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195904 [2018/12/03 05:21]
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195904 [2018/12/03 23:26]
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-13.+===== At Our Annual Reunion===== 
-AT OUR ANNUAL REUNION. ​+
 "​Mulga. "​Mulga.
 +
 After the shock of the new clubroom I felt that anything could happen on Reunion weekend, and as Saturday moved on it was evident that the mood set by the Great Event was to continue. After the shock of the new clubroom I felt that anything could happen on Reunion weekend, and as Saturday moved on it was evident that the mood set by the Great Event was to continue.
-The Grose Wad road had just been patched up (you Doubting Thomases should have seen it the week before!) The Grose was a swimmable depth and looking lush all around, and the ringing of bell birds pierced the air. (That may sound familiar, but what can you expect?)  + 
-Suddenly came the inimitable sound of lawnmowers trundling down the track, and then a crunching ​-sort of rumble as Putt appeared wheeling a barrow loaded with gear. "​Harvey was right", ​puff*d ​Putt, "No doubt about a wheelbarrow:" Downhill, anyway. A quickfrip ​to Richmond to pick up the train travellers, then log handling, tents popping up every shere, Edna Stretton collecting items of entertainment,​ performers with tea in one hand and a just-acquired script in the other, and then - +The Grose Wold road had just been patched up (you Doubting Thomases should have seen it the week before!) The Grose was a swimmable depth and looking lush all around, and the ringing of bell birds pierced the air. (That may sound familiar, but what can you expect?​) ​ 
-Fire's Burning: + 
-as Maurice Berry and Lyndsey Gray lit the pile of logs with two flaming Olympic type torches ​brolght ​by Brian Harvey. +Suddenly came the inimitable sound of lawnmowers trundling down the track, and then a crunching sort of rumble as Putt appeared wheeling a barrow loaded with gear. "​Harvey was right", ​puffed ​Putt, "No doubt about a wheelbarrow!" Downhill, anyway. A quick trip to Richmond to pick up the train travellers, then log handling, tents popping up everywhere, Edna Stretton collecting items of entertainment,​ performers with tea in one hand and a just-acquired script in the other, and then - 
-Edna organised well, and maintained a steady flow of song and sketch with room for apyone ​who could be persuaded to perform. Highlights of the right were a true fairytale ​"The Frog Prince",​ and a "Trial of the Past Editor"​. We did notice a slight accent on Dormie'​s 5% and must mention the superb performance of Snow Brown as a famous three-dimensional Artiste. + 
-The initiation ceremony was a chariot relay race between three teams of four each - two lawnmowers and a barrow - and somehow I think ,the horses fared better ​tiA,​ni ​the drivers over thB rugged course. The winners were awarded with a feed of fried witchety grubs, but this was a sell, for I have it on good authority that they were made of dough. Pity!+Fire's Burning
 + 
 +as Maurice Berry and Lyndsey Gray lit the pile of logs with two flaming Olympic type torches ​brought ​by Brian Harvey. 
 + 
 +Edna organised well, and maintained a steady flow of song and sketch with room for anyone ​who could be persuaded to perform. Highlights of the night were a true fairy tale "The Frog Prince",​ and a "Trial of the Past Editor"​. We did notice a slight accent on Dormie'​s 5% and must mention the superb performance of Snow Brown as a famous three-dimensional Artiste. 
 + 
 +The initiation ceremony was a chariot relay race between three teams of four each - two lawnmowers and a barrow - and somehow I think the horses fared better ​than the drivers over thB rugged course. The winners were awarded with a feed of fried witchety grubs, but this was a sell, for I have it on good authority that they were made of dough. Pity! 
 Jack Gentle was sworn in for a further term and spoke gratefully of the assistance he'd been given during the year. Jack Gentle was sworn in for a further term and spoke gratefully of the assistance he'd been given during the year.
-Sunday dawned bright, but too early, and before long the beach wascrowded ​with all shapes and sizes. Mud-slinging was restricted to some self-inflicted torture by the stalwarts, who slid to their heart'​s content down a bank of Wood's Creek and seemed to enjoy it thoroughly. Meanwhile Dennis Gittoe'​s canoe plied a steady trade up and down the river. + 
-Return seats were found for everyone, and all in all it as a mighty Reunion. Thanks to Colin Putt and his committee and helpers for the harayakka ​which made it (and the supper) such a success, and to the members and families whose presence made it worthwhile. +Sunday dawned bright, but too early, and before long the beach was crowded ​with all shapes and sizes. Mud-slinging was restricted to some self-inflicted torture by the stalwarts, who slid to their heart'​s content down a bank of Wood's Creek and seemed to enjoy it thoroughly. Meanwhile Dennis Gittoe'​s canoe plied a steady trade up and down the river. 
-1959 REUNION ATTENDANCE.  + 
-Adults 120 (includes 86 active members) Children 63. +Return seats were found for everyone, and all in all it was a mighty Reunion. Thanks to Colin Putt and his committee and helpers for the hard yakka which made it (and the supper) such a success, and to the members and families whose presence made it worthwhile. 
-SLOW TRIP DOWN THE KOWMUNG.+ 
 +--- 
 + 
 +=== 1959 Reunion Attendance=== 
 + 
 +Adults 120 (includes 86 active members)Children 63. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Slow Trip Down The Kowmung===== 
 - Alex Colley. - Alex Colley.
-A4 we breakfasted on the green grass beneath a pine tree in a Blackheath Park on Saturday December 20th, we felt that our trip had at last started. Many weeks of preparation had gone beforehand. We had had several meetings to compose our 200 lb. food list and to plan camping equipment, waterproofing of packs and  contents etc., also much shopping and packing and a special week-end trip to Lannigan'​s Creek to leave a food depot, which we would reach on the ninth day. On the previous evening we had left our travelling clothes and other oddments at Les and Marie Harper'​s place. Now, as we ate the first meal out of our packs, we knew the die was cast. We could take nothing more, and must depend for the next 13 days on our long preparations. To have all the organising behind and the trip ahead was an exciting prospect, enhanced by a cloudless day, a cool morning breeze, warm sunlight, and an extensive view of the blue mountains beyond which we mould start our walk. + 
-Mr. Hattswell picked us up at 8 a m., and by 11 we were at Ginkin, our starting point. There were eight in the party - Jack Wren (our leader, though he resigned once or twice), Jean and Alan Nilson, Allan Abbott, Pam Baker, ​1-17tTirle ​Renwick, Frank Leyden and I. A nonr bushwalker observer, seeing us setting ​oat, all clean and pale, over the luseious ​green pastures, might have been puzzled to decide whether we were going to a back:to childhood party or eluding ​oar warders. The favoured female fashion was a kind of smock, called a Kowmung shirt, which reached from neck:to knees and might or might not be held in the middle by a belt. The +As we breakfasted on the green grass beneath a pine tree in a Blackheath Park on Saturday December 20th, we felt that our trip had at last started. Many weeks of preparation had gone beforehand. We had had several meetings to compose our 200 lb. food list and to plan camping equipment, waterproofing of packs and contents etc., also much shopping and packing and a special week-end trip to Lannigan'​s Creek to leave a food depot, which we would reach on the ninth day. On the previous evening we had left our travelling clothes and other oddments at Les and Marie Harper'​s place. Now, as we ate the first meal out of our packs, we knew the die was cast. We could take nothing more, and must depend for the next 13 days on our long preparations. To have all the organising behind and the trip ahead was an exciting prospect, enhanced by a cloudless day, a cool morning breeze, warm sunlight, and an extensive view of the blue mountains beyond which we would start our walk. 
-boys also sported a variety of shirts. One little + 
-'fellow, about 6 ft. high and 3i ft. round, had +Mr. Hattswell picked us up at 8 a.m., and by 11 we were at Ginkin, our starting point. There were eight in the party - Jack Wren (our leader, though he resigned once or twice), Jean and Alan Wilson, Allan Abbott, Pam Baker, ​Yvonne ​Renwick, Frank Leyden and I. A non-bushwalker observer, seeing us setting ​out, all clean and pale, over the luscious ​green pastures, might have been puzzled to decide whether we were going to a back to childhood party or eluding ​our warders. The favoured female fashion was a kind of smock, called a Kowmung shirt, which reached from neck to knees and might or might not be held in the middle by a belt. The boys also sported a variety of shirts. One little fellow, about 6 ft. high and 3 1/2 ft. round, had grown out of his shirt, and his mother had tacked a foot or so of check tablecloth to its hem so as to bring it down to his knees. Another wore a spotlessly white dress shirt. When motionless he looked, but for the colour of his skin, like the Pelaco advertisement,​ but he cut a dashing figure as his beard grew and he leapt from rock to rock with the tails flying behind. Broad straw hats and gym boots completed the ensemble of both sexes. 
-grown out of his shirt, and his mother had tacked +
-a foot or SD of check tablecloth to its hem so as +
-to bring it dawn to his knees. Another wore a +
-spotlessly white dress shirt. When motionless he +
-looked, but for the colour of his skin, like the +
-Pelaco advertisement,​ but he cut a dashing figure +
-as his beard grew and he leapt from rock to rock +
-with the tails flying behind. Broad straw hats +
-and gym boots completed the ensemble of both sexes.+
 As we made our way towards the Tuglom the message "​bushwalkers"​ passed from fly to fly, and soon each of us moved within our own swarm. When we produced steak for lunch an extra loud buzz arose, probably the fly equivalent of a cheer. All our defences, including insecticides and mosquito net, were useless, but we comforted ourselves with the thought that they were probably worse here, where animals grazed, than further on, and this proved to be so. As we made our way towards the Tuglom the message "​bushwalkers"​ passed from fly to fly, and soon each of us moved within our own swarm. When we produced steak for lunch an extra loud buzz arose, probably the fly equivalent of a cheer. All our defences, including insecticides and mosquito net, were useless, but we comforted ourselves with the thought that they were probably worse here, where animals grazed, than further on, and this proved to be so.
-In the afternoon we made our way over the + 
-limestone outcrops, past notices which warned of dog traps. The dingoes must have been bad here - a well worn enclosure fenced with 6 ft. netting +In the afternoon we made our way over the limestone outcrops, past notices which warned of dog traps. The dingoes must have been bad here - a well worn enclosure fenced with 6 ft. netting was evidence that the sheep were rounded up nightly and placed in it for protection. We trod warily, but soon learned to recognise trap emplacements near the fences that the dogs would skirt. It was hot in the sun with our nine day packs, which weighed over 30 lbs. for the girls and over 40 for the boys, and we were glad to flop down on our camp site within view of Tuglow Falls about 1.30 p.m. Despite the dead thornbush around, it was a well grassed and comfortable spot. Next morning, after a couple of hours spent photographing Tuglow Falls and Chardon'​s ​Canyon, we set off down the Kowmung. I had been on this part of the river before, with the first S.B.W. trip down the river bed, when we placed our packs on the top of our surf floats and they rolled straight over. Though I recognised little of the river now, my companions on that trip never seemed far away. 
-was evidence that the sheep were rounded up nightly + 
-15. +For the first few miles the valley is just rough. Stretches of fairly open walking are interspersed with rock hopping, scrambling, and scrub pushing. We arrived at Tuglow Hole, a deep rock pool with sheer walls on one side, about p.m. and camped again rather ​than start our pack floating that afternoon. The river here is some 3,000 ftabove sea level. Trout broke the surface as evening drew in, but unfortunately we had no fishing license, so we couldn'​t catch any. We regretted too that we hadn't brought our bulldozer. There was a little patch of ground near the water just big enough for our dining room. The Wilson Construction Co. got to work and flattened a space for one tent, while another, best unnamed, removed some sizeable vegetation to make enough room for three to lie in the dining room. Frank erected his tent over various rocks and tussocks round which he and Allan Abbott somehow insinuated themselves. 
-FOR ALL YOUR TRANSPORT PROBLEM + 
-CONTACT +This was typical of our camp sites for the next few days. Pitching one tent was not so difficult ​- there were occasional flat spaces just big enough for one tent. To put another near it called for considerable site improvement while the third tent sometines had to be (or perhaps I should say, "​was",​) pitched up to 50 yards away. 
-ROSWELL'​S TAXI & TOURIST SERVICE + 
-RING, WRITE, WIRE or CALL +Soon after setting out next morning we came to the first of the rock enclosed ​pools which necessitated swimming. Groundsheets were carefully wrapped around our packs and  into the water we went, towing them by a cord held in the teeth. We knew it would work, but nevertheless were glad to report "all dry" after our first swim. 
-'​PHONE:​ Blackheath w459 or 1N151 BOOKING OFFICE: 4 doors from Gardners Inn Hotel (LOOK FOR THE NEON SIGN) + 
-SPEEDT 5 or 8 PASSENGER CARS AVAMOLE +From now on the river started to plunge down the rocky gorge, descending some 2000 feet in a few miles. I have no clear memory of the sequence ​of rock faces, climbs, swims, pools etc. over the next few days. Sometimes ​we would be able to walk a mile or so over rocks and boulders along the banks. It was cool weather - we hardly saw the sun after the first two days - and we didn't swim our packs unless we had to. Once or twice we went perhaps a hundred feet above the river to avoid a swim, but only if we could see a negotiable route beyond, which would enable us to get back to the river. Many parties have had the experience of going up and up, perhaps 2000 feet, looking for a way down to the river again, and some parties have become separated this way. We came to several falls of about 30 feet. Often we would look down the gorge, where the water tumbled between cottage sized rocks, smooth slides and cliff faces and wonder how on earth we could get through. But Jack always had the answer. In the critical places we would produce the sash cord, place a loop round the nervous members of his flock, and, keeping a firm grip on the cord, direct their footsteps. We climbed over, round, and under the huge boulders, across steep slabs above the water where our rubber soles would barely grip, over the top of waterfalls and once down a tree, our legs protected by pyjama pants. When we were not climbing or scrambling we were wading or swimming. Only for short stretches did we walk. All day long, and all night too, the water roared in our ears. 
-=GE OR SMALL PARTIES CATERED FOR + 
-FARES: KANOGRA WALLS 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers) +Our plan was to leave plenty of time for this part of the trip so that we could enjoy the swimming. The dull, cool weather damped our enthusiasm for the water, but we were not a strong party, and a few hours walking a day was all we wanted to do. The trip can be done in half the time we took, but we were all agreed that it is more like work than pleasure to rush it in midsummerOne afternoon we came across a beautiful grassy flat only 300 yards below our lunch spot, and there we camped. 
-PERRY'​S LOOEDOWN 3/_ It It It nn n + 
-JENOLPI: STATE FOREST 20/- " " II TI II +Before we set off in the morning there was an all round spraying of faces with "​bask"​ - a pressure packed fly repellant with an agreeable odour which kept nearly all the busy little insects off our skin. Grubby we might be, and with our halo of flies, but, like Georgeous George the wrestler entering the ring, we exuded a delicate perfume as we took to the undergrowth
-CARLON'​S FARM lo/ 11 n 11 It 11 + 
-NE WILL BE PLEASED TO QUOTE TRIPS OR SPECIAL PARTIES ON APPLICATION. +By the evening of the 24th we had reached the top of a steep drop which started with a 30 foot fall and a long pool between sheer, or steeply sloped,rock. In a thick growth of small trees myrtles ​think just above the fall, Jack had discovered enough space to camp. It was overcast, the mountains rose steeply above us and the dense canopy of the small trees shut out the sky. Camping was again difficult, and the quiet which came over some was understandable. But the dinner was, as usual, first rate and, the work done, our camp site quite comfortable. Round the fire we produced excerpts from the song book while those who could sing did, and those that couldn'​t tried. Meanwhile Alan Wilson was busy in his tent. An hour or so later he emerged with a small branch from a casuarina, poked it in the ground behind us, connected a wire and lo! a Christmas tree, complete with coloured lights and presents for all! A very nice bit of fun which warmed the cockles of our hearts and inspired us to sing carols. 
-and placed in it for protection. We trod warily, but soon learned to recognise trap emplacements near the fences that the dogs would skirt. It was ho t in the sun with our nine day packs, which weighed over 30 lbs. for the girls and over 40 for the boys, an3 we were glad to flop down on our camp site within view of Tuglow Falls about 1.30 p m. Despite the dead thornbush around, it was a well grassed and comfortable spot. Next morning, after a couple of hours spent photographing Tuglow Falls and Chardon'​s ​Carron, we set aff down the Kowmung. I had been on this part of the river before, with the first S.B.N. trip down the river bed, when we placed our packs on the top of our surf floats and they rolled straight over. Though I recognised little of the river now, my companions on that trip never seemed far away. + 
-For the first few miles the valley is just rough. Stretches of fairly open walking are interspersed with rock hopping, scrambling, and scrub pushing. We arrived at Tuglow Hole, a deep rock pool with sheer walls on one side, about p m. and camped again,​rathor ​than start our pack floating that afternoon. The river here is some 3,000 ft,, above sea level. Trout broke the surface as evening drew in, but unfortunately we had no fishing license, so we couldn'​t catch any. We regretted too that wc: hadn't brought our bulldozer. There was a little patch of ground near the water just big enough for our dining room. The Wilson Construction Co. got to work and flattened a space for one tent, while another, best unnamed, removed some sizeable vegetation to make enough room for three to lie in the dining +Next day we negotiated the last big drop and came to the more level stretches ​below. There was still some swimming - the last and most impressive of the canyons is only about three miles above Lannigan'​s Creek - but the walking was easier, the chief nuisance being a thick growth of weeds, including white daisies, evidently carried ​down from the farms above. 
-l6. + 
-room. Frank erected his tent over various rocks and tussocks round which he and Allan Abbott somehow insinuated themselves. +A couple of evenings later a thunderstorm broke. The bush fires had left the ground very bare and the hillsides badly eroded. Within half an hour we were crossing a small stream of almost pure mud coming in from the left bank. Thereafter the water never cleared. This made crossings difficult as we couldn'​t see the bottom. 
-This was typical of oar camp sites for the next few days. Pitching one tent + 
-was not so difficalt ​- there were occasional flat spaces just big enough for one +We were now approaching the biggest gorge on the Kowmung - our food depot at Lannigan'​s Creek. It included our Christmas dinner, cum Alan Wilson'​s birthday party; in fact as many goodies in tins, bottles, jars etc. as we could carry down there (84 lbs. including food for the rest of the trip). It was well concealed in a small cave, the tins inscribed in Jean's lipstick in case the labels came off, and the packages placed in dried vegetable containers supplied by courtesy of Paddy Pallin. Nevertheless reports circulated of a wallaby with ruby-red lips, a sleek possum ​leering at us from the tree tops, and a rabbit with a tin opener. It was not until we were at Bull's Creek, some 200 yards from our depot, that we recognised our location. Jack immediately withdrew his resignation and sprinted for the depot, jostled by other members of the party who claimed the right to be first. The next furlong was the fastest of the trip. 
-tent. To put another near it called for considerable site improvement while the third tent sometines had to be (or perhaps I should say, "​was",​) pitched up to 50 yards away. + 
-Soon after setting out next morning we came to the first of the rock erelosed ​pools which necessitated swimming. Groundsheets were carefully wrapped around our packs and  into the water we went, towing them by a cord held in the teeth. We knew it would work, but nevertheless were glad to report "all dry" after our first swim. +In quick time the food was uncovered. Except that something had tried to uncork the sherry and some of the salami and bread was mouldy, all was well. A fine campsite, unnoticed on our last trip, was found about 20 yards away, tents erected, the billy boiled, and, in no time, 2 1/2 lbs of Alan's rich, luscious birthday fruit cake had disappeared down our gullets. Eating continued with intervals for sleep and washing of clothes for the rest of that afternoon and most of the next morning. The fact that it rained heavily most or the time was hardly noticed. We went on after an early lunch next dayr, leaving a disused wombat hole full of tins behind us. 
-From now on the river started + 
-to plunge down the rocky gorge, descending some 2000 feet in a few miles. I have no clear memory of the segaence ​of rock faces, climbs, swims, pools etc. over the next few +We walked now mostly on grassy banks by long still pools fringed by casuarinas. The noise of the river, once a roar, later a rush, was now a gentle swish. Though swimming was no longer necessary, we had to cross from time to time and rather resented a couple of hours return to rock hopping and wading in the muddy water, when we reached the Bulga Denis Canyon. But the scenery was compensation,​ particularly the vivid reds, browns and yellows of Sunrise and Sunset bluff, Orange Bluff and other formations. Below the Bulga Denis it was mostly open easy walking again. After more than a week out most of us were pretty fit. The tensions built up in a year of city life were gone. Walking was less effort - there were no more strains, sprains or bruises as in the first few days. We had soon evolved an easy camping routine. As soon as we camped each of us went to our task, so that, before long, there was time to relax and talk. We had gone through a lot of experiences together and had evolved that easy companionship that only a long walk with "​compatibles"​ can bring. The city seemed far behind, there was no rushing to get back after a couple of days, and the bush was our home. We felt sorry for Frank Leyden when he had to set out on his own to get back to work from Lannigan'​s Creek. 
-days. Soraetimes ​we would be able to walk a mile or so over rocks and boulders along + 
-the banks. It was cool weather - we hardly saw the sun after the first two days - and we didn't swim our packs unless we had to. Once or twice we went perhaps a +The weather continued dull, so that there was no temptation to swim, but perhaps we were lucky to avoid heat and sunburn. On the eleventh day we reached the Cox Junction, to find the Cox muddier than the KowmungWhy there is such a clamor about fires and erosion on the Snowy catchment, and none about the Warragamba catchment, where the damage is considerably worse, I cannot understand. I suspect it is because scientists, like nearly everybody else, never get more than a few yards from their cars, so never see the river of gravel moving down the Cox or the mud in the once clean Kowmung. But, as on the Snowy mountains, someday they will discover, after laboured observations,​ what the bushwalkers have known for many years. 
-hundred feet above the river to avoid a swim, but only if we could see a negotiable +
-route beyond, ​-which would enable us to get back to the river. Many parties have had the experience of going up and up, perhaps 2000 feet, looking for a way down to the river again, and some parties have become separated this way. We came to several falls of about 30 feet. Often we would look down the gorge, where the +
-water tumbled between cottage sized rocks, smooth slides and cliff faces and wonder how on earth we could get through. But Jack +
-always had the answer. In the critical places we would produce the sash cord, place a loop round the nervous members of his flock, and, keeping a firm grip on the cord, direct their footsteps. We climbed over, round, and under the huge boulders, across steep slabs above the water wlmre our rubber soles would barely grip, +
-over the top of waterfalls and once down a tree, +
-our legs protected by pyjama pants. When we were not climbing or scrambling we were wading or swimming. Only for short stretches did we walk. +
-All day long, and all night too, the water roared in our ears. +
-17. +
-Our plan was to leave plenty of time for this part of the trip so that we could enjoy the swimming. The dull, cool weather damped our enthusiasm for the water, but we were not a strong party, and a few hours walking a day was all we +
-wanted to da. The trip can be done in half the time we took, but we were all agreed that it is more like work than pleasure to rush it in midsummerOne afternoon we came across a beautiful grassy flat only 300 yards below our lunch spot, and there we camped. +
-Before we set off in the +
-morning there was an all rcand +
-spraying of faces with "​bask"​ - +
-a pressure packed fly repellant +
-with an agreeable odour which +
-kept nearly all the busy little +
-insects off our skin. Grubby +
-we might be, and with our halo of flies, but, like Georgeous +
-George the wrestler entering the ring, we exuded a delicate +
-perfume as we took to the under. growth+
-IONv +
-By the evening of the 24th +
-we had reached the top of a steep drop which started with a 30 foot fall and a long pool between sheer, or steeply sloped,roCk. +
-In a thick:growth of small trees myrtles ​1:think just above +
-the fall, Jack had discovered ​+
-enough space to camp. It was overcast, the mountains rose steeply above us and the dense canopy of the small trees Shut out the sky. Camping was again +
-difficult, and the quiet Which came over some was understandable. But the dinner was, as usual, first rate and, the work done, our camp site quite comfortable. Round the fire we produced excerpts from the song book while those who could sing +
-did, and those that couldn'​t tried. Meanwhile Alan Wilson was busy in his tent. +
-An hour or so later he emerged with a small branch from a caSuarina, poked it in the ground behind us, connected a wire and lo!a Christmas tree, complete with coloured lights and presents for all! A very nice bit of fun which warmed the +
-cockles of our hearts and inspired us to sing carols. +
-Next day we negotiated the last big drop and came to the more level +
-stretches ​belaw. There was still some swimming - the last and most impressive of the canyons is only about three miles aboVe Lannigan'​s Creek - but the +
-walking was easier, the chief nuisance being a thick growth of weeds, including white daisies, evidently carried ​dawn from the farms above. +
-A couple of evenings later a thunderstorm broke. The bush fires had left the ground very bare and the hillsides badly eroded. Within half an hour we were crossing a snail stream of almost pure mud coming in from the left bank. Thereafter the water never cleared. This made crossings difficult as we couldn'​t see the bottom. +
-ig. +
-We were now approaching the biggest gorge on the Kowmung - our food depot at Lannigan'​s Creek:. It included our Christmas dinner, cum Alan Wilson'​s birthday party; in fact as many goodies in tins, bottles, jars etc. as we could carry down there (84 lbs. including food for the rest of the trip). It was well concealed in a small cave, the tins inscribed in Jean's lipstick in case the labels came off, and the packages placed in dried vegetable containers supplied by courtesy of Paddy Pa4in. Nevertheless reports circulated of a wallaby with ruby-red lips, a sleek poOsum ​leering at us from the tree tops, and a rabbit with a tin opener. It was +
-not until we were at Bull's Creek, +
-some 200 yards from our depot, +
-that we recognised our location. +
-Jack immediately withdrew his +
-resignation and sprinted for the +
-depot, jostled by other members of +
-the party who claimed the right +
--7) to be first. The next furlong was +
-the fastest of the trip. +
-In quick time the food was +
-.f jSi uncovered. Except that something +
-44441 01414' ​had tried to uncork the sherry and some of the salami and bread was mouldy, all was well. A fine campsite, unnoticed on our last trip, was found about 20 yards away, tents erected, the billy bbiled, and, in no time, 2i lbs of Alan's rich, luscious birthday fruit cake had disappeared down +
-cur gullets. Eating continued with intervals for sleep and washing of clothes for +
-the rest of that afternoon and most of the next morning. The fact that it rained +
-heavily most or the time was hardly noticed. We vent on after an early lunch next +
-dtir, leaving a disused wombat hole full of tins behind us. +
-We walked now mostly on grassy banks by long still pools fringed by casuarinas. The noise of the river, once a roar, later a rush, was now a gentle swish. Though swimming was no longer necessary, we had to cross from time to time and rather resented a couple of hours return to rock hopping and wading in the muddy water, when we reached the Bulga Denis Canyon. But the scenery was compensation,​ particularly the vivid reds, browns and yellows of Sunrise and Sunset bluff, Orange Bluff and other formations. Below the Bulga Denis it was mostly open easy walking again. After more than a week out most of us were pretty fit. The tensions built up in a year of city life were gone. Walking was less effort - there were no more strains, sprains or bruises as in the first few days. We had soon evolved an easy camping routine. As soon as we camped each of us went to our task, so that, before long, there was time to relax and talk:. We had gone through a lot of experiences together and had evolved that easy companionship that only a long walk with "​compatibles"​ can bring. The city seemed far behind, there was no rushing to get back after a couple of days, and the bush was our home. We felt sorry for Frank:Leyden when he had to set out on his own to get baek to work from Lannigan'​s Creek. +
- The weather continued dull, so that there was no temptation to swim, but +
-perhaps we were lucky to avoid heat and sunburn. On the eleventh day we reached +
-the Cox Junction, to find the Cox muddier than the KovmungNhy there is such a +
-+
-19. +
-clamor about fires and erosion on the Snowy catchment, and none about the Warragamba catchment, where the damage is considerably worse, I cannot understand. I suspect it is because scientists, like nearly everybody else, never get more than a few yards from their cars, so never see the river of gravel moving down the Cox or the mud in the once clean Kawmung. But, as on the Snowy mountains, someday they will discover, after laboured observations,​ what the bushwalkers have known for many years.+
 However, apart from the colour of the water, the Cox was as lovely as ever. Our last camp, not far from Breakfast Creek, was made in pouring rain, but a big fire, good organisation,​ and the determination of our cooks, provided a first rate meal. That is something on the 12th night out. However, apart from the colour of the water, the Cox was as lovely as ever. Our last camp, not far from Breakfast Creek, was made in pouring rain, but a big fire, good organisation,​ and the determination of our cooks, provided a first rate meal. That is something on the 12th night out.
-Breakfast Creek, like Kanangra River, Christies Creek, and other side creeks where fire damage was evidently not so severe, was flowing strong ​ard clear. As we started up Carlon'​s Creek we rL,​alised ​there was something missing. For the first time since we set out there was no sound of running water, and the silence was uncanny. Emerging for the first time on the tops after some 80 miles in the valley was quite a sensation too. We looked towards the "​Dogs"​ and Mount Jenolan, partly covered by cloud, and, in no time, were discussing an Easter trip from Kanangra. At the top of the Hill beyond Carlon'​s we net Frank again; leading a small party of S.B.W'​s out for the New Year Break. They were the first people we had met since the first day of our trip. + 
-Back at Blackheath we did our best to slip unobserved ​-through the Harpers'​ front gate, but not before some wide-eyed small boys had gathered to see +Breakfast Creek, like Kanangra River, Christies Creek, and other side creeks where fire damage was evidently not so severe, was flowing strong ​and clear. As we started up Carlon'​s Creek we realised ​there was something missing. For the first time since we set out there was no sound of running water, and the silence was uncanny. Emerging for the first time on the tops after some 80 miles in the valley was quite a sensation too. We looked towards the "​Dogs"​ and Mount Jenolan, partly covered by cloud, and, in no time, were discussing an Easter trip from Kanangra. At the top of the Hill beyond Carlon'​s we met Frank again; leading a small party of S.B.W'​s out for the New Year Break. They were the first people we had met since the first day of our trip. 
-the sight. We hope it won't take the Harpers long to live down our visit. It was luxury to change and wash there. Then Marie turned on a saper afternoon tea. Plate after plate of dainties disappeared with eMbarrassing ​rapidity. Poor Marie must have been cooking for days and I can only hope that our obvious relish of the feast was some compensation for her trouble. + 
-Our trip ended as it started with a meal in the park. Then we boarded a beautiful green-upholstered aluminium train feeling as if we owned it. At Central we parted under the clock, and SD each to our own suburb, maybe feeling a little lonely after 13 days constant companionship,​ and, except, perhaps for our retiring member, hoping for another trip together soon.+Back at Blackheath we did our best to slip unobserved through the Harpers'​ front gate, but not before some wide-eyed small boys had gathered to see the sight. We hope it won't take the Harpers long to live down our visit. It was luxury to change and wash there. Then Marie turned on a super afternoon tea. Plate after plate of dainties disappeared with embarrassing ​rapidity. Poor Marie must have been cooking for days and I can only hope that our obvious relish of the feast was some compensation for her trouble. 
 + 
 +Our trip ended as it started with a meal in the park. Then we boarded a beautiful green-upholstered aluminium train feeling as if we owned it. At Central we parted under the clock, and so each to our own suburb, maybe feeling a little lonely after 13 days constant companionship,​ and, except, perhaps for our retiring member, hoping for another trip together soon. 
 (Sketches by Pam Baker.) (Sketches by Pam Baker.)
-THOSE WERE THE DAYS! S.B.W. motorists were impressed by the steepness of + 
-Fitz's Hill on the way to Gudgenby. (Easter trip to A.C.T.) Little did they know that as late as 1951 (possibly later) a log was left at the top of the hill to be tied on behind to assist braking during the descent! We assume that the road has been regraded since.+---- 
 + 
 +=== Hatswell'​s Taxi and Tourist Service. === 
 + 
 +For all your transport problems contact Hattswell'​s Taxi and Tourist Service. Ring, write, wire or call any hour, day or night. 
 + 
 +'​Phone:​ Blackheath W459 or W151. Booking Office - 4 doors from Gardner'​s Inn Hote1 (look for the neon sign.) 
 + 
 +Speedy 5 or 8 passenger cars available. Large or small parties catered for. 
 + 
 +Fares: 
 + 
 +  * Kanangra Walls - 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers) 
 +  * Perry'​s Lookdown - 3/- per head (minimum 5 passengers) 
 +  * Jenolan State Forest - 20/- per head (minimum 5 passengers) 
 +  * Carlon'​s Farm - 10/- per head (minimum 5 passengers) 
 + 
 +We will be pleased to quote other trips or special parties on application. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== Those were the days=== 
 + 
 +S.B.W. motorists were impressed by the steepness of Fitz's Hill on the way to Gudgenby. (Easter trip to A.C.T.) Little did they know that as late as 1951 (possibly later) a log was left at the top of the hill to be tied on behind to assist braking during the descent! We assume that the road has been regraded since. 
 + 
 +---- 
 SCANNING ​ SCANDINAVIA. SCANNING ​ SCANDINAVIA.
 - Keith Renwick. - Keith Renwick.
195904.txt · Last modified: 2018/12/04 01:54 by tyreless