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196301 [2015/12/14 05:21]
tyreless
196301 [2016/01/13 21:30] (current)
tyreless
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 =====The Sydney Bushwalker===== =====The Sydney Bushwalker=====
  
-A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalker, +A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalker, The N.S.W. Nurses'​ Association Rooms "​Northcote Building,"​ Reiby Place, Sydney. Box No. 4476 G.P.O. Sydney.
-The N.S.W. Nurses'​ Association Rooms "​Northcote Building,"​ Reiby Place, Sydney. Box No. 4476 G.P.O. Sydney.+
  
 =====January 1963===== =====January 1963=====
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 The Nooroo Buttress is a 3,200 feet descent and overlooks Whalania Deep, the greatest declivity in the Blue Nhuntains. The buttress is extremely rocky. Some of the rocks are in the form of bluffs, others are loose and treacherous underfoot particularly when descending, while there is one spot a few hundred feet from the top where it is advisable to traverse to the left s(i.e. coming down) around the bluff. The buttress in places narrows into a jagged arete which overhangs Jenolan Creek, and to avoid sprained ankles or worse we veritably The Nooroo Buttress is a 3,200 feet descent and overlooks Whalania Deep, the greatest declivity in the Blue Nhuntains. The buttress is extremely rocky. Some of the rocks are in the form of bluffs, others are loose and treacherous underfoot particularly when descending, while there is one spot a few hundred feet from the top where it is advisable to traverse to the left s(i.e. coming down) around the bluff. The buttress in places narrows into a jagged arete which overhangs Jenolan Creek, and to avoid sprained ankles or worse we veritably
-felt our way down this awesome ridge. The sun was behind us, the views were tremendous, and cameras clicked furiously. As we got further down +felt our way down this awesome ridge. The sun was behind us, the views were tremendous, and cameras clicked furiously. As we got further down we could look back and upwards at the grey monster we had climbed down. There were also wonderful views of the Falls in Davies Canyon on Sally Camp Creek and of an un-named waterfall in Jenolan Creek. The buttress widens towards the bottom and becomes an open forest of oaks and gums with verdant Dilwinnia growing abundantly under the trees.
-we could look back and upwards at the grey monster we had climbed down. There were also wonderful views of the Falls in Davies Canyon on Sally Camp Creek and of an un-named waterfall in Jenolan Creek. The buttress widens towards the bottom and becomes an open forest of oaks and gums with verdant Dilwinnia growing abundantly under the trees.+
  
 we reached the idyllic little clearing at the junction of Jenolan Creek and the Kanangra River at 1535. After resting and refreshing ourselves for 20 minutes we set out for Konangaroo, where we arrived at 1745 just on dusk and just when Peter was thinking we wouldn'​t get in until Sunday. On the way down the river we had a look at the Norbert Carlon plaque, which is rather hard to find. we reached the idyllic little clearing at the junction of Jenolan Creek and the Kanangra River at 1535. After resting and refreshing ourselves for 20 minutes we set out for Konangaroo, where we arrived at 1745 just on dusk and just when Peter was thinking we wouldn'​t get in until Sunday. On the way down the river we had a look at the Norbert Carlon plaque, which is rather hard to find.
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 It all started as an idea dreamed up on the long week-end in October, when several of us went along the Turon River from Capertee to Sofala and Hill End. The River was just at the right height, the damping looked perfect all the way along, and we found some specks of gold to add interest. Bob said it would be nice to do the whole River by boat. We could carry it across the shallow spots. Bob then suggested we could build a tin canoe in no time for very little cost, and the whole party got carried away with the idea. It all started as an idea dreamed up on the long week-end in October, when several of us went along the Turon River from Capertee to Sofala and Hill End. The River was just at the right height, the damping looked perfect all the way along, and we found some specks of gold to add interest. Bob said it would be nice to do the whole River by boat. We could carry it across the shallow spots. Bob then suggested we could build a tin canoe in no time for very little cost, and the whole party got carried away with the idea.
  
-After a lot of paper work and research a plan of a canoe was produced. The idea of tin was rather a shock to the canoe people, but they added their advice anyway, and two of them even agreed to come on the trip. They tactfully said they would bring their own standard canoes. The next thing we saw was the skeleton of the first canoe which Bob had put together after hours at work, and then brought home on top of Roy Cragg'​s car. The size was the first thing that impressed everyone. He bad said it would be 17 feet long and should hold four people and gear, and most people had been very doubtful if any tin canoe would take that many. However, when we saw it we realised this was no ordinary boat. The framework had been very carefully put together and galvanised, and it was still quite light enough to handle. At this stage everyone was new to the job, and each stage took longer than we expected. It stopped traffic when seven of us carried the whole boat out on to the footpath to wrap its tin round it. It took all of us to hold it while an electric drill was brought out through the front of the house and the holes drilled for the first rivets and screws. Then Roy got to work with the solder, and the boat began to take shape. The ends caused some trouble, as it is not easy to shape these parts without causing kinks in the iron. After sorting out thee problems things went along quickly, and by the second week-end two canoes, one with a tin shell and one at the first stage, were in the backyard. The girls were busy painting and holding the boats steady, dabbing acid on the soldering jobs, and generally acting as carpenters and +After a lot of paper work and research a plan of a canoe was produced. The idea of tin was rather a shock to the canoe people, but they added their advice anyway, and two of them even agreed to come on the trip. They tactfully said they would bring their own standard canoes. The next thing we saw was the skeleton of the first canoe which Bob had put together after hours at work, and then brought home on top of Roy Cragg'​s car. The size was the first thing that impressed everyone. He bad said it would be 17 feet long and should hold four people and gear, and most people had been very doubtful if any tin canoe would take that many. However, when we saw it we realised this was no ordinary boat. The framework had been very carefully put together and galvanised, and it was still quite light enough to handle. At this stage everyone was new to the job, and each stage took longer than we expected. It stopped traffic when seven of us carried the whole boat out on to the footpath to wrap its tin round it. It took all of us to hold it while an electric drill was brought out through the front of the house and the holes drilled for the first rivets and screws. Then Roy got to work with the solder, and the boat began to take shape. The ends caused some trouble, as it is not easy to shape these parts without causing kinks in the iron. After sorting out thee problems things went along quickly, and by the second week-end two canoes, one with a tin shell and one at the first stage, were in the backyard. The girls were busy painting and holding the boats steady, dabbing acid on the soldering jobs, and generally acting as carpenters and plumbers'​ offsiders. The big moment for launching the first boat came, and we found two men could lift the finished boat on top of a car, so the estimated weight was about right.
-plumbers'​ offsiders. The big moment for launching the first boat came, and we found two men could lift the finished boat on top of a car, so the estimated weight was about right.+
  
-The Parramatta River comes in fairly close to where the boats were being +The Parramatta River comes in fairly close to where the boats were being built, so we carried the canoe down to the mangrove flats, and found the tide half out. Luckily there is a storm water canal running in where the water was deeper, so we slid the boat down the bank and saved a long tramp across the mud, with the possibility of losing several members of the party. With six of us on board the canoe floated just right, and was steadier than we had even hoped.
-built, so we carried the canoe down to the mangrove flats, and found the tide half out. Luckily there is a storm water canal running in where the water was deeper, so we slid the boat down the bank and saved a long tramp across the mud, with the possibility of losing several members of the party. With six of us on board the canoe floated just right, and was steadier than we had even hoped.+
  
 After working out the weight of the average person and the weight of the gear it was decided that six of us equalled a party of four with packs, so all appears well. Keith Renwick had worked out food and gear lists to the ounce. By next week-end there will be three canoes in the yard with seven people rushing round trying to finish them in time to put on the train in time for the Christmas trip. We don't know which train as yet, as rivers are a little doubtful in this dry weather. We hope it will be one of the north coast rivers. Read the February magazine and find out! After working out the weight of the average person and the weight of the gear it was decided that six of us equalled a party of four with packs, so all appears well. Keith Renwick had worked out food and gear lists to the ounce. By next week-end there will be three canoes in the yard with seven people rushing round trying to finish them in time to put on the train in time for the Christmas trip. We don't know which train as yet, as rivers are a little doubtful in this dry weather. We hope it will be one of the north coast rivers. Read the February magazine and find out!
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 Among discoveries in the early days of settlement at Port Jackson, none is more notable than that made by an exploring party in January, 1798. Convicts were members of the minor expedition which collected the first known specimen of Menura novae-hollondiae,​ the superb lyre-bird. Generally at the infant settlement, the strange new bird was regarded as a pheasant; the more learned colanists, however, believed it to be a Bird-of-Paradise. Naturalists were almost as puzzled by Menura as they were by the Platypus, when specimens reached England. Among discoveries in the early days of settlement at Port Jackson, none is more notable than that made by an exploring party in January, 1798. Convicts were members of the minor expedition which collected the first known specimen of Menura novae-hollondiae,​ the superb lyre-bird. Generally at the infant settlement, the strange new bird was regarded as a pheasant; the more learned colanists, however, believed it to be a Bird-of-Paradise. Naturalists were almost as puzzled by Menura as they were by the Platypus, when specimens reached England.
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196301.txt · Last modified: 2016/01/13 21:30 by tyreless