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196109 [2016/02/29 01:49]
tyreless
196109 [2016/02/29 01:54] (current)
tyreless
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 ====321 September 1961 Price 1/-==== ====321 September 1961 Price 1/-====
  
-|Editor|Don Matthews, 33 Pomona Street, ​Pennnt ​Hills. WJ3524|+|Editor|Don Matthews, 33 Pomona Street, ​Pennant ​Hills. WJ3524|
 |Business Manager|Brian Harvey| |Business Manager|Brian Harvey|
 |Reproduction|Denise Hull| |Reproduction|Denise Hull|
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 |September 27th|Free night - Come in and finalise arrangements for your trip on the long weekend.| |September 27th|Free night - Come in and finalise arrangements for your trip on the long weekend.|
 |October 4th|This is Committee Meeting night, but a First Aid Lecture will be given for Prospectives and members who would like to brush up on their technique.| |October 4th|This is Committee Meeting night, but a First Aid Lecture will be given for Prospectives and members who would like to brush up on their technique.|
-|October 18th|Mb. Charles Casperson will talk on C.J. Dennis of "The Sentimental Bloke" fame.|+|October 18th|Mr. Charles Casperson will talk on C.J. Dennis of "The Sentimental Bloke" fame.|
  
 ====Past.==== ====Past.====
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 -Jim Brown. -Jim Brown.
  
-If you have been saying for years that someone is all wrong and should know better, how do you make reparation when your confidence in your own judgment ​is shaken? Especially when the offended party is an organisation as large as the Army Survey Corps, and the critic a solitary walker.+If you have been saying for years that someone is all wrong and should know better, how do you make reparation when your confidence in your own judgement ​is shaken? Especially when the offended party is an organisation as large as the Army Survey Corps, and the critic a solitary walker.
  
 Anyway, the facts are these. Something like nine years ago, in company with four other pioneers, I made a traverse of the Blue Labyrinth from West to East, from Waratah Trig, some 13 miles out along the Kings Tableland Road, via the divide between Warragamba River and the Erskine Creek, to Warragamba Dam, then just beginning to take shape as a retaining wall. Anyway, the facts are these. Something like nine years ago, in company with four other pioneers, I made a traverse of the Blue Labyrinth from West to East, from Waratah Trig, some 13 miles out along the Kings Tableland Road, via the divide between Warragamba River and the Erskine Creek, to Warragamba Dam, then just beginning to take shape as a retaining wall.
  
-On the Sunday morning, assiduously following the ridge pattern shown on the map, we came to a place right on the junction of the uncontoured Jenolan military map and the contoured Liverpool sheet, where something was evidently amiss. Our ridbe began to go down - then down some more - and even downwarder.+On the Sunday morning, assiduously following the ridge pattern shown on the map, we came to a place right on the junction of the uncontoured Jenolan military map and the contoured Liverpool sheet, where something was evidently amiss. Our ridge began to go down - then down some more - and even downwarder.
  
 We checked thereabouts,​ and after a fine flurry of map and compass consultation,​ I announced (1) the map was wrong (2) we were on the watershed as indicated on the map (3) there was a creek shown as flowing into Ripple Creek (hence to the Warragamba) but which really cut through our "​divide"​ and entered the Erskine (4) the correct watershed was a ridge, shown as a furry caterpillar on the Jenolan map, which sort of finished in mid air near the Eastern edge of the map. We checked thereabouts,​ and after a fine flurry of map and compass consultation,​ I announced (1) the map was wrong (2) we were on the watershed as indicated on the map (3) there was a creek shown as flowing into Ripple Creek (hence to the Warragamba) but which really cut through our "​divide"​ and entered the Erskine (4) the correct watershed was a ridge, shown as a furry caterpillar on the Jenolan map, which sort of finished in mid air near the Eastern edge of the map.
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 On the Wednesday I had a marathon "​bushwalk"​ through London - it just happened that way for though I'd meant to get buses from place to place there was always something in between to be seen. Started off from St. Paul's down Ludgate Hill and Fleet Street to the Law Courts at Temple Bar, then past Australia House along the Strand to Admiralty Arch and through into St. James'​s Park. "​Admired"​ Buckingham Palace and up Constitution Hill to Hyde Park Corner, where I did get a bus to Marble Arch, there, to rest my barking dogs, a cup of coffee in Lyons Corner House, before going into Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens, ending up at the Albert Hall by way of Peter Pan's statue and the fountains. That evening we went to a straight play "The Miracle Worker"​ at Wyndham'​s,​ excellent, a play to set you thinking, the story of the early years of Helen Keller and the beginning of her education by Anne Sullivan. Anna Massey, daughter of Raymond Massey, took the part of Anne Sullivan,. and there are no adjectives superlative enough to describe her performance,​ nor that of Janina Faye who played, or mimed, the part of the child Helen Keller. On the Wednesday I had a marathon "​bushwalk"​ through London - it just happened that way for though I'd meant to get buses from place to place there was always something in between to be seen. Started off from St. Paul's down Ludgate Hill and Fleet Street to the Law Courts at Temple Bar, then past Australia House along the Strand to Admiralty Arch and through into St. James'​s Park. "​Admired"​ Buckingham Palace and up Constitution Hill to Hyde Park Corner, where I did get a bus to Marble Arch, there, to rest my barking dogs, a cup of coffee in Lyons Corner House, before going into Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens, ending up at the Albert Hall by way of Peter Pan's statue and the fountains. That evening we went to a straight play "The Miracle Worker"​ at Wyndham'​s,​ excellent, a play to set you thinking, the story of the early years of Helen Keller and the beginning of her education by Anne Sullivan. Anna Massey, daughter of Raymond Massey, took the part of Anne Sullivan,. and there are no adjectives superlative enough to describe her performance,​ nor that of Janina Faye who played, or mimed, the part of the child Helen Keller.
  
-After London, the Lakes, the usual hotel at the head of the Langdale Valley, for it is one which would be hard to better, situated as it is right at the foot of the Langdale Pikes, the ideal hotel for walking types, comfortable,​ good food and excellent company, though there were two elderly couples from the South of England right out of their element, who wanted to know what you did in the evenings - the answer staring them in the face, too tired after the day's walk to do anything but sit (in the bar) and talk. Before going up I'd sat down and worked out at "Walks Programme",​ six walks for fine days, six walks for wet ones, perfectly planned, but the best laid plans... My sister and niece were up the first weekend, sometimes Pip is in a walking mood, sometimes not, and this time she was rather inclined towards the latter, not being helped by the weather which was dull and overcast, inclined to rain or drizzle. We went round to Thirlmere by car then set off to walk over High Tove to Watendlath but as we got to the cairn we could see mist swirling up out of the far valley and rain coming our way, with Pip not very keen to go down only to have to come up again, we just turned ​roand then went back to the car and Langdale. Monday, according to plan, I set off for Keswick, over the Stake Pass, down Langstrath to Rosthwaite in Borrowdale, then via Watendlath to Derwentwater. In all I guess it was a distance of some 16 or 17 miles for me, but well over 20 for Cobber who did a lot of to-ing and fro-ing in the early part of the day, and we both arrived very wearily in Keswick, the dog worn out, my feet playing up badly. Found out afterwards I'd collected three blisters, entirely my own fault, not having gone far the first day I thought my socks mould do a second and save washing, the blisters I'm sure were a result of that and having to do a few miles road bash.+After London, the Lakes, the usual hotel at the head of the Langdale Valley, for it is one which would be hard to better, situated as it is right at the foot of the Langdale Pikes, the ideal hotel for walking types, comfortable,​ good food and excellent company, though there were two elderly couples from the South of England right out of their element, who wanted to know what you did in the evenings - the answer staring them in the face, too tired after the day's walk to do anything but sit (in the bar) and talk. Before going up I'd sat down and worked out at "Walks Programme",​ six walks for fine days, six walks for wet ones, perfectly planned, but the best laid plans... My sister and niece were up the first weekend, sometimes Pip is in a walking mood, sometimes not, and this time she was rather inclined towards the latter, not being helped by the weather which was dull and overcast, inclined to rain or drizzle. We went round to Thirlmere by car then set off to walk over High Tove to Watendlath but as we got to the cairn we could see mist swirling up out of the far valley and rain coming our way, with Pip not very keen to go down only to have to come up again, we just turned ​round then went back to the car and Langdale. Monday, according to plan, I set off for Keswick, over the Stake Pass, down Langstrath to Rosthwaite in Borrowdale, then via Watendlath to Derwentwater. In all I guess it was a distance of some 16 or 17 miles for me, but well over 20 for Cobber who did a lot of to-ing and fro-ing in the early part of the day, and we both arrived very wearily in Keswick, the dog worn out, my feet playing up badly. Found out afterwards I'd collected three blisters, entirely my own fault, not having gone far the first day I thought my socks mould do a second and save washing, the blisters I'm sure were a result of that and having to do a few miles road bash.
  
 Tuesday I decided we'd better take life easy, so we went into Ambleside by bus and did a simple little walk up Wansfell Pike. It was a beautiful day, and a lovely walk up a "​mountain"​ just over 1500 ft. from which you could see almost half the Lake District. That evening the weather broke, there was a most peculiar storm which blotted out all the valley in blackness, very weird indeed. Still suffering from the effects of the marathon to Keswick, and with the weather bad, on the Wednesday we had a wet splash up to Chapel Stile, the village in Langdale Valley, in the morning, and a trot up the Blea Tarn track in the afternoon, but by Thursday we were raring to go again. I joined up with another lass at the hotel for a walk to Waterhead, on Windermere, she was showing me a new way down the valley which avoided the road, a footpath on the far side of the stream. It was very pleasant, but we had fifteen minutes fun when we came to a 6 ft. wall with a six-barred gate padlocked, trying to get the dog through. The wall was too high for him to scramble over, and he couldn'​t jump the gate, so one on each side we tried to lift it a little to make roan for him to crawl under. It was like a little creek underneath and Cobber didn't want to get his undercarriage wet, finally Sally climbed over to make him realise he'd got to come, or be left, and one at each end of the gate we heaved and to our astonishment that time it lifted a good 12 inches, and his lordship cantered through. As we got to Windermere the weather really fined up, the sun was quite warm and bright, it was grand, and that evening in the bar everybody was laying plans for what they'd do the following day, expecting similar conditions, but oh no, we woke to a steady downpour. Again by bus to Ambleside, and we walked the 8 miles "​home"​ in swimming conditions, along the side of Rydal Water and Grasmere (Loughrigg Terrace), then over Red Bank back into "​THE"​ valley, soaked to the skin when we reached the hotel, and so ended the week. But it had all been good fun, on the whole I think the much maligned (weatherwise) Lake District, had fared better that week than many other parts of Britain, and certainly I'd not got wet so often as in the week with Bookie last year, maybe next, when I hope Eddie Stretton will be with me, will be better still. Tuesday I decided we'd better take life easy, so we went into Ambleside by bus and did a simple little walk up Wansfell Pike. It was a beautiful day, and a lovely walk up a "​mountain"​ just over 1500 ft. from which you could see almost half the Lake District. That evening the weather broke, there was a most peculiar storm which blotted out all the valley in blackness, very weird indeed. Still suffering from the effects of the marathon to Keswick, and with the weather bad, on the Wednesday we had a wet splash up to Chapel Stile, the village in Langdale Valley, in the morning, and a trot up the Blea Tarn track in the afternoon, but by Thursday we were raring to go again. I joined up with another lass at the hotel for a walk to Waterhead, on Windermere, she was showing me a new way down the valley which avoided the road, a footpath on the far side of the stream. It was very pleasant, but we had fifteen minutes fun when we came to a 6 ft. wall with a six-barred gate padlocked, trying to get the dog through. The wall was too high for him to scramble over, and he couldn'​t jump the gate, so one on each side we tried to lift it a little to make roan for him to crawl under. It was like a little creek underneath and Cobber didn't want to get his undercarriage wet, finally Sally climbed over to make him realise he'd got to come, or be left, and one at each end of the gate we heaved and to our astonishment that time it lifted a good 12 inches, and his lordship cantered through. As we got to Windermere the weather really fined up, the sun was quite warm and bright, it was grand, and that evening in the bar everybody was laying plans for what they'd do the following day, expecting similar conditions, but oh no, we woke to a steady downpour. Again by bus to Ambleside, and we walked the 8 miles "​home"​ in swimming conditions, along the side of Rydal Water and Grasmere (Loughrigg Terrace), then over Red Bank back into "​THE"​ valley, soaked to the skin when we reached the hotel, and so ended the week. But it had all been good fun, on the whole I think the much maligned (weatherwise) Lake District, had fared better that week than many other parts of Britain, and certainly I'd not got wet so often as in the week with Bookie last year, maybe next, when I hope Eddie Stretton will be with me, will be better still.
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 The morning dawned, as always - breakfast was soon over and Cox's River prepared to withstand an assault by the S.B.W. - and how! Within three-quarters of a mile from the start the party was halted for the necessity of the first of many crossings they were to undertake. The Leader seeing the hesitation and consternation on the faces of his men, plunged boldly and fearlessly to cross to the other Side and henceforth became immortalised like the Roman Standard Bearer in 55 B.C. The remainder followed without comment, but the writer knows at least one person guilty of mutinous mutterings in the process. For those persons interested in statistics there were to be thirteen such crossings, generally uneventful but every member had an exciting moment due to the current, slimy rocks or lack of acrobatic ability. Anon we became blasé and emphatically deny the rumour that snorkel apparatus was a must on the walk. The morning dawned, as always - breakfast was soon over and Cox's River prepared to withstand an assault by the S.B.W. - and how! Within three-quarters of a mile from the start the party was halted for the necessity of the first of many crossings they were to undertake. The Leader seeing the hesitation and consternation on the faces of his men, plunged boldly and fearlessly to cross to the other Side and henceforth became immortalised like the Roman Standard Bearer in 55 B.C. The remainder followed without comment, but the writer knows at least one person guilty of mutinous mutterings in the process. For those persons interested in statistics there were to be thirteen such crossings, generally uneventful but every member had an exciting moment due to the current, slimy rocks or lack of acrobatic ability. Anon we became blasé and emphatically deny the rumour that snorkel apparatus was a must on the walk.
  
-Our walk proceeded with frequent consultations to the topgraphical ​features: not a creek or hillock escaped our notice, never in the history of mankind, were there so many maps amongst so few... etc. etc. Approaching lunchtime we had just about dried out. We were short of our intended halt at Sandy Hook, rue to a little lateness in starting out, and our Leader thought it would be a good idea to have our meal with clean feet for he was off once again to the opposite shore of the Cox. It became a ritual - like a doctor'​s prescription - __we always crossed the Cox directly before and directly after meals__. After lunch we made efforts to make up for our lost time by short cutting Sandy Hook and were fortunate to encounter in quick succession a Black Wallaby and a young Red Fox. Meanwhile on the other side of the river the crows, from the noise they were making, were having a heated free for all. Query: 'Do dinkum Crows hold '​court'​ like their European cousins?'​+Our walk proceeded with frequent consultations to the topographical ​features: not a creek or hillock escaped our notice, never in the history of mankind, were there so many maps amongst so few... etc. etc. Approaching lunchtime we had just about dried out. We were short of our intended halt at Sandy Hook, rue to a little lateness in starting out, and our Leader thought it would be a good idea to have our meal with clean feet for he was off once again to the opposite shore of the Cox. It became a ritual - like a doctor'​s prescription - __we always crossed the Cox directly before and directly after meals__. After lunch we made efforts to make up for our lost time by short cutting Sandy Hook and were fortunate to encounter in quick succession a Black Wallaby and a young Red Fox. Meanwhile on the other side of the river the crows, from the noise they were making, were having a heated free for all. Query: 'Do dinkum Crows hold '​court'​ like their European cousins?'​
  
 Despite our efforts, the sun was sinking rapidly as we were nearing Chaplowe Creek, the going became awkward in the river bed and good camp sites became non-existent. It was a relief when the leader called it a day, waved his magic wand and in complete darkness produced a satisfactory place for the night. Meanwhile one of the sheep had wandered from the flock and while the shepherd was retrieving this stray, the others made camp. Soon a fire was going and our stomachs filled, the night air was pervaded with the aroma of toasted socks. The tribulations of the day were forgotten. Despite our efforts, the sun was sinking rapidly as we were nearing Chaplowe Creek, the going became awkward in the river bed and good camp sites became non-existent. It was a relief when the leader called it a day, waved his magic wand and in complete darkness produced a satisfactory place for the night. Meanwhile one of the sheep had wandered from the flock and while the shepherd was retrieving this stray, the others made camp. Soon a fire was going and our stomachs filled, the night air was pervaded with the aroma of toasted socks. The tribulations of the day were forgotten.
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 4. __Nylon vs. Natural Fibre__. This question always follows an accident where nylon rope is used. Had the accident occurred on a natural fibre rope the trend would be to turn to the synthetic rope. In correspondence with the British Mountaineering Council it is clear that the same signs of doubt are expressed after similar accidents in U.K. and Europe. It is the best climbers who fall as they are the ones who try the difficult routes. All the accidents are on nylon these days as the best climbers realise it is by far the superior product. The breaking strain of natural fibre is about half of an equivalent weight nylon rope. It has no flexibility in which to absorb a falling leader'​s kinetic energy. If a leader falls on natural fibre for any distance the rope would __snap__ because of this. If not, the fallen leader would probably die from internal injuries in any case. __Elasticity__ is a very major consideration. If ever a natural fibre rope becomes wet for any reason, it should be discarded for climbing as its reliability is extremely doubtful even when dried out properly. Water does not affect nylon. 4. __Nylon vs. Natural Fibre__. This question always follows an accident where nylon rope is used. Had the accident occurred on a natural fibre rope the trend would be to turn to the synthetic rope. In correspondence with the British Mountaineering Council it is clear that the same signs of doubt are expressed after similar accidents in U.K. and Europe. It is the best climbers who fall as they are the ones who try the difficult routes. All the accidents are on nylon these days as the best climbers realise it is by far the superior product. The breaking strain of natural fibre is about half of an equivalent weight nylon rope. It has no flexibility in which to absorb a falling leader'​s kinetic energy. If a leader falls on natural fibre for any distance the rope would __snap__ because of this. If not, the fallen leader would probably die from internal injuries in any case. __Elasticity__ is a very major consideration. If ever a natural fibre rope becomes wet for any reason, it should be discarded for climbing as its reliability is extremely doubtful even when dried out properly. Water does not affect nylon.
  
-For any enquiries about reduction of brealking ​strain over a long period, for prices, system or ordering, figures in theoretical leader falls, reference to the British Mountaineering Council'​s article "What Rope to Use?", contact Miss E. Hahn at MW0522 Ex. 274 (B) or write to Mr. Peter J. Morgan, Hon. Secretary, Melbourne University Mountaineering Club, C/- Union House, University of Melbourne, Parkville, N.2, Victoria.+For any enquiries about reduction of breaking ​strain over a long period, for prices, system or ordering, figures in theoretical leader falls, reference to the British Mountaineering Council'​s article "What Rope to Use?", contact Miss E. Hahn at MW0522 Ex. 274 (B) or write to Mr. Peter J. Morgan, Hon. Secretary, Melbourne University Mountaineering Club, C/- Union House, University of Melbourne, Parkville, N.2, Victoria.
  
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 |September 17|Glenbrook - Glenbrook Creek - Oaks North Ridge - The Oaks, Glenbrook. 12 miles. Good man reading practice in this area. Could be scratchy in parts. Gaiters recommended. Maybe a few Waratahs in flower, too. 8.20 a.m. Lithgow train from Central Steam Station to Glenbrook. Tickets: Glenbrook Return at 13/9d. Map: Liverpool Military. Leader: Jim Brown.| |September 17|Glenbrook - Glenbrook Creek - Oaks North Ridge - The Oaks, Glenbrook. 12 miles. Good man reading practice in this area. Could be scratchy in parts. Gaiters recommended. Maybe a few Waratahs in flower, too. 8.20 a.m. Lithgow train from Central Steam Station to Glenbrook. Tickets: Glenbrook Return at 13/9d. Map: Liverpool Military. Leader: Jim Brown.|
-|Septamber ​24|Pymble - bus to St. Ives - Bungaroo - Middle Harbour Creek - Lindfield. 11 miles. A pleasant walk along the upper reaches of Middle Harbour where there are normally lots of wild flowers at this time of the year. 8.10 a.m. train Central Electric Station to Pymble via Bridge. 8.46 a.m. bus Pymble to St. Ives. Tickets: Pymble via Bridge at 4/3d. plus 1/- bus fare. Map: Sydney Military or any good Sydney Suburban Street Directory. Leader: Molly Rodgers.|+|September ​24|Pymble - bus to St. Ives - Bungaroo - Middle Harbour Creek - Lindfield. 11 miles. A pleasant walk along the upper reaches of Middle Harbour where there are normally lots of wild flowers at this time of the year. 8.10 a.m. train Central Electric Station to Pymble via Bridge. 8.46 a.m. bus Pymble to St. Ives. Tickets: Pymble via Bridge at 4/3d. plus 1/- bus fare. Map: Sydney Military or any good Sydney Suburban Street Directory. Leader: Molly Rodgers.|
 |October 8|Waterfall - Mt. Westmacott - Myuna Creek - Woronora Trig - Woronora River - Heathcote. 12 miles. A variation of the usual plod along Heathcote Creek. Instead the walk will take to the high country both at Mt. Westmacott and Woronora Trig. Should be some very attractive stands of wildflowers. 8.20 a.m. train Central Electric Station to Sutherland. CHANGE there for Rail Motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Waterfall Return at 5/9d. Map: Port Hacking Tourist or Camden Military. Leader: David Ingram.| |October 8|Waterfall - Mt. Westmacott - Myuna Creek - Woronora Trig - Woronora River - Heathcote. 12 miles. A variation of the usual plod along Heathcote Creek. Instead the walk will take to the high country both at Mt. Westmacott and Woronora Trig. Should be some very attractive stands of wildflowers. 8.20 a.m. train Central Electric Station to Sutherland. CHANGE there for Rail Motor to Waterfall. Tickets: Waterfall Return at 5/9d. Map: Port Hacking Tourist or Camden Military. Leader: David Ingram.|
 |October 15|Pymble bus to St. Ives (Warrimoo Road) - Cowan Creek - Bobbin Head - Berowra. 12 miles. Track walking all the way through Kuringai Chase. The area is noted for the excellent display of wildflowers. 9.10 a.m. train Central Electric Station to Pymble via Bridge. 9.46 a.m. bus Pymble to Warrimoo Road. Tickets: Berowra via Bridge at about 6/- plus 1/- bus fare. Map: Broken Bay Military. Leader: Thelma Giblett.| |October 15|Pymble bus to St. Ives (Warrimoo Road) - Cowan Creek - Bobbin Head - Berowra. 12 miles. Track walking all the way through Kuringai Chase. The area is noted for the excellent display of wildflowers. 9.10 a.m. train Central Electric Station to Pymble via Bridge. 9.46 a.m. bus Pymble to Warrimoo Road. Tickets: Berowra via Bridge at about 6/- plus 1/- bus fare. Map: Broken Bay Military. Leader: Thelma Giblett.|
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196109.txt · Last modified: 2016/02/29 01:54 by tyreless