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196008 [2016/01/20 22:51]
kennettj
196008 [2016/04/23 07:29] (current)
kennettj [Head Due South]
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 We reached Newnes at 1 am, and the trouble started. My four "​lady"​ passengers thought it unnecessary to pitch the tent and were debating who would sleep in the car and whop would sleep under the tent. As it may have lasted all nigh and they were not considering accommodating me either in the car or the tent I solved their problem - I locked the tent in the boot and took possession of the back seat leaving them to choose a suitable tree for shelter. First light found our illustrious leader ringing an electric bell in our ears. The effect on Helen Barrett was to cause her to say "​Answer that phone, someone",​ revolve once, and continue her slumber. We reached Newnes at 1 am, and the trouble started. My four "​lady"​ passengers thought it unnecessary to pitch the tent and were debating who would sleep in the car and whop would sleep under the tent. As it may have lasted all nigh and they were not considering accommodating me either in the car or the tent I solved their problem - I locked the tent in the boot and took possession of the back seat leaving them to choose a suitable tree for shelter. First light found our illustrious leader ringing an electric bell in our ears. The effect on Helen Barrett was to cause her to say "​Answer that phone, someone",​ revolve once, and continue her slumber.
  
-At Eight, somewhat behind schedule, the leader headed downstream whilst George Grey headed upstream. These differences of opinion with respect to navigation became the prime feature of our attempts to get lost. That the party led by Snow had only reached Annie Rowan'​s clearing on the first day, a distance of four miles, was to quote the Duncan - "not only disgusting but absurd also. See that my party reaches Bullring Creek by dusk". By nine the ruins were reached and a pleasant hour was spent playing boats and sunbaking in an open tank on the roof of the candle factory. Eventually we moved on but we covered barely half a mile when we came upon a bushfire. With a little encouragement from Heather, our conservation spirit pervaded us, so we downed backs and set to. All our efforts to extinguis. ​one tree were in vain until Dot threw earth over it. What a predicament - contrary to The Club s rule we had extinguished a fire with dirt. Should we waive the rule or set all on fire again? Fortunately our problem was solved by Snow bringing a bucket of water from the creek. Eleven thirty saw the fire and our schedule out so we pressed on. The delay was obviously causing the leader great concern for upon reaching the mine he promptly dropped his pack and led off down the tunnel. Our inspection took but half an hour and thereafter we had great difficulty restraining Bob from roaming off towards every likely looking ruin.+At eight, somewhat behind schedule, the leader headed downstream whilst George Grey headed upstream. These differences of opinion with respect to navigation became the prime feature of our attempts to get lost. That the party led by Snow had only reached Annie Rowan'​s clearing on the first day, a distance of four miles, was to quote the Duncan - "not only disgusting but absurd also. See that my party reaches Bullring Creek by dusk". By nine the ruins were reached and a pleasant hour was spent playing boats and sunbaking in an open tank on the roof of the candle factory. Eventually we moved on but we covered barely half a mile when we came upon a bushfire. With a little encouragement from Heather, our conservation spirit pervaded us, so we downed backs and set to. All our efforts to extinguish ​one tree were in vain until Dot threw earth over it. What a predicament - contrary to The Club's rule we had extinguished a fire with dirt. Should we waive the rule or set all on fire again? Fortunately our problem was solved by Snow bringing a bucket of water from the creek. Eleven thirty saw the fire and our schedule out so we pressed on. The delay was obviously causing the leader great concern for upon reaching the mine he promptly dropped his pack and led off down the tunnel. Our inspection took but half an hour and thereafter we had great difficulty restraining Bob from roaming off towards every likely looking ruin.
  
 Even before lunch it was obvious to all that Lyndsey'​s leg injury was causing her considerable trouble and subsequently the party'​s speed would have to be reduced. A fine effort was made by all but due to our inspecting, exploring, sunbaking, firefighting,​ ambling and rambling we managed to reach Arnie Rowan'​s in time to camp, thus giving a repeat performance of Snow's trip. The spirits of most were high and humour was not lacking, in fact Heather'​s remarks were rather astounding. Late in the evening Snow, from his sleeping bag, suggested a brew but the water buckets were empty. As usual the girls looked to the male members who to a man refused the task on the grounds that the women were lighter on their feet, thus more surefooted in the dark, and it would be safer for them to go. Even Heather'​s eloquent though ambiguous appeals failed to inspire the men and finally Lola took up the challenge. ​ Even before lunch it was obvious to all that Lyndsey'​s leg injury was causing her considerable trouble and subsequently the party'​s speed would have to be reduced. A fine effort was made by all but due to our inspecting, exploring, sunbaking, firefighting,​ ambling and rambling we managed to reach Arnie Rowan'​s in time to camp, thus giving a repeat performance of Snow's trip. The spirits of most were high and humour was not lacking, in fact Heather'​s remarks were rather astounding. Late in the evening Snow, from his sleeping bag, suggested a brew but the water buckets were empty. As usual the girls looked to the male members who to a man refused the task on the grounds that the women were lighter on their feet, thus more surefooted in the dark, and it would be safer for them to go. Even Heather'​s eloquent though ambiguous appeals failed to inspire the men and finally Lola took up the challenge. ​
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 On Sunday morning Bob decided to curtail the walk somewhat by leading up the first likely creek downstream. On the assurance of Snow and another authority that "once above the cliff line the plateau beyond is as flat as a table" Lyndsey was encouraged to continue. The creek turned into a chimney and the view from the top was spectacular both down the valley and over the "​plateau"​. In fact the "​plateau"​ was not quite as flat as had been described - as far as the eye could see it was dissected by deep ravines and canyons which seemed to follow no set drainage pattern. As a second boost to our morale Bob promptly led off along a ridge which ended abruptly on the brink of a cliff line. After playing mountain goats for several hours we reached a ridge which looked very promising. Poor Bob was rather dismayed when he realised that the beautiful deep valley to the west which he was admiring was Annie Rowan'​s Creek, and it now seemed that the odds were in favour of it developing into a four day trip. We walked this dry and uninteresting ridge until we reached a swamp at an opportune time for lunch. Heather, Snow, George and myself took the rearguard that afternoon and soon dropped well behind owing to Snow and George insisting on leading off down side spurs, and their peculiar habit of stopping every now and. again to eat waratah seeds. The Mount Cameron track was located after much wandering along the ridge and we overhauled the main party at dusk. On Sunday morning Bob decided to curtail the walk somewhat by leading up the first likely creek downstream. On the assurance of Snow and another authority that "once above the cliff line the plateau beyond is as flat as a table" Lyndsey was encouraged to continue. The creek turned into a chimney and the view from the top was spectacular both down the valley and over the "​plateau"​. In fact the "​plateau"​ was not quite as flat as had been described - as far as the eye could see it was dissected by deep ravines and canyons which seemed to follow no set drainage pattern. As a second boost to our morale Bob promptly led off along a ridge which ended abruptly on the brink of a cliff line. After playing mountain goats for several hours we reached a ridge which looked very promising. Poor Bob was rather dismayed when he realised that the beautiful deep valley to the west which he was admiring was Annie Rowan'​s Creek, and it now seemed that the odds were in favour of it developing into a four day trip. We walked this dry and uninteresting ridge until we reached a swamp at an opportune time for lunch. Heather, Snow, George and myself took the rearguard that afternoon and soon dropped well behind owing to Snow and George insisting on leading off down side spurs, and their peculiar habit of stopping every now and. again to eat waratah seeds. The Mount Cameron track was located after much wandering along the ridge and we overhauled the main party at dusk.
  
-The campsite was in a shallow saddle well sheltered and with no chance of anyone drowning as there was no water within a mile. Rona and Dot devoured their leg of mutton - I do not say devoured without justification. Their method, which is rather unique, consists of ramming a stake through a pre-cooked leg and throwing it in the fire until it gets hot or you get impatient. Having removed it from the fire it is held by the stake and the thin end of the leg and revolved until a section appears which looks hot enough, smells alright, or can be torn apart without the nose obstructing the work of devouring it. It is passed from MS to the other and heated as frequently as required. Another innovation was a Mellah making competition which for coagulation was won by Gwen Seach and for flavour by Heather. In order to get a flying start the following morning we rolled in rather early.+The campsite was in a shallow saddle well sheltered and with no chance of anyone drowning as there was no water within a mile. Rona and Dot devoured their leg of mutton - I do not say devoured without justification. Their method, which is rather unique, consists of ramming a stake through a pre-cooked leg and throwing it in the fire until it gets hot or you get impatient. Having removed it from the fire it is held by the stake and the thin end of the leg and revolved until a section appears which looks hot enough, smells alright, or can be torn apart without the nose obstructing the work of devouring it. It is passed from one to the other and heated as frequently as required. Another innovation was a Mellah making competition which for coagulation was won by Gwen Seach and for flavour by Heather. In order to get a flying start the following morning we rolled in rather early.
  
 The flying start wasn't even a flutter as it was seven before anyone stirred. According to Duncan'​s ten miles to the inch, 250' contoured, "guess where you are" map it was a good fifteen miles walk and with no improvement in Lyndsey it showed promise of being quite a day. Lyndsey decided to leave early and asked Bob for directions. ​ Bob looked at the map, looked to the heavens, looked at Lyndsey and said "​Follow the- track till you reach the pine forest and then head due South"​. Away went Lyndsey and ten minutes later Helen received the sane instructions and followed. She was soon pursued by Gwen and Lola, twenty minutes later Bob and the Butlers set off, and another twenty saw the rearguard under way.  The flying start wasn't even a flutter as it was seven before anyone stirred. According to Duncan'​s ten miles to the inch, 250' contoured, "guess where you are" map it was a good fifteen miles walk and with no improvement in Lyndsey it showed promise of being quite a day. Lyndsey decided to leave early and asked Bob for directions. ​ Bob looked at the map, looked to the heavens, looked at Lyndsey and said "​Follow the- track till you reach the pine forest and then head due South"​. Away went Lyndsey and ten minutes later Helen received the sane instructions and followed. She was soon pursued by Gwen and Lola, twenty minutes later Bob and the Butlers set off, and another twenty saw the rearguard under way. 
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 Along the track a few miles we cam upon a recently vacated campsite which we assumed to be that of several stockmen we had met the previous day. We reached a road junction at the edge of the pine forest as Duncan'​s group were disappearing over a crest in a southerly direction. On the road was scratched the message "PARTY 3" and an arrow indicating the south road. There was some doubt as to whether this meant Bob's party or the third party, Gwen and Lola, but as all recent footprints had gone that way Snow was quick to take the opportunity to make an original move so he immediately led off at right angles. Fifteen minutes later we reached the old railway. The lack of footprints was evidence that the rearguard was now the vanguard and this fact afforded Snow considerable amusement. I argued that we were heading the wrong way bit before he could rearrange my sense of direction we heard dogs barking in a copse on the far side of the railway loop. Our calls were answered by a whoop so we waited instead of leaving a message and heading for the cars as Snow intended. Limping around the loop, accompanied by Gwen and Lola, came Lyndsey. A quick mental check indicated that Helen had strayed. Along the track a few miles we cam upon a recently vacated campsite which we assumed to be that of several stockmen we had met the previous day. We reached a road junction at the edge of the pine forest as Duncan'​s group were disappearing over a crest in a southerly direction. On the road was scratched the message "PARTY 3" and an arrow indicating the south road. There was some doubt as to whether this meant Bob's party or the third party, Gwen and Lola, but as all recent footprints had gone that way Snow was quick to take the opportunity to make an original move so he immediately led off at right angles. Fifteen minutes later we reached the old railway. The lack of footprints was evidence that the rearguard was now the vanguard and this fact afforded Snow considerable amusement. I argued that we were heading the wrong way bit before he could rearrange my sense of direction we heard dogs barking in a copse on the far side of the railway loop. Our calls were answered by a whoop so we waited instead of leaving a message and heading for the cars as Snow intended. Limping around the loop, accompanied by Gwen and Lola, came Lyndsey. A quick mental check indicated that Helen had strayed.
  
-The stockmen offered Lyndsey a ride from their camp to the road, which accepted, but before they moved off Helen caught them up and the position was explained to her. Thinking the would soon be overtaken by the horses Helen continued on but the stockmen were rather slow to break map and Lola and Gwen reached the camp before they had moved, were told of the offer to Lyndsey and went ahead also. The minted party soon caught up to the two girls but had not sighted Helen by time they reached the pine forest junction and a glance at the road was enough to show that Helen was still travelling south at a fair turn of speed. They followed, reaching the railway road just in time to see Helen vanish at high speed, still on a course due south, towards the Lithgow slag heap. One of the stockmen and a couple of dogs took off to round up Helen while the others were given correct, directions to find Newnes. More barking from the dogs in the timber, more yelling from us and round the hill came Duncan and the Butlers so we waited a little longer. He had seen the sign on the road and followed in order to be within a day's walk of the girls and upon reaching the road was given instructions by the obliging stockmen tho also assured him that they would tale care of Helen. Duncan had not finished his tale then Helen care trotting around the hill. She stumbled up to the group and looking Duncan straight in the face said "It just go e s to prove that you cannot estimate a person'​s intelligence"​. Everyone laughed but upon enquiry I discovered that no one was quite sure whether she was referring to Duncan or herself ​ To the indignant questions as to why he had ordered a south route instead of a westerly one he replied: "With you girls wanting to go running off before bird chirp you can't expect a man to have full command of hLs faculties - now, had I said east and then 180 degrees that would have been unwarranted but at that hour a slight error was permissible" ​+The stockmen offered Lyndsey a ride from their camp to the road, which accepted, but before they moved off Helen caught them up and the position was explained to her. Thinking the would soon be overtaken by the horses Helen continued on but the stockmen were rather slow to break map and Lola and Gwen reached the camp before they had moved, were told of the offer to Lyndsey and went ahead also. The minted party soon caught up to the two girls but had not sighted Helen by time they reached the pine forest junction and a glance at the road was enough to show that Helen was still travelling south at a fair turn of speed. They followed, reaching the railway road just in time to see Helen vanish at high speed, still on a course due south, towards the Lithgow slag heap. One of the stockmen and a couple of dogs took off to round up Helen while the others were given correct, directions to find Newnes. More barking from the dogs in the timber, more yelling from us and round the hill came Duncan and the Butlers so we waited a little longer. He had seen the sign on the road and followed in order to be within a day's walk of the girls and upon reaching the road was given instructions by the obliging stockmen tho also assured him that they would tale care of Helen. Duncan had not finished his tale then Helen care trotting around the hill. She stumbled up to the group and looking Duncan straight in the face said "It just goes to prove that you cannot estimate a person'​s intelligence"​. Everyone laughed but upon enquiry I discovered that no one was quite sure whether she was referring to Duncan or herself ​ To the indignant questions as to why he had ordered a south route instead of a westerly one he replied: "With you girls wanting to go running off before bird chirp you can't expect a man to have full command of his faculties - now, had I said east and then 180 degrees that would have been unwarranted but at that hour a slight error was permissible" ​
  
 The order of march was now reversed - the idea being to reach Newnes, bring the cars up and so save Lyndsey the last four miles walk. On Dot's request a member of the Catholic Bushwalkers tho had his car at the tunnel, drove back and brought Lyndsey down to inspect the tunnel after which he drove her out to Bell. We lunched on the valley side of the tunnel and then walked down the line until we reached the road leading to the farm. Dot demonstrated her maternal responsibility in an unusual may  From the time we left the pine forest she clearly marked our way with large arrows muttering as she drew them "You can't trust Duncan, he'd go astray anywhere"​. Curiosity gaining the upper hard we asked - why her interest in Bob. "​Well,"​ answered Dot, constructing a great timber arrow pointing towards the valley "Rona is with him and I don't want her to miss school tomorrow"​. A lift to the pub spared us the last four miles roadbash also and speeded up our move out. With the exception of my car taking a rest on the steepest part of the road out and holding up half a dozen cars the run to Katoomba was uneventful. The order of march was now reversed - the idea being to reach Newnes, bring the cars up and so save Lyndsey the last four miles walk. On Dot's request a member of the Catholic Bushwalkers tho had his car at the tunnel, drove back and brought Lyndsey down to inspect the tunnel after which he drove her out to Bell. We lunched on the valley side of the tunnel and then walked down the line until we reached the road leading to the farm. Dot demonstrated her maternal responsibility in an unusual may  From the time we left the pine forest she clearly marked our way with large arrows muttering as she drew them "You can't trust Duncan, he'd go astray anywhere"​. Curiosity gaining the upper hard we asked - why her interest in Bob. "​Well,"​ answered Dot, constructing a great timber arrow pointing towards the valley "Rona is with him and I don't want her to miss school tomorrow"​. A lift to the pub spared us the last four miles roadbash also and speeded up our move out. With the exception of my car taking a rest on the steepest part of the road out and holding up half a dozen cars the run to Katoomba was uneventful.
  
 +---------------
  
 On July 20th Malcolm McGregor and Jim Brown kept the full house chuckling with some rare story-telling,​ and followed up with a demonstration of an Electronic Brain designed to classify walkers into levels of competence or hopelessness. Some unwilling "​assistance from members of the audience, cunningly devised machinery with its knobs, lights, buzzers, bells and whatnots, and some hilarious results from wrong knob pulling rounded off an enjoyable evening. On July 20th Malcolm McGregor and Jim Brown kept the full house chuckling with some rare story-telling,​ and followed up with a demonstration of an Electronic Brain designed to classify walkers into levels of competence or hopelessness. Some unwilling "​assistance from members of the audience, cunningly devised machinery with its knobs, lights, buzzers, bells and whatnots, and some hilarious results from wrong knob pulling rounded off an enjoyable evening.
196008.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/04/23 07:29 by kennettj