User Tools

Site Tools


195906

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
195906 [2016/02/04 03:23]
kennettj [Yadboro Rim]
195906 [2016/02/04 03:35] (current)
kennettj [Notes on the Castle Country]
Line 395: Line 395:
  
 =====Notes on the "​Castle Country"​===== =====Notes on the "​Castle Country"​=====
-The area described in Jim Brown'​s "​Yadboro Rim" is part of a huge tract of fascinating country between Nowra and Braidwood. 
  
-To the North, Ettrema Gorge is at present being more thoroughly explored, +The area described in Jim Brown'​s "​Yadboro Rim" is part of a huge tract of fascinating country between Nowra and Braidwood. ​To the North, Ettrema Gorge is at present being more thoroughly explored, 
-Endrick falls are well known (not many parties have been down the lower Endrick +Endrick falls are well known (not many parties have been down the lower Endrick though) and in this issue Paddy Pallin describes a trip down the Shoalhaven from the Endrick crossing. Bungonia and the Lake Louise areas are well trodden, and Jerrara Creek and its falls have been traversed by the "​aquasplats" (Brrrr.!)
-though) and in this issue Paddy Pallin describes a trip down the Shoalhaven from the Endrick crossing. Bungonia and the Lake Louise areas are well trodden, and Jerrara Creek and its falls have been traversed by the Haquasplats" (Brrrr.!)+
  
-Moving south, the traffic around Pigeon House and the Renwick-Castle area is +Moving south, the traffic around Pigeon House and the Renwick-Castle area is increasing. Talaterang has been climbed from conventional and rare approaches; the Castle saddle has been reached from all directions, last year the Budawang-Currockbilly area was visited.
-increasing. Talaterang has been climbed from conventional and rare approaches; the Castle saddle has been reached from all directions, last year the Budawang-Currockbilly area was visited.+
  
 Most of these trios have been described in the Magazine since the last edition of the Index in 1955.... Most of these trios have been described in the Magazine since the last edition of the Index in 1955....
  
-To get back to the Castle: +To get back to the Castle: Kevin Ardell described the 1955 exploration in the July issue of that year.
- +
-Kevin Ardell described the 1955 exploration in the July issue of that year.+
  
 Alex Colley covers the Corang approach in the October 1957 issue, complete with map. John Noble'​s articles with maps give details of Budawang-Currockbilly in August and September. Alex Colley covers the Corang approach in the October 1957 issue, complete with map. John Noble'​s articles with maps give details of Budawang-Currockbilly in August and September.
  
 For an army survey see For an army survey see
-"PhyE-2,7iv -f he Shoalhaven River Valley"​ F.A. Craft. +"Physiography of the Shoalhaven River Valley"​ F.A. Craft. 
-Sce,NS.W. - Proceedings ​'Vol. 56 1931 +So. N.S.W. - Proceedings Vol. 56 1931pp. 99-132 Tallong-Bungonia 243-261 Nerrimunga Creek. 261-265 Bulee Ridge412-430 Nerriga. Shows views from Endrick and Corang Trigs. 
-pp. 99-132 Tallong-Bungonia 243-261 Nerrimunga Creek. 261-265 Bulee Ridge +    
-412-430 Nerriga +MAPS: 
-Eih-7ws ​views from Endrick and Corang Trigs. +The sketch ​map on page 19 is not by itself, intended ​for accurate route findingRecent writers will gladly give the necessary detailed information on access to the Castle from the Vines or from the Jerricknorra.
-   ​MAPS:​ +
-map on page 19 is notby itself, intended ​fr accurate route findingRecent writers will gladly give the necessary detailed information on access to the Castle from the Vines or from the Jerricknorra.+
  
 Ken Angel'​s map of "The Castle-Mt.Pigeon House" gives plenty of detail East from Tarn Mountain, but local knowledge is still necessary for reasonable progress. Ken Angel'​s map of "The Castle-Mt.Pigeon House" gives plenty of detail East from Tarn Mountain, but local knowledge is still necessary for reasonable progress.
  
-We've given this area quite a bashing in the last two issues - let's hope that +We've given this area quite a bashing in the last two issues - let's hope that the June long weekend will bring forth some scintillating articles on the Blue Mountains and other areas - Ed. 
-the June long weekend will bring forth some scintillating articles on the Blue Mountains and other areas - Ed.+ 
 +Brian Harvey'​s Trip for Prospectives and New Members had 16 out (including 3 visitors and 3 prospectives). Barham Gentle aged 13 was mystified at the walking philosophy, of "​climbing up the steepest cliffs then climbing down again"​. By Sunday midday several out-of-condition members were silently agreeing with him. Mist in the valleys lent enchantment (as they say in the best tourist guides) to the evergreen views. 
 + 
 + 
 +===== Further News from Lyn baber =====
  
-Brian Harvey'​s Trip for Prospectives and New Members had 16 out (including 3 visitors and 3 prospectives). Barham Gentle aged 13 was mystified at the walking 
-philosophy, of "​climbing up the steepest cliffs then climbing down again"​. By Sunday midday several out-of-condition members were silently agreeing with him. Mist in the valleys lent enchantment (as they say in the best tourist guides) to the evergreen views. 
  
-FURTHER NEWS FROM LYN BLBa.. 
 We arrived in India on the 22nd December. We arrived in India on the 22nd December.
-We have travelled through Margherita, Diburgh, Conane, Gauhat, ​C-och Behar, Siliguri, Darjeeling, Siliguri again and now to Delhi. In Assam we passed through lots of Tea Gardens and slept one night at Meth-me ​Tea Estate. Christmas Day was just like any other day. Just when we should have been having a beautiful Xmas Dinner we were waiting for a ferry to take us across the Brahmaputra river. We ate breat and Wham and opened a tin of Apricots as a snecial ​treat. We stayed that night in a Dak bungalow - one in almost every Indian town for travellers, mostly free. All we o-vuld ​manage to buy for tea was some potatoes so we had bread, beans and potatoes ​fa tea. MA% Of curse all of these people are Hindu or some other religion who do no-r% recognise Xmas at all, cnnsegiently ​you w-uld not even know. On Boxing Day we came to one the Tea Estates that Beth Hanilton ​had given me the address ​-f, soall confidence, I walked in and asked f-Ir these people. They had only left L. years earlier. Anyway this lady, the Manager'​s wife, asked us in to afternoon tea and we had our first piece of Xmas cake. That night we met a Superintendant of an Indian- owned Tea Estate who arranged accommodation for us at another Indian-owned Estate. When we arrived we had a reception committee waiting, all men, and were they wonderful - really thrilled that we were there. They fired questi-ns ​at us and we talke on into the night. They gave us a tremendous dinner and even thrrigh ​we were hungry we just had to give up. Next morning we even had a cup of tea in bed and after breakfast had an inspection of the Tea factory. It was nearly lunch time before we got away. A very similar thing han,​ened ​when we were nassing ​through the town of Diburgh. We were changing money at the bank when we received an invitation to "​lecture"​. We were escorted into a room which looked like a boardroom, and were seated at a big round table, and then the people flocked around us. Eventually we discovered that we were sitting in the library of the district'​s Lawyer'​s Club. All our questioners actually were Lawyers and boy was it tough. We talked about everything with them and were constantly told how glad they were to sneak with us. One + 
-man said that before India'​s Independence they c-uld not have even spoken to us at all,+We have travelled through Margherita, Diburgh, Conane, Gauhat, ​Cooch Behar, Siliguri, Darjeeling, Siliguri again and now on to Delhi. In Assam we passed through lots of Tea Gardens and slept one night at Methone ​Tea Estate. Christmas Day was just like any other day. Just when we should have been having a beautiful Xmas Dinner we were waiting for a ferry to take us across the Brahmaputra river. We ate bread and Wham and opened a tin of Apricots as a special ​treat. We stayed that night in a Dak bungalow - one in almost every Indian town for travellers, mostly free. All we could manage to buy for tea was some potatoes so we had bread, beans and potatoes ​for tea. WOW Of course ​all of these people are Hindu or some other religion who do not recognise Xmas at all, consequently ​you would not even know. On Boxing Day we came to one of the Tea Estates that Beth Hamilton ​had given me the address ​of, so all confidence, I walked in and asked for these people. They had only left years earlier. Anyway this lady, the Manager'​s wife, asked us in to afternoon tea and we had our first piece of Xmas cake. That night we met a Superintendant of an Indian- owned Tea Estate who arranged accommodation for us at another Indian-owned Estate. When we arrived we had a reception committee waiting, all men, and were they wonderful - really thrilled that we were there. They fired questions ​at us and we talked ​on into the night. They gave us a tremendous dinner and even though ​we were hungry we just had to give up. Next morning we even had a cup of tea in bed and after breakfast had an inspection of the Tea factory. It was nearly lunch time before we got away. A very similar thing happened ​when we were passing ​through the town of Diburgh. We were changing money at the bank when we received an invitation to "​lecture"​. We were escorted into a room which looked like a boardroom, and were seated at a big round table, and then the people flocked around us. Eventually we discovered that we were sitting in the library of the district'​s Lawyer'​s Club. All our questioners actually were Lawyers and boy was it tough. We talked about everything with them and were constantly told how glad they were to speak with us. One man said that before India'​s Independence they could not have even spoken to us at all,
 We only spent one night at Darjeeling. It really is beautiful, breathtaking. India is mostly so flat, and then the Himalayas rise straight out of the Plains. We only spent one night at Darjeeling. It really is beautiful, breathtaking. India is mostly so flat, and then the Himalayas rise straight out of the Plains.
-We climbed continuously for 47 miles, 8,000 feet up, just winding back and forth up the almost vertical mountain side. Our ears were popping. All the little houses just seemed to be clinging to the edge. The road itself was very narrow and was quite thrilling at times, especially when a car came from the op-)osite ​direction. While we were talking to some people in the lounge of the Planter'​s Club, before a r-,​aring ​log fire, disaster struck. Somebody stole some things from the Landrover, seventeen rolls of unexposed ​KAachrme ​film as well as some other odds and ends. Film is very hard to get (--1.:Et here. We had to stay the night in a hotel, so our trip to Darjeeling was quite expensive. Of:course the main thing to do in Darjeeling is t ) try to see the sunrise on the Himalayas, and also to see Everest. We got up at 4 a m. and drove another 1,000 feet up to Tiger Hill, the vantage point. All we could see was the swirling mist and nearly froze in the attempt. Lots of other trurists ​were there but gave up. However, we cut-waited them all, and after ab-ut three haurs the mists magically lifted, and there lay the Eanchenjunga ​range shimmering with snow, the Tibetan mountains, and Everest, a tiny dot on the horizon. It was beautiful:: The mountains ​-with all the little villages are just like toys. We came down that evening and the next day called in to collect our trailer from a Tea Estate. We had not dared to take it on the -windy roads.+ 
 +We climbed continuously for 47 miles, 8,000 feet up, just winding back and forth up the almost vertical mountain side. Our ears were popping. All the little houses just seemed to be clinging to the edge. The road itself was very narrow and was quite thrilling at times, especially when a car came from the opposite ​direction. While we were talking to some people in the lounge of the Planter'​s Club, before a roaring ​log fire, disaster struck. Somebody stole some things from the Landrover, seventeen rolls of unexposed ​Kodachrome ​film as well as some other odds and ends. Film is very hard to get as well as some other odds and ends. We had to stay the night in a hotel, so our trip to Darjeeling was quite expensive. Of course the main thing to do in Darjeeling is to try to see the sunrise on the Himalayas, and also to see Everest. We got up at 4 a m. and drove another 1,000 feet up to Tiger Hill, the vantage point. All we could see was the swirling mist and nearly froze in the attempt. Lots of other tourists ​were there but gave up. However, we out-waited them all, and after about three hours the mists magically lifted, and there lay the Kanchenjunga ​range shimmering with snow, the Tibetan mountains, and Everest, a tiny dot on the horizon. It was beautifulThe mountains with all the little villages are just like toys. We came down that evening and the next day called in to collect our trailer from a Tea Estate. We had not dared to take it on the windy roads.
 (To be continued..) (To be continued..)
  
195906.txt · Last modified: 2016/02/04 03:35 by kennettj