User Tools

Site Tools


196102

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
196102 [2013/03/19 09:29]
robert_carter
196102 [2013/03/19 09:56] (current)
robert_carter
Line 302: Line 302:
  
  
 +===== Dry Milk Delirium =====
 +
 +By A. Theakston.
  
-DRY MLLE DELLIIT1.1. 
-- A, Theakston. 
 An orderly Boxing Day en route An orderly Boxing Day en route
-with chicken and Rhine-gold to boot soon came to an end+with chicken and Rhine-gold to boot 
 +soon came to an end
 in a blaze of glory when in a blaze of glory when
-the flotsam of the new morn brought shark for breakfast and the thought of the disorderly spectacle we cast+the flotsam of the new morn brought 
 +shark for breakfast and the thought 
 +of the disorderly spectacle we cast
 for Australia is truly a land of contrast. for Australia is truly a land of contrast.
-By mute threats and muttered indecisions amidst heat and discontent + 
-our leader from the rear did lead us to a lagoon off liurrumburra ​Beach. +By mute threats and muttered indecisions 
-Two glorious nights, two glorious days basking and swimming in hot and cold pools eating oysters, catching fish, Derek'​s ​monstei., Beverly so chic!. +amidst heat and discontent 
-Gesila so darkMargo and Stan so bright red,+our leader from the rear did lead us 
 +to a lagoon off Murrumburra ​Beach. 
 +Two glorious nights, two glorious days 
 +basking and swimming in hot and cold pools 
 +eating oysters, catching fish, 
 +Derek'​s ​monster, Beverly so chic! 
 +Gesila so darkMargo and Stan so bright red,
 dried vegs and ugh - nutmeat dried vegs and ugh - nutmeat
 all in the shadow of the Bull and Cow reef. all in the shadow of the Bull and Cow reef.
 +
 Our backs and shoulders were brindle and red Our backs and shoulders were brindle and red
-so off to Pretty Beach with its shop and its girls then under the stars did everyone bed. +so off to Pretty Beach with its shop and its girls 
-The water was cold, the rocks hot and hard fossils gazed Up out of sightless eyes +then under the stars did everyone bed. 
-onward we vent, as you please+The water was cold, the rocks hot and hard 
 +fossils gazed up out of sightless eyes 
 +onward we went, as you please
 after spending some time after spending some time
 eating the rind of car Tassie cheese. eating the rind of car Tassie cheese.
 +
 A Hollywood jungle we did find A Hollywood jungle we did find
-a garden of Eden except for the flies crab for supper, stingray for breakfast who knows what beyond tomorrow lays+a garden of Eden except for the flies 
 +crab for supper, stingray for breakfast 
 +who knows what beyond tomorrow lays
 Our little Napolean craved by now Our little Napolean craved by now
-to have us all numbered or mow: +to have us all numbered or wow ! 
-made her greatest mistake to tit+made her greatest mistake to wit
 "Walk two miles and no more, so be it". "Walk two miles and no more, so be it".
-The wrath of the Busbies ​is slow to take hold still: She was led underwater to behold+The wrath of the Bushies ​is slow to take hold 
 +still, she was led underwater to behold
 a shark and a stingray which in their turn a shark and a stingray which in their turn
-gave contemptuous glares'in -which she did burn+gave contemptuous glares in which she did burn
 only one thing was wrong, neither wanted her eighter. only one thing was wrong, neither wanted her eighter.
-At Pebbly Beach we were met by a reception a ranger full of awkward questions + 
-and soon New -fear's Eve was being spent +At Pebbly Beach we were met by a reception 
-in the usual may with heads bent+a ranger full of awkward questions 
 +and soon New Year's Eve was being spent 
 +in the usual way with heads bent
 over a mug of punch and a hissing brown serpent. over a mug of punch and a hissing brown serpent.
-15. +
-16.+
 New Year's Day came in a burst of glory New Year's Day came in a burst of glory
 the stars went out and it became quite gory the stars went out and it became quite gory
-the -water was frigid, only the English could stand it So we walked out until+the -water was frigid, only the English could stand it 
 +So we walked out until
 Depot Beach seemed far behind ​ Depot Beach seemed far behind ​
-Ahead, a cold vet night and a dry sawmill. +Ahead, a cold wet night and a dry sawmill. 
-WATCH OUT FOR THE INDIANS. + 
-(Continued). + 
-Keith Renwick. +===== Watch Out For The Indians ​(Continued)===== 
-In the course of climbing out I was invited to join Michael and Gilly, who had a Simca stationwaggon, for a few days visiting the scenic attractions of the area. This was a very lucky break. There is definitely only one real way to see America and this is by car. The mhole country is geared for this type of transport and it's the only may to get to many places, scenic spots and camping areas alike. + 
-That night we caMped ​at Desert View which is the furthest east of the Grand Canyon Lookout points, from Vhich you look vest and north along the canyon and east out over the painted desert and Indian Country, ​lihich ​is at a Slightly ​lower level than the rest of the Grand Canyon Plateau area. We spent most of the morning admiring the view and visiting a reproduction of a Hopi Tower which, ​then new, are used as combined lookout tower food storage place and fart. This one, apart from the commanding ​View from the top, is used as a museum with many Indian paintings and relics. They are quite big structures of stone and mud construction about 4 stories high, round and slightly tapering from the bottom to the top. Inside they had floors ​Which bad a hole in the middle which in the old days provided access to the floor by means of a ladder. In times of seige these ladders were pulled up and the fart defended from the inside by means of the hole in the floor. +By Keith Renwick. 
-Travelling South East from Desert View toward Cameron we came to a small notice pointing along a side road to a lookout overlooking the Little Colorado River, obviously some small side stream, but we thought we might as well have a look anyway. After you leave the car you walk a few yards out to the drop only to find it a false lip and after scrambling down this you go out to the cliff edge in front oily to find it's another false lip and so on until you begin to wonder just where the + 
-edge is. Suddenly you.:'re there and are looking 3,000 to 4,000 ftvertically downward into a canyon only a few hundred feet wide with a roaring brown river at the bottom. A couple of steps further forward a "​slight"​ step down and you'd have wet feet! +In the course of climbing out I was invited to join Michael and Gilly, who had a Simca stationwagon, for a few days visiting the scenic attractions of the area. This was a very lucky break. There is definitely only one real way to see America and this is by car. The whole country is geared for this type of transport and it's the only way to get to many places, scenic spots and camping areas alike. 
-After regathering our gulps we boarded the car and headed to Cameron and south + 
-to Wupatki National Monument and the Citadel. These are ,​s,?,​acient ​Indian Pueblo remains of Indians who inhabited the area after the eruption of Sunset Crater volcano (nearby) in 1064.A.D. They were attracted by the rich volcanic soil and developed quite a high standard of living before being driven out by a 30-year drought at the end of +That night we camped ​at Desert View which is the furthest east of the Grand Canyon Lookout points, from which you look west and north along the canyon and east out over the painted desert and Indian Country, ​which is at a slightly ​lower level than the rest of the Grand Canyon Plateau area. We spent most of the morning admiring the view and visiting a reproduction of a Hopi Tower which, ​when new, are used as combined lookout tower food storage place and fort. This one, apart from the commanding ​view from the top, is used as a museum with many Indian paintings and relics. They are quite big structures of stone and mud construction about 4 stories high, round and slightly tapering from the bottom to the top. Inside they had floors ​which had a hole in the middle which in the old days provided access to the floor by means of a ladder. In times of seige these ladders were pulled up and the fort defended from the inside by means of the hole in the floor. 
-the 1200 A.D's. Prior to the eruption of the volcano the Indians ​mho had been in this area before lived in pit dwellings. + 
-These dwellings (only the walls still standing) were built of flat slabs of rock stacked on top of each other and reached a height of several stories in some places, the cracks being filled in with mud and clay. They cultivated crops in shallow depressions filled with volcanic ash soil which gathered and held what little +Travelling South East from Desert View toward Cameron we came to a small notice pointing along a side road to a lookout overlooking the Little Colorado River, obviously some small side stream, but we thought we might as well have a look anyway. After you leave the car you walk a few yards out to the drop only to find it a false lip and after scrambling down this you go out to the cliff edge in front only to find it's another false lip and so on until you begin to wonder just where the edge is. Suddenly you're there and are looking 3,000 to 4,000 ft vertically downward into a canyon only a few hundred feet wide with a roaring brown river at the bottom. A couple of steps further forward a "​slight"​ step down and you'd have wet feet! 
-17. + 
-moisture there vas, because even in those times it was semi desert. Pottery and basketry also were well practised arts. Rocky outcrops of sedimentary rocks provided the flagging for the buildings but in between these rocky outcrops was rich red volcanic soil broken ​dawn from the ash and pumice thrown out by the explosive eruption of the volcano. There was no lava flow. +After regathering our gulps we boarded the car and headed to Cameron and south to Wupatki National Monument and the Citadel. These are ancient ​Indian Pueblo remains of Indians who inhabited the area after the eruption of Sunset Crater volcano (nearby) in 1064 AD. They were attracted by the rich volcanic soil and developed quite a high standard of living before being driven out by a 30-year drought at the end of the 1200 ADs. Prior to the eruption of the volcano the Indians ​who had been in this area before lived in pit dwellings. 
-As we got in near to the volcano, which protrudes about 1,000 ftabove the plateau floor in a perfect cone, the small nut size rocks changed to jet black and covered the entire scene (it was much like coke to look:at). We climbed Sunset crater and it lives up to its name, with a jet black foreground and a blood red sunset over the painted desert. + 
-We moved on further by car that night before we camped; and awoke the next morning at Oak Creek Canyon south of Flagstaff. It is a large yellow sandstone +These dwellings (only the walls still standing) were built of flat slabs of rock stacked on top of each other and reached a height of several stories in some places, the cracks being filled in with mud and clay. They cultivated crops in shallow depressions filled with volcanic ash soil which gathered and held what little moisture there was, because even in those times it was semi desert. Pottery and basketry also were well practised arts. Rocky outcrops of sedimentary rocks provided the flagging for the buildings but in between these rocky outcrops was rich red volcanic soil broken ​down from the ash and pumice thrown out by the explosive eruption of the volcano. There was no lava flow. 
-bed and all weathered out by the action of the river and rain to a depth of a couple + 
-of thousand feet. What really sets it off is the rich green vegetation against the red sandstone. We spent some time walking around and driving through the canyon, +As we got in near to the volcano, which protrudes about 1,000 ft above the plateau floor in a perfect cone, the small nut size rocks changed to jet black and covered the entire scene (it was much like coke to look at). We climbed Sunset crater and it lives up to its name, with a jet black foreground and a blood red sunset over the painted desert. 
-then headed north west to Walnut Canyon National ​Ebnament. It is a small narrow + 
-canyon a couple of hundred feet deep in the white sandstone/​limestone mentioned +We moved on further by car that night before we camped; and awoke the next morning at Oak Creek Canyon south of Flagstaff. It is a large yellow sandstone bed and all weathered out by the action of the river and rain to a depth of a couple of thousand feet. What really sets it off is the rich green vegetation against the red sandstone. We spent some time walking around and driving through the canyon, then headed north west to Walnut Canyon National ​Monument. It is a small narrow canyon a couple of hundred feet deep in the white sandstone/​limestone mentioned previously. In the overhanging ledges, the cliff dwelling Indians, of the same time as the Pueblo Indians at Wupatki, built their stone and clay dwelling houses. Once again the park was spendidly laid out with free booklets and a track to follow which had numbered ​pegs on it. The vegetation in the canyon was roughly similar to that around Sydney, and the mountains; a relatively dry climate with sandy soil giving a predominately spiny vegetation on the ridges with a lush growth in the sheltered creek beds. There was of course a large variety and most of them had pegs in front of them, while the description in the book told what the plant was, a bit about it and, most interesting of all, what the Indians used it for. They sure were clued up on using things around them. Once again they reached a relatively high standard of living with beautiful pottery and basketwork. 
-previously. In the overhanging ledges, the cliff dwelling Indians, of the same time as the Pueblo Indians at WUpatki, built their stone and clay dwelling houses. + 
-Once again the park was spendidly laid out with free booklets and a track to follow which had naMbered ​pegs on it. The vegetation in the canyon was roughly similar to that around Sydney, and the mountains; a relatively dry climate with sandy soil +Their homes were made by stacking up flat slabby stones in front of these overhangs and at the ends. They had one small door opening about 3 feet high 17-18" thick and perhaps a small window high up about 1 foot square. Possibly also to let the smoke out as the roofs of the caves were well blackened. Everyone lived as one big happy family, so to speak, all sharing the one room. However these people also suffered the hand of drought and eventually had to move on as the water supplies failed. This was the same 30 year drought that affected their contemporaries further north at the end of the 1200'​s. 
-giving a predominately spiny vegetation on the ridges with a lush growth in the + 
-sheltered creek beds. There was of course a large variety and most of them had pegs +The Petrified Forest is a long way further east than Walnut Canyon and we got there late in the afternoon only an hour or so before it shut. In order to keep a check on the souvenir hunters, ​which America is full of, they have this Park completely fenced around with a high wirenetting fenceetcwith a gate at each end (about 5-10 miles apart) and a road through it. This road isn't fenced and you can wander freely from it, but the whole lot is closed up at night. There are guards apt to search your car, though not always, at each end. Once again they had a very well planned information office-cum-museum ​Which tells about all there is to know about the forest. There is also of course plenty of free and purchasable booklets. 
-in front of them, while the description in the book told what the plant was, a bit about it and, most interesting of all, what the Indians used it for. They sure were + 
-clued up on using things around them. Once again they reached a relatively high standard of living with beautiful pottery and basketwork. +At one time in the early geological history of the U.S.A. there were great forests 90 to 100 miles to the west. As the trees died they were carried East to a great flood plain where they were quickly buried with sediments and eventually covered to a depth of 3,000 feet. As this was going on, silica (like quartz) in the sedimentary deposits was slowly ​being dissolved and redeposited inside the small cells and pores of the wood. Then as the wood gradually rotted away all that was left was the stone. 
-Their homes were made by stacking up flat slabby stones in front of these + 
-overhangs and at the ends. They had one small door opening about 3 feet high 17- 18" +Then the great Rocky Mountain uplift started, pulling this area up with it. Gradually ​all the accumulated deposits were eroded from the surface until today where these deposits are once again exposed to view. 
-thick and perhaps a small window high up about 1 foot square. Possibly also to let + 
-the smoke out as theroofs ​of the caves were well blackened. Everyone lived as one big happy family, so to speak, all sharing the one room. However these people also +We just got out of the north end in time and went a few miles north to a lookout and a sunset over the painted desert again. (The painted desert is a pretty large area.) 
-suffered the hand of drought and eventually had to move on as the mater supplies + 
-failed. This vas the same 30 year drought that affected their contemporaries further north at the end of the 1200'​s. +That night we drove a long way further south west headed for Carlsbad Caverns. It was full moon and bitterly cold. We were very surprised to find that even though we were on a high plateau 6,000 to 7,000 feet above sea level there were still high mountains around us, many with snow on, rising to 10,000 to 12,000 feet above sea level. Mostly the hills and mountains were wooded with pine forests (except the top) but the flat plains in between were just brown grass land. We camped that night just over a 7,000 feet pass. On again in the morning then in the afternoon we came over the rim of a large sunken valley and down past the rocket launching establishments of White Sands. Curses, they didn't let any rockets off for us! In the middle of the valley floor is White Sands National Monument. 
-The Petrified Forest is a long may further east than Walnut Canyon and we got there late in the afternoon only an hour or SD before it shut. In order to keep a check:​onthe ​souvenir hunters, ​Which America is full of, they have this Park completely fenced around with a high wirenetting fence etcwith a gate at each end (about 5-10 miles apart) and a road through it. This road isn't fenced and you can wander freely from it, but the whole lot is closed up at night. There are guards apt to search your car, though not always, at each end. Once again they had a very well planned information office-cum-musaum ​Which tells about all there is to know about the forest. There is also of course plenty of free and purchasable booklets. + 
-Atone time in the early geological history of the U.S.A. there were great forests 90 to 100 miles to the west. As the trees died they were carried East to a great flood plain where they were quickly buried with sediments and eventually covered to a depth of 3,000 feet. As this was going on, silica (like quartz) in the sedimentary +This is a lot of windblown ​sandhills ​of Gypsum ​or Calcium Sulphate and is the by-product of the weathering of large selenite crystals in the mountains nearby. Once again they have a museum, continous films, free booklets and numbered pegs but you have to drive round this time as it is so big (16 miles round trip). Of course you can get out and walk around as the many bare footprints on the hills testify. The hills are continually on the move so that they have to keep making the road but as this is gypsum surfaced it is no real problem. This shift is fairly slow because along the edge where vegetation of sorts grows, it just keeps lengthening its roots as the hill slowly rises about them and in this way keeps on top. However when the hill moves on the roots are unclothed again and stand naked several feet above the floor of the valley. 
-I8. + 
-deposits was Slowly ​being dissolved and redeposited inside the small cells and pores of the wood. Then as the wood gradually rotted away all that was left was the stone. +People of course write their names in the sand: however, this is one place where it doesn'​t really matter because it all gets blown out again with the next wind ! 
-Then the great Rocky Mountain uplift started, pulling this area up with it. Gradually ​Pill the accumulated:deposits were eroded from the surface until today where these deposits are once again exposed to view. + 
-We just got out of the north end in time and vent a few miles north to a lookout and a sunset over the painted desert again. (The painted desert is a pretty large area.) +It's a long way from White Sands to Carlsbad Caves but we reached there early in the morning ​to find large notices about no camping in the park, so we camped just outside the park at the front gate. 
-That night we drove a long way further south west headed for Carlsbad Caverns. It was full moon and bitterly cold. We were very surprised to find that even though we were on a high plateau 6,000 to 7,000 feet above sea level there were still high mountains around us, many with snow on, rising to 10,000 to 12,000 feet above sea level. Mostly the hills and mountains were wooded with pine forests (except the top) but the flat plains in between were just brown grass land. We camped that night just over a 7,000 feet pass. On again in the morning then in the afternoon we came over the rim of a large sunken valley and down past the rocket launching establishments of White Sands. Curses, they didn't let any rockets off far us! In the middle of the valley floor is White Sands National Monument. + 
-This is a lot of windblown ​sandbills ​of Gypsim ​or Calcium Sulphate and is the by-product of the weathering of large selenite crystals in the mountains nearby. Once again they have a museum, continous films, free booklets and numbered pegs but you have to drive round this time as it is so big (16 miles round trip).. Of course you can get out and walk around as the many bare footprints on the hills testily. The hills are continually on the move so that they have to keep making the road but as this is gypsum surfaced it is no real problem. This shift is fairly slow because along the edge where vegetation of sorts grows, it just keeps lengthening its roots as the hill slowly rises about them and in this way keeps on top. However when the hill moves on the roots are unclothed again and stand naked several feet above the floor of the valley. +The area around here is a very dry, rocky desert regeion with limestone and sandstone outcrops along narrow gullies which were former creek beds. It is all part of a small plateau and the roadway follows one of these dry creek beds, eventually emerging out on the plateau edge which drops steeply away several hundred feet to a flat desert plain below. The vegetation is mostly cacti and other desert plants. Right near the edge of this plateau is an enormous new building housing all the park facilities and administration centre. This building ​is about the size of a small university. They have restaurants,​ souvenir ​shops, museum, living quarters ​for the staff, waiting hall and many other facilities including the top outlet of the lifts from the "​Big ​Room". 
-People of course write their names in the sand: however, this is one place where it doesn'​t really matter because it all gets blown out again with the next mind+
-It's a long way from Mite Sands to Carlsbad Caves but we reached there early in the morninz ​to find large notices about no camping in the park, so we camped just outside the part at the front gate. +
-The area around here is a very dry, rocky desert regeion with limestone and sandstone outcrops along narrow gullies which were former creek:beds. 'It is all part of a small plateau and the roadway follows one of these dry creek beds, eventually emerging out on the plateau edge which drops steeply away several hundred feet to a flat desert plain below. The vegetation is mostly cacti and other desert plants. Right near the edge of this plateau is an enormous new building housing all the park facilities and administration centre. This bufl  ding is about the size of a small university. They have restaurants,​ souvenir ​Shops, museum, living quarters ​far the staff, waiting hall and many other facilities including the top outlet of the lifts from the "​Big ​Rood'.+
 (To be continued) (To be continued)
  
196102.txt · Last modified: 2013/03/19 09:56 by robert_carter