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196207 [2019/06/27 05:36]
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196207 [2019/06/28 02:51] (current)
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 We present an article this month from Thornigah, "The Hero in the Literature of climbing and Exploration",​ which puts forward a provocative point of view - the gradual sublimation of the individual to the highly organised large expedition. It is particularly appropriate as this month Col Putt gives his talk on his visit to the Carstenz Pyramid in West New Guinea (July 25). While the members of this expedition may not qualify with Thornigah as legendary heroes, (I would like to see Putto with a black beard) here at least was a highly individualistic effort. (My wife, who has been reading this over my shoulder, has just commented that she would like to see a little more highly individualistic effort round the house). We present an article this month from Thornigah, "The Hero in the Literature of climbing and Exploration",​ which puts forward a provocative point of view - the gradual sublimation of the individual to the highly organised large expedition. It is particularly appropriate as this month Col Putt gives his talk on his visit to the Carstenz Pyramid in West New Guinea (July 25). While the members of this expedition may not qualify with Thornigah as legendary heroes, (I would like to see Putto with a black beard) here at least was a highly individualistic effort. (My wife, who has been reading this over my shoulder, has just commented that she would like to see a little more highly individualistic effort round the house).
  
-If you have read the instalments of Col's report in the last few mags, you'll get mor- out of Col's talk than pins and needles you know where. We even have a map this month. I know, I know, we should have had it with the first instalment, but what do you think this is, the "​National Geographic"?​+If you have read the instalments of Col's report in the last few mags, you'll get more out of Col's talk than pins and needles you know where. We even have a map this month. I know, I know, we should have had it with the first instalment, but what do you think this is, the "​National Geographic"?​
  
 We also have this month an article from Ern French on the Easter trip to Gloucester Tops which you will find interesting reading. If you are planning a trip in this area, you will also get some useful information from it. We also have this month an article from Ern French on the Easter trip to Gloucester Tops which you will find interesting reading. If you are planning a trip in this area, you will also get some useful information from it.
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 In General Business Frank Barlow raised the question of a nameplate for the street entrance to the Club. He said that the small one we had didn't do justice to our premises, and suggested a brass plate which he would be prepared to supply and put up. Reference was made to a very decorative sign prepared by Taro but not used because of space limitations. Jack Gentle said he had in his care a brass plate some three feet long used at the Ingersoll Hall, but too large for Reiby Place. Geof Wagg declared that we were not a brass plate Club. A sign carved in redgum (dead of course) would be more appropriate. It was decided that we acquire a suitable nameplate, but details were left to the Committee. In General Business Frank Barlow raised the question of a nameplate for the street entrance to the Club. He said that the small one we had didn't do justice to our premises, and suggested a brass plate which he would be prepared to supply and put up. Reference was made to a very decorative sign prepared by Taro but not used because of space limitations. Jack Gentle said he had in his care a brass plate some three feet long used at the Ingersoll Hall, but too large for Reiby Place. Geof Wagg declared that we were not a brass plate Club. A sign carved in redgum (dead of course) would be more appropriate. It was decided that we acquire a suitable nameplate, but details were left to the Committee.
  
-Frank Ashdown suggested that it be made a rule that any day walk of 10 miles be accepted as a test walk, but as this would require constitutional revision, decided to defer the motion to the half-yearly meeting. He also drew attention to some who used the club facilities and went on walks without ​paymeng ​a penny into Club funds. The President undertook to speak to the offenders. The President also told us that Committee had decided that the 6 months period allowed for prospective membership would not be extended in future unless there was good reason for doing so.+Frank Ashdown suggested that it be made a rule that any day walk of 10 miles be accepted as a test walk, but as this would require constitutional revision, decided to defer the motion to the half-yearly meeting. He also drew attention to some who used the club facilities and went on walks without ​paying ​a penny into Club funds. The President undertook to speak to the offenders. The President also told us that Committee had decided that the 6 months period allowed for prospective membership would not be extended in future unless there was good reason for doing so.
  
 It was announced the time had come for the posting of a list of the unfinancial on the Club Notice Board. It was announced the time had come for the posting of a list of the unfinancial on the Club Notice Board.
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 Possibly due to translation the German school with its unhealthy anthropomorphism of the mountains seemed to me to be neither heroic nor graceful. The cry of north faces, more and more difficult routes, the accounts of holding by frozen fingers speak eloquently of technique on the mountain. Translated to paper they invite mere comparison with other north faces, routes differing fractionally and other climbers with immense finger strength. A comparison of finger strength occupied one chapter in one forgettable book I read. One could possibly feed these books into a computer and receive an answer in terms of finger agony per height gained, subscripted for north or south faces. Possibly due to translation the German school with its unhealthy anthropomorphism of the mountains seemed to me to be neither heroic nor graceful. The cry of north faces, more and more difficult routes, the accounts of holding by frozen fingers speak eloquently of technique on the mountain. Translated to paper they invite mere comparison with other north faces, routes differing fractionally and other climbers with immense finger strength. A comparison of finger strength occupied one chapter in one forgettable book I read. One could possibly feed these books into a computer and receive an answer in terms of finger agony per height gained, subscripted for north or south faces.
  
-Perhaps it was the black and white photography that was essential to the spirit of the early books. Snow and black rocks look so cruel, treacherous and alien, the sky is uniformly black from the brief exposure, the explorers beard'​s a piratical black, their eyes sunken and hollow. The decline in the literature started with colour photography. Blue skies, bright jackets, ginger beards are not the stuff of hereos ​under pressure. Colour photos of climbers appear to be just up the mountain from a fashionable ski resort; bare rocks take my interest from heroism to the less noble pursuit of geology. Even the horrors of Annapurna and the technical glory of Everest are muted by the propriety blue of the sky. The sight of a frost bitten, authenticated hero being carried in a large box by a Sherpa has something of the illustrations of a certain saint. Didn't Peter Freuchen cut off his on foot when frostbite and gangrene had shredded the tissue from his ankle.+Perhaps it was the black and white photography that was essential to the spirit of the early books. Snow and black rocks look so cruel, treacherous and alien, the sky is uniformly black from the brief exposure, the explorers beard'​s a piratical black, their eyes sunken and hollow. The decline in the literature started with colour photography. Blue skies, bright jackets, ginger beards are not the stuff of heroes ​under pressure. Colour photos of climbers appear to be just up the mountain from a fashionable ski resort; bare rocks take my interest from heroism to the less noble pursuit of geology. Even the horrors of Annapurna and the technical glory of Everest are muted by the propriety blue of the sky. The sight of a frost bitten, authenticated hero being carried in a large box by a Sherpa has something of the illustrations of a certain saint. Didn't Peter Freuchen cut off his on foot when frostbite and gangrene had shredded the tissue from his ankle.
  
 Great tragedy, in the heroic sense, doesn'​t lead to or stem from disaster. Thus there is a distinction in the loss of Mallory and Irvine almost at the height of a climbers ambition and the death of Scneider, an excellent climber, in a sleeping bag. Mallory and Irvine are unalloyed tragedy, Hilary and Tensing the final committee stage swept from the mountain to the brilliant, hysterical colour film of a coronation; an accident in time to mar the greatness. Great tragedy, in the heroic sense, doesn'​t lead to or stem from disaster. Thus there is a distinction in the loss of Mallory and Irvine almost at the height of a climbers ambition and the death of Scneider, an excellent climber, in a sleeping bag. Mallory and Irvine are unalloyed tragedy, Hilary and Tensing the final committee stage swept from the mountain to the brilliant, hysterical colour film of a coronation; an accident in time to mar the greatness.
  
-The distinction between tragedy and disaster is less subtly shown in the literature of Polar exploration and the descent from heroic stature more evident. The utter disaster of Franklin and the peculiarly patriotic disaster of Scott seem at this distance to be pointless and unnecessary. In each case their expeditions suffer by comparison, by the canon of tragedy mentioned and by similar expeditions;​ Franklin with Nansen and Scott with the arch villian ​Amundsen, the foreigner who by definition should not have won so easily.+The distinction between tragedy and disaster is less subtly shown in the literature of Polar exploration and the descent from heroic stature more evident. The utter disaster of Franklin and the peculiarly patriotic disaster of Scott seem at this distance to be pointless and unnecessary. In each case their expeditions suffer by comparison, by the canon of tragedy mentioned and by similar expeditions;​ Franklin with Nansen and Scott with the arch villain ​Amundsen, the foreigner who by definition should not have won so easily.
  
-For the comfort of English speaking people there are three journeys in the literature which are the apotheosis of all the heroes of climbing and exploration. They are "The Winter Journey"​ from "The Worst Journey in the World",​ any account of Mawson walking, stumbling, falling and walking again as his two companions died, his main concern to die in a spot sufficiently visible for his diaries and results to be found; and for heart stopping thrills any account of Shackleton and the Endurance. There are no photographs of the Winter Journey and I can only recall photos of Mawson when he had become a kindly ​profassor ​(professors in my experience being men and not heroes). Shackleton has been immortalised by Frank Hurley in the only medium fit for heroes, the early cumbersome black and white technique. From the moment he left his ship crushed in the ice until he walked into the whaling station on South Georgia nearly three years later he was literally under pressure every moment of every day. Hurley has caught the tremendous grace of the fellow in one tumbled tableau on the beach of Elephant Island.+For the comfort of English speaking people there are three journeys in the literature which are the apotheosis of all the heroes of climbing and exploration. They are "The Winter Journey"​ from "The Worst Journey in the World",​ any account of Mawson walking, stumbling, falling and walking again as his two companions died, his main concern to die in a spot sufficiently visible for his diaries and results to be found; and for heart stopping thrills any account of Shackleton and the Endurance. There are no photographs of the Winter Journey and I can only recall photos of Mawson when he had become a kindly ​professor ​(professors in my experience being men and not heroes). Shackleton has been immortalised by Frank Hurley in the only medium fit for heroes, the early cumbersome black and white technique. From the moment he left his ship crushed in the ice until he walked into the whaling station on South Georgia nearly three years later he was literally under pressure every moment of every day. Hurley has caught the tremendous grace of the fellow in one tumbled tableau on the beach of Elephant Island.
  
-The men lie, lounging ​gexhausted ​on the black rocks, the mockery of a beach. They are dilapidated,​ dispirited, wondering if they are still alive.+The men lie, lounging ​exhausted ​on the black rocks, the mockery of a beach. They are dilapidated,​ dispirited, wondering if they are still alive.
  
 Shackleton stands in the posture of a football coach I remember from schooldays. Telling them they have done well, they aren't beaten yet but in truth the worst is to come. He is going to sail to South Georgia in that boat that is not much more robust than a surf boat. Icebergs. We'll keep a sharp lookout. Waves. There'​s some dunnage to deck the thing aver. Winds. There are stones here on the beach for movable ballast. He will make the right, but dreadful landfall, walk over an unexplored mountain range, toboggan down the other side in fog, preferring uncertain risks to certain freezing. He will do all that and come back with help. He is standing bareheaded, he is smoking a cigarette! Shackleton stands in the posture of a football coach I remember from schooldays. Telling them they have done well, they aren't beaten yet but in truth the worst is to come. He is going to sail to South Georgia in that boat that is not much more robust than a surf boat. Icebergs. We'll keep a sharp lookout. Waves. There'​s some dunnage to deck the thing aver. Winds. There are stones here on the beach for movable ballast. He will make the right, but dreadful landfall, walk over an unexplored mountain range, toboggan down the other side in fog, preferring uncertain risks to certain freezing. He will do all that and come back with help. He is standing bareheaded, he is smoking a cigarette!
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 Leaving on Thursday night after an excellent tea from Molly, we journeyed via Putty and Singleton to stop for the night at Glendon Brook. Quite a fair spot at the north end of the bridge for two or three tents, poles and wood in short supply as the country is well cleared. A wash in the wide, but badly silted brook, breakfast in sunlight and we were away thru picturesque country over winding and in parts rough and rutted roads. Soon we were following up the Allyn River and so engrossed were we that only when we drove between the huts of the saw mill village at the head of the valley were we jolted into a more alert state of mind! Leaving on Thursday night after an excellent tea from Molly, we journeyed via Putty and Singleton to stop for the night at Glendon Brook. Quite a fair spot at the north end of the bridge for two or three tents, poles and wood in short supply as the country is well cleared. A wash in the wide, but badly silted brook, breakfast in sunlight and we were away thru picturesque country over winding and in parts rough and rutted roads. Soon we were following up the Allyn River and so engrossed were we that only when we drove between the huts of the saw mill village at the head of the valley were we jolted into a more alert state of mind!
  
-A glance at the military map showed that we had passed the turnoff which runs over the divide and into the village of Salisbury on the Williams River. And so to Barrington House. Bob and Audrey already there, had conversed with the owner and had permission to leave the cars in the grounds. Having heard a horrible tale about people driving ​gars from the House to Carey'​s Peaks I was very pleased to find the narrow and muddy track unchanged. After about half a mile, the party decided upon lunch, a time consuming operation in rain forest. However eventually on our way, with the sunlight splashing down thru the thick foliage. At a fork in the track, Bill and I investigated the steeply falling right hand - almost to the bottom before I recognised it as Rocky Crossing, a good lunch spot for parties descending from the tops. It was in great spate, a really fine sight. The day was fast running away as we reached a campsite, now called Lagoon Pinch at the foot of the steep rise. The fire trail from the Allyn side cuts into the old track here and continues to the tops. Several fine trees, formerly standing in this spot were down and cut up ready for the mill! Fire trails are of course for the prevention of fire.+A glance at the military map showed that we had passed the turnoff which runs over the divide and into the village of Salisbury on the Williams River. And so to Barrington House. Bob and Audrey already there, had conversed with the owner and had permission to leave the cars in the grounds. Having heard a horrible tale about people driving ​cars from the House to Carey'​s Peaks I was very pleased to find the narrow and muddy track unchanged. After about half a mile, the party decided upon lunch, a time consuming operation in rain forest. However eventually on our way, with the sunlight splashing down thru the thick foliage. At a fork in the track, Bill and I investigated the steeply falling right hand - almost to the bottom before I recognised it as Rocky Crossing, a good lunch spot for parties descending from the tops. It was in great spate, a really fine sight. The day was fast running away as we reached a campsite, now called Lagoon Pinch at the foot of the steep rise. The fire trail from the Allyn side cuts into the old track here and continues to the tops. Several fine trees, formerly standing in this spot were down and cut up ready for the mill! Fire trails are of course for the prevention of fire.
  
 A light shower fell during breakfast and overcast and more showers was the order as we climbed steadily, being passed by an old jeep which slugged its way to the top over a badly eroded and obstructed track. Lunch was taken on the site of O'​Grady'​s Hut, now totally demolished, and some time spent in locating a hut called Selby Allyn of the Sydney Technical College walkers. This is a well kept hut which would be a haven in really bad weather. A small charge is requested of those using it. The log contains numerous references to snow conditions. The trail runs on past O'​Grady'​s and around the higher ground, S and W of the swamp areas, and then, I believe, down Stewarts Ck, probably, via the old track. Offshoots run to Carey'​s,​ Barrington Trig and I suppose other points. A light shower fell during breakfast and overcast and more showers was the order as we climbed steadily, being passed by an old jeep which slugged its way to the top over a badly eroded and obstructed track. Lunch was taken on the site of O'​Grady'​s Hut, now totally demolished, and some time spent in locating a hut called Selby Allyn of the Sydney Technical College walkers. This is a well kept hut which would be a haven in really bad weather. A small charge is requested of those using it. The log contains numerous references to snow conditions. The trail runs on past O'​Grady'​s and around the higher ground, S and W of the swamp areas, and then, I believe, down Stewarts Ck, probably, via the old track. Offshoots run to Carey'​s,​ Barrington Trig and I suppose other points.
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 Going up stream we pass a flying fox and then come to a low level bridge; a rising road took us to a house at the foot of the spur which leads up and over the divide between the Chichester and the Williams. A talk with the householder and we were off, with Grace streaking away in front. This proved a veritable Rack, Roar and Rumble - the immediate peak concealed another behind which lurked another. However wide views all around, and easy walking. Over the top and Salisbury lies below. A tentative plan was to try and reach Chichester Dam for lunch, but time had beaten us. Going up stream we pass a flying fox and then come to a low level bridge; a rising road took us to a house at the foot of the spur which leads up and over the divide between the Chichester and the Williams. A talk with the householder and we were off, with Grace streaking away in front. This proved a veritable Rack, Roar and Rumble - the immediate peak concealed another behind which lurked another. However wide views all around, and easy walking. Over the top and Salisbury lies below. A tentative plan was to try and reach Chichester Dam for lunch, but time had beaten us.
  
-And so its head for home. On reaching Gresford, someone suggested a drink and led the way into the general store, next door to the pub. A universal store this, groceries, iron ware, drinks, bird cages, oatmeal, candlesticks,​ kneeboots, butter and eggs, barbwire, hairnets, bolts anu bolt holes, horse medicine, over and underwear, cement, dusting powder, birds nest soup, parts for grandfather-clocks,​ last week's Herald and tomorrow'​s Argus. If I appear to rave, it is merely my enthusiasm for this kind of shop. They have something others have not.+And so its head for home. On reaching Gresford, someone suggested a drink and led the way into the general store, next door to the pub. A universal store this, groceries, iron ware, drinks, bird cages, oatmeal, candlesticks,​ kneeboots, butter and eggs, barbwire, hairnets, bolts and bolt holes, horse medicine, over and underwear, cement, dusting powder, birds nest soup, parts for grandfather-clocks,​ last week's Herald and tomorrow'​s Argus. If I appear to rave, it is merely my enthusiasm for this kind of shop. They have something others have not.
  
 Then to Singleton for tea, a stop near Windsor to drink a thermos of coffee and so back to town after another refreshing sojourn with nature of which the fool sees himself as something set apart, but the wise are happy knowing they are part. Then to Singleton for tea, a stop near Windsor to drink a thermos of coffee and so back to town after another refreshing sojourn with nature of which the fool sees himself as something set apart, but the wise are happy knowing they are part.
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 Turns into maiden'​s fare. Turns into maiden'​s fare.
  
-Eileen and Jach, from S.B.W,+Eileen and Jack, from S.B.W,
  
 Good luck! May all that trouble you be maidens fair. Good luck! May all that trouble you be maidens fair.
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 Glenbrook - Euroka Clearing - Fireworks Ridge - Campfire Creek - Glenbrook - 12 miles. Recommended for new members. A good walk in pleasant bush surroundings where some map reading is involved if the party is to return on time from the famous Blue Labyrinth. ​ Glenbrook - Euroka Clearing - Fireworks Ridge - Campfire Creek - Glenbrook - 12 miles. Recommended for new members. A good walk in pleasant bush surroundings where some map reading is involved if the party is to return on time from the famous Blue Labyrinth. ​
  
-8.20 a.m. interurban ("​Silver Fish") Lithgow train frcp Central Steam Station to Glenbrook. Tickets: Glenbrook return @ 13/9. Map: Liverpool Military.+8.20 a.m. interurban ("​Silver Fish") Lithgow train from Central Steam Station to Glenbrook. Tickets: Glenbrook return @ 13/9. Map: Liverpool Military.
  
 Leader: Jack Gentle. Leader: Jack Gentle.
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 Waterfall - Kangaroo Crk - Karloo Pool - Audley. 10 miles. This walk may be slightly more than 10 miles. Follows Kangaroo Crk from its source to entry into the Hacking River. Will involve some rock hopping. A very attractive part of National Park. Waterfall - Kangaroo Crk - Karloo Pool - Audley. 10 miles. This walk may be slightly more than 10 miles. Follows Kangaroo Crk from its source to entry into the Hacking River. Will involve some rock hopping. A very attractive part of National Park.
  
-8.20 a.m. Cronulla train from Central Electric Station to Sutherland. Change at Sutherland for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: ​Waterrall ​return @ 5/9. Map: Port Hacking Tourist.+8.20 a.m. Cronulla train from Central Electric Station to Sutherland. Change at Sutherland for rail motor to Waterfall. Tickets: ​Waterfall ​return @ 5/9. Map: Port Hacking Tourist.
  
 Leader: Dick Child. Leader: Dick Child.
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 You Bushies seem to have been doing some good trips. There are no gorge trips that can be done in Colorado. All the canyons have roads up them, and anyway the water'​s too cold and there are no waterfalls. I assume Danai Brook hasn't been climbed up yet. You Bushies seem to have been doing some good trips. There are no gorge trips that can be done in Colorado. All the canyons have roads up them, and anyway the water'​s too cold and there are no waterfalls. I assume Danai Brook hasn't been climbed up yet.
  
-The week before last was a University vacation and I've just come back from an intrepid trip in the Utah desert, just upstream from the main part of the Grand Canyon. It was a hard walk, living on grilled rattlesnake and cactus mash soup, but the rcck formations and climbing were fantabulous. I'll have to show you all my slides when I get back.+The week before last was a University vacation and I've just come back from an intrepid trip in the Utah desert, just upstream from the main part of the Grand Canyon. It was a hard walk, living on grilled rattlesnake and cactus mash soup, but the rock formations and climbing were fantabulous. I'll have to show you all my slides when I get back.
  
 I've just shown my New Zealand slides here. I made it look as if all the slides were taken on one monstrous mountain climb; landing by lobster boat in Doubtful Sound, trekking inland through the moss forests; attacked by a ferocious amphibious wombat (actually Stitt backing out of a mudhole at Wood's Creek); climbing up the Cheval Ridge on Malte Brun, the only route on to the Tasman Glacier; negotiating the Hochstetter Ice Fall by climbing down into each crevasse on a knotted rope in bare beetle-crushers;​ climbing up the snow ridge of Green; and finally on to the summit of Hochstetter Dome - the highest peak in N.Z. I've been asked to show my slides again. I've just shown my New Zealand slides here. I made it look as if all the slides were taken on one monstrous mountain climb; landing by lobster boat in Doubtful Sound, trekking inland through the moss forests; attacked by a ferocious amphibious wombat (actually Stitt backing out of a mudhole at Wood's Creek); climbing up the Cheval Ridge on Malte Brun, the only route on to the Tasman Glacier; negotiating the Hochstetter Ice Fall by climbing down into each crevasse on a knotted rope in bare beetle-crushers;​ climbing up the snow ridge of Green; and finally on to the summit of Hochstetter Dome - the highest peak in N.Z. I've been asked to show my slides again.
  
-After returning from the Utah desert I succumbed to a deplorable atavistic urge. Instead of shaving off the week's accumulated stubble with a clean bold sweep, I procrastinated in front of the bathroon ​mirror and, in my imagination,​ began trimming it first in the Van Dyke style, then the Walrus, then the Ned Kelly. The inevitable happened; I settled for the Abraham Lincoln and left it on. Now, instead of "​Wombat"​ the more insolent students at the University call me "​Honest Abe."+After returning from the Utah desert I succumbed to a deplorable atavistic urge. Instead of shaving off the week's accumulated stubble with a clean bold sweep, I procrastinated in front of the bathroom ​mirror and, in my imagination,​ began trimming it first in the Van Dyke style, then the Walrus, then the Ned Kelly. The inevitable happened; I settled for the Abraham Lincoln and left it on. Now, instead of "​Wombat"​ the more insolent students at the University call me "​Honest Abe."
  
 I had read about Pizzas in the Lil Abner strip in Australia, but had never seen one. But now I have. Pizza places are everywhere in America and the Pizzas are enormous - about 2 feet across. Eating a pizza is a night'​s work. Another institution,​ uncommon in Australia but common here, is the smorgasborg. At these places they have great buckets of delicious food and you can ladle as much onto your plate, and come back for as many helpings as you like, all for one dollar, which, in general buying power is about 5/-. How these places make a profit I can't understand. Everyone in the Hiking Club goes to a smorgasborg on Sunday nights. I find that a glass of milk and a slice of bread each day keeps me going for the rest of the week. Round about Friday and Saturday the bread-milk diet needs discipline, but the thought of the coming Sunday night makes it worthwhile building up an appetite. I had read about Pizzas in the Lil Abner strip in Australia, but had never seen one. But now I have. Pizza places are everywhere in America and the Pizzas are enormous - about 2 feet across. Eating a pizza is a night'​s work. Another institution,​ uncommon in Australia but common here, is the smorgasborg. At these places they have great buckets of delicious food and you can ladle as much onto your plate, and come back for as many helpings as you like, all for one dollar, which, in general buying power is about 5/-. How these places make a profit I can't understand. Everyone in the Hiking Club goes to a smorgasborg on Sunday nights. I find that a glass of milk and a slice of bread each day keeps me going for the rest of the week. Round about Friday and Saturday the bread-milk diet needs discipline, but the thought of the coming Sunday night makes it worthwhile building up an appetite.
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 === Search and Rescue. === === Search and Rescue. ===
  
-The Cusiter family of Leura has forwarded an appreciation of the work doen in finding their son's body. The purchase of medical articles to be taken on S & R rescues has been decided upon in consultation with the Section'​s medical advisor. A suitable stretcher for cliff rescues is to be made. The use of two way radio communication together with a base station is being further investigated. Further funds will be required before purchase. Colin Putt has agreed to take charge of mountain rescues involving cliff climbs.+The Cusiter family of Leura has forwarded an appreciation of the work done in finding their son's body. The purchase of medical articles to be taken on S & R rescues has been decided upon in consultation with the Section'​s medical advisor. A suitable stretcher for cliff rescues is to be made. The use of two way radio communication together with a base station is being further investigated. Further funds will be required before purchase. Colin Putt has agreed to take charge of mountain rescues involving cliff climbs.
  
 === Annual Ball. === === Annual Ball. ===
  
-Any suggestions for novelties? Best decorated table again this year - a suggested theme is "Old Boots"​. A good attendance is aimed at in an effort to improve on previous years. Tickets will ba 22/6.+Any suggestions for novelties? Best decorated table again this year - a suggested theme is "Old Boots"​. A good attendance is aimed at in an effort to improve on previous years. Tickets will be 22/6.
  
 === "The Bushwalker Annual"​. === === "The Bushwalker Annual"​. ===
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 ---- ----
  
-SCIENCE.NATURLLY. +===== Science Naturally=====
-The sun is our powerhou-se. With the exception of atomic +
-power, all sources of energy-coal,​ oil, wood and wind come directly from the sun. +
-The sun is just another star; it differs but little from millions upon millions of other stars, but as we are'​only 93 million miles from it (which is just nothing man!) it looks bigger and feels warmer to US. The next nearest star to us, by comparison, is 25 million million miles away (and that is still like nothing). The sun measures 864,000 miles across and it would take 330,000 of our Earths to make the sun. A fair sized object, and warm too! Its surface temperature is about 10,000F, +
-The energy of the Sun comes from the same process as in the Hydrogen bomb. Two atoms of Hydrogen given the right temperature,​ will join together to form one atom of Helium. However the atom +
-of Helium does not weigh twice as much as the atom of Hydrogen, but slightly less. The difference in weight appears as a fair size burst of energy (mainly light and heat) at the moment of fusion of the two atoms. +
-So the Sun is actually losing weight at arate of thousands of tons a day, changing it into heat and light as a by-product of the Hydrogen to Helium prodtss. But donit Worry about it running out, it will see you out! +
-- Various _agencies are at work breaking down the solid rocks into sands, gravels,, soils-and silts.- rain", wind, frost, plant roots, heat. These by-products of the rock are gradually moved down to the sea by the action of water. The Mississippi River is lowering its whole catchment area at the rte--e--1-got in 6,000 years, the Upper Ganges, 1 foot in 800 years. Geologically speaking, this +
-is pretty rapid progress. It has been calculated that all of England will be flat as a board, at sea level, within a millioh years.- This denuding action is counteracted by movements in the Earth'​s crust, which lift up the land to form elevated plains (penepiains). The debris from the rivers is dumped under the sea where it slowly solidifies into clays, shales, conglomeriptes and sandstones (called sedimentary rocks). These in tarn, may be lifted by crust movement to form new land. +
-Our Blue Mountains Were formed in just' such a manner.+
  
-22. The Sydney Bushwalker July,- 1962. +The sun is our powerhouseWith the exception ​of atomic powerall sources ​of energy ​coaloilwood and wind come directly ​from the sun.
-Sydney Cove was chosen by Phillip for his first settlement because here a small stream entered the harbour. ​The Tank Stream rose in some springs in what is now Hyde ParkIt'​flowed down a shallow gully where Hamilton Street is today, and "​tanks"​ were cut in the sandstone hear Hunter Street to catch the vital supply. The sea reched up to Bridge Street in 1788; and here a tmall bridge was erected to cross the Tank Stream. (Don't rush down to see it - it has since been demolished.) +
-ANNUAL COLOUR-SLIDE COMPETITION +
-A full house on June 27, saw the showing ​of 120 Slides entered by 20 members. Judged by Malc. McGregorBill Rodgers. and Arthur Gilroy the locations ranged from Tasmania to the tropics and on to the Middle East and Europe. +
-Largely on the score of "Would we like it on the Wall at home for years and years",​ the judges made the following choices; +
-1. Frank Leydon'​s study of flannel. flowers ​unusual but attractive lightingcoupled with pleasing and carefully studied composition. +
-2.. Helen Gray'​s_landScape from The Castle,. towards'​ByangeeWalls and Pidgeon House ,;​.a%composition in receding plan'​es *:with strong impression of detith,​andAistance +
-.,.,   +
-:Frank aarlawe'​s,​ seascape - from A. !yacht on the way to Tasmania. storm-tossed waters, angry skies and '​screaming wind. +
-,Others in the "best ten" ere:-: - +
-Jack Gentle'​s shot of Edna Stretton ducking a wetting at Wood's Creek. . +
-George Gray's study of a goanna. +
-Ron Knightley'​s slide of a creek-scene in England. Helen Gray's snowscape at Kosciusko. +
-Jack Gentle'​s Tasmanian landscape. +
-John Bookluck'​s storm-scene in Ireland +
-Frank Leydon'​s vlollambie gorge scene.+
  
 +----
 +
 +The sun is just another star; it differs but little from millions upon millions of other stars, but as we are only 93 million miles from it (which is just nothing man!) it looks bigger and feels warmer to us. The next nearest star to us, by comparison, is 25 million million miles away (and that is still like nothing). The sun measures 864,000 miles across and it would take 330,000 of our Earths to make the sun. A fair sized object, and warm too! Its surface temperature is about 10,000°F.
 +
 +The energy of the Sun comes from the same process as in the Hydrogen bomb. Two atoms of Hydrogen given the right temperature,​ will join together to form one atom of Helium. However the atom of Helium does not weigh twice as much as the atom of Hydrogen, but slightly less. The difference in weight appears as a fair size burst of energy (mainly light and heat) at the moment of fusion of the two atoms.
 +
 +So the Sun is actually losing weight at a rate of thousands of tons a day, changing it into heat and light as a by-product of the Hydrogen to Helium process. But don't worry about it running out, it will see you out!
 +
 +----
 +
 +Various agencies are at work breaking down the solid rocks into sands, gravels, soils and silts - rain, wind, frost, plant roots, heat. These by-products of the rock are gradually moved down to the sea by the action of water. The Mississippi River is lowering its whole catchment area at the rate of 1 foot in 6,000 years, the Upper Ganges, 1 foot in 800 years. Geologically speaking, this is pretty rapid progress. It has been calculated that all of England will be flat as a board, at sea level, within a million years. This denuding action is counteracted by movements in the Earth'​s crust, which lift up the land to form elevated plains (peneplains). The debris from the rivers is dumped under the sea where it slowly solidifies into clays, shales, conglomerates and sandstones (called sedimentary rocks). These in turn, may be lifted by crust movement to form new land.
 +
 +Our Blue Mountains were formed in just such a manner.
 +
 +----
 +
 +Sydney Cove was chosen by Phillip for his first settlement because here a small stream entered the harbour. The Tank Stream rose in some springs in what is now Hyde Park. It flowed down a shallow gully where Hamilton Street is today, and "​tanks"​ were cut in the sandstone hear Hunter Street to catch the vital supply. The sea reached up to Bridge Street in 1788, and here a small bridge was erected to cross the Tank Stream. (Don't rush down to see it - it has since been demolished.)
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== Annual Colour-Slide Competition. =====
 +
 +A full house on June 27, saw the showing of 120 Slides entered by 20 members. Judged by Malc. McGregor, Bill Rodgers and Arthur Gilroy the locations ranged from Tasmania to the tropics and on to the Middle East and Europe.
 +
 +Largely on the score of "Would we like it on the wall at home for years and years",​ the judges made the following choices;
 +
 +1. Frank Leydon'​s study of flannel flowers - unusual but attractive lighting, coupled with pleasing and carefully studied composition.
 +
 +2. Helen Gray's landScape from The Castle, towards Byangee Walls and Pidgeon House - a composition in receding planes with strong impression of depth,and distance.
 +
 +3. Frank Barlowe'​s seascape - from a yacht on the way to Tasmania; storm-tossed waters, angry skies and screaming winds.
 +
 +Others in the "best ten" were:
 +
 +  * Jack Gentle'​s shot of Edna Stretton ducking a wetting at Wood's Creek.
 +  * George Gray's study of a goanna.
 +  * Ron Knightley'​s slide of a creek-scene in England.
 +  * Helen Gray's snowscape at Kosciusko.
 +  * Jack Gentle'​s Tasmanian landscape.
 +  * John Bookluck'​s storm-scene in Ireland.
 +  * Frank Leydon'​s Wollongambie gorge scene.
 +
 +----
196207.txt · Last modified: 2019/06/28 02:51 by tyreless