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196205 [2019/06/13 23:41]
tyreless
196205 [2019/06/14 03:39] (current)
tyreless
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 11.3.62. 11.3.62.
  
-It is'a long time since I heard from any of the Bushies but I suppose you are all thriving; I hope so. Now is Bushwalker Reunion time, so I'll picture you all sledding down mud slopes and torturing initiates at Wood's Creek. It is ceremonial season here too. Yesterday I was supposed to climb Green Mountain, behind Boulder, as one of the induction rites to full membership of the Climbing Club, but it was snowing heavily, and I was recovering from a cold, so I stayed in bed. This cold is the second I've had in America and the wors. On Saturday last weekend I was out for tea and was plied by Vodka, Benedictine,​ and pickled horses doovers till all hours of the morning, and this must have been too much for my constitution. On Sunday when I went skiing I felt dopey, and on Monday it was clear that I had a bad attack of the dog's disease with aching joints, bronchitis, fever and a wet nose. I feel normal today for the first time.+It is a long time since I heard from any of the Bushies but I suppose you are all thriving; I hope so. Now is Bushwalker Reunion time, so I'll picture you all sledding down mud slopes and torturing initiates at Wood's Creek. It is ceremonial season here too. Yesterday I was supposed to climb Green Mountain, behind Boulder, as one of the induction rites to full membership of the Climbing Club, but it was snowing heavily, and I was recovering from a cold, so I stayed in bed. This cold is the second I've had in America and the worst. On Saturday last weekend I was out for tea and was plied by Vodka, Benedictine,​ and pickled horses doovers till all hours of the morning, and this must have been too much for my constitution. On Sunday when I went skiing I felt dopey, and on Monday it was clear that I had a bad attack of the dog's disease with aching joints, bronchitis, fever and a wet nose. I feel normal today for the first time.
  
 Although much has been slanderously alleged, I have never been a white-ant in Australia. When I have subverted trips the motive has never been muscular laziness; it has always been a desire to exercise and perfect my expertise in psychological persuasion. However, in the latter field my skill continues to improve. Two weekends ago when setting of for a climb of two 14;​000'​ peaks Duncan cunningly suggested that the passengers should bring skis in case the car broke down and they had to ski out. On reaching the foot of the climb, the air being soupy with snow, Duncan suggested that it would be dangerous to climb in such weather and that, although it was only 3 a.m., the party should retire to a nearby decadent skiing resort and wait until it opened. To a man the party consented and spent the whole day in decadent skiing. On the next weekend came my greatest victory. I wasn't on the trip (I was downing grog and caviare as earlier reported) yet my spirit carried the day. Even before the party left Boulder it was obvious, and was being openly stated, that they lacked resolve and conviction, and sure enough, when the day came, Grey's and Terry'​s were not climbed. Although the weather was good, the party spent the whole day at another decadent ski area with only a token attempt to do any climbing. Although much has been slanderously alleged, I have never been a white-ant in Australia. When I have subverted trips the motive has never been muscular laziness; it has always been a desire to exercise and perfect my expertise in psychological persuasion. However, in the latter field my skill continues to improve. Two weekends ago when setting of for a climb of two 14;​000'​ peaks Duncan cunningly suggested that the passengers should bring skis in case the car broke down and they had to ski out. On reaching the foot of the climb, the air being soupy with snow, Duncan suggested that it would be dangerous to climb in such weather and that, although it was only 3 a.m., the party should retire to a nearby decadent skiing resort and wait until it opened. To a man the party consented and spent the whole day in decadent skiing. On the next weekend came my greatest victory. I wasn't on the trip (I was downing grog and caviare as earlier reported) yet my spirit carried the day. Even before the party left Boulder it was obvious, and was being openly stated, that they lacked resolve and conviction, and sure enough, when the day came, Grey's and Terry'​s were not climbed. Although the weather was good, the party spent the whole day at another decadent ski area with only a token attempt to do any climbing.
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 It was a chagrined pair of Putts who arrived at the general meeting, having cooled their heels for some time at a darkened, inhospitable Stittery. (The Stitts were out!) It was a chagrined pair of Putts who arrived at the general meeting, having cooled their heels for some time at a darkened, inhospitable Stittery. (The Stitts were out!)
  
-The Stites ​finally arrived at the meeting, big smiles, a big cheerio to everyone, and were greeted by an indignant pair of Putts - "What about our invite to dinner?"​+The Stitts ​finally arrived at the meeting, big smiles, a big cheerio to everyone, and were greeted by an indignant pair of Putts - "What about our invite to dinner?"​
  
 And the St. st. st. And the St. st. st.
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 Then followed a series of Friday night (mostly) meetings of the Committee generally at Thorne'​s Cafe then in Castlereagh Street and it was subsequently learned that Mr. Hungerford was agreeable to having his Crown Lease cancelled provided he received compensation of £130. Then followed a series of Friday night (mostly) meetings of the Committee generally at Thorne'​s Cafe then in Castlereagh Street and it was subsequently learned that Mr. Hungerford was agreeable to having his Crown Lease cancelled provided he received compensation of £130.
  
-After various appeals including an appeal to the Wild Life Preservation Society (of which Roy F. Bennett was then Prbsident ​and which Society donated £25) we managed to get together the sum of £50. It was then we approached the then Commissioner for Railways, W.J. Cleary and he agreed to advance us £80 on loan.+After various appeals including an appeal to the Wild Life Preservation Society (of which Roy F. Bennett was then President ​and which Society donated £25) we managed to get together the sum of £50. It was then we approached the then Commissioner for Railways, W.J. Cleary and he agreed to advance us £80 on loan.
  
 We were then in the happy position to approach the Government who promised after cancellation of the Lease to reserve the area as a Public Reserve in perpetuity. In addition to doing this the Crown also set aside an area along each bank of the Grose River upstream for some distance, I think it was 6 chains, back from the water'​s edge as a Public Reserve and they did the same thing up both banks of Govett'​s Leap Creek as far as "The Junction"​. We were then in the happy position to approach the Government who promised after cancellation of the Lease to reserve the area as a Public Reserve in perpetuity. In addition to doing this the Crown also set aside an area along each bank of the Grose River upstream for some distance, I think it was 6 chains, back from the water'​s edge as a Public Reserve and they did the same thing up both banks of Govett'​s Leap Creek as far as "The Junction"​.
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 === Can you tell a lizard from a snake? === === Can you tell a lizard from a snake? ===
  
-While no one, we hope, would mistake a jew liard, goanna or gecko for a snake, it is not so easy to select as lizards the skinks whose legs are reduced to small bumps, and the legless lizards in which the front legs are entirely missing, and the rear legs are tiny flaps. The difference lies firstly in the eyelids. Lizards have these while snakes do not, their eyes being covered by a clear scale like a watch glass. Secondly, a snake'​s tongue is long, rodlike and forked and can move in and out with the mouth shut, while the lizard has a more conventional tongue, broad flat and fleshy, only just nicked at the end, being protruded with the mouth open.+While no one, we hope, would mistake a jew lizard, goanna or gecko for a snake, it is not so easy to select as lizards the skinks whose legs are reduced to small bumps, and the legless lizards in which the front legs are entirely missing, and the rear legs are tiny flaps. The difference lies firstly in the eyelids. Lizards have these while snakes do not, their eyes being covered by a clear scale like a watch glass. Secondly, a snake'​s tongue is long, rodlike and forked and can move in and out with the mouth shut, while the lizard has a more conventional tongue, broad flat and fleshy, only just nicked at the end, being protruded with the mouth open.
  
 And thirdly, if you're still not satisfied, a snake has no external ears, while in most lizards, the ear is represented externally by a hole in each side of the head. And thirdly, if you're still not satisfied, a snake has no external ears, while in most lizards, the ear is represented externally by a hole in each side of the head.
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 === Eucalypts. === === Eucalypts. ===
  
-Eucalypts get their name from two Greek words. "​Eu"​ meaning "​well"​ and "​kalyptos"​ meaning "​covered"​. These refer to the hard, tight fitting little caps which cover the flower until the expanding stamens force them off at maturity. There are over 500 different species of Eucalypts in Austrelia, 210 of which have been found in New South Wales.+Eucalypts get their name from two Greek words. "​Eu"​ meaning "​well"​ and "​kalyptos"​ meaning "​covered"​. These refer to the hard, tight fitting little caps which cover the flower until the expanding stamens force them off at maturity. There are over 500 different species of Eucalypts in Australia, 210 of which have been found in New South Wales.
  
 === Lyre-birds. === === Lyre-birds. ===
  
-The lyre-bird'​s large rounded nest is contructed ​outwardly of sticks and twigs and other forest debris; the inner portion of bark, dead leaves, rootlets and mosses mixed with soil. The egg cavity is warmly lined with soft lyre-bird feathers. The nest may be built close to the ground, even upon it in some instances, or at a height of from anything between 12 and 60 feet up in a tree. Sometimes the crown of a tree fern is chosen as a site, a rock ledge or a sloping bank. Again, the bulky structure may be wedged in the fork of a dead gum tree. This bird obviously needs a few tips from Frank Leyden on how to select a good camp site.+The lyre-bird'​s large rounded nest is constructed ​outwardly of sticks and twigs and other forest debris; the inner portion of bark, dead leaves, rootlets and mosses mixed with soil. The egg cavity is warmly lined with soft lyre-bird feathers. The nest may be built close to the ground, even upon it in some instances, or at a height of from anything between 12 and 60 feet up in a tree. Sometimes the crown of a tree fern is chosen as a site, a rock ledge or a sloping bank. Again, the bulky structure may be wedged in the fork of a dead gum tree. This bird obviously needs a few tips from Frank Leyden on how to select a good camp site.
  
 === Stars. === === Stars. ===
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 The expedition visited the Carstensz Mountains of Netherlands New Guinea in June and July 1961, with the object of climbing the major peaks of this range and carrying out scientific work. Because of an acute shortage of suitable aircraft in the country at the time the planned airdrops of food and equipment were not made, but the expedition, using native food and minimum equipment, covered a walking distance of approximately two hundred miles through little-known country, established a feasible route to and up the North wall of the range, climbed two minor peaks, carried out botanical, meteorological and topographic work, and made geological discoveries of theoretical and practical importance. The expedition visited the Carstensz Mountains of Netherlands New Guinea in June and July 1961, with the object of climbing the major peaks of this range and carrying out scientific work. Because of an acute shortage of suitable aircraft in the country at the time the planned airdrops of food and equipment were not made, but the expedition, using native food and minimum equipment, covered a walking distance of approximately two hundred miles through little-known country, established a feasible route to and up the North wall of the range, climbed two minor peaks, carried out botanical, meteorological and topographic work, and made geological discoveries of theoretical and practical importance.
  
-The Carstensz Mountains, which are the highest mountains of Australasia,​ lie at approximately Latitude 4.04' and Longitude 137.10'​ about fifty miles inland from the South Coast of West New Guinea; the peaks reach a height of nearly 17,000 feet. The range, which is a mass of limestone thrust above the level of the surrounding high plateau, is in the shape of a horse shoe, with the opening facing West, and is capped by a large icefield drained by several glaciers. Another small ice cap exists on Idenberg Top, some six miles to the West on the main dividing range. The highest peaks are Ngga Poloe, at the East end, 4 and the Carstensz ​Pyramind, on the South Side of the horse shoe; there is some doubt as to which of these is the higher. To the North East of the mountains is an extensive high plateau at ten to twelve thousand feet above sea level, the way on to this pleateau lies through swamp, jungle and moss forest. To the South and West the country is deeply incised with large river valleys; access has been gained to the mountains from the South coast by two of these valleys, the Tsinga and the Otomana. The Carstensz range and its surroundings are notable for the very high rate of precipitation at all times of the year, and for the regular unremitting nature of the rain and snow fall.+The Carstensz Mountains, which are the highest mountains of Australasia,​ lie at approximately Latitude 4.04' and Longitude 137.10'​ about fifty miles inland from the South Coast of West New Guinea; the peaks reach a height of nearly 17,000 feet. The range, which is a mass of limestone thrust above the level of the surrounding high plateau, is in the shape of a horse shoe, with the opening facing West, and is capped by a large icefield drained by several glaciers. Another small ice cap exists on Idenberg Top, some six miles to the West on the main dividing range. The highest peaks are Ngga Poloe, at the East end, 4 and the Carstensz ​Pyramid, on the South Side of the horse shoe; there is some doubt as to which of these is the higher. To the North East of the mountains is an extensive high plateau at ten to twelve thousand feet above sea level, the way on to this pleateau lies through swamp, jungle and moss forest. To the South and West the country is deeply incised with large river valleys; access has been gained to the mountains from the South coast by two of these valleys, the Tsinga and the Otomana. The Carstensz range and its surroundings are notable for the very high rate of precipitation at all times of the year, and for the regular unremitting nature of the rain and snow fall.
  
 The Carstensz Mountains were first seen from the coast by the Dutch navigator Jan Carstensz, in the seventeenth century, but the first expedition to reach the mountains was that of Wollaston, who in 1913 reached the foot of the icefalls feeding the Tsinga river, but because of the length and difficulty of the access route, was unable to climb further. In 1936, the Dutch expedition of Colijn, Wissel and Dozy, using an amphibian aircraft for aerial reconnaissance and to airdrop supplies, reached the centre of the "horse shoe" by way of the Otomana river, and in the space of three weeks climbed the ice peak Ngga Poloe, performed extensive geological and botanical investigations,​ and made several attempts on the Carstensz Pyramid, which is a rock peak of considerable difficulty. The Carstensz Mountains were first seen from the coast by the Dutch navigator Jan Carstensz, in the seventeenth century, but the first expedition to reach the mountains was that of Wollaston, who in 1913 reached the foot of the icefalls feeding the Tsinga river, but because of the length and difficulty of the access route, was unable to climb further. In 1936, the Dutch expedition of Colijn, Wissel and Dozy, using an amphibian aircraft for aerial reconnaissance and to airdrop supplies, reached the centre of the "horse shoe" by way of the Otomana river, and in the space of three weeks climbed the ice peak Ngga Poloe, performed extensive geological and botanical investigations,​ and made several attempts on the Carstensz Pyramid, which is a rock peak of considerable difficulty.
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 ---- ----
  
 +=== Overseas Travellers. ===
  
 +On 10th April, Edna Stretton sailed in the "​Oriana"​ for Southampton via Suez, and on the same date, Eric and Norma Rowen and family sailed in the "​Orsova"​ for England via America and Panama. Edna will visit Bev and Don Read and Sheila Binns during her stay in the United Kingdom. Eric will be paying his first visit to his native Liverpool for a number of years. Edna will spend a week touring with the Rowens, when a visit to Blackpool is promised!
 +
 +Prior to sailing, Edna was entertained at a bush "​send-off"​ at Euroka Clearing, a notable occasion when several of the senior members were able to motor right into the clearing on the new fire trail. An enjoyable week-end was had by all and the parting guest was presented with a reel of Kodachrome film so that she might record some of the highlights of the trip for subsequent viewing in the Clubroom.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=== Hatswell'​s Taxi & Tourist Service. ===
 +
 +For all your transport from Blackheath contact Hatswell'​s Taxi & Transport Service. Ring, write, wire or call any hour - day or night.
 +
 +'​Phone:​ Blackheath W459 of W151.
 +
 +Booking office: 4 doors from the Gardners Inn Hotel (look for the neon sign).
 +
 +Speedy 5 or 8 passenger cars available. Large or small parties catered for.
 +
 +Fares:
 +
 +  * Kanangra Walls: 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Perry'​s Lookdown: 4/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Jenolan State Forest: 20/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Carlon'​s Farm: 12/6 per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +
 +We will be pleased to quote trips or special parties on application.
 +
 +----
 +
 +
 +=== Plumbing Troubles??? ===
 +
 +__Do you need__ new roof, guttering and downpipes??
 +
 +__Or does__ the roof and guttering need re-painting??​
 +
 +__Or perhaps__ a new water service or hot-water installation??​
  
-OVERSEAS TRAVELLERS. 
-On 10th April, Edna Stretton sailed in the "​Oriane for 
- ​Southampton via Suez: and on the same date, Eric and Norma Rowen and family sailed in the "​Orsovan for England via America and Panama. Edna will visit Bev and Don Read and Sheila ,Binns during her stay in the United Kingdom. Eric will be paying his first visit to his native Liverpool for a number of years. Edna will spend a week touring with the Rowens, when a visit to Blackpool is promised! 
-Prior to sailing, Edna was entertained at a bush i'​send-Off'​ at Euroka Clearing, a notable occasion when several of the senior members were able to motor right into the clearing on the new fire trail. An enjoyable week-end was had by all and the parting guest Was presented with a reel of Kodachrome film so that she might record some of the highlights of the trip for subsequent viewing in the'​Clubroom. 
-May 1962 The Sydney. Bushwalker 17 
-FOR ALL YOUR TRANSPORT FROM BLACKHEATH CONTACT 
-1JATSWELL'​S TAXI AND TOURIST SERVICE 
-RING, WRITE, WIRE OR CALL  ANY HOUR - DAY OR NIGHT 
-'​PHONE:​ Blackheath W459 or W151 
-BOOKING OFFICE: 4 doors from Gardners Inn Hotel (LOOK FOR THE NEON SIGN) 
-SPEEDY 5 or 8 PASSENGER CARS AVAILABLE LARGE OR SMALL PARTIES CATERED FOR 
-FARES: KANANGRA WALLS 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers) 
-PERRY'​S LOOKDOWN 4/... 77 77 71 
-JENOLAN STATE FOREST 20/- " 77 71 
-o CARLON'​S FARM 
-WE WILL BE PLEASED TO IU.OTE TRIPS OR SPECIAL PARTIES ON APPLICATION 
-............ ​ 
-PLUM'​BING TRCLUBLES???​ DO YOU NEED - 
-NEW ROOF, GUTTERING and DOWNPIPES ?? 
-OR DOES  
-THE ROOF Amo GjTTERING NEED RE-PAINTING ?? 
-OR PERHAPS - 
-ANEW WATER SERVICE OR HOT-WATER INSTALLATION ?? 
 No job is too small - for any plumbing installations or alterations No job is too small - for any plumbing installations or alterations
-YOU NEED ROY'S FRIENDLY PLUMBING SERVICE + 
-CONTACT ROY CRAGGS ​in the S.B.W. Club-rooms or contact Joe CraggsCarpenIer ​and Painter, 41 Rosamond Street, Hornsby, Telephone JU2203 +__You need Roy's friendly plumbing service__. 
-REMEMBER YOU NEED ,ROYIS.FRIENDLY SERVICE ​!!! + 
-12/6 +Contact Roy Craggs ​in the S.B.W. Club-rooms or contact Joe CragsCarpenter ​and Painter, 41 Rosamond Street, Hornsby, Telephone JU2203. 
-77 11. + 
-18 The Sydney BushwalkerMay 1962 +__Remember__ - you need Roy's friendly service!!! 
-GLEN AFRIC + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Glen Afric===== 
 John Bookluck. John Bookluck.
-The grandeur of the highlands couldn'​t be better captured than in Glen Aftic, Some Scots may say Loch Maree, others Gairloch. To me Glen Afric will always remain a vivid picture of yesterday. 
-The beautiful always remains fixed in one's mind even though it is 
-difficult to describe, for the beautiful does n7)t exist. It is a feeling brought'​ about slowly by natural impulEes and it is not easily presented. Often it re-Uires much lab,-,ur. Walking is such a pastime that requires a great amount of effort, and it is during erinds of relaxation that our eye sees the most and then nature succumbs it with the scenery arund which can vary frot plcid to te glidgur of mountain paks amongst clouds. ,,. memory is imwessed. 
-It was ray bushwalking instinct that chose the way.. I left Inverness, a large town, pleasant though not yet over run by mechanisation,​ in a bus and travelled to the ropi junction. From there I w,?:​13.7.ed"​tn a hostel which would be a starting point before, setting off along the trac!s: to Glen :ifric. 
-A the hostel the usual pleasant faces-greeted Me but to my disapp-6intment - all had come from Glen Lfric and the weather was not promising. However pictures on the wall from the '​Scotsman convinced me of what lay ahead desnite the bleak weather, and little did I realise that a fault in my camera would make the return. The fault I discovered while taking a snap of a little loch that reflected its heather surrounds and the-blue sky in its placid waters. "​Strange",​ I though, such a lot of photos on one ro11:41 I'd had this trouble before. The time had come to investigage. It was as I suspected, film slipping on the cogs. I didn't swear, I didn't curse the camera. Instead I decided to retrace my steps, not from the west coast, but from Inverness. For my pains I was well rewarded - I saw Glen fric under two weather conditions. 
-Whilst walking to the hostel I came across a gorge. s I stnod gazing thru the delicate form of a silver beech that overhung it and overlooked the wild white stream flowing between Its steep side, a well rounded voice intarluded, "​Beautiful isn't it?" "Soon it will be filled with water. For years I've been coming here. Next year it will be full."'​ 
-I agreed it was a v_ry beautiful place and added that there were many others like it, despite the electrification of Scotland, and went on to say that if-I lived in England I'd have my holidays cut out for the next twenty years before venturing onto the Continent. 
-"​-It'​s at I've been telling the wife for tears  be replied excitedly. You must have a cup of tea and :perhz7Ts I can offer you 
-The road from the hotel-led tr, a gate. On the other side was a lodge and a small gravel-road. ilhead were the lochs to whoc edge clung the narrow road winding in graceful contours. Occasionally it ran tYtru the heathand heather surrounded by pines - the true pines ofScotland. Today -the elements were at peace and lazy White clouds drifted over the 351dcid waters which reflected the 
-blue in the heavens above. Stillness reigned; occasionally broken by the greetingof a smiling tourist who ventured along the track as far as the loch where it ended in a stream meandering in a grassy river flat surrounded by mountains. 
- May 1962 The Sydney Bushwalker 19. 
-Soon the stream stopped its meandering and the grassy hills which closed in on it gave way to the mountain slopes mantled in green. The 
-track sought higher ground, winding round the little burns which fed the 
-stream below. After a few hours walking, a distant, building appeared, 
-dwarfed by the mountains. Drawing closer I could discern two more buildings. One was rather dilapidated the mens bunk-house. i. crealr creepy old barn thru which the cold north wind blew, freezing its occupants who were huddled 
-in half a dozen blankets orsandwiched between mattresses, few tales of the supernatural would soon settle the cue-stion of sloe-a. 
-I drew nearer I could discern in luminous white letters against its - grey background - The Warden is a. lazy -- 
-"​Where'​s the warden?'"'​ I asked. "​He'​s fishing,' ​ came a casual reply. 
-Eventually he came in carrying a c-sup16 of tiddlers which he threw on the table like an experienced fisherman and turned to-.meei, me. He wore the largest plus fours I've seen; laite, enough for nti te-i get in one leg. They were -tucked in loud-checked socks. that were hold up by garters. His f:ce was bearded.. There was a' friendly-look in his eyeS and he sp,-1)ke with clear -firm tonee. ​ His mate a student of dentistry spoke with a rich well modulated voice, the t.:Inpe that the English envy. He was clean shaven with high cheek bones and nearly chiselled features that -wore an air of friendliness. His hair hung heavy to one side like an 7-ring1ishmen. 
-, 
-"How many nights ​ will we book you in for? *Ross asked. "​One,"​ I replied. "​You'​d :better, stay to-morrow, we need som hap, so that's two nights: =:fter that you may get the itch and stay on longer"​.'​ 
-The next, day I worked-leisurely all day; Outside it drizzled occasionally. Grey skies reigned. There was no inspiration to be out so -I-worked well aild  pleased the warden with my, construction of shelves which David: and Ross Wanted to decorate in the fashion of'​great artists. 
-Since you worked so well, to-morrow you'll be allowed to join the 5' gallon club. My eyes beamed as I thought over the club. Surely the warden, of all 
-people, wouldn'​t keep 5 gallons. ndye t it is feasible, for at this hostel'​ anything happens. I didn't go to bed that evening, we discussed so. much. However I got to bed about 4.30 a m. liter a couple of hours sleep I awoke. The 5 gallon club was try only thought. I quickly rose, looking forward to seeing D-1.tid. 
-. . 
-Da tiid always carried his fishing lines whenatir he left the hostel. Today he carried also an odd shaped rucksack frame on which sat a drum. "​What'​s that", I asked, " That's it", he replied. Th:tt   I repeated exascerated,​ that's only a five gallon kero drum. "​That'​s right, you'll be carrying it on the return j -urney FULL."'​ 
-long the track not far from the loch, and for some unknown reason, I felt sick. Perhaps it was the thought of 50 lbs on my shoulders. Physiological- my-bhological-pathological or not I must rest: Here th e grass was dry and a few rocks protruded above it, rir sloped g.J3ntly into the crystal stream running smoothly 
-over its pebble floor. It was on such a rock I reclined lazily to rest my eyes on the green hill yonder. 
-20 The Sydney Bushwalker May 1962 
-Only a few Seconda did. the hill reamin green. David that good Scot who couldn'​t stand. seeing -aeople idle-handed gavt me a fishing line - oh for the Irish. "You may as well make'​use of this line while you're here.'''​ I took the line and put on a piece of bait much to the disa=0V-al nf David and RoSs who claimed bait was the lazy way, the continental way. Not long after they had gone and I was relaxing and breathing deeply tht still air when felt a strong tug at the line. The rod almost dnubled. I cursed my luck' 
-the only trout in the river where kee:n fisherman stand all day hoping fOr such a cateTi. Wishing, to be rid of the source of ann-Tance, I wound in fast only for a cou,ele nf turns. The reel had jmmed.. So I stood up and hauled in the line like a lifesaver. Line was everywhere and the trout kept jumping arc,und. 
-The hook refused t^ come out. It seemed to be set in. This is terrible. I tried to kill it by methods I'd seen but it kept slipping-nut of my hands. I'm sure some one greased him up. He just wouldn'​t die. So we both lay down to our fete. 
-Hihat a mesa' ​ I looked up. It was David. 'But I forgive you', he 8aid picking up the fish, "​it'​ithe best I've seen - I'll stay behind and try py luck". "You wereaquick , I said. ' There mere-no provisions to be picked up , replied David. "​That'​s gbocin ​ "But we have the kero dnd I hope your feeling strong enough to carry the pack and make yourself a member , said Ross. 
-_Liter crossing the grassy river flat and dodging around and 'about the muddy parts I ascended to higher ground where it was drier except where a burn crossed it. _Here the track followed the contour of the land in a gentle grade and that encourages walking. Soon I Covered the mile. The girls who followed behind were 4 anxious to become members also. So ,I gave them the drum gladly. 
-long the track I had visions of trout fried in butter. Ross and David didn't get a bite. David didn't think it proper to cut up a delicous trout to make fish balls for five. Nor did we catch any fish the next day,after spending all day in the rain. I'm sure that fish was fated for David. The following day we left. The 
-fric itch had wern itself off. The girls and I went on to Ratogan Hostel and Ross returned to Inverness. 
-It filled me with sadness as I looked back along the track at the h6stel so  small in a mammoth world of treeless green soon to be swallowed up in it. 
-. long the track followed the girls wheeling their cycles. They were of dauntless character and were doing this trip with cycles against advice given in the hand book (when Scots warn - they mean it), and also to prove they were as good as the boys of their club, 
-The track had been easy, the worst to come.- It came near the saddle where the green hills lost their cloak are rocky clefts protruded ae formidable mountains. Until the saddle the cycles had been Aaeeled-considerably,​ and now had to be carried all the way. The track over was steep and down steeper and parts the mountain side practically fell into the stream -below. Sometimes I would writ, but they would accept no. help. For once' I was worried - the girls hdn't turned up. It was late. I spoke to t e warden, but he. didn't seem_ worried so I went onto the porch to watch a sunset that reflected its golden-light in the placid loch till it ended in a sharp edge silhouetted by mountains above which the etherial light poured its fantasy of colour. "Hullo there came clear voices familiar. It was the girls. 
-May 1962 The 3ydney,​Bushwalker 21. 
-SOCIAL CALENDAR FOR MAY 
-MAY 16 Hear RON KNIGHTLEY tell of some of his experiences overseas in a talk entitled c'​Around the World in 80 Weeks"​. 
-Miff 23 MR. F. McCAMLEY of the Conchology Section of the Royal Zoological Society will give a talk illustrated with slides on "​Shells and their Animals.T. 
-MAY 30 The Bush Music Club (previously known as the Bush Wackers)....,​. Wackol 
-ANNUAL PHOTOGRAPHIC COLOUR SLIDE COMPETITION 27th JUNE, 1962 
-SCENIC AND NON-SCENIC 
-6 slides only from each entrant and slides to be in the hands of the Society Secretary not later than 12g12,111e. for judging. Please mark your slides clearly for easy sorting after the showing. 
-N.S.W. FEDERATION OF BUSHWALKING CLUBS - MARCH MEETING 
-Items for Attention. the Bushwalker Annual, The next issue is planned for January 1963. A committee will be formed at the April Federation Meeting and anyone interested in any phase of magazine production will be welcomed. 
-The Bushwalkers Ball 1962 Paddington TOwn Hall, FRIDAY 14th September 1962, The Federation felt that 6 months? notice should enable most indefinite bustmalkers to decide whether he/she will attend or otherwise. 
-Blue Mountains Cit Council proposes a further re-enactment of the Crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1963, 150 years after the event Likely participants please keep in mind. 
-22 The Sydhey Bushwalker May 1962 
-Car Access to "​Bindook"​ Mr. Laing requests no cars in linter time. The road can be dangerouswhen wet at any time of the year. Mt. Werong is the last point on the Oberon Stock Route to which cars may be taken without risk of damage, 
-Items for Information. Portions 8 and 9 Parish of Balgo. Three years ago, Federation suggested that Portions rand 9 Parish of Bulgo, immediately South of the Garrawarra Primitive Area boundary, be added to the Park. It is now suggested that all Clubs write 
-to the Minister for Lands, Box 30 GPO Sydney, requesting that this be done in an effort to keep speculators out. 
-Proposal to Merge National Park and the Garrawarra Primitive Area, This matter was discussed. It was pointed butthat the purpose of each area was quite dissimilar. National Park is now easy of access and caters for many different kinde of public recreation, whereas the Primitive Area has been left mainly in its natural state, with limited use by the public generally, and is of considerable educational value for naturalists and nature lovers. 
-Fire Trail Ov-.2r Cloudmaker. The Forestry Officer for the area denies the proposal 
-Search and Rescue. New lists of volunteers have already been requested from each Club. When prepared, three copies of each list would be appreciated. 
-"Due to increased public interest; we are now able to put on a full feature each_week-end a (Nin, Melville). 
-March 4, Late Sunday night search for a member of this Club, who was missing after a day walk. He subsequently made a donation, in kind, to the searchers. Owing to the nature of the donation, the recipients have decided to conduct a competition and the proceeds will augment 8 & R funds, which are currently taking a bashing. (As one of our Members was concerned, a generous response will be appreciated). 
-March 10. D. Cussiter, 17 yr old student; missing from Leura for a week. Leura Police could not locate the victim, so askedfor a complete re-searcti of the area. 108 turned up on SaturdayIllorning. The _body was sighted from Elysian Rock by one party after a 90 minute search, and was also located shortly after by a party working from the bottom of the cliff line.. 
-March 19. The biggest job yet tackled when Richard Donaghy fell over a cliff on Kanangra Rivulet while helping others of the party. Dr. Bob Binks was, fortunately,​ in the area and was able to descend,​tothe patient and give whatever aid was possibl. 32 rock climbers and others turned out. Loose rock and scree slope rendered rescue difficult, Russell Kippax finally brought the patient up the worst part of the ascent strapped to his back. Federation will inquire whether any award for bravery can be awarded for the feat. Members of S & R Executive asked that their Appreciation be conveyed to Elsie Bruggy for her work in organising a second carrying party at short notice. 
  
 +The grandeur of the highlands couldn'​t be better captured than in Glen Afric. Some Scots may say Loch Maree, others Gairloch. To me Glen Afric will always remain a vivid picture of yesterday.
 +
 +The beautiful always remains fixed in one's mind even though it is difficult to describe, for the beautiful doesn'​t exist. It is a feeling brought about slowly by natural impulses and it is not easily presented. Often it requires much labour. Walking is such a pastime that requires a great amount of effort, and it is during periods of relaxation that our eye sees the most and then nature succumbs it with the scenery around which can vary from placid to the grandeur of mountain peaks amongst clouds. A memory is impressed.
 +
 +It was my bushwalking instinct that chose the way. I left Inverness, a large town, pleasant though not yet over run by mechanisation,​ in a bus and travelled to the road junction. From there I walked to a hostel which would be a starting point before setting off along the track to Glen Afric.
 +
 +At the hostel the usual pleasant faces greeted me but to my disappointment all had come from Glen Afric and the weather was not promising. However pictures on the wall from the Scotsman convinced me of what lay ahead despite the bleak weather, and little did I realise that a fault in my camera would make the return. The fault I discovered while taking a snap of a little loch that reflected its heather surrounds and the-blue sky in its placid waters. "​Strange",​ I thought, "such a lot of photos on one ro11." I'd had this trouble before. The time had come to investigate. It was as I suspected, film slipping on the cogs. I didn't swear, I didn't curse the camera. Instead I decided to retrace my steps, not from the west coast, but from Inverness. For my pains I was well rewarded - I saw Glen Afric under two weather conditions.
 +
 +Whilst walking to the hostel I came across a gorge. As I stood gazing thru the delicate form of a silver beech that overhung it and overlooked the wild white stream flowing between its steep side, a well rounded voice interluded, "​Beautiful isn't it?" "Soon it will be filled with water. For years I've been coming here. Next year it will be full."
 +
 +I agreed it was a very beautiful place and added that there were many others like it, despite the electrification of Scotland, and went on to say that if I lived in England I'd have my holidays cut out for the next twenty years before venturing onto the Continent.
 +
 +"​It'​s what I've been telling the wife for years" be replied excitedly. "You must have a cup of tea and perhaps I can offer you a lift."
 +
 +The road from the hotel led to a gate. On the other side was a lodge and a small gravel road. Ahead were the lochs to whose edge clung the narrow road winding in graceful contours. Occasionally it ran thru the heath and heather surrounded by pines - the true pines of Scotland. Today the elements were at peace and lazy white clouds drifted over the p1acid waters which reflected the blue in the heavens above. Stillness reigned, occasionally broken by the greeting of a smiling tourist who ventured along the track as far as the loch where it ended in a stream meandering in a grassy river flat surrounded by mountains.
 +
 +Soon the stream stopped its meandering and the grassy hills which closed in on it gave way to the mountain slopes mantled in green. The track sought higher ground, winding round the little burns which fed the stream below. After a few hours walking, a distant building appeared, dwarfed by the mountains. Drawing closer I could discern two more buildings. One was rather dilapidated - the mens bunk-house. A creaky creepy old barn thru which the cold north wind blew, freezing its occupants who were huddled in half a dozen blankets or sandwiched between mattresses. A few tales of the supernatural would soon settle the question of sleep.
 +
 +As I drew nearer I could discern in luminous white letters against its grey background - "The Warden is a lazy -- "
 +
 +"​Where'​s the warden?"​ I asked. "​He'​s fishing," ​ came a casual reply.
 +
 +Eventually he came in carrying a couple of tiddlers which he threw on the table like an experienced fisherman and turned to meet me. He wore the largest plus fours I've seen; large enough for me to get in one leg. They were tucked in loud checked socks that were held up by garters. His face was bearded. There was a friendly look in his eyes and he spoke with clear firm tones. His mate a student of dentistry spoke with a rich well modulated voice, the type that the English envy. He was clean shaven with high cheek bones and clearly chiselled features that wore an air of friendliness. His hair hung heavy to one side like an Englishmen.
 +
 +"How many nights will we book you in for?" Ross asked. "​One,"​ I replied. "​You'​d better stay to-morrow, we need some help, so that's two nights. After that you may get the itch and stay on longer"​.
 +
 +The next day I worked leisurely all day. Outside it drizzled occasionally. Grey skies reigned. There was no inspiration to be out so I worked well and pleased the warden with my construction of shelves which David and Ross wanted to decorate in the fashion of great artists.
 +
 +Since you worked so well, to-morrow you'll be allowed to join the 5 gallon club. My eyes beamed as I thought over the club. Surely the warden, of all people, wouldn'​t keep 5 gallons. And yet it is feasible, for at this hostel anything happens. I didn't go to bed that evening, we discussed so much. However I got to bed about 4.30 a.m. After a couple of hours sleep I awoke. The 5 gallon club was my only thought. I quickly rose, looking forward to seeing David.
 +
 +David always carried his fishing lines whenever he left the hostel. Today he carried also an odd shaped rucksack frame on which sat a drum. "​What'​s that", I asked. "​That'​s it", he replied. That.... I repeated exasperated,​ that's only a five gallon kero drum. "​That'​s right, you'll be carrying it on the return journey - FULL."
 +
 +Along the track not far from the loch, and for some unknown reason, I felt sick. Perhaps it was the thought of 50 lbs on my shoulders. Physiological-mythological-pathological or not I must rest. Here the grass was dry and a few rocks protruded above it, or sloped gently into the crystal stream running smoothly over its pebble floor. It was on such a rock I reclined lazily to rest my eyes on the green hill yonder.
 +
 +Only a few seconds did the hill remain green. David that good Scot who couldn'​t stand seeing people idle-handed gave me a fishing line - oh for the Irish. "You may as well make use of this line while you're here." I took the line and put on a piece of bait much to the disapproval of David and Ross who claimed bait was the lazy way, the continental way. Not long after they had gone and I was relaxing and breathing deeply the still air when I felt a strong tug at the line. The rod almost doubled. I cursed my luck, probably the only trout in the river where keen fisherman stand all day hoping for such a catch. Wishing to be rid of the source of annoyance, I wound in fast only for a couple of turns. The reel had jammed. So I stood up and hauled in the line like a lifesaver. Line was everywhere and the trout kept jumping around. The hook refused to come out. It seemed to be set in. This is terrible. I tried to kill it by methods I'd seen but it kept slipping out of my hands. I'm sure some one greased him up. He just wouldn'​t die. So we both lay down to our fate.
 +
 +"What a mess". I looked up. It was David. "But I forgive you", he said picking up the fish, "​it'​s the best I've seen - I'll stay behind and try my luck". "You were quick",​ I said. "There were no provisions to be picked up", replied David. "​That'​s god". "But we have the kero and I hope your feeling strong enough to carry the pack and make yourself a member",​ said Ross.
 +
 +After crossing the grassy river flat and dodging around and about the muddy parts I ascended to higher ground where it was drier except where a burn crossed it. Here the track followed the contour of the land in a gentle grade and that encourages walking. Soon I covered the mile. The girls who followed behind were anxious to become members also. So I gave them the drum gladly.
 +
 +Along the track I had visions of trout fried in butter. Ross and David didn't get a bite. David didn't think it proper to cut up a delicious trout to make fish balls for five. Nor did we catch any fish the next day, after spending all day in the rain. I'm sure that fish was fated for David. The following day we left. The Afric itch had worn itself off. The girls and I went on to Ratogan Hostel and Ross returned to Inverness.
 +
 +It filled me with sadness as I looked back along the track at the hostel so small in a mammoth world of treeless green soon to be swallowed up in it.
 +
 +Along the track followed the girls wheeling their cycles. They were of dauntless character and were doing this trip with cycles against advice given in the hand book (when Scots warn - they mean it), and also to prove they were as good as the boys of their club.
 +
 +The track had been easy, the worst to come. It came near the saddle where the green hills lost their cloak are rocky clefts protruded as formidable mountains. Until the saddle the cycles had been wheeled considerably,​ and now had to be carried all the way. The track over was steep and down steeper and parts the mountain side practically fell into the stream below. Sometimes I would wait, but they would accept no help. For once I was worried - the girls hadn't turned up. It was late. I spoke to the warden, but he didn't seem worried so I went onto the porch to watch a sunset that reflected its golden light in the placid loch till it ended in a sharp edge silhouetted by mountains above which the etherial light poured its fantasy of colour. "Hullo there",​ came clear voices familiar. It was the girls.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== Social Calendar For May. =====
 +
 +=== May 16 ===
 +
 +Hear Ron Knightley tell of some of his experiences overseas in a talk entitled "​Around the World in 80 Weeks"​.
 +
 +=== May 23 ===
 +
 +Mr. F. McCamley of the Conchology Section of the Royal Zoological Society will give a talk illustrated with slides on "​Shells and their Animals"​.
 +
 +== May 30 ===
 +
 +The Bush Music Club (previously known as the Bush Wackers)..... Wacko!
 +
 +----
 +
 +=== Annual Photographic Colour Slide Competition. ===
 +
 +27th June, 1962.
 +
 +Scenic and non-scenic.
 +
 +6 slides only from each entrant and slides to be in the hands of the Society Secretary not later than __13 June__ for judging. Please mark your slides clearly for easy sorting after the showing.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== N.S.W. Federation Of Bushwalking Clubs - March Meeting. =====
 +
 +=== Items for Attention. ===
 +
 +The Bushwalker Annual. The next issue is planned for January 1963. A committee will be formed at the April Federation Meeting and anyone interested in any phase of magazine production will be welcomed.
 +
 +=== The Bushwalkers Ball 1962. ===
 +
 +Paddington TOwn Hall, Friday 14th September 1962. The Federation felt that 6 months'​ notice should enable most indefinite bushwalkers to decide whether he/she will attend or otherwise.
 +
 +=== Blue Mountains City Council. ===
 +
 +Proposes a further re-enactment of the Crossing of the Blue Mountains in 1963, 150 years after the event. Likely participants please keep in mind.
 +
 +=== Car Access to "​Bindook"​. ===
 +
 +Mr. Laing requests no cars in Winter time. The road can be dangerous when wet at any time of the year. Mt. Werong is the last point on the Oberon Stock Route to which cars may be taken without risk of damage.
 +
 +=== Items for Information. ===
 +
 +Portions 8 and 9 Parish of Balgo. Three years ago, Federation suggested that Portions 8 and 9 Parish of Bulgo, immediately South of the Garrawarra Primitive Area boundary, be added to the Park. It is now suggested that all Clubs write to the Minister for Lands, Box 30 GPO Sydney, requesting that this be done in an effort to keep speculators out.
 +
 +=== Proposal to Merge National Park and the Garrawarra Primitive Area. ===
 +
 +This matter was discussed. It was pointed out that the purpose of each area was quite dissimilar. National Park is now easy of access and caters for many different kinds of public recreation, whereas the Primitive Area has been left mainly in its natural state, with limited use by the public generally, and is of considerable educational value for naturalists and nature lovers.
 +
 +=== Fire Trail Over Cloudmaker. ===
 +
 +The Forestry Officer for the area denies the proposal.
 +
 +=== Search and Rescue. ===
 +
 +New lists of volunteers have already been requested from each Club. When prepared, three copies of each list would be appreciated.
 +
 +"Due to increased public interest, we are now able to put on a full feature each week-end."​ (Nin. Melville).
 +
 +March 4. Late Sunday night search for a member of this Club, who was missing after a day walk. He subsequently made a donation, in kind, to the searchers. Owing to the nature of the donation, the recipients have decided to conduct a competition and the proceeds will augment S & R funds, which are currently taking a bashing. (As one of our Members was concerned, a generous response will be appreciated).
 +
 +March 10. D. Cussiter, 17 yr. old student, missing from Leura for a week. Leura Police could not locate the victim, so asked for a complete re-search of the area. 108 turned up on Saturday morning. The body was sighted from Elysian Rock by one party after a 90 minute search, and was also located shortly after by a party working from the bottom of the cliff line.
 +
 +March 19. The biggest job yet tackled when Richard Donaghy fell over a cliff on Kanangra Rivulet while helping others of the party. Dr. Bob Binks was, fortunately,​ in the area and was able to descend to the patient and give whatever aid was possible. 32 rock climbers and others turned out. Loose rock and scree slope rendered rescue difficult. Russell Kippax finally brought the patient up the worst part of the ascent strapped to his back. Federation will inquire whether any award for bravery can be awarded for the feat. Members of S & R Executive asked that their appreciation be conveyed to Elsie Bruggy for her work in organising a second carrying party at short notice.
 +
 +----
196205.txt · Last modified: 2019/06/14 03:39 by tyreless