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196203 [2019/06/04 03:01]
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196203 [2019/06/06 07:10]
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 ===== Social Notes. ===== ===== Social Notes. =====
  
-On February 21st Mr. Fred Hersey, a Field Officer of the Fauna Proteotion ​Panel, spoke on the work of the Department and the way in which Bushwalkers could help to preserve our bushlands and Fauna. He also showed Walt Disney'​s film "​Nature'​s Half Acre".+On February 21st Mr. Fred Hersey, a Field Officer of the Fauna Protection ​Panel, spoke on the work of the Department and the way in which Bushwalkers could help to preserve our bushlands and Fauna. He also showed Walt Disney'​s film "​Nature'​s Half Acre".
  
 On February 28th Putt was to have talked on the recent NZAC exploration in West New Guinea. Colin'​s talk was deferred and Laurie Raynor, who would not be available later in the year, gave an illustrated talk on his recent attempt on Mt. Wilhelmina in West New Guinea. This was a fascinating journey with photography to match, clearly showing the approach to the Mountain passes, and with informed comments on the geology of the area and on the native population. On February 28th Putt was to have talked on the recent NZAC exploration in West New Guinea. Colin'​s talk was deferred and Laurie Raynor, who would not be available later in the year, gave an illustrated talk on his recent attempt on Mt. Wilhelmina in West New Guinea. This was a fascinating journey with photography to match, clearly showing the approach to the Mountain passes, and with informed comments on the geology of the area and on the native population.
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   - Eric Adcodk   - Eric Adcodk
-  - Paddy:Bourke+  - Paddy Bourke
   - Roy Craggs   - Roy Craggs
  
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 __Men__. __Men__.
    
-  - Mal Rodgers+  - Will Rodgers
   - Eric Adcock   - Eric Adcock
   - Bob Godfrey   - Bob Godfrey
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   - Bill Rowlands & Eileen Taylor   - Bill Rowlands & Eileen Taylor
-  - Eric Adcbck ​& Lola Wedlock+  - Eric Adcock ​& Lola Wedlock
   - Bob Godfrey & Phyllis Radcliffe   - Bob Godfrey & Phyllis Radcliffe
  
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   - Bill Rodgers & Jean Wilson (Tie).   - Bill Rodgers & Jean Wilson (Tie).
  
-The Carnival Organiser has issued a warning to the very successful married ladies to watch out for fireworks from an up-and-coming ​younster ​next year!! We won't mention the names of those illustrious members who drove their CARS to about 200 yards from the swimming hole!!+The Carnival Organiser has issued a warning to the very successful married ladies to watch out for fireworks from an up-and-coming ​youngster ​next year!! We won't mention the names of those illustrious members who drove their CARS to about 200 yards from the swimming hole!!
  
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-Robert H. Jones (better known to us as "​Strawberry"​) passed through Sydney on Thursday March 1st on his way to climb Balls Pyramid near Lord Howe Island. Strawb and other membersof ​ASPRO, (Australian South Pacific Rockclimbing Organisation?​) who as far as we know are MUWC's and VRC's, were met by a party of S.B.W'​s. John Logan and Alex Theakston provided transport for the great load of equipment, including large amounts of radio gear.+Robert H. Jones (better known to us as "​Strawberry"​) passed through Sydney on Thursday March 1st on his way to climb Balls Pyramid near Lord Howe Island. Strawb and other members of ASPRO, (Australian South Pacific Rockclimbing Organisation?​) who as far as we know are MUWC's and VRC's, were met by a party of S.B.W'​s. John Logan and Alex Theakston provided transport for the great load of equipment, including large amounts of radio gear.
  
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 Maybe the Bushies know all about the Bush, but of our beautiful Harbour, what do they know? So here is a Quiz - Maybe the Bushies know all about the Bush, but of our beautiful Harbour, what do they know? So here is a Quiz -
  
-  - What spot is most perfmeous?+  - What spot is most perfumeous?
   - What spot is most foul?   - What spot is most foul?
   - What spot is most feminine?   - What spot is most feminine?
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 Or winter, during annual holidays, I planned to walk from Picton into Burragorang Wiley via backroads. In those days I prided myself that I knew the timetable of every country passenger train operating within a radius of 100 miles of Sydney. With the confidence that some people swallow a well known variety of headache powder I joined a suburban train that would bring me to Central Station by 9.40 a.m., with 15 minutes to get the Goulburn train. Or winter, during annual holidays, I planned to walk from Picton into Burragorang Wiley via backroads. In those days I prided myself that I knew the timetable of every country passenger train operating within a radius of 100 miles of Sydney. With the confidence that some people swallow a well known variety of headache powder I joined a suburban train that would bring me to Central Station by 9.40 a.m., with 15 minutes to get the Goulburn train.
  
-Somemhere ​near St. Peters I remembered this wasn't Saturday: that the Goulburn train left Sydney at 9.40 on weekdays.+Somewhere ​near St. Peters I remembered this wasn't Saturday: that the Goulburn train left Sydney at 9.40 on weekdays.
  
-Swiftly, as a gamble, I put Plan B into effect. I alighted at Redfern and flung up to the indicator boards to find there was a fast electric train calling at Burwood and Strathffeld ​due in one minute, at 9.41. Catching that was simple, but then came a nerve-wracking ten minutes or so: mentally I drove the suburban train. Visually I watched the parallel main line and watched hopefully (but in vain) for a twin red signal. We were still pulling out of Burmood ​when the steam train ranged up beside us and we ran side by side to Strathfield.+Swiftly, as a gamble, I put Plan B into effect. I alighted at Redfern and flung up to the indicator boards to find there was a fast electric train calling at Burwood and Strathfield ​due in one minute, at 9.41. Catching that was simple, but then came a nerve-wracking ten minutes or so: mentally I drove the suburban train. Visually I watched the parallel main line and watched hopefully (but in vain) for a twin red signal. We were still pulling out of Burwood ​when the steam train ranged up beside us and we ran side by side to Strathfield.
  
 Oh, it was a frantic scuttle down into the subway, along and up onto platform 3 as the station hand was waving his green flag and intoning "stand clear please!"​ I made it, yes, but it was far too fine for comfort. Oh, it was a frantic scuttle down into the subway, along and up onto platform 3 as the station hand was waving his green flag and intoning "stand clear please!"​ I made it, yes, but it was far too fine for comfort.
  
-Much about the same period I was caught fairly on two occasions in the Otford - Stanwell Park area at the end of day walks. They were Saturday day hikes (I used that word almost in its worst connotation),​ planned to return on the 5.7 train from Otford (5.2 from Stanwell Park), with tho next train some 3½ hours later.+Much about the same period I was caught fairly on two occasions in the Otford - Stanwell Park area at the end of day walks. They were Saturday day hikes (I used that word almost in its worst connotation),​ planned to return on the 5.7 train from Otford (5.2 from Stanwell Park), with the next train some 3½ hours later.
  
 The first trip brought us down from the hills behind Coal Cliff and we wandered casually back to Stanwell along the railway line. Now, between Coal Cliff and Stanwell Park there are two short tunnels and between them a lofty brick viaduct almost 200 feet high, spanning a creek. In the lazy yellow afternoon light the bridge was most photogenic and one of my freelance walking (rather hiking) cronies couldn'​t resist a photograph. The gorge of Stanwell Creek is steep and thickly grown and it took some time to get a good angle. (A murrain on photographers,​ I say.) The first trip brought us down from the hills behind Coal Cliff and we wandered casually back to Stanwell along the railway line. Now, between Coal Cliff and Stanwell Park there are two short tunnels and between them a lofty brick viaduct almost 200 feet high, spanning a creek. In the lazy yellow afternoon light the bridge was most photogenic and one of my freelance walking (rather hiking) cronies couldn'​t resist a photograph. The gorge of Stanwell Creek is steep and thickly grown and it took some time to get a good angle. (A murrain on photographers,​ I say.)
  
-As we left the bridge I thought I heard a faint whistle and by the time we were through the second tunnel the 5.2 was chugging stolidly along the southern slopes of the bay. We ran in the gutters beside the line, not even looking up as the train passed in a leisurely but quite ruthless manner. We even reached the southern ramp of the platform when the etigine ​exhaust announced its theme in slow tempo, and the brake van crawled away from us.+As we left the bridge I thought I heard a faint whistle and by the time we were through the second tunnel the 5.2 was chugging stolidly along the southern slopes of the bay. We ran in the gutters beside the line, not even looking up as the train passed in a leisurely but quite ruthless manner. We even reached the southern ramp of the platform when the engine ​exhaust announced its theme in slow tempo, and the brake van crawled away from us.
  
 The other time was not a real scramble. We were caught thoroughly - were our watches haywire that day? During the late afternoon we came back from Stanwell Park to Otford via the old abandoned railway tunnel under Bald Hill. It was about a mile long and with a decent torch you could traverse it in 20-25 minutes. Not now - it was blown up in 1942 as an anti-invasion precaution. The other time was not a real scramble. We were caught thoroughly - were our watches haywire that day? During the late afternoon we came back from Stanwell Park to Otford via the old abandoned railway tunnel under Bald Hill. It was about a mile long and with a decent torch you could traverse it in 20-25 minutes. Not now - it was blown up in 1942 as an anti-invasion precaution.
  
-We emerged (our time) at 4.45, and with 22 minutes to train time and only a quarter mile to go, perched in the sublight ​on a stack of old sleepers for a bite of chocolate and biscuit. At 4.57 I heard an unscheduled train coming up - but when it came under the overhead bridge I realised too late it was the 5.7. We finished our snack and decided to fill in the pleasant November evening by walking on along the railway.+We emerged (our time) at 4.45, and with 22 minutes to train time and only a quarter mile to go, perched in the sunlight ​on a stack of old sleepers for a bite of chocolate and biscuit. At 4.57 I heard an unscheduled train coming up - but when it came under the overhead bridge I realised too late it was the 5.7. We finished our snack and decided to fill in the pleasant November evening by walking on along the railway.
  
 Somewhere between Lilyvale and Helensburgh we got so intrigued in some new-fangled track lubricating devices we almost "did in" the 8.30 p.m. I've still a recollection of running along the last cutting to Helensburgh,​ hotly pursued by the headlamp and churning exhaust of the late train. Somewhere between Lilyvale and Helensburgh we got so intrigued in some new-fangled track lubricating devices we almost "did in" the 8.30 p.m. I've still a recollection of running along the last cutting to Helensburgh,​ hotly pursued by the headlamp and churning exhaust of the late train.
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 In January I was down Little River from Couridjah and found the landscape more or less awash after the summer rains. Crossing streams was a long and tedious affair of trial and withdrawal, so that at 3.40 p.m. on Sunday I had just over 3 hours to make the only train back from Couridjah. Coming out the previous day that stage had taken exactly 3 hours - when I was about 25 miles fresher. In January I was down Little River from Couridjah and found the landscape more or less awash after the summer rains. Crossing streams was a long and tedious affair of trial and withdrawal, so that at 3.40 p.m. on Sunday I had just over 3 hours to make the only train back from Couridjah. Coming out the previous day that stage had taken exactly 3 hours - when I was about 25 miles fresher.
  
-It was a case for "​scientific" ​ walking. I ran down every little favourable grade - not many of them. If a rising grade was short I took it at the gallop: if it was a trudge I spared the tired legs and plodded up it. In one place where the whole track was a watercourse for a couple of hundred yards I took to the scrub: it was slower than wading, but I didn't have to stop and "​de-sand"​ my showes ​as I had going out. Limped onto Couridjah station at 6.50, with a margin of 7 minutes. It's not enough for comfort when there'​s no alternative transport.+It was a case for "​scientific" ​ walking. I ran down every little favourable grade - not many of them. If a rising grade was short I took it at the gallop: if it was a trudge I spared the tired legs and plodded up it. In one place where the whole track was a watercourse for a couple of hundred yards I took to the scrub: it was slower than wading, but I didn't have to stop and "​de-sand"​ my shoes as I had going out. Limped onto Couridjah station at 6.50, with a margin of 7 minutes. It's not enough for comfort when there'​s no alternative transport.
  
 As if this were not sufficient warning to wantons we were well and truly caught in another scramble the following (Australia Day) Weekend, at the close of a moist three days down at Burning Palms with the Gentle party. Having the vehicle "on the ice" we went as a family group by rail and, to complete the trip, planned to walk out to Lilyvale for the homeward run. There was a train at 2.40, and a surprisingly long gap then till about five o'​clock. We've found that it's a good plot when you have a smallish one in the family to be reasonably early home on a holiday weekend, so there were good and valid reasons for catching the 2.40 p.m. We reckoned that meant away from the Palms about 12.45: say lunch early at 11.30 - and 30 on: however, on that steamy morning the blandishments of the beach were too alluring to the lesser Brown and it was past 12.0 noon when we took lunch. As if this were not sufficient warning to wantons we were well and truly caught in another scramble the following (Australia Day) Weekend, at the close of a moist three days down at Burning Palms with the Gentle party. Having the vehicle "on the ice" we went as a family group by rail and, to complete the trip, planned to walk out to Lilyvale for the homeward run. There was a train at 2.40, and a surprisingly long gap then till about five o'​clock. We've found that it's a good plot when you have a smallish one in the family to be reasonably early home on a holiday weekend, so there were good and valid reasons for catching the 2.40 p.m. We reckoned that meant away from the Palms about 12.45: say lunch early at 11.30 - and 30 on: however, on that steamy morning the blandishments of the beach were too alluring to the lesser Brown and it was past 12.0 noon when we took lunch.
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 Then it was 1.10 when we set out up the Squeeze Hole track - add say 30 minutes for the hill and a spell at the lookout thrown in as well... We were going along the top track towards Lilyvale at 1.50, and I had privately resolved that we had perhaps a 50-50 chance of the train. Seven-year-olds aren't quite in the marathon class. Then it was 1.10 when we set out up the Squeeze Hole track - add say 30 minutes for the hill and a spell at the lookout thrown in as well... We were going along the top track towards Lilyvale at 1.50, and I had privately resolved that we had perhaps a 50-50 chance of the train. Seven-year-olds aren't quite in the marathon class.
  
-The track was, nicely muddied and ploughed up and about halfway to Lilyvale the thunderclouds rolled over and a smart shower began, adding to the greasiness of the already sloppy path. At the top of the hill above Lilyvale, at 2.25, we took recourse to desperate ​paasures. Kath took over the extra pack, I grabbed a small hand and we began to run.+The track was, nicely muddied and ploughed up and about halfway to Lilyvale the thunderclouds rolled over and a smart shower began, adding to the greasiness of the already sloppy path. At the top of the hill above Lilyvale, at 2.25, we took recourse to desperate ​measures. Kath took over the extra pack, I grabbed a small hand and we began to run.
  
 Part way down the slope I decided the worn soles of my sneakers were getting practically no grip at all on the slimy track, and Chris would really be better off without my hand. Then we were down, crossing the slightly swollen Hacking River and slipping and sliding up the smooth clay bank. A last sprint up to the station with my watch showing 2.43 (a mercy it was about 5 minutes fast), and the train rolling in as I slipped out of a cape-groundsheet which was almost as wet inside with sweat as it was outside with rain. Part way down the slope I decided the worn soles of my sneakers were getting practically no grip at all on the slimy track, and Chris would really be better off without my hand. Then we were down, crossing the slightly swollen Hacking River and slipping and sliding up the smooth clay bank. A last sprint up to the station with my watch showing 2.43 (a mercy it was about 5 minutes fast), and the train rolling in as I slipped out of a cape-groundsheet which was almost as wet inside with sweat as it was outside with rain.
  
-Now, it may be sinful pride, but by comparison with some other walkers I could name, I've always felt I was a cautious and provident sort of person: not the kihd that is prone to dash up at the last whistle blowing, flag-wagging moment of a train departure. Yet there are quite a few case histories. It all goes for to  show that it's almost impossible to be a walker without (sometimes) scrambling for a train.+Now, it may be sinful pride, but by comparison with some other walkers I could name, I've always felt I was a cautious and provident sort of person: not the kind that is prone to dash up at the last whistle blowing, flag-wagging moment of a train departure. Yet there are quite a few case histories. It all goes for to  show that it's almost impossible to be a walker without (sometimes) scrambling for a train.
  
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 === April 1st === === April 1st ===
  
-Pymble - bus to St. Ives (Douglas Street) - Bungaroo - Middle Harbour Creek - Lindfield. 8 miles. Good swimming pools in the fresh water section of Middle ​Harbor ​Creek. Traverses Lady Davidson and Lindfiad ​Parks, mainly unspoilt bushland within 12 miles of the City.+Pymble - bus to St. Ives (Douglas Street) - Bungaroo - Middle Harbour Creek - Lindfield. 8 miles. Good swimming pools in the fresh water section of Middle ​Harbour ​Creek. Traverses Lady Davidson and Lindfield ​Parks, mainly unspoilt bushland within 12 miles of the City.
  
 9.10 a.m. Electric train Central - Pymble via Bridge. 9.46 a.m. bus Pymble - St. Ives. Tickets: Pymble Return via Bridge at 4/3, plus 1/1d. bus fare. 9.10 a.m. Electric train Central - Pymble via Bridge. 9.46 a.m. bus Pymble - St. Ives. Tickets: Pymble Return via Bridge at 4/3, plus 1/1d. bus fare.
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 ===== Greyhound "​Safari"​ Tours For 1962. ===== ===== Greyhound "​Safari"​ Tours For 1962. =====
  
-Especially planned to holiday ​requiremnts ​of bushwalkers & camping club members.+Especially planned to holiday ​requirements ​of bushwalkers & camping club members.
  
 === Central Australia, Alice Springs, Ayers Rock Tour (Duration 3 weeks). === === Central Australia, Alice Springs, Ayers Rock Tour (Duration 3 weeks). ===
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 __Tour "​K"​__ Departs Sydney Saturday 15th September. Travelling via Newcastle, Kempsey, Gold Coast, Brisbane, Rockhampton,​ Mackay, Townsville (1 day), (Magnetic Is.), Paronella Park, Atherton Tablelands Area (3 days), Lake Eacham, Lake Barrine, Mareeba, Cooktown (1 day), Daintree, Cairns, (Green Is.), Charters Towers, Clermont, Toowoomba, Tenterfield and Tamworth. Fare £54. 0. 0. __Tour "​K"​__ Departs Sydney Saturday 15th September. Travelling via Newcastle, Kempsey, Gold Coast, Brisbane, Rockhampton,​ Mackay, Townsville (1 day), (Magnetic Is.), Paronella Park, Atherton Tablelands Area (3 days), Lake Eacham, Lake Barrine, Mareeba, Cooktown (1 day), Daintree, Cairns, (Green Is.), Charters Towers, Clermont, Toowoomba, Tenterfield and Tamworth. Fare £54. 0. 0.
  
-=== Westerna ​Australia Caves and Wild Flowers Tour (Duration 4 weeks). ===+=== Western ​Australia Caves and Wild Flowers Tour (Duration 4 weeks). ===
  
 __Tour "​E"​__ Departs Sydney Saturday 15th September. Travelling via Albury, Bendigo, Bordertawn, "​Barossa Valley",​ Pt. Augusta, Ceduna, Nullabor Plains, Norseman, Esperance, "​Stirling Range National Park", "​Porongorups National Park", Albany (1 day), Frenchman'​s Bay, Denmark, "​Valley of Giants",​ Pemberton, "​Kingdom of the Karri",​ Cape Leeuwin, Augusta and Margaret River Caves Area (2 days), Perth (3 days), Kalgoorlie, Nullabor Plains, Renmark, Mildura and Katoomba. Fare £69.10. 0. __Tour "​E"​__ Departs Sydney Saturday 15th September. Travelling via Albury, Bendigo, Bordertawn, "​Barossa Valley",​ Pt. Augusta, Ceduna, Nullabor Plains, Norseman, Esperance, "​Stirling Range National Park", "​Porongorups National Park", Albany (1 day), Frenchman'​s Bay, Denmark, "​Valley of Giants",​ Pemberton, "​Kingdom of the Karri",​ Cape Leeuwin, Augusta and Margaret River Caves Area (2 days), Perth (3 days), Kalgoorlie, Nullabor Plains, Renmark, Mildura and Katoomba. Fare £69.10. 0.
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 Tour "​O"​ gold Coast, Lamington and Carnarvon Ranges National Parks. Duration 3 weeks. Departs Sydney 2nd June, 1962. Fare £39.10. 0. Tour "​O"​ gold Coast, Lamington and Carnarvon Ranges National Parks. Duration 3 weeks. Departs Sydney 2nd June, 1962. Fare £39.10. 0.
  
-=== Bookings and Inforamtion: ===+=== Bookings and Information: ===
  
  
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 Dear Sir, Dear Sir,
  
-Recent ​ccrrespondents ​writing about the construction of a short length of road and the erection of a memorial shelter shed and water tank in Bouddi Natural Park appear to have indulged in rather exaggerated language - for example "If the people have to step out of their core or come out from under a roof, they are being excluded"​.+Recent ​correspondents ​writing about the construction of a short length of road and the erection of a memorial shelter shed and water tank in Bouddi Natural Park appear to have indulged in rather exaggerated language - for example "If the people have to step out of their core or come out from under a roof, they are being excluded"​.
  
 In spite of lip service to the idea that parks ere for the general public the writers give me the impression that they firmly believe in walkers only. No car must cross a park boundary either because it shouldn'​t be there at all or because of the litter, fires and damage left by the occupants. In spite of lip service to the idea that parks ere for the general public the writers give me the impression that they firmly believe in walkers only. No car must cross a park boundary either because it shouldn'​t be there at all or because of the litter, fires and damage left by the occupants.
  
-One writer "​believes that it has always been the opinion of most bushwalkers.... that some areas should be left in a primitive.... state"​. Probably this is true, but if this means the whole of some parks, I suggest that it is unsound, as it does not provide for access except ​fcr those arriving on foot. I feel that a better general principle would be that the bulk of all parks should be retained in a primitive state.+One writer "​believes that it has always been the opinion of most bushwalkers.... that some areas should be left in a primitive.... state"​. Probably this is true, but if this means the whole of some parks, I suggest that it is unsound, as it does not provide for access except ​for those arriving on foot. I feel that a better general principle would be that the bulk of all parks should be retained in a primitive state.
  
 Bouddi is an excellent example of the difficulty of having parks with no access. Anyone arriving by car had to park on the road, and if he wished to camp close to his car (perhaps a strange, but not altogether unreasonable wish) there was only one small area close beside the road where he could do so. If he had a caravan he must camp on the road. Bouddi is an excellent example of the difficulty of having parks with no access. Anyone arriving by car had to park on the road, and if he wished to camp close to his car (perhaps a strange, but not altogether unreasonable wish) there was only one small area close beside the road where he could do so. If he had a caravan he must camp on the road.
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 Our plans for bigger and better parks will be listened to only if the people generally want them and I believe the only way they will come to want them is by being allowed to use them. Improvement in peoples'​ habits must come through Education and Rangers, and the Education and Rangers won't be supplied unless people want them. Our plans for bigger and better parks will be listened to only if the people generally want them and I believe the only way they will come to want them is by being allowed to use them. Improvement in peoples'​ habits must come through Education and Rangers, and the Education and Rangers won't be supplied unless people want them.
  
-There is great danger that roads will "tear through the bush and "gash the hillsides"​. But with increasing population and development,​ burying our heads in the sand at Maitland Bay and crying "no motorists at Mt. Bouddi",​ (where bushwalkers never camped pre fire-trail and road,) has no hope of preventing it. This can be done only by pursuading ​the Administration that each park should be properly and carefully planned and by having sufficient public support.+There is great danger that roads will "tear through the bush and "gash the hillsides"​. But with increasing population and development,​ burying our heads in the sand at Maitland Bay and crying "no motorists at Mt. Bouddi",​ (where bushwalkers never camped pre fire-trail and road,) has no hope of preventing it. This can be done only by persuading ​the Administration that each park should be properly and carefully planned and by having sufficient public support.
  
 Yours faithfully, Yours faithfully,
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 Newcastle. Newcastle.
  
-Thanks to those responsible for the "​Mag."​ service (you may treat the abbreviation as Magazine or Magnificent!) As one who has little chance of keeping in touch except by the Magazine I appreciate very much the job it is doing. May I sqy that I think the occasional reprinting from old issues is an excellent one. I think I have, stowed away in various places, every issue since its commencemat. If you can put your hands on Myles Dunphy'​s "To Kanangra by Perambulator"​ (or similar title) I think it would make good re-reading...+Thanks to those responsible for the "​Mag."​ service (you may treat the abbreviation as Magazine or Magnificent!) As one who has little chance of keeping in touch except by the Magazine I appreciate very much the job it is doing. May I say that I think the occasional reprinting from old issues is an excellent one. I think I have, stowed away in various places, every issue since its commencement. If you can put your hands on Myles Dunphy'​s "To Kanangra by Perambulator"​ (or similar title) I think it would make good re-reading...
  
 Regards, Regards,
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 For this motion to have been carried would not only have been a slur against the ability of the present Editor but a reflection against the members themselves in not supporting the journal by sending in sufficient contributions. For this motion to have been carried would not only have been a slur against the ability of the present Editor but a reflection against the members themselves in not supporting the journal by sending in sufficient contributions.
  
-The magazine is as strong as hre members may choose to make it; but where there is forgetfulness by the members to write, they themselves are to blame, not the Editor if the journal tends to become weaker through the lack of material.+The magazine is as strong as the members may choose to make it; but where there is forgetfulness by the members to write, they themselves are to blame, not the Editor if the journal tends to become weaker through the lack of material.
  
-The magazine ​undubtedly ​in the present and past has proven to be an asset to the club all round.+The magazine ​undoubtedly ​in the present and past has proven to be an asset to the club all round.
  
 The journal is the mouthpiece of all club activities and is open to any member, who is desirous to write of his experiences relative to the Bushwalking movement. The journal is the mouthpiece of all club activities and is open to any member, who is desirous to write of his experiences relative to the Bushwalking movement.
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 The mover, no doubt, realised this and so moved along the lines he did to show all members the importance of sending him articles that the members on the whole may benefit. The mover, no doubt, realised this and so moved along the lines he did to show all members the importance of sending him articles that the members on the whole may benefit.
  
-(Sgd. ) Clem Hallstrom.+(Sgd.) Clem Hallstrom.
  
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 Everest - years of planning, and a small mountain of boodle - while the world holds its breath. And the grand total - 2 men, out of the world'​s 2000 mill, can say 3 little words - we did it! Everest - years of planning, and a small mountain of boodle - while the world holds its breath. And the grand total - 2 men, out of the world'​s 2000 mill, can say 3 little words - we did it!
  
-And what a waste of life, in perfgct ​fitness. ​Cotaider ​young Toni Kutz, swaying by day - by night - on the Eiger: was ever a more terrible, prolonged ending. Toni - in the very flower of youth - and every minute of the agony clearly visible to the helpless experts through the eye of a plus 70 telescope - sport!+And what a waste of life, in perfect ​fitness. ​Consider ​young Toni Kutz, swaying by day - by night - on the Eiger: was ever a more terrible, prolonged ending. Toni - in the very flower of youth - and every minute of the agony clearly visible to the helpless experts through the eye of a plus 70 telescope - sport!
  
-Now this is my view of such doings - in a restraining letter to a friend ​og mine addicted to alpine gambling - I wrote: "Ah but one slip - and that blithe spirit folds its wings. A death is not just death, an isolated spot of ceasing life - ripples go out far and wide, as in a stone disturbed lake. Out - and out - may lap and pain the many shores of loving memory - a lifetime hence!+Now this is my view of such doings - in a restraining letter to a friend ​of mine addicted to alpine gambling - I wrote: "Ah but one slip - and that blithe spirit folds its wings. A death is not just death, an isolated spot of ceasing life - ripples go out far and wide, as in a stone disturbed lake. Out - and out - may lap and pain the many shores of loving memory - a lifetime hence!
  
 (Sgd.) Taro. (Sgd.) Taro.
Line 551: Line 551:
 (Editors note: May we, in reply quote Edward Whymper: (Editors note: May we, in reply quote Edward Whymper:
  
-"The line which separates the difficult from the dangerous is sometimes very shadowy, but it is not an imaginery ​line. It is a true line, without breadth. It is often easy to pass, and very hard to see. It is sometimes passed unconsciously,​ and the consciousness that it has been passed is felt too late. If the doubtful line is passed consciously,​ deliberately,​ one passes from doing that which is justifiable,​ to that which is unjustifiable."​)+"The line which separates the difficult from the dangerous is sometimes very shadowy, but it is not an imaginary ​line. It is a true line, without breadth. It is often easy to pass, and very hard to see. It is sometimes passed unconsciously,​ and the consciousness that it has been passed is felt too late. If the doubtful line is passed consciously,​ deliberately,​ one passes from doing that which is justifiable,​ to that which is unjustifiable."​)
  
 ---- ----
  
-AMMO TO TaO'S QUIZ on Page 7): +=== Answers to Taro's Quiz (on Page 7): === 
-1. Lavender Bay. + 
-2. Hen and Chicken Bay +  - Lavender Bay. 
-3. Darling Harbour +  ​- ​Hen and Chicken Bay. 
-4Manly +  - Darling Harbour. 
-5. Neutral Bay +  - Manly. 
-6. The Spit +  - Neutral Bay. 
-7Dotible ​Bay. +  - The Spit. 
-8. Carooning ​Cove +  - Double ​Bay. 
-9. Elizabeth ​Fay+  - Careening ​Cove. 
-10. Point-Piper +  - Elizabeth ​Bay
-11Cabarita - +  Point Piper. 
-12NIH. Macquarie 's Chair +  - Cabarita. 
-13Farm Cole +  - Mrs. Macquarie'​s Chair. 
-14. Circular Quay. +  - Farm Cove. 
-15. Pinchgut +  - Circular Quay. 
-16. Potts Point +  ​- ​Pinchgut. 
-17. Goat Island +  - Potts Point. 
-18Rusheutter's Bay. +  - Goat Island. 
-LEECHES +  - Rushcutter's Bay. 
-ARE CREATURES + 
-WITH NO ATTRACTIVE FEATURES.+---- 
 + 
 +===== Leeches Are Creatures With No Attractive Features===== 
 +  ​
 - Don Matthews. - Don Matthews.
-For once Snow mas early; but by the time we had assembled, and then stoppad ​en rite far supPliesanf far a look at Cordeaux Dam, and-for lunch at NI. Keira, it was 3 o'​clock when we reached The Page's place in Jamberoo Pass. + 
-Peter looked sceptical when we declared our intention of doing an overnight walk. On previous occasions the lure of the bush camp sites of "Ben Ricketts " +For once Snow was early; but by the time we had assembled, and then stopped ​en route for suppliesand for a look at Cordeaux Dam, and for lunch at Mt. Keira, it was 3 o'​clock when we reached The Page's place in Jamberoo Pass. 
-had been too great, and we had camped there and enjoyed day walks around the Barren Grounds, especially at wildflower ​tine. However, we convinced him, so he recommanded Gook's Nose - Brother'​s ​,Creek - Drawing Room Rocks - Barren Grounds, a circular tour with fine viewpoints. + 
-We left the-Griffiths Trail where it dr-rts (4:​olin ​to the" ​pool on Upper Broghers Creek and made-oar way 6-at to Cook's Nose. From here the Brogber's'Creek Valley opened up towards Kangaroo Valley. ​Lbout 500 feet beneath our feet, just below the +Peter looked sceptical when we declared our intention of doing an overnight walk. On previous occasions the lure of the bush camp sites of "Ben Ricketts"​ had been too great, and we had camped there and enjoyed day walks around the Barren Grounds, especially at wildflower ​time. However, we convinced him, so he recommended Cook's Nose - Brother'​s Creek - Drawing Room Rocks - Barren Grounds, a circular tour with fine viewpoints. 
-17. + 
-cliffs, were the high terraces, wide and lush and dotted with Palm trees and rocks.+We left the Griffiths Trail where it drops down to the pool on Upper Broghers Creek and made our way out to Cook's Nose. From here the Brogher's Creek Valley opened up towards Kangaroo Valley. ​About 500 feet beneath our feet, just below the cliffs, were the high terraces, wide and lush and dotted with Palm trees and rocks. 
 Further down, cattle grazed on the slopes and the farms down the valley could be clearly picked out. Further down, cattle grazed on the slopes and the farms down the valley could be clearly picked out.
-Peter had assured us'​that the way through the cliffs was easy so we looked around on the Eastern side t- -just back- from the point. We looked in the -wrong place, and -what we saw was no-b irivitirg - just A wet, scrubby, roclzr, gully which didn't look -too hopeful. We know 'now- that' there - eb sy track right through the -cliff --line, but at thetime a gently sloping gully on the Western side l,--)oked easier, so 'itre headed f. 
-This was easy until we reached a creek whidh rose near-the point and then If'​lowed about N.E. for some hundreds of yards before diving down through the western '​bliff. Fallen logs helped us to get across and into some horrible tangle jungle 
-rorwth between creek and cliff. 
  
-A viewpoint from the cliff-line shoikied ​us a definite break to our right, so +Peter had assured ​us that the way through ​the cliffs ​was easy so we looked around on the Eastern sidejust back from the pointWe looked in the wrong place, and what we saw was not inviting - just wetscrubbyrockygully which didn'​t ​look too hopeful. We know now that there is an easy track right through ​the cliff linebut at the time a gently sloping gully on the Western side looked easier, so we headed ​for it.
-Imick into the scrub arid down over dank earth and leaves on to the creek which '​dropped quickly until it reached a 30' waterfall. At this point I rebelled: "​Snow"​ -I said, "this is too hakardous"​. I have a premonition of impending disaster. But +
-Snow had disappeared and there was no hope of retreat. +
-+
-We follow-6d, a,s he sidled to the right, and then gingerly groped our way +
-qlovrn a leafy earth ridge between the low tree growth. ,About a hundred feet down, where we expected to find the high terrace ​,-the crek flattened out for a distance +
-before continuing-its dash downwardsAfter a search through ​the thicket at the +
-reek side we peered through a gap to see flat ground stretching away to the South. +
-Mb were down, and it was 6.30 and getting dark. +
-We moVed along the co'​mpad to an inviting ​camp spot beneath a huge tree oti.Wpy. +
-Snot sank gratefully to earth and sighed a sigh of contentment. Then he leaped +
-into theair with startled yell. Leeches! "Go 0 e I said"you brought them with +
-you" (from the- creekthat is). But Snow was right. Wave upon wave of hungry- leeches were advancing towards us, so we upped and moved to higher ground whei3e we hoped there might not be so many. +
-There weren'​t ​so marry, bUt:​therewere enough.' There-were also hordes di' +
- . . +
-moSquitoes, as we found out uring the night; but the" memory of-the disCOmfOrtt was soon washed out by the dawn Of a perfect ,day, with dos of birds flitting though the brush, and the view of the mist-filled valley below. +
-We dropped down to the road near the highest 'farm, crossing the Broger 's Creelc ford, then plodded up the hill to the Woodhill Gap, and up the track, faint in parts, to the Drawing Room Rock.- From '​here ​there were Wonderful views over the coastal plain and down the Valler Of Brogers into Kangaroo Valley: The track continued ae far as the heathlandswhere it lost itself (lost us, anyhow) in the lush grotth, so we 4owly sl4rted the east side of the swamp at about one Idle an hour to reach the Griffiths Trail, again. +
-, L - +
-The traverse'​of,​ the heath:, although hard going, mas rewarded by the +
-of five-Ground P'​atrots in flight- in different parts of the plateau and by views to the south of Pigeon House and CurrockbilIy. +
-We followed the Trail- -down to the pool, 6. pieasrnt Spot for lunch, especially in springtime, then there ar +
-the Reserve entrance, where we again admired the Trust'​s handiwork, and down the +
-e masses of wildflrmer&​ in bloom. Then up the track to road to -Ben RicliBtts.+
  
-NOTES ON THE BARREN GROUNDS AREA. +This was easy until we reached a creek which rose near the point and then flowed ​about N.Efor some hundreds ​of yards before ​diving down through ​the western cliffFallen logs helped us to get across ​and into some horrible tangle jungle growth between creek and cliff.
-THE PAGES OF BEN RICISTTS. +
- '​Iii 1948, or thereabouts,​ S.B.W'​s Ra-e-and Peter Page built their. home on flat terrace beneath ​the Cliffs of the Barren Grounds plateau. They are keen walkers ​and Nature lovers: and know all there is to know about the area - its scenic attractions,​ wild life, and flowers. +
-For years now, old and new S.B.111'​s have journeyed'​ to "​Pages"​ to enjoy their hospitality and the beauty at their back door. +
-' Those who haven'​t,​ or new members unaware ​of the nrea; are invited to call on Rae and Peter at "Ben Rickett.'​s"​ , Mountain Road, Jamber6o, and learn something of the Barren Grounds Reserve and of the surrounding cruntry. +
-THE EL.,RRE-14 GROUNDS F,A.UNAL RESERVE NO. +
-(From Fauna Conservation and. The Wildlife Refuge Idea Fauna Protection +
-Panel, 1960). +
-Barren Grounds Faunal Reserve, No.3', is on p1-4teau land-a bnut 2,000 feet above sea level:, west if Kiama and -just 'above Jamberbo. At present, its area i:s about 3;600 acres coVerifig large tracts of sizampy heathnds_ which act as water supply regulators for streams which belotig to the Kangaroo system, and so are-important to the farmlands in the valley. -Where the swamps have given away to drier conditions the open forest takes over., and in the little :valleys developed by the creeks ​before ​they tumble over the edge' of the plateau,, there are Small stands of' sub-trbpical grOwth inCluding tree ferns; blaCk-wa ttleS and ,coachwoodsIn consequence,​ there are several habitata '​each-with good and growing fkina populations. Perhaps '​themost interesting envir-ontherrb is th-d-heathlands. Here live at leb st two fairly 'rare species,- the Ground (or Swamp) Parrot and the Eastern Bristle Bird and they are known to breed in this Reserve.- Before the Grounds were dedicated as - a Faunal Reserve, they had been under grazing Iidence.-- In addition to the effects of the actual grazing, the area was blinded over regularly. Now the regriSirbli has: - been most out. standing ​and as the two rare birds mentioned above :nest near or oh the ground, the -Chances of regeneration should be vei". high. There are other riattral attracti-5ns of high value on the Grounds the swampy heaths give rise, to floral splendour ​ which beside bringing their array of Honey-eaters ​and other fauna, are a 'great attraction themselves to viSitors. +
-TO preserve-the spirit of the Reserve '​camping in it should be restricted to - the entrance, near the Ranger'​s Hut. +
-There are many walking tours in this area,, outside the Faunal Reserve, e g. Brogher'​s Creek, Gerringong Falls, Carrington Falls.+
  
 +A viewpoint from the cliff line showed us a definite break to our right, so back into the scrub and down over dank earth and leaves on to the creek which dropped quickly until it reached a 30' waterfall. At this point I rebelled. "​Snow"​ I said, "this is too hazardous"​. I have a premonition of impending disaster. But Snow had disappeared and there was no hope of retreat.
 +
 +We followed, as he sidled to the right, and then gingerly groped our way down a leafy earth ridge between the low tree growth. About a hundred feet down, where we expected to find the high terrace, the creek flattened out for a distance before continuing its dash downwards. After a search through the thicket at the creek side we peered through a gap to see flat ground stretching away to the South. We were down, and it was 6.30 and getting dark.
 +
 +We moved along the cowpad to an inviting camp spot beneath a huge tree canopy. Snow sank gratefully to earth and sighed a sigh of contentment. Then he leaped into the air with a startled yell. Leeches! "Go on", I said, "you brought them with you" (from the creek, that is). But Snow was right. Wave upon wave of hungry leeches were advancing towards us, so we upped and moved to higher ground where we hoped there might not be so many.
 +
 +There weren'​t so many, but there were enough. There were also hordes of mosquitoes, as we found out during the night; but the memory of the discomforts was soon washed out by the dawn of a perfect day, with dozens of birds flitting though the brush, and the view of the mist-filled valley below.
 +
 +We dropped down to the road near the highest farm, crossing the Broger'​s Creek ford, then plodded up the hill to the Woodhill Gap, and up the track, faint in parts, to the Drawing Room Rock. From here there were wonderful views over the coastal plain and down the Valley Of Brogers into Kangaroo Valley. The track continued as far as the heathlands, where it lost itself (lost us, anyhow) in the lush growth, so we slowly skirted the east side of the swamp at about one mile an hour to reach the Griffiths Trail again.
 +
 +The traverse of the heath, although hard going, was rewarded by the sighting of five Ground Parrots in flight in different parts of the plateau and by views to the south of Pigeon House and Currockbilly.
 +
 +We followed the Trail down to the pool, a pleasant spot for lunch, especially in springtime, when there are masses of wildflowers in bloom. Then up the track to the Reserve entrance, where we again admired the Trust'​s handiwork, and down the road to Ben Ricketts.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== Notes On The Barren Grounds Area. =====
 +
 +=== The Pages of Ben Ricketts. ===
 +
 +In 1948, or thereabouts,​ S.B.W'​s Rae and Peter Page built their home on a flat terrace beneath the cliffs of the Barren Grounds plateau. They are keen walkers and Nature lovers, and know all there is to know about the area - its scenic attractions,​ wild life, and flowers.
 +
 +For years now, old and new S.B.W'​s have journeyed to "​Pages"​ to enjoy their hospitality and the beauty at their back door.
 +
 +Those who haven'​t,​ or new members unaware of the area, are invited to call on Rae and Peter at "Ben Rickett'​s"​ , Mountain Road, Jamberoo, and learn something of the Barren Grounds Reserve and of the surrounding country.
 +
 +=== The Barren Ground Faunal Reserve No. 3. ===
 +
 +(From Fauna Conservation and The Wildlife Refuge Idea (Fauna Protection
 +Panel, 1960)).
 +
 +Barren Grounds Faunal Reserve, No.3, is on plateau land about 2,000 feet above sea level, west if Kiama and just above Jamberoo. At present, its area is about 3,600 acres covering large tracts of swampy heathlands which act as water supply regulators for streams which belong to the Kangaroo system, and so are important to the farmlands in the valley. Where the swamps have given away to drier conditions the open forest takes over, and in the little valleys developed by the creeks before they tumble over the edge of the plateau, there are small stands of sub-tropical growth including tree ferns, black wattles and coachwoods. In consequence,​ there are several habitats each with good and growing fauna populations. Perhaps the most interesting environment is the heathlands. Here live at least two fairly rare species, the Ground (or Swamp) Parrot and the Eastern Bristle Bird and they are known to breed in this Reserve. Before the Grounds were dedicated as a Faunal Reserve, they had been under grazing licence. In addition to the effects of the actual grazing, the area was burned over regularly. Now the regrowth has been most outstanding and as the two rare birds mentioned above nest near or on the ground, the chances of regeneration should be very high. There are other natural attractions of high value on the Grounds; the swampy heaths give rise to floral splendour.... which beside bringing their array of Honey-eaters and other fauna, are a great attraction themselves to visitors.
 +
 +----
 +
 +To preserve the spirit of the Reserve camping in it should be restricted to the entrance, near the Ranger'​s Hut.
 +
 +There are many walking tours in this area, outside the Faunal Reserve, e.g. Brogher'​s Creek, Gerringong Falls, Carrington Falls.
 +
 +----
196203.txt · Last modified: 2019/06/06 07:10 by tyreless