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195910 [2018/12/19 22:50]
tyreless
195910 [2018/12/20 02:36]
tyreless
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 On Wednesday, September 23rd, the evening at the Club was given over to an important debate. Subject: "The Older Members are of Greater Benefit to the Club". On Wednesday, September 23rd, the evening at the Club was given over to an important debate. Subject: "The Older Members are of Greater Benefit to the Club".
  
-The President, Jack Gentle, was in the chair, and three members, Messrs. Ardill, ​Hallstram ​and McGregor, represented the Government (Older Members) and three, Miss Pridham and Masters Knightley and Wagg the Opposition (Younger Members).+The President, Jack Gentle, was in the chair, and three members, Messrs. Ardill, ​Hallstrom ​and McGregor, represented the Government (Older Members) and three, Miss Pridham and Masters Knightley and Wagg the Opposition (Younger Members).
  
 Kevin Ardill, clothed in white robes with an angelic halo nodding atop his head (which garb suggested that he was already defunct) opened the debate on a sober note, marred slightly by frequent libations of a golden fluid in a bottle marked: "​Bell'​s"​. Kevin Ardill, clothed in white robes with an angelic halo nodding atop his head (which garb suggested that he was already defunct) opened the debate on a sober note, marred slightly by frequent libations of a golden fluid in a bottle marked: "​Bell'​s"​.
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 It's a funny arrangement getting a job here. You ring up - he sayd to call on such and such a date a week or so later - you go in and see him - he writes in a few days to say you've got the job, rate of pay and to R.S.V.P. - you write back and accept the job and rate of pay - he writes back to say when to start - what a lot of boloney. You've almost got to swear you are staying in England for good. I feel like making them swear they'​ll keep me on for a year. It's a funny arrangement getting a job here. You ring up - he sayd to call on such and such a date a week or so later - you go in and see him - he writes in a few days to say you've got the job, rate of pay and to R.S.V.P. - you write back and accept the job and rate of pay - he writes back to say when to start - what a lot of boloney. You've almost got to swear you are staying in England for good. I feel like making them swear they'​ll keep me on for a year.
  
-I saw a funny incident last week that really tickled me. I went for a walk around the suburbs to the Zoo and Primrose Hill and further on to Hampstead Heath. I got lost a few times getting there but it reminded me something of Norton'​s Basin on the Warragamba. Soon I came upon a pond on a crest of a hill and as the breeze was pretty stiff there were quite a few model yacht racing events. Well - I hear this revving up of a small motor and there I see a young bloke with a sparkling new boat with a propeller, sort of aeroplane style, at the back. It keeps spluttering and burping till he finally got it right and lowered it into the water very gently. The boat took off with a whishshshsh and he started running with his eyes glued to the boat. I could see he wouldn'​t make it and started laughing. On he ran and fell in the icy water - I laughed louder. The boat crashed into the other side and sank. I almost split myself. While others were giving me dirty looks and being sympathetic to the bloke I was wiping the tears from my eys. It looked so much like something Charlie Chaplin would do.+I saw a funny incident last week that really tickled me. I went for a walk around the suburbs to the Zoo and Primrose Hill and further on to Hampstead Heath. I got lost a few times getting there but it reminded me something of Norton'​s Basin on the Warragamba. Soon I came upon a pond on a crest of a hill and as the breeze was pretty stiff there were quite a few model yacht racing events. Well - I hear this revving up of a small motor and there I see a young bloke with a sparkling new boat with a propeller, sort of aeroplane style, at the back. It keeps spluttering and burping till he finally got it right and lowered it into the water very gently. The boat took off with a whishshshsh and he started running with his eyes glued to the boat. I could see he wouldn'​t make it and started laughing. On he ran and fell in the icy water - I laughed louder. The boat crashed into the other side and sank. I almost split myself. While others were giving me dirty looks and being sympathetic to the bloke I was wiping the tears from my eyes. It looked so much like something Charlie Chaplin would do.
  
 "Where I'm working I'm the only one who can fit, turn, weld and mill and the "​Gov'​nor"​ thinks I'm "​smashing"​. He hasn't asked just what I'm smashing. "Where I'm working I'm the only one who can fit, turn, weld and mill and the "​Gov'​nor"​ thinks I'm "​smashing"​. He hasn't asked just what I'm smashing.
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 === Sanitarium Health Food and Vegetarian Cafe. === === Sanitarium Health Food and Vegetarian Cafe. ===
  
-Warmer weather ​callf for a change in your food-list. But the Sanitarium Shop caters for all seasons. So call in and make yourself familiar with out wide range of food products suitable for the bushwalker.... whatever the weather!+Warmer weather ​calls for a change in your food-list. But the Sanitarium Shop caters for all seasons. So call in and make yourself familiar with out wide range of food products suitable for the bushwalker.... whatever the weather!
  
 13 Hunter St., Sydney. BW1725. 13 Hunter St., Sydney. BW1725.
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 The subjects vary in different regions, whether we speak of our local district, or of the whole of the Continent. For instance, marine subjects are much more common near the coast; some tribes depicted them, others did not. Again, though some inland tribes ate river fish, they never presented them in their art. Strangely enough though such animals as the platypus, koala, wombat, possum, birds, are not often seen, the spiny ant-eater is not uncommon, while the wallaby and the kangaroo are hot favourites. Flowers and shellfish are among the rarest objects depicted in rock art, because they were considered to belong to the realm of women, and believe it or not, there was nothing effeminate about being an aboriginal artist. That was a man's work. Something like being a monumental mason, I guess. As so much of the aboriginal art had to do with native laws, ritual, fertility, and hunting for bigger game, perhaps the reason for the division of labour is easy to understand. The subjects vary in different regions, whether we speak of our local district, or of the whole of the Continent. For instance, marine subjects are much more common near the coast; some tribes depicted them, others did not. Again, though some inland tribes ate river fish, they never presented them in their art. Strangely enough though such animals as the platypus, koala, wombat, possum, birds, are not often seen, the spiny ant-eater is not uncommon, while the wallaby and the kangaroo are hot favourites. Flowers and shellfish are among the rarest objects depicted in rock art, because they were considered to belong to the realm of women, and believe it or not, there was nothing effeminate about being an aboriginal artist. That was a man's work. Something like being a monumental mason, I guess. As so much of the aboriginal art had to do with native laws, ritual, fertility, and hunting for bigger game, perhaps the reason for the division of labour is easy to understand.
  
-There are exceptions, particularly in the Kimberleys, where Dr. Phyllis Kaberry, a girl I went to school with, discovered that the wife of a clan headman, goes along with her husband when he does a repaint job on a crocodile figure in a cave, to increase crocodile numbers. As in the Kimberley paintings and the Sydney-Hawkesbury rock engravings, the dominating forms are human and huge spirit beings. I remember going on a walk beginning at Mt. Kuring-gai and discovering not far from the railway line a huge spirit being. Leading away from this rock carving, in a northerly direction, I counted 32 footprints carved in the rock in a distance of about a quarter of a mile. I saw another ​lerge spirit being someway off the track near Kariong, out of Gosford. This could have been almost thirty feet long.+There are exceptions, particularly in the Kimberleys, where Dr. Phyllis Kaberry, a girl I went to school with, discovered that the wife of a clan headman, goes along with her husband when he does a repaint job on a crocodile figure in a cave, to increase crocodile numbers. As in the Kimberley paintings and the Sydney-Hawkesbury rock engravings, the dominating forms are human and huge spirit beings. I remember going on a walk beginning at Mt. Kuring-gai and discovering not far from the railway line a huge spirit being. Leading away from this rock carving, in a northerly direction, I counted 32 footprints carved in the rock in a distance of about a quarter of a mile. I saw another ​large spirit being someway off the track near Kariong, out of Gosford. This could have been almost thirty feet long.
  
-The manner of their presentation is also very interesting. If you recall seeing any of these larger-than-life human figures, you will have noticed that they are always shown from the front. Mostly with arms outspread or above the head. The legs are usually apart. The fingers and toes, if present, look like forks, the hair like that of a model who had just received an electric shock. Sometimes the figures had phallic symbols and were used for instruction of the young, as is seen in the carvings (off the beaten track to visitors) at Muogamarra ​sanctury, not far from the Hawkesbury River.+The manner of their presentation is also very interesting. If you recall seeing any of these larger-than-life human figures, you will have noticed that they are always shown from the front. Mostly with arms outspread or above the head. The legs are usually apart. The fingers and toes, if present, look like forks, the hair like that of a model who had just received an electric shock. Sometimes the figures had phallic symbols and were used for instruction of the young, as is seen in the carvings (off the beaten track to visitors) at Muogamarra ​sanctuary, not far from the Hawkesbury River.
  
 Animals are usually shown in profile. Whales and sharks usually have one (sometimes two) eyes showing, with a line for the mouth, and sometimes only one pair of limbs or fins, shown. Mammals such as the kangaroo were drawn in profile, but lizards, snakes, turtles, were depicted from above. It seems as though the rock artists depicted their subjects from the angle at which they most commonly saw them; they would see kangaroos hopping, emus running, but they would look down on a tortoise or a snake. Animals are usually shown in profile. Whales and sharks usually have one (sometimes two) eyes showing, with a line for the mouth, and sometimes only one pair of limbs or fins, shown. Mammals such as the kangaroo were drawn in profile, but lizards, snakes, turtles, were depicted from above. It seems as though the rock artists depicted their subjects from the angle at which they most commonly saw them; they would see kangaroos hopping, emus running, but they would look down on a tortoise or a snake.
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 In many respects aboriginal surface rock art in our district seems childlike, because no effort has been made to suggest body contours, feathers, fur, scales, or tones of body coverings. Still in other parts of Australia, the aboriginal artist did some very original work, with the MIMI stick people and the X-Ray fish, kangaroos and birds. In many respects aboriginal surface rock art in our district seems childlike, because no effort has been made to suggest body contours, feathers, fur, scales, or tones of body coverings. Still in other parts of Australia, the aboriginal artist did some very original work, with the MIMI stick people and the X-Ray fish, kangaroos and birds.
  
-These MIMI stick figures of the north are in striking contrast to the huge figures on the Hawkesbury sandstone. Perhaps the fact that even adjacent tribes often had a distinctly different artistic history, accounts for this pattern of contrast. But no matter what part of Australia you travel and search for aboriginal paintings or carvings, you will find an all-over talent for telling a pictorial story. It may be the story of spearing kangaroos in Dufgy's Forest, of a whale feast in Muogamarra Sanctuary, or the trail of an Emu hunt in the big gallery in the red cave at Mootwingee, in far western N.S.W.+These MIMI stick figures of the north are in striking contrast to the huge figures on the Hawkesbury sandstone. Perhaps the fact that even adjacent tribes often had a distinctly different artistic history, accounts for this pattern of contrast. But no matter what part of Australia you travel and search for aboriginal paintings or carvings, you will find an all-over talent for telling a pictorial story. It may be the story of spearing kangaroos in Duffy's Forest, of a whale feast in Muogamarra Sanctuary, or the trail of an Emu hunt in the big gallery in the red cave at Mootwingee, in far western N.S.W.
  
 We are particularly lucky to be doing so much of our bush walking in the Sydney-Hawkesbury district, because anthropologists believe that in the heavily dissected plateau where one finds numerous fairly flat rock surfaces, there are more engravings, more carved outlines than in any other part of the world. They believe there are close on 4,000 figures, a wonderful record of the aboriginals long occupation of the area and an enduring museum of his culture - if vandals don't discover their whereabouts,​ or water erosion leach them away for ever. We are particularly lucky to be doing so much of our bush walking in the Sydney-Hawkesbury district, because anthropologists believe that in the heavily dissected plateau where one finds numerous fairly flat rock surfaces, there are more engravings, more carved outlines than in any other part of the world. They believe there are close on 4,000 figures, a wonderful record of the aboriginals long occupation of the area and an enduring museum of his culture - if vandals don't discover their whereabouts,​ or water erosion leach them away for ever.
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 === Walking trial (12 hours). === === Walking trial (12 hours). ===
  
-Eight parties entered and interesting routes were taken, e.g. Kanangra - cross Kawmung, Scott'​s Main Range - Cookem - Black Dog; Jenolan - Harry'​s River - Breakfast Creek.+Eight parties entered and interesting routes were taken, e.g. Kanangra - cross Kowmung, Scott'​s Main Range - Cookem - Black Dog; Jenolan - Harry'​s River - Breakfast Creek.
  
 It all ended in a campfire at Carlon'​s on Saturday night, followed by a spinebash on Sunday. It all ended in a campfire at Carlon'​s on Saturday night, followed by a spinebash on Sunday.
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 Written by J.W. for Eileen, Snow, George and Yarmak. Written by J.W. for Eileen, Snow, George and Yarmak.
  
-It was all Snow's fault. But then it always is. He suggested White'​s River Hut and as I had had two goes at getting there, I said whaoko!!+It was all Snow's fault. But then it always is. He suggested White'​s River Hut and as I had had two goes at getting there, I said whacko!!
  
 Yarmak and I went down to Cooma on the Midnight Horror (alias the Koszi Snow Express) and met Snow, George and Eileen at the Hotel site early Saturday morning; well, it was 11 o'​clock any-way, we loaded the food and gear into the cars and set off to Munyang Power Station. Yarmak and I went down to Cooma on the Midnight Horror (alias the Koszi Snow Express) and met Snow, George and Eileen at the Hotel site early Saturday morning; well, it was 11 o'​clock any-way, we loaded the food and gear into the cars and set off to Munyang Power Station.
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 "​We'​ve got a steep climb up the Penstock but after that its flat all the way, so we'll be there for tea" says Snow. We groaned and tried to get above horizontal under our packs and skis and dutifully trotted after him up the zigzag road. At 3.32 p.m. the following day we arrived at White'​s River Hut. "​We'​ve got a steep climb up the Penstock but after that its flat all the way, so we'll be there for tea" says Snow. We groaned and tried to get above horizontal under our packs and skis and dutifully trotted after him up the zigzag road. At 3.32 p.m. the following day we arrived at White'​s River Hut.
  
-"There might be Rats here" says Snow. So when it was time for bed we did our packs up tight, pulled our heads in and went to sleep on the mattresses on the floor. About 12 o'​clock there was a bit of a rumpus among the dillies and things on the table. I sat up and looked around, but couldn'​t see a thing except a tin, which had obviously fallen off the table and was rocking slowly back and forth on the floor. Mmm" I thought "​Rats"​. I struggled up and hopped over to the table to investigate,​ but didn't look in the pack which was on the table in case a rat jumped out on top of me. Not a thing moved, not a sound anywhere, so abandoning the search, I went back to the crack beside George in which I had been wedged. Once on your side and you couldn'​t move an inch.+"There might be Rats here" says Snow. So when it was time for bed we did our packs up tight, pulled our heads in and went to sleep on the mattresses on the floor. About 12 o'​clock there was a bit of a rumpus among the dillies and things on the table. I sat up and looked around, but couldn'​t see a thing except a tin, which had obviously fallen off the table and was rocking slowly back and forth on the floor. ​"Mmm" I thought "​Rats"​. I struggled up and hopped over to the table to investigate,​ but didn't look in the pack which was on the table in case a rat jumped out on top of me. Not a thing moved, not a sound anywhere, so abandoning the search, I went back to the crack beside George in which I had been wedged. Once on your side and you couldn'​t move an inch.
  
 I had no sooner got comfortable when one of the plates fell onto the floor with a crash and we all jumped upright, even Snow; but the Rat was gone, and after hanging up the packs and plugging up one of the more obvious holes we all went back to bed. George had blocked up the hole with a tine and a large stone on top. For half an hour after the poor rat strained and grunted with exertion trying to get that rock off his hole and for spite came over and chewed Yarmak'​s flying helmet, which Yarmak happened to be wearing at the time. I had no sooner got comfortable when one of the plates fell onto the floor with a crash and we all jumped upright, even Snow; but the Rat was gone, and after hanging up the packs and plugging up one of the more obvious holes we all went back to bed. George had blocked up the hole with a tine and a large stone on top. For half an hour after the poor rat strained and grunted with exertion trying to get that rock off his hole and for spite came over and chewed Yarmak'​s flying helmet, which Yarmak happened to be wearing at the time.
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 The following day was mighty, with clear blue sky and marvellous snow. The boys went up to Dickey Cooper, Bogong, and gloated over the view and the fantastic rundown, while Eileen and I made a great job of messing up the slopes around the hut. That night was rather quiet with only one exchange between Snow and the Rat, with Snow relatively victorious. The following day was mighty, with clear blue sky and marvellous snow. The boys went up to Dickey Cooper, Bogong, and gloated over the view and the fantastic rundown, while Eileen and I made a great job of messing up the slopes around the hut. That night was rather quiet with only one exchange between Snow and the Rat, with Snow relatively victorious.
  
-Tuesday saw us up fairly early and away to Tate. With skins on our skis the climb up to the tops was maggies meat.  From the tops (where we ate Loganberry Snow) we could see The Grey Mare Range, Twynam and then over the Murray Valley to Bogong in Victoria.+Tuesday saw us up fairly early and away to Tate. With skins on our skis the climb up to the tops was maggies meat. From the tops (where we ate Loganberry Snow) we could see The Grey Mare Range, Twynam and then over the Murray Valley to Bogong in Victoria.
  
 After lunch which we ate on Tate's west ridge Eileen and I started back, as a storm was brewing, leaving Snow and George to complete the climb. The trip back in the gathering storm was very impressive. The mist gathered around us, enclosing us in a world of silence, lifting only once to give us a magnificent view of Jagangal, lit with gold from the late sun, to a backdrop of angry blue black storm clouds. Yarmak greeted us back at the hut and very soon after Snow and George arrived, beating the darkness by about half an hour. After lunch which we ate on Tate's west ridge Eileen and I started back, as a storm was brewing, leaving Snow and George to complete the climb. The trip back in the gathering storm was very impressive. The mist gathered around us, enclosing us in a world of silence, lifting only once to give us a magnificent view of Jagangal, lit with gold from the late sun, to a backdrop of angry blue black storm clouds. Yarmak greeted us back at the hut and very soon after Snow and George arrived, beating the darkness by about half an hour.
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 Superbly made from Neoprene coated Nylon fabric at 99/6 each. Superbly made from Neoprene coated Nylon fabric at 99/6 each.
  
-Paddy Palling ​Pty Ltd. Lightweight Camp Gear.+Paddy Pallin ​Pty Ltd. Lightweight Camp Gear.
  
 201 Castlereagh St., Sydney. BM2685. 201 Castlereagh St., Sydney. BM2685.
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 ---- ----
  
 +===== Recommended Test Walks For October. =====
  
-RECOMMENDED ​ TEST WALKS  MR OCTOBER. +__October ​16-17-l8__. Picton - Car to Nattai Pass (Sheehy'​ s Creek). Camp on Nattai. Pleasant medium river walking along Nattai, ​camp on river Saturday night. Easy grades out to Hilltop via Starlight'​ s Track. Maps: For location - Tourist Map of Blue Mountains and BurragorangFor Detail - Military sheet of Mittagong covers the southern part of the trip. Burragorang sheet not available. Leader: Bill Rodgers. 
-OCTOBER ​16-17-la Picton - Car to Nattai Pass (Sheehy'​ s Creek). Camp on Nattai. Pleasant medium river walking along Nattai, ​tamp on river Saturdnight. + 
-ay +__October ​24-25__. Katoomba, along Narrow Neck to camp at Glen Raphael (water, wood and westerlies). From Clear Hill, panoramas of the roughest country in the State. Descend spikes and drop from Medlow Gap to Glen Alan crossing. Track walking across upper Breakfast Creek and through the thickets to Carlon's farm at the head of Galong Creek. Road bash to Mitchell'​s Creek and graded track walk out in Devil'​s Hole to Katoomba. Maps: For location - Tourist map of Blue Mountains and Burragorang. For Detail - Myles Dunphy'​s map of the Gangerangs. ​Leader: Jack Gentle. 
-Easy grades out to Hilltop via Starlight'​ s Track. + 
-Maps: For location - Tourist Map of Blue Mountains and Burragorang+---- 
-For Detail - Military sheet of Mittagong covers the southern part of the trip. + 
-Burragorang sheet not available. +===== With Lyn Baber In Pakistan And Afghanistan===== 
-Leader: Bill Rodgers. + 
-.00TOBER ​24-25 +"In Pakistan we traVelled through Lahore, ​Rawal Pindi, Peshawur, to Khyber. Lahore was a very big city, very clean, with lots of trees and wide streetsThe older part of the city is just a jumble at narrow lanes and markets. Everywhere in Pakistan the women are completely ​veiled too. We called at the Castrol Agent and garage and there met a very nice Pakistaniwho invited Lou and I to stay at his home. The Pakistanis really guard their women, so the boys were not even asked inside, told to sleep at the Y.M.C.A. Of course they didn'​t. They slept in the truck in a park and had quite a few adventures on their own, really ​discovered ​the night life of Lahore and we have had terrific fun trying to get the truth out of them. I doubt if we'll ever knowIn Lahore I really did not feel safe by myself. The men stared ​so much at seeing a girl that it was horrible. Peshawur is another big city, quite near the Afghanistan border. We met two young lawyers ​there who helped us do our shopping etc, and then one of them asked us home to his village for the nightWe readily accepted and set off with the two of them in the front seat. We certainly did not expect his village to be quite like it wasWe found ourselves winding ​through ​narrow dark lanes with very high mud walls, some so narrow that Tess could hardly squeeze through, and other corners we had to back to negotiate at all. We pulled up at a dark narrow doorway and were told that this was it, and then very warily we walked inside, but inside, to our surprise, we found a big courtyard and house, with a verandah supported by high Grecian-like columns, ​carpets ​and lounges. This was the house for entertaining and also where the young men stayed. The women once more were away behind ​a high wall and even Lou and I did not meet them this time. 
-Katoomba, along Narrow Neck to camp at Glen Raphael (water, wood and westerlies). From Clear Hill, panoramas of the roughest country in the State. Descend spikes and drop from Medlow Gap to Glen Alan crossing. Track walking across upper Breakfast Creek and through the thickets to Canon's farm at the head of Galong Creek. Road bash to Mitchell'​ s Creek and graded track walk out in Devil'​s Hole to Katoomba. + 
-Maps: For location - Tourist map of Blue Mountains and Burragorang. +We spent a very pleasant evening ​and had our dinner in real Pakistani ​style. A cloth spread on the floor, no chairs, no cutlery at all. There was one big dish of rice in the centre, ​small dishes of meat, vegetables, and fish, and some roti, which are round flat things, like a pancake only dry and not sweet. ​We ate everything, even the rice, with our fingers, and used the roti to eat some of the wetter things. That is the real Indian style too and is quite fun. 
-For Detail - Myles Dunphy'​ s map of the Gangeran gs, + 
-Leader: Jack Gentle. +I always thought that Khyber Pass was in Afghanistan but it is in Pakistan. We left Peshawar in the morning, drove about 30 miles before we got to the beginning of the Pass and were through it and at the border by lunch time. Photographs were banned by the officials on the way through the Khyber Pass, I'm not sure why. We were told that if any of the tribesmen saw us taking photos they would take us straight back to Peshawur. The Pass was about 30 miles long and all little jagged ​mountains, with the road winding throughOn every second ​mountain ​there seemed to be some type of fort or post and we saw dozens of guards on high points over the road, almost unnoticeable with the countryside,​ so there were probably ​dozens more than we did not see. Also all along the way there were cement ​plaques set in the cuttings along the road of lots of different Regiment'​s Crests. 
-WITH LYN BABER I1 PAKISTAN AND AFGHANISTAN+ 
-1,In Pakistan we traVelled through Lahore, ​R,​awal ​Pindi,Peshawur, to Khyber. Lahore was a very big city, very clean, with lots of trees and wide 'streetsThe older part of the city is justa jumble at narrow lanes and markets. Everywhere in Pakistan the women are Completely ​veiled too. We called at the Castrol Agent and garage and there met a very nice _PakiStaniwha invited Lou and I to stay at his home. The Pakistanis really guard their Women, so the boys were not even asked inside, told to sleep at the Y.M.C.A. Of course they didn'​t. They slept in the truck in a perk and had quite a few adventures on their own, really ​discoVered ​the night life of Lahore and we have had terrific fun trying to get the truth out of them. I doubt if we'll ever knowIn Lahore I really did not feel safe by my-Self. The iwn Stared ​so much at seeing a girl that it was horrible. ​,Peshawur is another big city, quite near the Afghanistan border. We met two young lawYers ​there who helped us do our shopping etc, and then one of them asked us home to his village for the night,, We readily accepted and set off with the two of them in the front seat. We certainly did not expect his village to be quite like it was We found ourselves winding ​throagh ​narrow dark lanes with very high mud walls, some so narrow that Tess could hardly squeeze through, and other corners we had to back to negotiate at all. We pulled up at a dark narrow doorway and were told that this was it, and then very warily we 'walked inside, but inside, to our surprise, we found a big courtyard and house, with a verandah supported by high Grecian-like columns, ​carpet, a and lounges. This was the house for entertaining and also where the young men stayed. The women once more were away _behind ​a high wall and even Lou and I did not meet them this time. +Ghaznia, 100 miles from Kabul, 25th January. 
-16. + 
-We spent a very pleasant evening ​aid had our dinner in real Paid stani style. A cloth spread on the floor, no chairs, no cutlery at all. There was one big dish of rice in the centre, ​snail dishes of mat, vegetables, and fish, and some roti, which are round flat things, like a..pancake only dry and not sweet. ​Ne ate everything, even the rice, with our fingers, and used the roti to eat some of the wetter things. That +After Eric arrived back from Kabul with a brand new dynamo we drove on for awhile and it was actually snowing. It was difficult to even see the road and the snow was half way up the wheels in some places - four wheel drive most of the time to keep us from sliding off the road. When we eventually stopped to sleep in a deserted house the car slipped off the road into the snow, so we just slept. When we awoke the next morning it was still snowing, had been all night, and the road was just not there. The boys managed to dig the snow away and drive Tess back on to the road, and just then a bus and a Russian Jeep came by with a man walking ahead in the snow to find the road. They were going in the opposite direction, and just after they passed us they decided that they could go no further and turned around, or at least the jeep did. He got stuck trying to pass us and we had to pull him back on the roadThe bus went off the road trying to turn. We spent ages trying to pull him out but just could not. The trouble was you could not see where the road was and where the ditches were, so all the people from the bus had to pile into our little house, and we set off for Ghaznia to get a tractor to help them. One man, the only one who could speak English, came with us. When we bought some petrol from the bus driver he wanted to charge us 50 Afghanis a gallon instead of 15. When we protested and said we had tried to help pull him out he said that he didn't want us to. Honestly, these Afghans wouldn't help you at all. They'​re so different from the Thai. It must be the cold climate and sense of self-preservation all the time. Anyway we floundered on through the snow with one of the boys walking in front to find the road. Halfway we found the Russian jeep right off the road again and spent about an hour pulling him out - snowing all the time. Eventually we reached Ghaznia in the dark and have stayed tonight at the hotel - very cheap with a great big heater in our room. In Kabul there are more Russians than Americans and that really is saying something. There are lots of Russian landrovers and cars, all very high off the ground, Russian cigarettes and Russian petrol. The petrol smells awful. This hotel is funny, I wouldn'​t say it was the cleanest. Last night we slept in our inner sheets in the beds. There are electric ​light bulbs hanging from the roof, but we use lanterns for lighting. There are taps but no water comes from them. Outside everything is under snow. Men were up early shovelling snow from the roofs. The houses, all mudcovered ​bricks, seem to climb up the hill like steps. On the way here we travelled over a 9,000 foot pass and just everything was white, white and shapeless, as far as the eye could see. 
-is the real Indian style too and is quite fun. + 
-I always thought that Khyber Pass was in Afghanistan but it is in Pakistan. We left Peshawar in the morning, drove about 30 miles before we got to the beginning of the Pass and were through it and at the border by lunch time. Photographs were +Kandahar, 28th January. 
-banned by the officials on the way through the Khyber Pass, I'm not sure why. We were told that if any of the tribesmen saw us taking photos they would take us straight back to Peshawur. The Pass was about 30 miles long and all little jagged ​mouqtains, with the road winding throughOn every second ​muntain ​there seemed to be some type of fort or post and we saw dozens of guards on high points over the road, almost unnoticeable with the countryside,​ so there were pr6bably ​dozens more than we did not see.. Also all along the way there were canent ​plaques set in the cuttings along the road of lots of different Regiment'​s Crests. + 
-MAMA, 100 miles from Kabul, 25th January. +We've just arrived here today - 5 1/2 days to do 318 miles. The road has been shocking - really awful, and this Russian petrol is putrid, makes poor old Tess work twice as hard. The nights have been just so cold that the whole motor freezes up and takes a couple of hours to thaw out in the morning. We heat the water, we heat the pipes, we do everything, but it still takes a long time to get it to goWhen we left Ghaznia, after all our troubles in the snow, one of our friends from the Russian Landrover, actually a Russianfarewelled ​us with Vodka. - vile stuff. Was it funny? We all ended up singing Grand Old English Songs to him and he sang us Russian ones, and I'm sure all of that will stop any possible war between us and Russia. Great friends. Gosh, it' s been cold. This afternoon when we arrived we met two V.W's travelling in the opposite direction, and containing 2 German boys and the other two Aussie boys (one Katoomba ​and one Sydney) bound for home. One of them knows Snow Brown from S.B.W. well. What a coincidence,​ so you can imagine all the "tale swapping"​. We are staying in the hotel and they are all in our room now - real AussiesIn Afghanistan there is all right-hand driving and on our way to Kabul we hit a taxi - very minor damage - we just could not make up our minds which side of the road to drive on. 
-After Eric arrived back from Kabul with a brand new dynamo we drove on for  awhile and it was actually snowing. It was difficult to even see the road and the snow was half way up the wheels in some places - four wheel drive most of the time to keep us from sliding off the road. When we eventually stopped to sleep in a deserted house the car slipped off the road into the snow, so we just slept. When we awoke the next morning it was still snowing, had been all night, and the road was just not there. The boys managed to dig the snow away and drive Tess back on to the road, aid just then a bus and a Russian Jeep came by with amaa walking ahead in the snow to find the road. They were going in the opposite direction, and just after they passed us they decided that they could go no further and turned around, or at least the jeep did. He got stuck trying to pass us and we had to pull him back on the roadThe bus went off the road trying to tuna. We spent ages trying to pull him  out but just could not. The trouble was you could not see where the road was and where the ditches were, so all the people from the bus had to pile into our little house, and we set off for Ghaznia to get a tractor to help them. One man, the only one who could speak English, came with us. '​nen ​we bought some petrol from the bus driver he wanted to charge us 50 Afghanis a gallon instead of 15. When we protested and said we had tried to help pull him out he said that he didn't want us to. Honestly, these Afghansw,​ouldn't help you at all. They'​re so different from the Thai. It must be the cold climate and sense of self-preservation all the time. Anyway we floundered on through the snow with one of the boys walking in front to find the road. Halfway we found the Russian jeep right off the road again and spent about an hour pulling him Jut - snowing all the time. Eventually we reached Ghaznia in the dark and have stayed tonight at the hotel - very cheap e. with a great big heater in air nom. In Kabul there are more Russians than Americans and that really is saying something. There are lots of Russian landrovers and cars, all very high off the ground, Russian cigarettes and Russian petrol. The petrol smells ​ awful. This hotel is funny, I wouldn'​t say it was the cleanest. Last night we slept in our inner sheets in the beds. There are electric ​lijat bulbs hanging from the roof, but we use lanterns for lighting. There are taps but no water canes from them. Outside everything is under snow. Men were up early shovelling snow from the roofs. The houses, all mdcavered ​bricks, seem to Climb up the hill like steps. On the way here we travelled over a 9,000 foot pass and just everything was white, white and shapeless, as far as the eye could see+ 
-17KANDAHAR, 28th January. +Teheran, ​11th February. 
-We've just arrived here today - 51- days to do 318 miles. The road has been shocking - really awful, and this Russian petrol is putrid, makes poor old 'Tess work twice as hard. The nights have been just so cold that the whole motor freezes up and takes a couple of hours to thaw out in the morning. We heat the water, we heat the pipes, we do everything, but it still takes a long time to get it to go, ' ​When we left Ghaznia, after all our troubles in the snow, one of our friends from the Rus clan LandroTer, ​, actually a Rus sian.f arewelled ​us with Vo cka. - vile stuff. Was it funny? We all ended up singing Grand Old English Songs to him and he sang us Russian ones, and I'm sure all of that will stop any possible war between us and + 
-Russia. Great friends. Gosh, it' s been cold. This afternoon when we arrived we +Arrived here last night. From Kandahar we travelled north again to Herat along the edge of a desert on one side and really rugged mountains on the other side. We actually had a couple of wonderful camps here, something we had not had for quite some time. Honestly the mountains in Afghanistan are breathtaking. We saw quite a few wolves and one night Bruce was off looking for firewood when we heard the cry "Eric, the gun, quick"​. I think my heart stopped still. There was a great scramble for torches and guns and a rush towards the voice. Actually Bruce was standing facing two wolves and when one of them began to circle Eric fired a shot which sent them both scurrying. At other times we would see a grey form slinking across the snow. From Herat we crossed the border into Iran. In the strip of no-man's land between the two countries there were stacks of wild geese. The boys took a few pot shots at them and I could actually see myself carving a beautiful, steaming hot, roast, goose - but no luck. At the Iran border town we stayed in the Customs OfficeIn Iran we just could not discover which side of the road the traffic usually travelled on because it seemed to come from both sides. When we asked some American soldiers in the next town they just said it all depends upon who had the biggest car. Actually it is all left hand drive. We met these soldiers when the local bank would not change our Traveller'​s cheques. They rescued us and also invited us to lunch. From there we rushed into Meshed because Eric was sickWe took him to an American Missionary hospital. It turned out he had Malaria. Meshed itself is a very holy city to the Moslems and we were warned not to go anywhere near the Mosque, which the whole city is built around. From Meshed we travelled on to Teheran. The journey ​took us four days, through rather tedious country and over really shocking roads. We thought Australian roads were bad enough, but if we had only known. Iran has been a real surprise to us. I knew that it would be winter ​but did not expect to be travelling in icy temperatures with snow swirling about. The mountains are very spectacular,​ all snow-clad rugged peaks. We have seen very little vegetation either, but we are only travelling in the north. Probably the south has not got so many mountains. Once again the women very rarely show their faces. A lot of the people speak French and several times we have been asked "​parley vous Francais"​. Lou can manage to understand quite a bit but all the rest of us can say is "oui, oui." Bruce is leaving us here in Teheran. I'd love to work here but have decided to go on. We've met lots of young people here who are working their way round the world and they are mostly teaching English in Teheran. This is really quite a Western city. It has very little Persian flavour, except when you go to the "Big Market"​ (a real Persian Market). Seeing that I lost my rug earlier I decided that I had better buy another, so Bruce and I went down there to see what we could find. The whole place is just a maze of small  alley-ways with covered roofs and they must sell just about everything ever manufactured. Of course ​to actually buy the blanket we had to bargain like fury for every penny and go from stall to stall. When we were in Afghanistan in the snow we read a Teheran travel folder and rejoiced when we saw that the temperature in Teheran never drops below 4.1 degrees, but the truth is that it has snowed almost continuously since we have been here. Yesterday morning when we awoke we found that there had been a terrific snow storm during the night and all the roads were just ice. The usual chaotic traffic just crawled along at a snail'​s pace. 40% of the cars had chains, even right in the city. Just walking ​across ​the road you had to be very careful that you did not land on your seat. People were shovelling snow off the roofs and just tossing it down on the footpaths, so you had to be very careful to dodge it all, and also an avalanche broke the water supply, but by lunch time the sun was out and the roads were safe again. Today is beautiful and we are setting off in glorious sunshine. 
-met two V.W' s travelling in the opposite direction, and containing 2 German boys and the other two Aussie boys (one Katoo mba and one Sydney) bound for hme. One of them + 
-knows Snow Brown from S.B.W.well. What a coincidence,​ so you can imagine all the +Kasvin, 17th February. 
-"tale swapping"​. We are staying in the hotel and they are all in our room now - + 
-real AussiesIn Afghanistan there is all right-hand driving and on our way to +Just this afternoon we left Teheran after being there for over a week. We had such a lot of repairs to be done. At the moment we are in a very comfortable hotel room, heater and all, at the expense of the local police. We went to the police and said that we had no money and this is what they arranged. Actually we are very short of Iranian currency and have just enough to see us out of the country. I think I forgot to tell you about our overnight ​stay at a Construction camp in Afghanistan. It was just the day before we reached Herat and our third last night in Afghanistan. Eric was bad with his Malaria, in fact was almost unconscious and we knew there was an American Construction firm in the town of Shandover ​so we called on them. We also wanted some welding done, which was completely impossible to get in any Afghan town. We were just lucky that it happened to be lunch time and they invited us in. There was one American and four Filipino boys there, ​supervising ​the building of a bridge. Were they well set up. They had huge caravans and a truly magnificent kitchen and dining ​room, all on wheels. So we sat down to a lunch of cold chicken and ham. They had absolutely everything, all imported from the States. Gee, food means a lot to us, especially even the smallest luxury. Anyway they asked us to stay the night, in the guest trailer, so we put Eric to bed and proceeded to take full advantage of air stay by using the electric washing ​machine ​- their laundryman even did it all for us, while I just supervised (ha ha) and helped him to hang the things on the line. That night you can just imagine our faces when the cook carried in a huge roast turkey. 
-Kabul we hit a taxi - very minor damage - we just could not make up our minds ithich ​side of the road to drive on. + 
-TEHERAN I 11th February. +We certainly have extremes, first it'​s ​Jungle ​Foot, then Malaria and now Chilblains. Gosh, it's cold at times. Tonight for example I drove into this town and my hands and feet were just freezing. When we stopped I was shivering, but by a heater it's very easy to warm up. Nearly every room in any decent building has an oil heater. 
-Arrived here last night. From Kandahar we travelled north again to Herat along the edge of a deserton one side and really rugged mountains on the other side. We actually had a couple of wonderful camps here, something we had not had for quite some time. Honestly the mountains in Afghanistan are breathtaking. We saw quite a few wolves and one night Bruce was off looking for firewood when we heard the cry "Eric, the gun, quick"​. I think my heart stopped still. There was a great scramble for torches and guns and a rush towards the voice. Actually Bruce was standing facing two wolves and when one of them began to circle Eric fired a shot which sent them both scurrying. At other times we would see a grey form slinking across the mow. From Herat we crossed the border into Iran. In the strip of no-mant s land between the two countries there were stacks of wild geese. The boys took a few pot shots at tl-em. ​and I could actually see myself carving a beautiful, steaming hot, roast, goose - but no duck  ​At the Iran border town we stayed in the Customs OfficeIn Iran we just could not discover which side of the road the traffic usually travelled on because it seemed to come from both sides. When we asked some American soldiers in the next town they just said it all depends upon who had the biggest car. Actually it is all left hand drive. We met these soldiers when the local_ ​bank would rot change our Traveller'​ s cheques. They rescued us andalso invited us to lunch. From there we rushed into Meshed because Eric was sickWe tookhim to an American Missionary hospital. It turned out he had Malaria. Meshed itself is a very holy city to the Moslems and we were warned not to go anywhere near the Mosque, which the whole city is built around. From Meshed we travelled on to Teheran. The hourney ​took us four days, through rather tedious country and over really shocking roads. We thought Australian roads were bad enotgh, but if we had only known. Iran has been a real surprise to us. I knew that it would be inter but did not expect to be travelling in icy temperatures with snow swirling about. The mountains are very spectacular,​ all snow-clad rugged peaks. We have seen very little vegetation either, but we are only travelling in the north. Probably the south has not got so many mountains. Once again the women very rarely show their faces. A lot of the people speak French and several times we have been asked "​parley vous Francais"​. Lou canmanage to understand quite a bit but all the rest of us can say is "oui, oui." Bruce is leaving us hare in Teheran. I'd love to work here but have decided to go on. We've met lots of young people here who are working their + 
-18. +---- 
-way round the world and they are mostly teaching English in Teheran.. This is really quite a Western city. It has very little Persian flavour, except when you go to the "Big Market"​ (a real Persian Market). Seeing that I lost my rug earlier I decided that I had better buy another, so Bruce and I went dovn. there to .see what we could find.  The whole place is just a maze of n;11  ey-ways with covered roofs and they must sell just about everything ever manufactured. Of co urse to actually buy the blanket we had to bargain like fury for every penny and go from stall to stall. When we were in Afghanistan in the snow we read a Teheran travel folder and rejoiced when we saw that the temperature in Teheran never drops below 4.1 degrees, but the truth is that it has snowed almost continuously since we have been here. Yesterday morning when we awoke we found that there had been a terrific snow storm during the night and all the roads were just ice. The usial chaotic traffic just crawled along at a snail'​s pace. 40% of the cars had chains, even right it-i the city. Just walking ​aCross ​the road you had to be verycareful that you did not land on your seat. People were shovellingsnow off the roofs and just tossing it down on the footpaths, so you had to be very careful to dodge it all, and also an avalanche broke the ,water supply, but by lunch time the sun was oub and the roads were safe again. Today is beautiful and we are setting off in glorious sunshine. + 
-KASVIN, 17th February. +=== Interested in Tasmania=== 
-Just this afternoon we left Teheran after being there for over a week. We had Sue h a lot of repairs to be done. At the moment we are in a very comfortable hotel room, heater and all, at the expense of the local police. We went to the police and said that we had no money and this is what they arranged. Actually we are very short + 
-Iranian currency and have just enough to see us Dub of the country. I think I +Available from Paddy this month - "​Tasmanian Tramp" 1959. (Journal of Hobart Walking Club.) 
-forgot to tell yu about our ov-ernitt ​stay at a Construction camp in Afghanistan. It was just the day before we reached Herat and our third last night in Afghanistan. Eric was bad with his Malaria, in fact was almostunconscious and we knew there was + 
-an American Construction firm in the town of ShandoTer ​so we called on them. We also +---- 
-wanted some welding done, which was completely impossible to get in any Afghantown. + 
-We were just lucky that it happened to be lunch time and they invited us in. There +===== Jim Brown'​s Walk=====
-was one American and f,tr. Filipino boys there, ​superviaLng ​the building of a bridge. +
-Were they well set up.. They had huge caravans and a truly magnificent kitchen and dining ​toom, all on wheels. So we sat down to a lunch of cold chicken and ham. They +
-had absolutely everything, all imported from the States. Gee, food means a lot to us, +
-especially even the smallest luxury. Anyway they asked us to staythe night, in the +
-guest trailer, so we put Eric to bed and proceeded to take full advantage of air stay by using the electric washing ​maohine ​- their laundryman even did it all for us, while I just supervised (ha ha) and helped him to hang the things on the line. That night you can just imagine our faces when the cook carried in a huge roast turkey. +
-We certainly have extremes, first it'​s ​Jugle Foot, then Malaria and now +
-Chilblains. Gosh, it's cold at times. Tonight for example I drove into this town +
-and my hands and feet were just freezing. When we stopped I was shivering, but by a heater it's very easy to warm up. Nearly every room in any decent building has an oil heater. +
-INTERESTED IN TASMANIAI +
-Available from Paddy this month - "​Tasmanian Tramp" 1959. (Journal of Hobart Walking Club. ) +
-19.+
  
-JIM BROWN'​S WALK. 
 "The Gent in the Tent". "The Gent in the Tent".
-DATE; 8-9th August, 1959. 
-ROUTE; Colo Vale - Mt l Flora - Nattai River - Starlight'​s Trail - Hill Top. 22 miles or so. 
-CAST I ILEMBERS. PROSPECTIVE MEKBERS. 
-Pam Baker Roy Craggs 
-Phil Hall Wal Moore 
-Kevin Ardill Geoff Ley. Alan Round 
  
-I have often heard articles about various walks criticised because vital statistics about the excursion are not included in the story. Personally, I can't see that it matters much, especially if the account is well written. However, for the benefit of the curious, and those members who promised Jim that they would came and didn't turn up, the information is published above.+__Date__: 8-9th August, 1959. 
 + 
 +__Route__: Colo Vale - Mt. Flora - Nattai River - Starlight'​s Trail - Hill Top. 22 miles or so. 
 + 
 +__Cast: Members: Pam Baker, Phil Hall, Kevin Ardill, Alan Round. Prospective Members: Roy Craggs, Wal Moore, Geoff Ley. 
 + 
 +I have often heard articles about various walks criticised because vital statistics about the excursion are not included in the story. Personally, I can't see that it matters much, especially if the account is well written. However, for the benefit of the curious, and those members who promised Jim that they would come and didn't turn up, the information is published above
 + 
 +Now to the story. As I was packing on the Friday night prior to the walk a knock came to the door. The time was about 8.45 p.m. Rather late for social visiting, but in these modern times, one has to be prepared for any eventuality. Open the door and Jim Brown stands revealed! Kath is ill and he would not be able to take the walk tomorrow. Would I do the honours? Of course, especially as he produced a Mittagong map marked with his intended route. I hadn't been on the Upper Nattai River before. That is why I had '​phoned Jim during the week and announced my intention of going. I also knew (hoped?) that Kevin Ardill would be going, and felt that surely the two of us could put up some sort of a show at map reading and not disappoint the __ten__ starters who had no Jim that they'd be attending. 
 + 
 +Saturday morning was dull and drizzly, which probably accounted for the roll call of only eight for the 9.30 a.m. Goulburn train, including the deputy-leader and Alan Round, whose name was not on the "​official"​ list.
  
-Now to the story. As I was packing an the Friday night prior to the walk a knock came to the door. The time was about 8.45 p m. Rather late for social visiting, but in these mAern times, one has to be prepared for any eventuality. Open the door and Jim Brown stands revealed: Kath is ill and he would not be able to take the walk tomorrow. Would I do the honours? Of course, especially as he produced a Mittagong map marked with his intended route. I hadn't been on the Upper Nattai River before. That is why I had '​phoned Jim during the week and announced my intention of going. I also knew (hoped?) that Kevin Ardill mould be going, and felt that surely the two of us could put up some sort of a show at map reading and not disappoint the ten starters who had no Jim that they'd be attending. 
-Saturday morning was dull anddrizzly, which probably accounted for the roll call 
-of only eight for the 9.30 a m. Gouiburn train, including the deputy-leader and 
-Alan Round, whose name was not on the "​official"​ list, 
 After an accordion recital of chiefly Gaelic airs by fellow passengers in highland dress, we changed to the rail motor at Picton. The recital was a pleasant change from music emitted by transistor radios so frequently inflicted upon helpless train travellers, whether they wish to listen to it or not. The train crew were quite interested in our proposed excursion. I promised to see them at Hill Top tomorrow night with rather forced joviality. After an accordion recital of chiefly Gaelic airs by fellow passengers in highland dress, we changed to the rail motor at Picton. The recital was a pleasant change from music emitted by transistor radios so frequently inflicted upon helpless train travellers, whether they wish to listen to it or not. The train crew were quite interested in our proposed excursion. I promised to see them at Hill Top tomorrow night with rather forced joviality.
  
-A cold westerly wind was blowing when we set out from Colo Vale, and it wasn't very long before the clouds came over with a promise ​ef snow. However, all wen got was a shower of sleet, and by the time we emerged from bush country at Colo settlement +A cold westerly wind was blowing when we set out from Colo Vale, and it wasn't very long before the clouds came over with a promise ​of snow. However, all we got was a shower of sleet, and by the time we emerged from bush country at Colo settlement near Mr. Flora, it was bright and sunny. The country opens out very suddenly near Blatch Trig., ​giving ​fine views over the Nattai Valley, of Mt. Jellore, the high country around Wanganderry ​and Bullio, the Southern Blue Mountains and back towards SydneyThe leader had suggested a possible route West of Mt. Flora, then down a fairly clear ridge into the Nattai Valley. As the afternoon was cool and clear, and we were not pressed for time, I decided to try and get down Blatch's Pass, in spite of previous adverse comments on this route to the Nattai.
-near Mr. Flora, it was bright and sunny. The country opens out very suddenly near +
-Blatch'Trig., ​giring ​fine -views over the Nattai Valley, of Mt. Jellore, the high country around Wanganderry ​an Bullio, the Southern Blue Mountains and back towards SydneyThe leader had suggested a possible route West of Mt. Flora, then down a fairly clear ridge into the Nattai Valley. As the afternoon was cool and clear, and we were not pressed for time, I decided to try and get down BlatCh's Pass, in spite of previous adverse comments on this route to the Nattai+
-Keeping West framBlatch Trig., we soon found oar selves swinging round to the South on a bridle track until Mt. Jellore was almost ahead of us, instead of being on our left. Maps were hastily consulted and opinions aired, but the ridges didn'​t +
-20. +
-look promising. The time began to fly, as it so often dues in these situations. Kevin took off in alffesterly direction to see what lay ahead, while the remainder did a "​recce"​ of air present position. After more than half an hour, Kevin returned, rather puffed as he had just measured his length on the ground by tripping over a fallen fence, and +
-reported a negotiable route by crag and creek into the Nattai. +
-Away we went to come out on the edge of a cliff face in less than a mile. By +
-descending into a creek nearby, we were able to sidle along a wallaby track under the cliff line to the point of a very steep ridge between two all creeks running into the +
-Nattai about 200 yards above Jellore Creek. The seemingly excellent camp site ahead +
-proved upon examination to be badly washed out by recent floods. Soon after passing +
-Jellore Creek, a suitable spot was located on the right bank. For various reasons, most +
-of the party were tired after their hectic week in the city, so, instead of campfire entertainment,​ by mutual agreement, most were in their sleeping bags soon after 8 p m. +
-We were all up fairly early next morning and got away before 9 a m., after a very definite request that the party stay together to obviate the need for a search of large areas of the Valley by myself and my advisor, K.A. The Nattai Valley is very beautiful,​ +
-in spite of evidence of heavy flooding about two weeks previously. The river bubbles and gurgles over the water worn rocks with occasional outcrops of pink granite. Then the water seems to lie in long green pools, reflecting the surrounding rocky outcrops +
-and trees, flanked in parts by stretches of sand. It was necessary to cross several times when the bank became too steep on one side, and this led to some competition as to who could keep dry feet the longest. We traversed a couple of expensive bracken covered flats before reaching a really good camp site at Reeky Waterholes Creek soon after 10 a m.. All these flats were covered with holes leading to wombat warrens, and should be treated with caution, as a misplaced fact in one of these holes can cause serious sprain or -worse (shades of Peggy Bransdon;) and its a long way back to transport. +
-I could now afford to relax a bit as the map shmed that we should reach McArthur 's Flat by noon. This was accomplished without difficulty, but the Lively river flat here r, has been severely mauled by a bushfire, and is only now recovering. Naturally, we had lunch here, in bright sunshine. +
-The track up the point Jf the ridge from McArthur'​s Flat (Starlight'​s Trail) has been considerably washed out following denudation of the ridge by a bushfire. We spent some time looking for it in various steep gullies, until Kevin finally located it up toward the cliff line. We then made full use of it to finish the climb, even though it is not too clear in a couple of places and is overgrown by Hardenbergia vines re4dy to trip the unwary. Near the top, there are blazes on various strategic trees, made by the Coates boys we later found out, which are of considerable assistance in locating the route, +
-Mr. Coates and two of the boys were doing some car repairs when we reached the top and stopped fa. a chat with them. Er. Coates told us of the bushfire which burnt right up from the Nattai River on 4th Nevember, 1957 destroying most of the bush in its progress. He also mentioned the adventures of a couple of overdue parties in the area. We set out frcm the farm at 3.45 p m. so as to be sure of catching the only train from Hill Top on Sunday night. We arrived at the station in good time to cook a couple of packaged soups and to have our ears bashed by a local while we "​swipped"​ (the soup, of course). Train time came, we escaped from the basher for a quick trip back to the city.+
  
 +Keeping West from Blatch Trig., we soon found ourselves swinging round to the South on a bridle track until Mt. Jellore was almost ahead of us, instead of being on our left. Maps were hastily consulted and opinions aired, but the ridges didn't look promising. The time began to fly, as it so often dues in these situations. Kevin took off in a Westerly direction to see what lay ahead, while the remainder did a "​recce"​ of our present position. After more than half an hour, Kevin returned, rather puffed as he had just measured his length on the ground by tripping over a fallen fence, and reported a negotiable route by crag and creek into the Nattai.
 +
 +Away we went to come out on the edge of a cliff face in less than a mile. By descending into a creek nearby, we were able to sidle along a wallaby track under the cliff line to the point of a very steep ridge between two all creeks running into the Nattai about 200 yards above Jellore Creek. The seemingly excellent camp site ahead proved upon examination to be badly washed out by recent floods. Soon after passing Jellore Creek, a suitable spot was located on the right bank. For various reasons, most of the party were tired after their hectic week in the city, so, instead of campfire entertainment,​ by mutual agreement, most were in their sleeping bags soon after 8 p.m.
 +
 +We were all up fairly early next morning and got away before 9 a.m., after a very definite request that the party stay together to obviate the need for a search of large areas of the Valley by myself and my advisor, K.A. The Nattai Valley is very beautiful, in spite of evidence of heavy flooding about two weeks previously. The river bubbles and gurgles over the water worn rocks with occasional outcrops of pink granite. Then the water seems to lie in long green pools, reflecting the surrounding rocky outcrops and trees, flanked in parts by stretches of sand. It was necessary to cross several times when the bank became too steep on one side, and this led to some competition as to who could keep dry feet the longest. We traversed a couple of extensive bracken-covered flats before reaching a really good camp site at Rocky Waterholes Creek soon after 10 a.m. All these flats were covered with holes leading to wombat warrens, and should be treated with caution, as a misplaced foot in one of these holes can cause serious sprain or worse (shades of Peggy Bransdon!) and its a long way back to transport.
 +
 +I could now afford to relax a bit as the map showed that we should reach McArthur'​s Flat by noon. This was accomplished without difficulty, but the lovely river flat here has been severely mauled by a bushfire, and is only now recovering. Naturally, we had lunch here, in bright sunshine.
 +
 +The track up the point of the ridge from McArthur'​s Flat (Starlight'​s Trail) has been considerably washed out following denudation of the ridge by a bushfire. We spent some time looking for it in various steep gullies, until Kevin finally located it up toward the cliff line. We then made full use of it to finish the climb, even though it is not too clear in a couple of places and is overgrown by Hardenbergia vines ready to trip the unwary. Near the top, there are blazes on various strategic trees, made by the Coates boys we later found out, which are of considerable assistance in locating the route.
 +
 +Mr. Coates and two of the boys were doing some car repairs when we reached the top and stopped for a chat with them. Mr. Coates told us of the bushfire which burnt right up from the Nattai River on 4th November, 1957 destroying most of the bush in its progress. He also mentioned the adventures of a couple of overdue parties in the area. We set out from the farm at 3.45 p.m. so as to be sure of catching the only train from Hill Top on Sunday night. We arrived at the station in good time to cook a couple of packaged soups and to have our ears bashed by a local while we "​swipped"​ (the soup, of course). Train time came, we escaped from the basher for a quick trip back to the city.
 +
 +----
195910.txt · Last modified: 2018/12/20 02:36 by tyreless