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195906 [2016/02/04 03:14]
kennettj [Notes From London]
195906 [2016/02/04 03:23]
kennettj [Yadboro Rim]
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 =====Yadboro Rim===== ​ =====Yadboro Rim===== ​
 +
 Jim Brown. Jim Brown.
  
-It has been said, with some truth, that successful exploratory and mountaineering parties climb to their targets on the backs of earlierless successfulventurers. In the less intrepid sphere of bushwalking this often holds true: the classic case, I shall never cease to quote, is the gradual penetration by walkers into the strip of wild ground fringed by the Clyde River on the east, the Nowra-Nerriga-Braidwood road on the north, the Budawang Range to the west, and the Yadboro Creek valley to the South. The whole area, embracing headwaters of the south-flowing Clyde River, would scarcely exceed ten miles in each direction, but because some parts are unusually wild, and the ridges surprisingly dissected, it proved quite an obstacle to penetration. The particular section that teased walkers for many years was the journey (of hardly more than eight miles) from The Vines (the sawmill at the end of the timber track south of Sassafras) to the northern end of The Castle, overlooking the junction of the Clyde and Yadboro Creek. For me, there was a purely personal allied fascination about the cliff line running west and east above the northern side of Yadboro Creek valley.+It has been said, with some truth, that successful exploratory and mountaineering parties climb to their targets on the backs of earlier less successful venturers. In the less intrepid sphere of bushwalking this often holds true: the classic case, I shall never cease to quote, is the gradual penetration by walkers into the strip of wild ground fringed by the Clyde River on the east, the Nowra-Nerriga-Braidwood road on the north, the Budawang Range to the west, and the Yadboro Creek valley to the South. The whole area, embracing headwaters of the south-flowing Clyde River, would scarcely exceed ten miles in each direction, but because some parts are unusually wild, and the ridges surprisingly dissected, it proved quite an obstacle to penetration. The particular section that teased walkers for many years was the journey (of hardly more than eight miles) from The Vines (the sawmill at the end of the timber track south of Sassafras) to the northern end of The Castle, overlooking the junction of the Clyde and Yadboro Creek. For me, there was a purely personal allied fascination about the cliff line running west and east above the northern side of Yadboro Creek valley.
  
-Before I touch on the more personal appeal of Yadboro Rim, I should tell some of the sequence of exploration by walkers. I say "​some"​ because it's quite likely there were trips well before my time with the Club, perhaps others more recently that I simply didn't hear aboutbut back in '47 Ray Kirkby took an Easter trip starting from Sassafras, out past the Vines and Endrick Trig, the Upper Corang, The Peak (Corang Trig) to emerge on the Nerriga Road somewhere near Mongarlowe turn off.+Before I touch on the more personal appeal of Yadboro Rim, I should tell some of the sequence of exploration by walkers. I say "​some"​ because it's quite likely there were trips well before my time with the Club, perhaps others more recently that I simply didn't hear about but back in '47 Ray Kirkby took an Easter trip starting from Sassafras, out past the Vines and Endrick Trig, the Upper Corang, The Peak (Corang Trig) to emerge on the Nerriga Road somewhere near Mongarlowe turn off.
  
 Later, during 1948, I think, Alex Colley had two parties go in from the same area, with the objective of going through towards The Castle. One of these walks, King's Birthday weekend, '48, included a veritable galaxy of navigational skill, but the weather was so poor that the party was almost mislaid. I went to Pigeon House that Weekend and saw the very moistened party of Castle hunters back in Nowra on the Monday evening. Knowing what sort of weather they struck, and now knowing the country, I am most surprised that they were NOT overdue. Later, during 1948, I think, Alex Colley had two parties go in from the same area, with the objective of going through towards The Castle. One of these walks, King's Birthday weekend, '48, included a veritable galaxy of navigational skill, but the weather was so poor that the party was almost mislaid. I went to Pigeon House that Weekend and saw the very moistened party of Castle hunters back in Nowra on the Monday evening. Knowing what sort of weather they struck, and now knowing the country, I am most surprised that they were NOT overdue.
  
-After that, to the best of my knowledge, there was a hiatus of About seven years. Meanwhile the road from Sassafras to the Vines was improved to the stage where ordinary cars could make it with reasonable care, and when a party comprising Frank Leyden, Bill Cosgrove, Kevin Ardill, Len Fall and Jack Gentle came that way in April 1955, they drove in almost to The Vines. This team did a surprisingly good job of exploration,​ pushing on across a deep gully, into a small swamp they named Bopalong'​s Valley, across another spur and the top of a wide swamp opening to the west into the Corang. Finally they reached a rocky massif which they dubbed Five Goats Plateau, overlooking the Upper Corang, with the Yadboro Rim stretching along the southern flank of the valley.+After that, to the best of my knowledge, there was a hiatus of about seven years. Meanwhile the road from Sassafras to the Vines was improved to the stage where ordinary cars could make it with reasonable care, and when a party comprising Frank Leyden, Bill Cosgrove, Kevin Ardill, Len Fall and Jack Gentle came that way in April 1955, they drove in almost to The Vines. This team did a surprisingly good job of exploration,​ pushing on across a deep gully, into a small swamp they named Bopalong'​s Valley, across another spur and the top of a wide swamp opening to the west into the Corang. Finally they reached a rocky massif which they dubbed Five Goats Plateau, overlooking the Upper Corang, with the Yadboro Rim stretching along the southern flank of the valley.
  
 Later the same year three car loads and a dozen or so walkers accompanied Kevin and Len on a repeat trip into that weird terrain. ​ From Five Goats Plateau I saw, and was fascinated by, the Yadboro Rim and the promised views to the south. ​ Among these present were George Gray, and Tine and Dom Matthews (their presence has a bearing on later developments). Later the same year three car loads and a dozen or so walkers accompanied Kevin and Len on a repeat trip into that weird terrain. ​ From Five Goats Plateau I saw, and was fascinated by, the Yadboro Rim and the promised views to the south. ​ Among these present were George Gray, and Tine and Dom Matthews (their presence has a bearing on later developments).
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 At Easter 1957, Alex Colley returned to the assault from a new direction. His party, including Frank Leyden, came in from the Nerriga Road west of The Peak, passed over that lofty pimple, and then, with bits of Corang Valley and Yadboro Rim as their path, reached the sources of Corang River, and Mount Renwick, the big tabletop west of The Castle. At Easter 1957, Alex Colley returned to the assault from a new direction. His party, including Frank Leyden, came in from the Nerriga Road west of The Peak, passed over that lofty pimple, and then, with bits of Corang Valley and Yadboro Rim as their path, reached the sources of Corang River, and Mount Renwick, the big tabletop west of The Castle.
  
-The next stage was Colin Putt's trip of October 1957 from The Vines - avowed target Mount Renwick (perhaps the Castle if all went well). Although the party didn't quite reach Renwick, it did provide a link between the earliest trips south of The Vines, and Alex's westerly attack on Renwick. On this jaunt, too, George Gray and I added our contribution to the sum total of experience: we kept Colin informed of the previous way in from The Vines, and suggested a long sidling around a bluff which brought us on to Tarn Mountain. From this point Colin and John Manning pioneered a quite easy way (which took a deal of discovering) down into the Corang Valley and on to the saddle leading to Renwick. On this trip was Eric Pegram who - When Alex led another party in from The Vines at Easter 1958 was present, as were the Matthewses. Between them they had the clues to speed the party through Hopalong'​s Valley, across the big swamp around the long sidle to Tarn Mountain, dawn into Corang and on to the Western saddle to Renwick. This party then went on to complete the picture by pushing into the valley beyond Renwick, through a rugged rift in the rocks and along another sidling to emerge at the tail of the Castle. To wind it all up, they went on out by way of Yadboro, The Clyde, Pigeon House and Drury'​s. Several other parties followed their course in the ensuing months, one encountering quite a blizzard on the June holiday weekend of 1958.+The next stage was Colin Putt's trip of October 1957 from The Vines - avowed target Mount Renwick (perhaps the Castle if all went well). Although the party didn't quite reach Renwick, it did provide a link between the earliest trips south of The Vines, and Alex's westerly attack on Renwick. On this jaunt, too, George Gray and I added our contribution to the sum total of experience: we kept Colin informed of the previous way in from The Vines, and suggested a long sidling around a bluff which brought us on to Tarn Mountain. From this point Colin and John Manning pioneered a quite easy way (which took a deal of discovering) down into the Corang Valley and on to the saddle leading to Renwick. On this trip was Eric Pegram who, when Alex led another party in from The Vines at Easter 1958 was present, as were the Matthewses. Between them they had the clues to speed the party through Hopalong'​s Valley, across the big swamp around the long sidle to Tarn Mountain, dawn into Corang and on to the Western saddle to Renwick. This party then went on to complete the picture by pushing into the valley beyond Renwick, through a rugged rift in the rocks and along another sidling to emerge at the tail of the Castle. To wind it all up, they went on out by way of Yadboro, The Clyde, Pigeon House and Drury'​s. Several other parties followed their course in the ensuing months, one encountering quite a blizzard on the June holiday weekend of 1958.
  
-And I felt quite frustratedI had had a small share in the March of Progress and had savoured none of the fruits. And I wanted to walk along the Yadboro Rim.+And I felt quite frustratedI had had a small share in the March of Progress and had savoured none of the fruits. And I wanted to walk along the Yadboro Rim.
  
 I decided to devote a few days of annual holidays to a solo jaunt into the Corang country. Once in a while I like to travel solo, especially if it is summer, when I can walk early and late and rest in the heat of the day - a habit that few walkers seem to endorse. I armed myself with details of the way beyond Renwick from Alex, and left home at four o'​clock on a Monday morning early in February. I decided to devote a few days of annual holidays to a solo jaunt into the Corang country. Once in a while I like to travel solo, especially if it is summer, when I can walk early and late and rest in the heat of the day - a habit that few walkers seem to endorse. I armed myself with details of the way beyond Renwick from Alex, and left home at four o'​clock on a Monday morning early in February.
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 Broadly, my plan was to go to Corang Trig (The Peak), follow the rim overlooking Yadboro as far as practicable to the saddle near Renwick, then continue on the known Colley route to the rear of the Castle - returning the same way to Renwick, thence via Corang Valley. The morning was cool, with a high but thick overcast. Broadly, my plan was to go to Corang Trig (The Peak), follow the rim overlooking Yadboro as far as practicable to the saddle near Renwick, then continue on the known Colley route to the rear of the Castle - returning the same way to Renwick, thence via Corang Valley. The morning was cool, with a high but thick overcast.
  
-I plunged straight down on to Jerricknorra Creek, and after a brief pause, struck up a long abandoned cart track on its northern side. The theory was to keep along the north edge of Jerricknorra until I came to The Peak. Whereupon I pulled +I plunged straight down on to Jerricknorra Creek, and after a brief pause, struck up a long abandoned cart track on its northern side. The theory was to keep along the north edge of Jerricknorra until I came to The Peak. Whereupon I pulled a boner that even the veriest tyro walker should avoid. Under a sunless sky with no real clue on direction, I walked steadily for almost two hours before a shallow swampy valley cutting across my way made me pause and study my compass. I should have been travelling a little south of east, in fact I was walking almost north!
-a boner that even the veriest tyro walker should avoid. Under a sunless sky with no real clue on direction, I walked steadily for almost two hours before a shallow +
-swampy valley cutting across my way made me pause and study my compass. I should have been travelling a little south of east, in fact I was walking almost north!+
  
 There'​s nothing to gain, in recounting what happened between 11.30, when I discovered this disquieting deviation, and 3.30 when I finally came to Corang Peak. What should have occupied barely 3 hours took 5, and cost a great deal of effort as I wallowed up and over countless spurs of the Corang River tangle. There'​s nothing to gain, in recounting what happened between 11.30, when I discovered this disquieting deviation, and 3.30 when I finally came to Corang Peak. What should have occupied barely 3 hours took 5, and cost a great deal of effort as I wallowed up and over countless spurs of the Corang River tangle.
  
-I dimly realised that the view from Corang Trig to the south and east was magnificent - Kanangra standard, with a backdrop of hazy ocean: to the north the view was intriguing and only in the west was the cyclorama somewhat undistinguished. I realised it dimly because I was fretting over lost time and because the configuration of the ground offered little encouragement to my plot to keep along the rim. There was a nasty locking ​gulf immediately east of the shoulders of Corang Trig. With a most un-February-like wind chilling me I made one halfhearted sortie in that direction, then turned north east and found an accommodating ridge that led into the open swampy part of Corang Valley with no intervening cliffs.+I dimly realised that the view from Corang Trig to the south and east was magnificent - Kanangra standard, with a backdrop of hazy ocean: to the north the view was intriguing and only in the west was the cyclorama somewhat undistinguished. I realised it dimly because I was fretting over lost time and because the configuration of the ground offered little encouragement to my plot to keep along the rim. There was a nasty looking ​gulf immediately east of the shoulders of Corang Trig. With a most un-February-like wind chilling me I made one halfhearted sortie in that direction, then turned north east and found an accommodating ridge that led into the open swampy part of Corang Valley with no intervening cliffs.
  
 I still had some notion of beating back to the Yadboro Rim, but after the energetic morning the easy if sometimes soggy walking along the open valley was too inviting. So I stayed down and the queer, broken craggy formations of Five Goats Plateau and Tarn Mountain approached with satisfying rapidity. I camped just before six o'​clock in a little side creek, very near the Corang River source, I ate quickly and by 7.30 was abed, slept like a log five hours and spent the next five waking and worrying over a cramp in the right knee. I still had some notion of beating back to the Yadboro Rim, but after the energetic morning the easy if sometimes soggy walking along the open valley was too inviting. So I stayed down and the queer, broken craggy formations of Five Goats Plateau and Tarn Mountain approached with satisfying rapidity. I camped just before six o'​clock in a little side creek, very near the Corang River source, I ate quickly and by 7.30 was abed, slept like a log five hours and spent the next five waking and worrying over a cramp in the right knee.
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 However I could spy out the land, and sat some time looking down on the impossible, chaotic rock formations that occupy the little valley east of Mount Renwick. They defy description - you simply have to see them: you may liken them to beehives or Eastern Temples, or the prow of a battleship, but the confusion of them, the "​unconventional"​ layout of the landscape can't be put into words. However I could spy out the land, and sat some time looking down on the impossible, chaotic rock formations that occupy the little valley east of Mount Renwick. They defy description - you simply have to see them: you may liken them to beehives or Eastern Temples, or the prow of a battleship, but the confusion of them, the "​unconventional"​ layout of the landscape can't be put into words.
  
-The next stage was to get down amongst them. I'm not sure if I departed from +The next stage was to get down amongst them. I'm not sure if I departed from the authorised Colley route, but I struck diabolically slow going in that green little ravine beyond Renwick, clambering through alternate patches of scrub that had been charred in bushfires and pockets of near rain forest. However, I identified the rift that ran out to the north east, and struggled through it, and down the little waterfall. Then, through a break in the forest, I saw the Byangee Walls reaching out towards the Clyde Valley and another ten minutes of clawing progress below the cliff line put me on the saddle at the tail of the Castle. It was noon, on a February day, yet I shivered as I crouched beside a tuft of cutting grass for lunch. In fact, it was so damned chilly I didn't even wait to brew up a billy of tea. I had no ambition to climb the Castle. That also isn't my cup of tea.
-the authorised Colley route, but I struck diabolically slow going in that green +
-little ravine beyond Renwick, clambering through alternate patches of scrub that +
-had been charred in bushfires and pockets of near rain forest. However, I identified the rift that ran out to the north east, and struggled through it, and down the little waterfall. Then, through a break in the forest, I saw the Byangee Walls reaching out towards the Clyde Valley and another ten minutes of clawing progress below the cliff line put me on the saddle at the tail of the Castle. It was noon, on a February day, yet I shivered as I crouched beside a tuftof cutting grass for lunch. In fact, it was so damned chilly I didn't even wait to brew up a billy of tea. I had no ambition to climb the Castle.. That also isn't my cup of tea.+
  
 Well, now that I'd got there, now that I'd personally satisfied myself that you can get through to the rear of the Castle, the old yearning to do Yadboro Rim came back. All right, I would return that way, once I'd extricated myself from the thick going around Renwick. Well, now that I'd got there, now that I'd personally satisfied myself that you can get through to the rear of the Castle, the old yearning to do Yadboro Rim came back. All right, I would return that way, once I'd extricated myself from the thick going around Renwick.
- . +  
-By the time I was back to my gear on the Renwick saddle it was 3.0 p.m. and I'd nearly had enough for the day. My bad day and bad night catching up, I supposed. However, there was just one other thing I wanted to do. I wanted to go once more to the camp site chosen by Colin up on Tarn Mountain. I had fond recollections of that fringe of a swamp with a good forest coverage all nestling beneath the big domed rock. So I climbed up there far the night, and very glad I was -- the swamp +By the time I was back to my gear on the Renwick saddle it was 3.0 p.m. and I'd nearly had enough for the day. My bad day and bad night catching up, I supposed. However, there was just one other thing I wanted to do. I wanted to go once more to the camp site chosen by Colin up on Tarn Mountain. I had fond recollections of that fringe of a swamp with a good forest coverage all nestling beneath the big domed rock. So I climbed up there for the night, and very glad I was -- the swamp in front was a living mass of Christmas Bells, and as the light faded behind the rocks, the whole of Tarn mountain appeared to have a soft red glow. The night was much more restful.
-in front was a living mass of Christmas Bells, and as the light faded behind the rocks, the wholeof Tarn mountain appeared to have a soft red glow.. The night was much more restful.+
  
 Wednesday'​s dawn was again coo1 and cloudy. Instead of my projected five o'​clock start I luxuriated in my sleeping bag and mentally timetabled my return trip. It was almost seven When I was breakfasted and pushing through the tangle of Christmas Bells. To leave Tarn Mountain I tried the saddle at its North-western end, and half an hour from starting was down in easy walking on the Corang. I was aware that I was moving better and felt as though I had got into walking trim, and after a mile I struck up towards the rim, emerging on it shortly after eight o'​clock only a few yards from the point where I had topped it the previous morning (only the previous morning! - or was it six months before?) Wednesday'​s dawn was again coo1 and cloudy. Instead of my projected five o'​clock start I luxuriated in my sleeping bag and mentally timetabled my return trip. It was almost seven When I was breakfasted and pushing through the tangle of Christmas Bells. To leave Tarn Mountain I tried the saddle at its North-western end, and half an hour from starting was down in easy walking on the Corang. I was aware that I was moving better and felt as though I had got into walking trim, and after a mile I struck up towards the rim, emerging on it shortly after eight o'​clock only a few yards from the point where I had topped it the previous morning (only the previous morning! - or was it six months before?)
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 For almost two miles of the five that reached out to Corang, the Rim was delightfully easy walking. Fairly level, with short reedy growth and a few small patches of scrub. The view to the south and east, fascinating. Then the ridge began to play tricks. At first I thought I had outwitted it, and avoided the obvious trap of dropping over into the Corang: then I slowly acknowledged the terrain had trapped me. There is one section of the rim - perhaps only a mile in length, that is notched with a series of fissures, running transverse to the ridge, similar to the gulf that bisects Renwick. I negotiated two small rifts, but the third was too deep, too greasy, and with bad grace I retreated into a side valley on the Corang watershed. For almost two miles of the five that reached out to Corang, the Rim was delightfully easy walking. Fairly level, with short reedy growth and a few small patches of scrub. The view to the south and east, fascinating. Then the ridge began to play tricks. At first I thought I had outwitted it, and avoided the obvious trap of dropping over into the Corang: then I slowly acknowledged the terrain had trapped me. There is one section of the rim - perhaps only a mile in length, that is notched with a series of fissures, running transverse to the ridge, similar to the gulf that bisects Renwick. I negotiated two small rifts, but the third was too deep, too greasy, and with bad grace I retreated into a side valley on the Corang watershed.
  
-It was now 9.30, but on the smooth valley floor I stepped along easily, and by 10.15 was back on the shoulder of Corang Trig again. ​ There was a strongly defined track around the South of the pimple and as this was the scenic side, and the one I wanted to try, I went that way. Half a mile west of Corang I noted a bluff reaching it over the Yadboro. It promised such views that I diverted. to it, and spent almost an hour steeping myself in the scenery. It isI believe, the finest of local vantage points, better than Corang itself, and probably comparable with the missed lookout from South Renwick.+It was now 9.30, but on the smooth valley floor I stepped along easily, and by 10.15 was back on the shoulder of Corang Trig again. ​ There was a strongly defined track around the South of the pimple and as this was the scenic side, and the one I wanted to try, I went that way. Half a mile west of Corang I noted a bluff reaching it over the Yadboro. It promised such views that I diverted. to it, and spent almost an hour steeping myself in the scenery. It is I believe, the finest of local vantage points, better than Corang itself, and probably comparable with the missed lookout from South Renwick.
  
 From that point the track marched clearly to the west and presently descended into the top of Jerricknorra Creek Valley, where it vanished completely. The rest was simple enough, however, and by two thirty I was back to the car - weary enough, scratched enough, but somehow, elated and at peace with myself. ​ From that point the track marched clearly to the west and presently descended into the top of Jerricknorra Creek Valley, where it vanished completely. The rest was simple enough, however, and by two thirty I was back to the car - weary enough, scratched enough, but somehow, elated and at peace with myself. ​
195906.txt · Last modified: 2016/02/04 03:35 by kennettj