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- ,  +===== At Our August Meeting===== 
-AT OUR AUGST MEETING.+
 Alex Colley. Alex Colley.
-Our meeting commenced with'a short silence in memory of one of the very early Club members - Max Gentle, and two othermembers ​of long standing - Ron Baker and Hilda Stoddart. + 
-The president extended a welcome to new members - jean and Alex Burton and Stan McDonald.+Our meeting commenced with a short silence in memory of one of the very early Club members - Max Gentle, and two other members ​of long standing - Ron Baker and Hilda Stoddart. 
 + 
 +The president extended a welcome to new members - Jean and Alex Burton and Stan McDonald. 
 In correspondence there was a post-card from Edna Stretton and Sheila Binns, who had scaled, or by other means arrived, at the top of Snowdon and posted it from there. In correspondence there was a post-card from Edna Stretton and Sheila Binns, who had scaled, or by other means arrived, at the top of Snowdon and posted it from there.
-The Treasurer reported receipt of further sdbscriptions to the value of C3l.5.-. Fund were increased by a donation of 2/- and a sale of tumblers. 
-The Walks Secretary reported an active month. The first walk of the month - Waterfall to Audley, led by Dick Childs, attracted 13 members 8 ptictpectiyes and ? yisitOrs. Sheila Tadman'​s walk to the Oaks on the next weekend was attended by. 10 members and 2 prospectives.. On.. the Friday night-the party camped in a large cave near the Glenbrook; Creek causeway, and the next day the, prospectives were appointed acting leaderq for the sake of.-expeaence.%Tayid. Ingram'​s Sunday walk:to Scouter 's mountain was done by 15 meMbers, 8.prospectives and 1 visitor. One of the party contracted cramp, and David had to. take, 
-September, 1962 
-The Sydney Bushwalker 3 
-back along the road while Jack Gentle led the main party along the scheduled route. The wildflowers were profuse. Snow Brown had 7 starters on his Jerricknorra Creek walk and there were 9 members and 3 prospectives on Jim Brown'​s 15 mile Sunday walk in the Labyrinth, which was completed between 10 a m. and 540 p m. The Federation S & R week,-end was well organised - the S.B.W. being well represented. There were over 40 searchers in 5 groups. Each leader directed and organised his own search. Special maps were issued and the searchers learnt A lot. At a large camp fire held at Burralow Creek, Bob Binks gave a lecture on S et: R medical kit. The next day Colin Putt gave a rescue demonstration. On Molly Rodger'​s walk to Bluegum difficulty was found in negotiating the washed out portion of the track below Victoria Falls, which has been out of repair for some 
-time. There were 21 starters on Jack Gentle'​s Sunday walk to Euroka. Mapping and Leadership instruction was given to all prospectives. Jack reported that Euroka 
-is still in good shape, despite the bulldozing thereabout, except that three 
-small trees have been cut down. On Dick Child'​s Waterfall Sunday walk, on the last week,-end of the month, there were 9 members and 3 prospectives. 
-Brian Harvey sent a message to say that he was unable to continue as a member 
-of the panel of lecturers. Colin Putt offered to fill the gap and was appointed to the panel. A Parks and Playground delegate will be elected at the half- yearly meeting. 
-On behalf of the Club Bill Rodgers extended congratulations to Lynette White and,Roy Craggs on their recent engagement. 
-Wilf Hilder then told us of a new edition of the 4 miles to the inch Sydney Geological map, a new Wollongong sheet and a new edition of Myles Dunphy'​s Kanangra Tops map. Corang and Ulladulla maps mould probably be available before the end of the year. Yalwal, Touga and provisional maps for areas to the West would be completed within 18 months, while the Bindook sheet should be out this week. Wills also told us that Mr. Lang of Eindook: and Gardiner had been 
-successful in prosecuting trespassers through the gate to their properties, but Mr. Lang didn't mind letting walkers have the key to the gate when requested (Frank Leyden'​s party visited the homestead at Queen'​s birthday week-end and had a friendly Chat with Mts. Lang and Mt. Scott of the Forestry Department). 
-After electing Don Matthews, Jack Gentle, Lynette White and Eileen Taylor as room stewards, the meeting drew to a close at 9.6 p m. 
  
-On every train or plane or bus +The Treasurer reported receipt of further subscriptions to the value of £3l.5.-. Fund were increased by a donation of 2/- and a sale of tumblers. 
-There is a child who makes a fuss - + 
-A restless kid who writhes and stands +The Walks Secretary reported an active month. The first walk of the month - Waterfall to Audley, led by Dick Childs, attracted 13 members 8 prospectives and 2 visitors. Sheila Tadman'​s walk to the Oaks on the next weekend was attended by 10 members and 2 prospectives. On the Friday night the party camped in a large cave near the Glenbrook Creek causeway, and the next day the prospectives were appointed acting leaders for the sake of experience. David Ingram'​s Sunday walk to Scouter'​s mountain was done by 15 members, 8 prospectives and 1 visitor. One of the party contracted cramp, and David had to take back along the road while Jack Gentle led the main party along the scheduled route. The wildflowers were profuse. Snow Brown had 7 starters on his Jerricknorra Creek walk and there were 9 members and 3 prospectives on Jim Brown'​s 15 mile Sunday walk in the Labyrinth, which was completed between 10 a.m. and 5.40 p.m. The Federation S & R week-end was well organised - the S.B.W. being well represented. There were over 40 searchers in 5 groups. Each leader directed and organised his own search. Special maps were issued and the searchers learnt a lot. At a large camp fire held at Burralow Creek, Bob Binks gave a lecture on S & R medical kit. The next day Colin Putt gave a rescue demonstration. On Molly Rodger'​s walk to Bluegum difficulty was found in negotiating the washed out portion of the track below Victoria Falls, which has been out of repair for some time. There were 21 starters on Jack Gentle'​s Sunday walk to Euroka. Mapping and Leadership instruction was given to all prospectives. Jack reported that Euroka is still in good shape, despite the bulldozing thereabout, except that three small trees have been cut down. On Dick Child'​s Waterfall Sunday walk, on the last week-end of the month, there were 9 members and 3 prospectives. 
-And eats and gropes with sticky hands. + 
-In and out, out and in +Brian Harvey sent a message to say that he was unable to continue as a member of the panel of lecturers. Colin Putt offered to fill the gap and was appointed to the panel. A Parks and Playground delegate will be elected at the half-yearly meeting. 
-And always going where he 's been. + 
-If I'm disturbed, and somewhat vexed, too +On behalf of the Club Bill Rodgers extended congratulations to Lynette White and Roy Craggs on their recent engagement. 
-The reason is, it's he I'm next to. + 
-And yet I really cannot whine +Wilf Hilder then told us of a new edition of the 4 miles to the inch Sydney Geological map, a new Wollongong sheet and a new edition of Myles Dunphy'​s Kanangra Tops map. Corang and Ulladulla maps would probably be available before the end of the year. Yalwal, Touga and provisional maps for areas to the West would be completed within 18 months, while the Bindook sheet should be out this week. Wilf also told us that Mr. Lang of Bindook and Mr. Gardiner had been successful in prosecuting trespassers through the gate to their properties, but Mr. Lang didn't mind letting walkers have the key to the gate when requested (Frank Leyden'​s party visited the homestead at Queen'​s birthday week-end and had a friendly chat with Mrs. Lang and Mr. Scott of the Forestry Department). 
-Because my luck is bad. He 's R.A. + 
-The Sydney Bushwalker September 1962  +After electing Don Matthews, Jack Gentle, Lynette White and Eileen Taylor as room stewards, the meeting drew to a close at 9.6 p.m. 
-DAT. WALES+ 
-SEPTEMBER ​23 Cowan - Cole Trig. - Porto--Bay - RailwayDam - Brooklyn. 12 miles. +---- 
-It is some time since this aount-rY- ​has been visited. The Area is mainly unspoiled and contains some lovely wild flower specimenswhich should be ,Gaiters recommended.' ​Train: ​815 a mGosford ​trin from Central Steam Station to Cowan. Tickets: ​Haikesburi'​River all/11 return.+ 
 +On every train or plane or bus\\ 
 +There is a child who makes a fuss -\\ 
 +A restless kid who writhes and stands\\ 
 +And eats and gropes with sticky hands.\\ 
 +In and out, out and in\\ 
 +And always going where he's been.\\ 
 +If I'm disturbed, and somewhat vexed, too\\ 
 +The reason is, it's he I'm next to.\\ 
 +And yet I really cannot whine\\ 
 +Because my luck is bad. He'​s ​mine. 
 + 
 +R.A. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Day Walks===== 
 + 
 +=== September ​23 === 
 + 
 +Cowan - Cole Trig. - Porto Bay - Railway Dam - Brooklyn. 12 miles. 
 + 
 +It is some time since this country ​has been visited. The area is mainly unspoiled and contains some lovely wild flower specimenswhich should be in full bloom. ​Gaiters recommended. 
 + 
 +Train: ​8.15 a.mGosford ​train from Central Steam Station to Cowan. Tickets: ​Hawkesbury ​River @ 11/11 return. 
 Map: Broken Bay Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: Jim Brown. Map: Broken Bay Military or Hawkesbury River Tourist. Leader: Jim Brown.
-OCTOBER 7 
-OCTCEER 14 
-Waterfall , Mt. Westmacott - Heathcote Creek - ,Heathcote. 9 miles. 
-In recent years there has been a splendid showing of Native Rose 
-on Mt. Westmacott Although a little late in. the flowering season, there could be some nice specimens about.. Suitable for new members. . . 
-. . 
-. 
-Train: 8.50 a me Cronulla train from Central lectric Station. Change at SUTHERLAND for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Waterfall return @ 5/9.. 
-Map: Port Hacking Tourist. . 
-Leader: Ramon UTrien. 
-HOrnsby - Koala Bear Park.., Bobbin H ead Thg Sphinx!- Turramurra. 9 miles. 
-This trip includes a vi sit to the 'Koala Bear Sanctuary in KUringai Chase-and then. '​traverses a piCturesque portion of the 
-Chase. .  4 
-Train: 9.10 abmr, Hornsby via Bridge from Central llectric 
-Station. , Tickets:'​ Hornsby via Bridge a. 5/6 return plus 'about V- for us'​fares -and inspection fee at the Sanctuary. " Map: Broken Bay Military. 
-Leader: Gladys Roberts. 
-Your editor still has a slightly pink face after last month'​s fanfare of 
-trumpets for the new series of articles on recipes, and, its subsequent omission. 
-We trust you didn't spend too long looking for it. This omission was due to  a last minute alteration in the form of the magazine and part of staff. With luck: ,​you'​ll find it in this issue. 
-These articles are to deal with food and its preparation,​ and can only come from you. Comments on diet and food lists: 'how. you carry your food and quantities are of equal interest to its preparation;​ though these things go hand-in-hand. 
-Anwar, don't be backward, Let's hear from you. 
-September 1962 The Sydney Bushwalker ​ 
-THE FIRST GANGE_LING WA.Z. Max Gentle. 
  
-After :visitingKanangra-.: Walls; ​via. Giambition mias to walk over, ..the Gangrang ​R. Walkers in 1929, lea rnti that this range the data given on available maps was Very +=== October 7 === 
-.. . i + 
-,.. While' 'fellow member,.:Myles Dunphy, tempted ​me_with ​descriptions of the +Waterfall - Mt. Westmacott - Heathcote Creek - Heathcote. 9 miles. 
- . . + 
-Upper Kowtai-ig "'​Gorge ;​-:' ​somehow the :rugged heights of  Gangerang proved the .... +In recent years there has been a splendid showing of Native Rose on Mt. Westmacott. Although a little late in the flowering season, there could be some nice specimens about. Suitable for new members. 
-.., i + 
-greater attraction.  -.  +Train8.50 a.m. Cronulla train from Central Electric Station. Change at Sutherland for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Waterfall return @ 5/9. 
- + 
- . :-- +Map: Port Hacking Tourist. Leader: Ramon U'​Brien. 
- ​. ​ + 
- A Burragorang Cattleman, Michael Maxwell; had been' On partof Gangerangand information given by him indicated the best places to climb the range, and its low cliffs also where water might be found. +=== October 14 === 
-. .  : + 
-While I was On a Friday evening train journey on Eight Hour -weekend, 1929,a chance.. meeting with Gordon Smith, at Valley Heights, resulted in having ​- -company on my.Gangerang walk,instead of going alone+Hornsby ​Koala Bear Park - Bobbin Head - The Sphinx - Turramurra9 miles. 
-I knew that Gordon would 'see-the 'distance because he --wa8 50 -mileschampion road walkerof Australia. Needless to:say we made good progress on the .-iralk-: ​out from Wentworth Fails :that nightto our carp site at the Sunset Rock,. No ten, blankets or 'sleeping ​'bags wei-;​e ​carried-. and we slept on a ,bed of leaves by with our light packs, walking down Kedumba...Pass next morning.. + 
-a log fire.. Fortunately the :weather was 'fine and ' clears ​and We madegood time +This trip includes a visit to the Koala Bear Sanctuary in Kuringai Chase and then traverses a picturesque portion of the Chase. 
-..., We, reactied. otil' breal-dast s:Lte 9/1..Cox's River at 8.30 a m., and thY-Q9x Kowmq-n ​junction at 12 noon. + 
-.g. - ' ​  +Train9.10 a.m. Hornsby ​via Bridge from Central Electric StationTickets: Hornsby via Bridge @ 5/6 return plus about 5/- for bus fares and inspection fee at the Sanctuary. 
-. .,.. . ..  + 
-At 2.30 p m. an Saturday afternoon' ​we commenced.`t6-Olimb ​the':​GariOrang.. +Map: Broken Bay Military. Leader: Gladys Roberts. 
-. Ra nge., from a pointone mile further upthe Cox.The-..ridge Iiira6 -Erb- first + 
-lightly timbered grassy slope,and rosevery steeply for -ab'​citit-- 4.00:​vfeet-;​ :then beccming ​boulder strewnwith thicker, -undergrowth. A.2,​6W41:​111 ​with a--.cavewas +---- 
- skirted here, being similar to the'​r"​ocks ​on the adjacent ​KgokEit;-?:fine + 
-View opened out up the Cox gorge, as far as the 11libnangar60 Cieli":​iarea',​i ​mentioned +Your editor still has a slightly pink face after last month'​s fanfare of trumpets for the new series of articles on recipes, and its subsequent omission. 
-.... by Surveyor Govett 's writings, and its western tributary, rising near the-,"​highest ​land", called by the Blacks of his time (if the word :can be --writt,​en ​as they + 
-proonounced ​it) "KuOuogang" ​,  +We trust you didn't spend too long looking for it. This omission was due to a last minute alteration in the form of the magazine and part of its staff. With luck you'll find it in this issue. 
-+ 
- I' ​  ; :1  +These articles are to deal with food and its preparationand can only come from youComments on diet and food lists, how you carry your food and quantities are of equal interest to its preparation,​ though these things go hand-in-hand. 
-About four miles from our viewiloint'​dould ​be -seen the low..cliffs:of..Gangerang + 
-plateau, and so we continued to ascend the ridge w e weri ,on, 'which was seen +Anyway, don't be backward. Let's hear from you. 
- ... . + 
-swinging more to the southwestin thaedirection   ​I ​ +---- 
-Otir route' laY through a thick forest of Turpentine and Eucain-Dtus"​.Saplins, + 
-but we sonitimes ​enjoyed a glimpse of t he niOuntain -country ​.northward to Mt. Mouin and Clear Hill. One of the best views was looking ​clown.I4-4-16-fi-iiiilla ​Creek +===== The First Gangerang Walk ===== 
-.;:ancl,acrossthe Komung.River,.to Byrnes Gapand TonaiLi ange. + 
-:  ​ +Max Gentle. 
- Nightfall found 'us caiappd 'an d'bed or'​lea7es.. 1 -.Lr aiog f ir e'-;-:-.'and'74.tie- each had a two qUal--t; billy of water, 'Ike had -1.-.::trie'd t frouf: i- + 
-   +After visiting Kanangra Walls, via Gingra, in August, 1928, my next ambition was to walk over the Gangrang ​RangeOn joining the Sydney Bush Walkers in 1929, I learnt ​that this range wa. unkmown tb club members, and the data given on available maps was very limited
-ngra.. in August1928; my next angeOn joining ​the SydneyBush was. unkmown tb club '​membersand limited.+ 
 +While fellow member, Myles Dunphy, tempted ​me with descriptions of the Upper Kowmung ​Gorgesomehow the rugged heights of Gangerang proved the greater attraction. 
 + 
 +A Burragorang Cattleman, Michael Maxwell; had been on part of Gangerangand information given by him indicated the best places to climb the range, and its low cliffsalso where water might be found. 
 + 
 +While I was on a Friday evening train journey on Eight Hour weekend, 1929, a chance meeting with Gordon Smith, at Valley Heights, resulted in having company on my Gangerang walk, instead of going alone. 
 + 
 +I knew that Gordon would see the distance because he was 50 miles champion road walker of Australia. Needless to say we made good progress on the walk out from Wentworth Fails that night to our camp site at the Sunset Rock. No tent, blankets or sleeping bags were carried and we slept on a bed of leaves by a log fire. Fortunately the weather was fine and clear, ​and we made good time with our light packs, walking down Kedumba Pass next morning. 
 + 
 +We reached our breakfast site on Cox's River at 8.30 a.m., and the Kowmung ​junction at 12 noon. 
 + 
 +At 2.30 p.m. on Saturday afternoon we commenced ​to climb the Gangerang Range, from a point one mile further up the Cox. The ridge was at first lightly timbered grassy slope, and rose very steeply for about 1,400 feet, then becoming ​boulder strewnwith thicker undergrowth. A low cliff with a cave was skirted here, being similar to the rocks on the adjacent ​Mt. Kookem. A fine view opened out up the Cox gorge, as far as the "Konangaroo Creek" the area mentioned by Surveyor Govett'​s writings, and its western tributary, rising near the "​highest land", called by the Blacks of his time (if the word can be written ​as they pronounced ​it) "Kuo-uogang". 
 + 
 +About four miles from our viewpoint could be seen the low cliffs of Gangerang plateau, and so we continued to ascend the ridge we were on, which was seen swinging more to the southwestin that direction
 + 
 +Our route lay through a thick forest of Turpentine and Eucalyptus saplins, but we sometimes ​enjoyed a glimpse of the mountain ​country northward to Mt. Mouin and Clear Hill. One of the best views was looking ​down Little Ti-Willa Creek and across the Komung ​[Kowmung] ​River, to Byrnes Gap and Tonalli Range
 + 
 +Nightfall found us camped on a bed of leaves by a log fire, and we each had a two quart billy of water, which we had carried up from the river. 
 + 
 +At daybreak next morning we continued walking along the thickly timbered flat topped ridge, which soon commenced to rise steeply, and eventually rached the foot of the low cliffs of sandstone and conglomerate. 
 + 
 +A way up was found through a break in these cliffs (Gentle's Pass) on the Ti-willa Creek side, and then, after walking a mile on a lightly timbered, stony ridge on the plateau, a stop was made for breakfast by a running stream, in a swampy upland gully. 
 + 
 +Later we walked southward over a slight rise, and then across the main marsh of the plateau, in the direction of a high hill, which we then thought to be the Gangerang peakOn reaching its crest we could see higher land ahead, and further progress was temporarily halted by a precipitous canyon, which a creek from the marsh had cut right through the ridge we were on (geographical rarity).  
 + 
 +This creek was later to be named "Dex Creek",​ and the high hill "Mt. Bolwarra"​. The view west extended across the Kanangra gorge, while eastward could be seen the grassy flats of the Lower Cox Valley. 
 + 
 +After crossing Dex Creeka well defined quartzite ridge led us along to the highest point of the range (Mt. Cloudmaker) at 12 noon, where marvellous views opened out over Kanangra gorge, and the famous walls, glowing in the sunlight. 
 + 
 +The ridge then became very spectacular,​ and ran westward, resembling a great heap of boulders, coming to a point on top. It dipped and rose again about three times, and then swung southward. After a series of dips and knobs, the rock hopping over the very hard type of quartzite became easier, and the now grassy ridge descended steeply to Gabes Gap, the lowest saddle on the range in this section. From this gap it was possible to look west down a dry creek bed to Kanangra Creek, while a gully with tree ferns dropped down on the east side to Gingra Creek. 
 + 
 +A very steep climb followed and presently we came to the foot of Craft's Wall, which we avoided, by keeping on its east sideAfter passing a number of caves, formed by the overhanging walls, we found ourselves on the main ridge again, which, after less than a mile, ended under the walls of Kanangra TopsA break in the walls, 100 yards to the south, provided a way up. This was later to be named "Smith's Pass". From there it was easy going west past Mt. Maxwell and over a narrow neck to the iron ladder. 
 + 
 +Our campsite for the night, in the cave with the dance platform, was reached at 4 p.m. a little over a day's walk from the Cox-Kowmung junction
 + 
 +On Monday morning Gordon was more at ease, walking along the old cart track to Jenolan CavesWe passed through the Grand Arch there at 1.30 p.m., and continued walking along the road for another 11 miles before being given a ride in a service car to Mt. Victoriain time to catch the 7.15 p.m. train to Sydney. 
 + 
 +Thus ended a good three days walk, but the next few months saw the first ascent of Mt. Paralyser and Thurat, the first visit to Mt. Guouogang, and the first walk along Yellow Dog. 
 + 
 +I remember standing on Mt. Moorilla, after a spell of torrential rain, in June 1930, when the view from there was really a picture, as it included five big waterfalls on the side of Thurat, which are not usually running. Next day, the first descent of Ti-willa Buttress ​was made. 
 + 
 +It was good to walk along the well defined ridges of this predominantly quartzite country. The experience gained in bushwalking there was essential to us in 1931when we ventured into a relatively dry Capertee-Colo area, which is only partly surveyed, but otherwise of rugged sandstone country, deeply intersected by ravines. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Try This Recipe=====
  
-6 The Sydney Bushwalker September 1962 
-At daybreak next morning we continued Walking along the thickly timbered flat topped ridge, -which soon commenced to rise steeply, and eventually rached the foot of the low cliffs of sandstone and conglomcrte. 
-A way up was found through a break in these Cliffs (Gcntle'​s Pass) 
-on the Creek side, and then, after walking a mile on a lightly timbered, story ridge on the plateau, a stop was made for breakfast by a running stream, in a swampy upland gully. 
-Later we walked southward over a slight rise, and then across the main marsh of the plateau, in the direction of a high hill, which we then thought to tie the Gangerang peak. On reaching its crest we could see higher land-ahead, and further progress was temporarily halted by a precipitous canyon, which a creek 
-from the marsh had cut right through the ridge we were on (a geographical rarity). ​ 
-This creek was later to be named "Dex Creek",​ and the high hill "Mt. Bolmarra"​. The view west extended across the Eanangra gorge, while eastward could be seen the grassy flats of the Lower Cox Valley. 
-After crossing Dex Creeki a well defined quartzite ridge led us along to the highest point of the range (Mt. Cloudmaker) at 12 noon, where marvellous view opened out over Kanangra gorge, and the famous walls, glowing in the sunlight. 
-The ridge then became very spectacular,​ and ran westward, resembling a great heap of boulders, Coming to a point on top. It dipped and rose again about three times, and then swung southward. After a series of dips and knobs, the rock:​hopping over the very hard type of quartzite became easier, and the now grassy ridge descended steeply to Gabes Gap, the lowest saddle on the range in this section. From this gap' it was possible to look west down a dry creek bed to Eanangra. Creek, while a gully with tree ferns dropped down on the east side to Gingra tr eek. 
-A ire* steep climb followed and presently we came to the foot of Craft'​s Wall, which we avoided, by keeping on its east side. After passing a number of caves, formed by the overhanging walls, we found ourselves on the main ridge again, which, after less than a mile, ended under the walls of Kanangra Tops. Abreak in the malls, 
-. 100 yards 'to the south, provided a way up. This was later to be named "​Smith'​s Pass". From there it was easy going west past Mt. Maxwell and over a narrow neck to the iron ladder. 
-Our campsite,​for the night, in the cave with the dance platf,m4m, was reached at 4,1)0144 a little over a daY's -walk from the Cox-Kowmung junction. 
-On Monday morning Gordon was more at ease, walking along the old cart track to Jenolan Caves. We apssed through the Grand Arch there at 1.30 p m., and continued walking along the road for another 11 miles before being given a ride in a service car to Mt. Victoria, in time to catch the 7.15 p m, train to Sydney. 
-September 1962 
-The Sydney Bushwalker 7  
-Thus ended a good three days walk, but the next few months saw the first ascent of Mt. Paralyser and Thurat, the first visit to ht. Guouogang, and the first walk along Yellow Dog. 
-I remember standing on Mt. Moorilla, after a spell of torrential rain, in June 1930, when the view from there wasreally a picture, as it included five big waterfalls an. the side of Thurat, which are not usually running. Next day, the first descent of Ti-willa Buttress was made. 
-It was goad to walk along the well defined ridges of this predominantly luartmite country, The experienue gained in bushwalking there was essential 
-to us in 1931, when we ventured into a relatively dry Capertee-Colo area which is only partly surveyed, but otherwise of rugged sandstone country l deeply intersected by ravines. 
-. 7 k 
-TRY THIS RECIPE 
 (Suitable more for reunions or field weekends than rugged walks). (Suitable more for reunions or field weekends than rugged walks).
-Steak a l'asply + 
-MariNate ​a good thick slab of steak. ​---- 1arinate7 ​I look up the dictionary. +=== Steak a l'Eucalypt. === 
-"​Marinate (ade) ir0t0 to pickle in vinegar or brine (see also Pi2k1e0)" So I look up pickle. + 
-"​Pickle - vot, preserve in vinegar or brine see also marinate (ade):-.ed  preserved etc. coloq. drunk."​+Marinate ​a good thick slab of steak. ​Marinate? ​I look up the dictionary. 
 + 
 +"​Marinate (ade) v.t. to pickle in vinegar or brine (see also Pick1e.)" 
 + 
 +So I look up pickle. 
 + 
 +"​Pickle - v.t. preserve in vinegar or brine see also marinate (ade):- ed  preserved etc. coloq. drunk."​ 
 I call in the cooking expert round the house. I call in the cooking expert round the house.
-"​Marilyn"​ I say (I always call her Marilyn when I want somethingWe both know I'm kidding, but it seems to work) "What does 'marinated ​mean?" "​Well",​ she says, "it simply means to soaks" "​Well,"​ I say, on earth don't they say soak." "​Beoause",​ she says "it doesn'​t quite mean to soak". I give up. + 
-Marinate a good thick slab of steak in claret with chopped garlic +"​Marilyn"​ I say (I always call her Marilyn when I want somethingWe both know I'm kidding, but it seems to work) "What does 'marinate' ​mean?" "​Well",​ she says, "it simply means to soaks" "​Well,"​ I say, "​Why ​on earth don't they say soak." "​Beoause",​ she says "it doesn'​t quite mean to soak". I give up. 
-for an hour. Then rub both sides well with butter and season with spices to your own taste.+ 
 +Marinate a good thick slab of steak in claret with chopped garlic for an hour. Then rub both sides well with butter and season with spices to your own taste. 
 Have a hot plate ready over a charcoal fire. Place gum leaves above and below the steak and cook fast. Have a hot plate ready over a charcoal fire. Place gum leaves above and below the steak and cook fast.
-Serve with a glass of cool claret. This we guarantee. + 
-Anyone who thinks television has killed ​conversations ​doesn'​t pay the phone bill. +Serve with a glass of cool claret. 
-C .41...za r.-V + 
-H) +This we guarantee. 
-8 The Sydney Bushvalker September 1962 SCIENCE., NATURALLY+ 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Anyone who thinks television has killed ​conversation, ​doesn'​t pay the phone bill. 
 + 
 +---
 + 
 +SCIENCE., NATURALLY
 Photo facts for hoto fiends. Photo facts for hoto fiends.
 Some subjects reouir.; 1 wide angle lens. Some subjects reouir.; 1 wide angle lens.
196209.txt · Last modified: 2019/07/10 03:11 by tyreless