wollangambe Creek] ===== 
 + 
 +This is the area assigned to Sydney Bushwalkers to explore. Recently, Ross Wyborn and party made a first descent of a section of the creek he has aptly called "​Clatterteeth Canyon"​ (though we believe other equally appropriate names were suggested).
  
-In our previous issue we omitted to mention that the poem "​BungraLl_a"​ 
-first appeared in an anniversary edition of the Catholic Bushwlker Annual. Ea. 
-WOLLANGAMBIE CREEK. This is the area assigned to Sydney Bushwan<​ers to explore. Recently, Ross Vyborn and party made a first descent of d section of the creek he has aptly called "​Clatterteeth Canyon"​ (though 
-we believe other equally appropriate names were suggested. 
 Ross's map and description of the trip appear in this issue. Ross's map and description of the trip appear in this issue.
  
-+===== Extract from letter to Paddy Pallin ===== 
-Extract from letter to Padc1,- Palline+ 
 Kosciusko ​ The Tin Mine Ilrea  Selby Alley, NeweaStlerUniversity Collaa e.Bushwalkers. Kosciusko ​ The Tin Mine Ilrea  Selby Alley, NeweaStlerUniversity Collaa e.Bushwalkers.
 +
 Four of the boys and. I had a trip to the Tin Mine and Pilot, ana you said you would be interested to know details aufortiarately,​ there Four of the boys and. I had a trip to the Tin Mine and Pilot, ana you said you would be interested to know details aufortiarately,​ there
 . is now a jeep track from Dead Horse Cap ii&o t thrnuh to the Tin Mine connecting with the Limestone track,at thesTin Mine. This'​track passes right under the Pilot and goes on into Victeri7,0 . is now a jeep track from Dead Horse Cap ii&o t thrnuh to the Tin Mine connecting with the Limestone track,at thesTin Mine. This'​track passes right under the Pilot and goes on into Victeri7,0
 +
 We had intended to take two days over the walk to the Tin. Mine because of anticipated aifficulty in finding the track, but in fact had an early lunch at Cascade Creek and arrived at the Tin Mine hus about 5 c/cloci - total distance about 16 miles. The walk is moderately interesting except for the last 5 or 6 miles, There is water all the way. The Tin Mine huts consist of the old big hut ,which is beautifully built  split weatherboards and shingles, measures about 45' x 20 and We had intended to take two days over the walk to the Tin. Mine because of anticipated aifficulty in finding the track, but in fact had an early lunch at Cascade Creek and arrived at the Tin Mine hus about 5 c/cloci - total distance about 16 miles. The walk is moderately interesting except for the last 5 or 6 miles, There is water all the way. The Tin Mine huts consist of the old big hut ,which is beautifully built  split weatherboards and shingles, measures about 45' x 20 and
 is too dirty to be attractive cal Charlie'​s Hut (see Geehi Club booklet) which is rough, clean and comfortable with three bunks a hydrology hut  luxurious, three bunks. is too dirty to be attractive cal Charlie'​s Hut (see Geehi Club booklet) which is rough, clean and comfortable with three bunks a hydrology hut  luxurious, three bunks.
 +
 It is a 4 or 5 mile walk from the hut to the Piloi, and the turnoff sign to ascend the Pilot is cut into a snow gums The ascentfram this spot takes from half an hour to an hce r, The return from the Pilot to Tin Mine huts can be made the most beautiful wsik by descending into Tin Mine Creek and following it until it intercepts the jeep track not far- from It is a 4 or 5 mile walk from the hut to the Piloi, and the turnoff sign to ascend the Pilot is cut into a snow gums The ascentfram this spot takes from half an hour to an hce r, The return from the Pilot to Tin Mine huts can be made the most beautiful wsik by descending into Tin Mine Creek and following it until it intercepts the jeep track not far- from
 the huts. This creek flows down a beautiful green valley where wild horses are very plentiful. the huts. This creek flows down a beautiful green valley where wild horses are very plentiful.
 +
 The Tin Mine Falls, which the Geehi booklet says are 1,600 feet, are in fact nearer 300 feet, Tao toil fall, cateracS, stroam boa and everything else over about halfamilo horizontally could be 1,-600 feet. However, it is a wonderful scene with great 17-.1,22e r6ck crags We made a round trip of it, having parkea a cal not far from the ;​Jacob=s_River. We had. brought a car in from the Jinda-b7ne to Ingobyra Rada1epg a jeep track, which takes off near GrcosTs P/af_n. We walked abut 13 miles from hear the Tin Mine across the Pinch RiVe:d., Stockwhip Hill, Dill's Garden to -the Jacob'​s River and then cllmbod up from the Jacobs a-nout a mile to where The Tin Mine Falls, which the Geehi booklet says are 1,600 feet, are in fact nearer 300 feet, Tao toil fall, cateracS, stroam boa and everything else over about halfamilo horizontally could be 1,-600 feet. However, it is a wonderful scene with great 17-.1,22e r6ck crags We made a round trip of it, having parkea a cal not far from the ;​Jacob=s_River. We had. brought a car in from the Jinda-b7ne to Ingobyra Rada1epg a jeep track, which takes off near GrcosTs P/af_n. We walked abut 13 miles from hear the Tin Mine across the Pinch RiVe:d., Stockwhip Hill, Dill's Garden to -the Jacob'​s River and then cllmbod up from the Jacobs a-nout a mile to where
 we had left the ca.32 The Jacobs wILere WC CTOSS6a it is a_-1.evely river  we had left the ca.32 The Jacobs wILere WC CTOSS6a it is a_-1.evely river 
 a beautiful place for a camp and a bit of fishing. it was a most successful trip and especially good when it is ebb  to be done with the two cars  that is one left at Dead Horse Gap and one above Jacob'​s River. a beautiful place for a camp and a bit of fishing. it was a most successful trip and especially good when it is ebb  to be done with the two cars  that is one left at Dead Horse Gap and one above Jacob'​s River.
-Of all the huts I have over soon Cascade ak-HUtiseth&​ one I would most like to see preserved, It 15 a wonderful exfeTle of the Bush+ 
 +Of all the huts I have over soon Cascade ak-HUtiseth&​ one I would most like to see preserved, It 15 a wonderful exfeTle of the Bush carpenter'​s work, is made from split alpine ash, the boards being almost as neat as if they had. been sawn. The minimum of nails was  uEel, tinter cleats with a few nails each being used to hold the boards on the walls. The hut will inevitably be burned and is really ready to burn. It could and should be taken to pieces and re-assembled in some sort of folk museum - the privately owned one just outside Cooma would be quite suitable. The structure of the hut is in excellent condition despite its age and neglect, but bark would have to be 
 +stripped from somewhere to re-roof it. Nowadays it is less than 100 
 +yards from a jeep track.
  
 IT'S YOUR MOVE NEXT. IT'S YOUR MOVE NEXT.
Line 131: Line 139:
 BM 2685 BM 2685
 0 0
-The Sydney Bushwaiker ,March, 1964 
-,  ,  ​ 
  
-Msil lMo IMIMM.1 ​   
  
-carpenter'​s work, is made from split alpine ash, the boards being almost as neat as if they had. been sawn. The minimum of nails was  uEel, tinter cleats with a few nails each being used to hold the boards on the walls. The hut will inevitably be burned and is really ready to burn. It could and should be taken to pieces and re-assembled in some sort of folk museum - the privately owned one just outside Cooma would be quite suitable. The structure of the hut is in excellent condition despite its age and neglect, but bark would have to be + 
-stripped from somewhere to re-roof it. Nowadays it is less than 100 + 
-yards from a jeep track.+ 
 14 14
  
 ===== The Origin of the "​Bone"​ ===== ===== The Origin of the "​Bone"​ =====
  
- +Newer members who gaze with mixed feelings upon the mighty lump of bone that graces the presidential table, may not be fully aware of its antiquity and historical importance. It is not hard to imagine some
-Newer members who gaze with mixed feelings upon the mighty lumpof bone that graces the presidential table, may not be fully aware of its +
-antiquity and historical importance. It is not hard to imagine some+
 under-nourished bovine collapsing on a scorching day in Megalong, to have portion of its anatomy removed some years later by a passing walker. under-nourished bovine collapsing on a scorching day in Megalong, to have portion of its anatomy removed some years later by a passing walker.
-But say not soThe "​Bone"​ has a more regal origin than this. It is, in fact, portion of a mighty denizen of the ancient, steamy swamps, that, before the upright bipeds appeared on the scene, roamed the countryside making great roaring noises that sounded something like "​Iwon'​tbedru e. It's name was Mego-stegosaurus ​Bushwadkadon, and its history has been recorded in poetry for future generations of Sydney Bushwalkers. There was a time when this was chanted at the reunion campfire as the "​Bone"​ was handed over to the in-coming President:- + 
-"​Behold the mighty Stegosaur, Famous in prehistoric lore +But say not soThe "​Bone"​ has a more regal origin than this. It is, in fact, portion of a mighty denizen of the ancient, steamy swamps, that, before the upright bipeds appeared on the scene, roamed the countryside making great roaring noises that sounded something like "​Iwon'​tbedruv"​. It's name was Mego-stegosaurus ​Bushwackadon, and its history has been recorded in poetry for future generations of Sydney Bushwalkers. There was a time when this was chanted at the reunion campfire as the "​Bone"​ was handed over to the in-coming President: 
-Not only for his weight and strength, But for his intellectual length. You will perceive by these remains The creature had two sets of brains - One in his head (the usual place), The other at his spinal base. Thus, he could reason "a priori",​ As well as "a posteriori",​ + 
-No problem bothered him a bit - He made both head and tail of it. +"​Behold the mighty Stegosaur, ​\\ 
-So wise was he, so wise and solemn, +Famous in prehistoric lore\\ 
-Each thought just fil led a spinal column. ​Iftone ​brain found the pressure strong, It passed a few ideas along; +Not only for his weight and strength, ​\\ 
-If something slipped his forward mind, - 'Twas rescued by the one behind; And if in error he was caught He had a saving afterthought;​ +But for his intellectual length. ​\\ 
-As he -thought twice before he spoke He had no judgments ​to revoke, +You will perceive by these remains ​\\ 
-For he could think without congestion Upon both sides of every question."​ +The creature had two sets of brains - \\ 
-You now know why bushwaikers ​are so often caught in two minds, and why it is so appropriate that President should have the only known relic of the extinct Stego. ​ +One in his head (the usual place), ​\\ 
 +The other at his spinal base. \\ 
 +Thus, he could reason "a priori", ​\\ 
 +As well as "a posteriori",​\\ 
 +No problem bothered him a bit - \\ 
 +He made both head and tail of it.\\ 
 +So wise was he, so wise and solemn,\\ 
 +Each thought just filled ​a spinal column. ​\\ 
 +If one brain found the pressure strong, ​\\ 
 +It passed a few ideas along;\\ 
 +If something slipped his forward mind, - \\ 
 +'Twas rescued by the one behind; ​\\ 
 +And if in error he was caught ​\\ 
 +He had a saving afterthought;​\\ 
 +As he thought twice before he spoke \\ 
 +He had no judgements ​to revoke,\\ 
 +For he could think without congestion ​\\ 
 +Upon both sides of every question."​ 
 + 
 +You now know why bushwalkers ​are so often caught in two minds, and why it is so appropriate that our President should have the only known relic of the extinct Stego. 
 The Stego, became extinct we are told, because he developed the habit of sitting down. The Stego, became extinct we are told, because he developed the habit of sitting down.
  
196403.1384472290.txt.gz · Last modified: 2013/11/14 23:38 by sbw