User Tools

Site Tools


195903

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
195903 [2018/11/28 05:29]
tyreless
195903 [2018/11/29 02:20] (current)
tyreless
Line 18: Line 18:
 |At Our February General Meeting|Alex Colley| 2| |At Our February General Meeting|Alex Colley| 2|
 |The Peryman-Doherty-Brown-Duncan-Joyce S.W. Tasmania Trip Christmas 58/59|Bob Duncan| 4| |The Peryman-Doherty-Brown-Duncan-Joyce S.W. Tasmania Trip Christmas 58/59|Bob Duncan| 4|
-|New River Lagoon to Kings, Melaleuca|Heathor ​Joyce| 9|+|New River Lagoon to Kings, Melaleuca|Heather ​Joyce| 9|
 |They Continue To Be Weird|Nino Burntoffa|14| |They Continue To Be Weird|Nino Burntoffa|14|
-|Rugged Walking in Tasuania|Heather Joyce|17|+|Rugged Walking in Tasmania|Heather Joyce|17|
 |Who'd Be A Walker|"​I Was"​|18| |Who'd Be A Walker|"​I Was"​|18|
 |Bushwalkers Are Tops|John Bookluck|19| |Bushwalkers Are Tops|John Bookluck|19|
Line 38: Line 38:
 Now to confess infers that I must have done something because clearly if you haven'​t done something then you can't confess to it. And any reasonable person would be likely to assume that after having my name published as Editor of this magazine for twelve issues I must have done __something__. Yet, here I am, wracking my brain to try and think what it was. Now to confess infers that I must have done something because clearly if you haven'​t done something then you can't confess to it. And any reasonable person would be likely to assume that after having my name published as Editor of this magazine for twelve issues I must have done __something__. Yet, here I am, wracking my brain to try and think what it was.
  
-As far as actual editing of articles goes, I've done next to hothing ​for fear of spoiling the delicious flavour of the personality written into them and which, I feel, is one of the most important features of our type of mag. In fact, the one occasion when I did edit one (I felt the flavour was a little strong) I was seriously taken to task by the author, at a General Meeting too, that I doubt if I'd have the courage to try it again.+As far as actual editing of articles goes, I've done next to nothing ​for fear of spoiling the delicious flavour of the personality written into them and which, I feel, is one of the most important features of our type of mag. In fact, the one occasion when I did edit one (I felt the flavour was a little strong) I was seriously taken to task by the author, at a General Meeting too, that I doubt if I'd have the courage to try it again.
  
 The one thing I did do regularly each month was to present Grace with a number of pages of scrawl resembling Chinese, written on both sides of the paper with a pencil so hard that it was almost engraved, and these she always managed to translate and type in English. The one thing I did do regularly each month was to present Grace with a number of pages of scrawl resembling Chinese, written on both sides of the paper with a pencil so hard that it was almost engraved, and these she always managed to translate and type in English.
Line 48: Line 48:
 "We can run an extra four pages and a map or illustration every second month."​ "We can run an extra four pages and a map or illustration every second month."​
  
-First, last and always come the contributors. Whoever they were, they never let me down. From the spasmodic "one per anaum" article writers and the travellers'​ letters to the faithful unfailing regulars like Alex, whose style reproduces with humour and accuracy the vageries of our Monthly Meetings.+First, last and always come the contributors. Whoever they were, they never let me down. From the spasmodic "one per annum" article writers and the travellers'​ letters to the faithful unfailing regulars like Alex, whose style reproduces with humour and accuracy the vageries of our Monthly Meetings.
  
 In short, to everyone who helped me make our magazine this last twelve months, my sincere thanks, and for myself - nothing to confess. In short, to everyone who helped me make our magazine this last twelve months, my sincere thanks, and for myself - nothing to confess.
Line 58: Line 58:
 Our meeting commenced with a welcome by the President to two new members, Len Young and Evelyn Esgate. Our meeting commenced with a welcome by the President to two new members, Len Young and Evelyn Esgate.
  
-In correspondence was a letter from the Rationalist Association,​ saying that the cost of arranging the furniture as requested would greatly exceed the rent we paid, and suggesting that we seek other accommodation if the present arrangement was unsatisfactory. A committee consisting of the Treasurer, the Vice Presidents, and two nominated members, Frank Young and Fred Kennedy, was appointed by the meeting to find new Club rooms. In support of the project, Jack Wren said that, in these days, you couldn'​t join any sort of club for £l, and that, even if new rooms meant a 50% increase, we could afford it.+In correspondence was a letter from the Rationalist Association,​ saying that the cost of arranging the furniture as requested would greatly exceed the rent we paid, and suggesting that we seek other accommodation if the present arrangement was unsatisfactory. A committee consisting of the Treasurer, the Vice Presidents, and two nominated members, Frank Young and Fred Kennedy, was appointed by the meeting to find new Club rooms. In support of the project, Jack Wren said that, in these days, you couldn'​t join any sort of club for £1, and that, even if new rooms meant a 50% increase, we could afford it.
  
 The President reminded us that we are also seeking a new hall for the Christmas party. The Mosman Roving Club had written to say that it had no accommodation now at Mosman, but did have a place at Killarney that it was prepared to rent. The President reminded us that we are also seeking a new hall for the Christmas party. The Mosman Roving Club had written to say that it had no accommodation now at Mosman, but did have a place at Killarney that it was prepared to rent.
Line 80: Line 80:
 ---- ----
  
-New South Wales Federaton ​of Bushwalking Clubs __Annual Reunion Camp__ at Burning Palms Beach. Weekend of 11/12 April. Transport to Governor Game Lookout from Waterfall.+New South Wales Federation ​of Bushwalking Clubs __Annual Reunion Camp__ at Burning Palms Beach. Weekend of 11/12 April. Transport to Governor Game Lookout from Waterfall.
  
 ----- -----
Line 152: Line 152:
 __December 31st__ __December 31st__
  
-and I'm racing you around the scopari in your flea bag to get you up." "​You'​ll tear my brand new flea bag" I screamed, hastily ​vaating ​it. "​I'​ve found a way to get these slobs up" gloated Snow to Heather.+and I'm racing you around the scopari in your flea bag to get you up." "​You'​ll tear my brand new flea bag" I screamed, hastily ​vacating ​it. "​I'​ve found a way to get these slobs up" gloated Snow to Heather.
  
-After brekker we walked to the edge of the plateau and looked down on the basin of New River Lagoon and the ocean, and acros to the magnificent 4,000 ft. dolerite tower, Precipitous Bluff. Something like Era from Governor Game Lookout but on a grander scale. The route ahead obviously lay down to the creek and then along the creek to New River Lagoon 2,000 or 3,000 feet below us.+After brekker we walked to the edge of the plateau and looked down on the basin of New River Lagoon and the ocean, and across ​to the magnificent 4,000 ft. dolerite tower, Precipitous Bluff. Something like Era from Governor Game Lookout but on a grander scale. The route ahead obviously lay down to the creek and then along the creek to New River Lagoon 2,000 or 3,000 feet below us.
  
 We started down the slope, first through scopari, which we now regarded as easy walking, and then into forest and dense undergrowth. This became progressively worse as we got lower. "Well, we've been through some pretty bad stuff so far," I said, "but this is past a joke." Everyone agreed and we determined to keep in tight Indian file for if we became separated, even by a few yards, in this we would never find one another again. The slope was very steep and one heaved and shoved until one fell forward. Sometimes we would be struggling up to twenty feet above the ground and then coming to a less dense patch we would tumble gently towards the ground. The important thing was to stay upright at all times. When you finished head down, feet up, you could do nothing but yell for help. It would take days to go up this slope I should think. We started down the slope, first through scopari, which we now regarded as easy walking, and then into forest and dense undergrowth. This became progressively worse as we got lower. "Well, we've been through some pretty bad stuff so far," I said, "but this is past a joke." Everyone agreed and we determined to keep in tight Indian file for if we became separated, even by a few yards, in this we would never find one another again. The slope was very steep and one heaved and shoved until one fell forward. Sometimes we would be struggling up to twenty feet above the ground and then coming to a less dense patch we would tumble gently towards the ground. The important thing was to stay upright at all times. When you finished head down, feet up, you could do nothing but yell for help. It would take days to go up this slope I should think.
Line 200: Line 200:
 Our last day dawned clear. Mike and Snow on their trip had followed the map and had left the snowpoles and made their own way across the low range to Cox's Bight. This time we decided to follow the snow poles all the way: They led us up the valley in the opposite direction to which you'd expect to go and to which the map led, and over the smaller bumps of the foothills up a gradual ridge to the top. We learnt later that each half of the map had a different compass alignment and not being used to this type of map on the mainland, we had been following the same grid. Our last day dawned clear. Mike and Snow on their trip had followed the map and had left the snowpoles and made their own way across the low range to Cox's Bight. This time we decided to follow the snow poles all the way: They led us up the valley in the opposite direction to which you'd expect to go and to which the map led, and over the smaller bumps of the foothills up a gradual ridge to the top. We learnt later that each half of the map had a different compass alignment and not being used to this type of map on the mainland, we had been following the same grid.
  
-On the other side of the range the snow poles led us across burnt buttongrass plains until we burst through coastal ti-tree to the Boyd Creek entrance and the beautiful Cox's Bight beach. In front we could see the extending sands at the far end of which a headland dropped sharply into the sea. On walking further along the beach we could look back at the impressive Ironbounds and out to sea at the lighthouse on Maatsuykor Island. It was a wonderful ​boach and so alien to the bauera, scopari and cutting grass of Tasmanian scrub or the hail and mists of the ranges. For adventure, variety of scenery and real challenge of walking, South West Tasmania is really worthwhile.+On the other side of the range the snow poles led us across burnt buttongrass plains until we burst through coastal ti-tree to the Boyd Creek entrance and the beautiful Cox's Bight beach. In front we could see the extending sands at the far end of which a headland dropped sharply into the sea. On walking further along the beach we could look back at the impressive Ironbounds and out to sea at the lighthouse on Maatsuykor Island. It was a wonderful ​beach and so alien to the bauera, scopari and cutting grass of Tasmanian scrub or the hail and mists of the ranges. For adventure, variety of scenery and real challenge of walking, South West Tasmania is really worthwhile.
  
 A well used track led across the buttongrass up the valley from Cox's Bight airstrip to Kings, Melaleuca. The afternoon sun was hot and the valley held the heat - hats and scrub were now for shade, not rain protection - and than we saw the red roof of King's homestead come closer and closer. This time the Kings were home and I can imagine how Snow and Mick felt when, after 3 1/2 days of hard walking, they found the house deserted. A well used track led across the buttongrass up the valley from Cox's Bight airstrip to Kings, Melaleuca. The afternoon sun was hot and the valley held the heat - hats and scrub were now for shade, not rain protection - and than we saw the red roof of King's homestead come closer and closer. This time the Kings were home and I can imagine how Snow and Mick felt when, after 3 1/2 days of hard walking, they found the house deserted.
Line 216: Line 216:
 === Sanitarium Health Food and Vegetarian Cafe. === === Sanitarium Health Food and Vegetarian Cafe. ===
  
-__The bushwaling ​season really commences with Easter__.+__The bushwalking ​season really commences with Easter__.
  
-Start it well by making ​hte Sanitarium Shop Products the permanent basis to your foodlists.+Start it well by making ​the Sanitarium Shop Products the permanent basis to your foodlists.
  
-Remember that there are no substitutes to equal the enjoyment and nourishment of our dried fruits, biscuits and other lines pre-eminently suited to the bushwaler.+Remember that there are no substitutes to equal the enjoyment and nourishment of our dried fruits, biscuits and other lines pre-eminently suited to the bushwalker.
  
 13 Hunter St., Sydney. BW1725. 13 Hunter St., Sydney. BW1725.
Line 263: Line 263:
 __Food Jars__ - Aluminium and plastic. A large array of shapes and sizes. __Food Jars__ - Aluminium and plastic. A large array of shapes and sizes.
  
-__Heavy Weight Socks__ - Bettor ​than ever quality pink miners socks 8/6 pair.+__Heavy Weight Socks__ - Better ​than ever quality pink miners socks 8/6 pair.
  
 And much more than we can tell you here so come in and look around. And much more than we can tell you here so come in and look around.
Line 269: Line 269:
 Paddy Pallin. Lightweight Camp Gear. Paddy Pallin. Lightweight Camp Gear.
  
-201 Castlereagh St., Sdyney.+201 Castlereagh St., Sydney.
  
 ---- ----
Line 275: Line 275:
 ===== They Continue To Be Weird. ===== ===== They Continue To Be Weird. =====
  
-- Nino Burrntoffa+- Nino Burntoffa
  
 Promptly at six o'​clock on the Friday night, I was waiting by the map at Central, eying my ridiculously small and light rucsac. No crampons; no rope; no felt-soled shoes; no pitons. Could I really survive a hike in the alps for two days with a mere fifteen kilos on my back? I learned that I could - but the crampons and rope would have helped. Promptly at six o'​clock on the Friday night, I was waiting by the map at Central, eying my ridiculously small and light rucsac. No crampons; no rope; no felt-soled shoes; no pitons. Could I really survive a hike in the alps for two days with a mere fifteen kilos on my back? I learned that I could - but the crampons and rope would have helped.
  
-By a quarter after six I began to fel apprehensive,​ as no other bearers of rucsacs had converged on my place of waiting. By 6.20 I was distinctly agitated and began searching the whole concourse.+By a quarter after six I began to feel apprehensive,​ as no other bearers of rucsacs had converged on my place of waiting. By 6.20 I was distinctly agitated and began searching the whole concourse.
  
 Ah! There was Digby, hurrying towards the platform. I chased after him. "​Digby!"​ I called, "Wait for me." Ah! There was Digby, hurrying towards the platform. I chased after him. "​Digby!"​ I called, "Wait for me."
Line 295: Line 295:
 "There was a whole mob of us there,"​ he said. "You been on the grog or something?"​ "There was a whole mob of us there,"​ he said. "You been on the grog or something?"​
  
-"​Digby,"​ I said solemnly, realising that there must be some misunderstanding,​ "I went to the enquiries man and I said to him: Where is the map? And he pointed to the wall and said: You blind, chum? Digby, I waited by the map, but I swear there was no-ono else."+"​Digby,"​ I said solemnly, realising that there must be some misunderstanding,​ "I went to the enquiries man and I said to him: Where is the map? And he pointed to the wall and said: You blind, chum? Digby, I waited by the map, but I swear there was no-one else."
  
-"Not THAT map!" he almost shouted. "0-o-oh" he groaned, "never mind. Here - this is where we're holed up."+"Not THAT map!" he almost shouted. "O-o-oh" he groaned, "never mind. Here - this is where we're holed up."
  
 I entered the compartment and smiled as Snow waved a cheery greeting. "You made it, Nino. Thought you must'​ve got picked up at the Cross or something."​ I entered the compartment and smiled as Snow waved a cheery greeting. "You made it, Nino. Thought you must'​ve got picked up at the Cross or something."​
Line 343: Line 343:
 "The rum? Why, yes. I have brought the rum, as you instructed me. Sixteen ounces in a plastic flask. That will cure the snake bites?"​ "The rum? Why, yes. I have brought the rum, as you instructed me. Sixteen ounces in a plastic flask. That will cure the snake bites?"​
  
-"Nine ..." He was interrupted by a tall, loud-mouthod ​individual who opened the compartment doors with a crash and, with a most inane grimace upon his countenance,​ bellowed: "​We-e-11! Didja eversee sucha goonylookin mob o' fosteringslobs?​ All set for the big w.a. classic, eh?"+"Nine ..." He was interrupted by a tall, loud-mouthed ​individual who opened the compartment doors with a crash and, with a most inane grimace upon his countenance,​ bellowed: "​We-e-11! Didja eversee sucha goonylookin mob o' fosteringslobs?​ All set for the big w.a. classic, eh?"
  
 "Ah! The Admiral,"​ chorused a number of voices. "Ah! The Admiral,"​ chorused a number of voices.
Line 367: Line 367:
 They would not want to burn me off. I was still pondering this statement when the train arrived at Katoomba and we gathered on the platform outside the carriage. We were enveloped in a soupy fog which the dim lights of the station all but failed to penetrate. They would not want to burn me off. I was still pondering this statement when the train arrived at Katoomba and we gathered on the platform outside the carriage. We were enveloped in a soupy fog which the dim lights of the station all but failed to penetrate.
  
-As the rest of us moved toward the exit, the individual called The Admiral was frantically rummaging in his rucsac and calling out, "Hey! Wait for me, you lotta goons. Think you're gonna steal a march on me in the race to the A.B., eh? Ah! here it is. Thought I'd lost me ticket and might hafta do a bit of fast talking. Quite outa practice at that since I got hookod."+As the rest of us moved toward the exit, the individual called The Admiral was frantically rummaging in his rucsac and calling out, "Hey! Wait for me, you lotta goons. Think you're gonna steal a march on me in the race to the A.B., eh? Ah! here it is. Thought I'd lost me ticket and might hafta do a bit of fast talking. Quite outa practice at that since I got hooked."
  
 He came pounding after us. Suddenly we were halted by Jim Brown: I say, you fellows. Does anyone belong to that pack back there?"​ He came pounding after us. Suddenly we were halted by Jim Brown: I say, you fellows. Does anyone belong to that pack back there?"​
Line 383: Line 383:
 ---- ----
  
-===== Rugged ​Waling ​In tasmania. =====+===== Rugged ​Walking ​In Tasmania. =====
  
 - Heather Joyce - Heather Joyce
Line 403: Line 403:
 Nor was our making camp an easy thing to accomplish - Duncan will agree with me here when I say that getting a tent up in Tasmania is a long job involving great skill and patience. So, for example, at Triabunna we had to cunningly pitch our tent behind the only patch of bush in such a manner as to hide it from the eyes of the local constabulary. Or at St. Helens, where we were unable to persuade the camp ranger that we should spend the night in the Youth Hostel and where that same "​gentleman"​ generously gave us the choice of two adjoining campsites of some twenty foot in this camping area of ? acres. But never mind, the "​reserved"​ notices of other unused campsites made good firewood. Or again at The Basin at Launceston where we sneaked in the park gates after dark to avoid the ranger. Nor was our making camp an easy thing to accomplish - Duncan will agree with me here when I say that getting a tent up in Tasmania is a long job involving great skill and patience. So, for example, at Triabunna we had to cunningly pitch our tent behind the only patch of bush in such a manner as to hide it from the eyes of the local constabulary. Or at St. Helens, where we were unable to persuade the camp ranger that we should spend the night in the Youth Hostel and where that same "​gentleman"​ generously gave us the choice of two adjoining campsites of some twenty foot in this camping area of ? acres. But never mind, the "​reserved"​ notices of other unused campsites made good firewood. Or again at The Basin at Launceston where we sneaked in the park gates after dark to avoid the ranger.
  
-But at last our great advanture ​was ended and we saw the great sides of the good ship "​Taruna"​ loom above us. Now our walking days were over and we could end our period of starvation by pestering our table steward for second helpings of every course on the menu (after all, for the past five days we had had to exist on meals of fresh fish and crayfish at 2/9 a pound).+But at last our great adventure ​was ended and we saw the great sides of the good ship "​Taruna"​ loom above us. Now our walking days were over and we could end our period of starvation by pestering our table steward for second helpings of every course on the menu (after all, for the past five days we had had to exist on meals of fresh fish and crayfish at 2/9 a pound).
  
 And the fact that we were almost tossed out of the first class dining room of the "​Taruna"​ just because we had no ties or long pants proved how dangerous and rugged can be a walking trip to Tasmania. And the fact that we were almost tossed out of the first class dining room of the "​Taruna"​ just because we had no ties or long pants proved how dangerous and rugged can be a walking trip to Tasmania.
Line 453: Line 453:
 ---- ----
  
 +===== Bushwalkers Are Tops. =====
  
-19. 
 by a Special Correspondent. by a Special Correspondent.
-There are tushies ​who can do the hundred ​railer ​in a weekend. Some can do it eaxily ​in three daysMany could do it in four days.The lesser ​tushwalkors ​could make the hundred miles in _a gentle six day ;Aron (this includes morning and afternoon tea). You 'would only laugh if I told you that Lynn and I did it in nine diveIts true fellow bushiesWe are ashamed, but not wholly to blameIt is old Tess' ​feat+ 
-While travelling along an uncharted road in the deptha ​of a jungle in ,​darkevt ​Thailand, the rains (lame uninvited. When rain comes, the jungle roads 'are praatically ​impassable even to old Tess, our Land Rover. She received this name in W.A. It Is very lucky Tess received her name in good old Aussie land, otherwise the editor would ban it. Tesstrailer is called ​Indhykickaroolt, a corruption of a N. Z. town called ​11Whykickamoecown. Before carrying on with the jungle story I'd like to introduce the other members of the party. The organiser is Eric Edis, an Englishman, Angela McMahon and Louise Whitfeld, who are both Y.H.A. members and wish to become prospective S.B.W. members, and Bruce Russell of New Zealand. The trip is called ​nEdis Expedition!' ​bit stands corrected to'​.nEaters Expeditionn. No eaters ​expodition ​could leave Auatralia ​without representatives of S.B. Worshippers,​ and the Club is represented by Lynatte ​Baber and John BookluckAs a party we're terrific eaters. Boy, how 4te can eat* No. longer the Lordt Prayer, "Give us our daily bread",​ but in +There are bushies ​who can do the hundred ​miler in a weekend. Some can do it easily ​in three daysMany could do it in four days. The lesser ​bushwalkers ​could make the hundred miles in gentle six day stroll ​(this includes morning and afternoon tea). You would only laugh if I told you that Lynn and I did it in nine daysIt'​s ​true fellow bushiesWe are ashamed, but not wholly to blameIt is old Tess' ​fault. 
-give us our daily rice. Moenqt bushwalker quantities, but the way + 
-luddha ​likes to see his people eat it (three big helpings)We've eaten in fan types of dives in villages, towns, cities, exclusive night clubs (the author only in last-mentioned case) and also 14th jungle people and British +While travelling along an uncharted road in the depths ​of a jungle in darkest ​Thailand, the rains came uninvited. When rain comes, the jungle roads are practically ​impassable even to old Tess, our Land Rover. She received this name in W.A. It is very lucky Tess received her name in good old Aussie land, otherwise the editor would ban it. Tess' ​trailer is called ​"​Whykickaroo"​, a corruption of a N.Z. town called ​"​Whykickamopcow"​. Before carrying on with the jungle story I'd like to introduce the other members of the party. The organiser is Eric Edis, an Englishman, Angela McMahon and Louise Whitfeld, who are both Y.H.A. members and wish to become prospective S.B.W. members, and Bruce Russell of New Zealand. The trip is called ​"​Edis ​Expedition" ​bit stands corrected to "​Eaters Expedition"​. No eaters ​expedition ​could leave Australia ​without representatives of S.B. Worshippers,​ and the Club is represented by Lynette ​Baber and John BookluckAs a party we're terrific eaters. Boy, how we can eat. No longer the Lord'​s ​Prayer, "Give us our daily bread",​ but in lieu, give us our daily rice. Ricenot in bushwalker quantities, but the way Buddha ​likes to see his people eat it (three big helpings)We've eaten in all types of dives in villages, towns, cities, exclusive night clubs (the author only in last-mentioned case) and also with jungle people and British ​Embassies. We have eaten everything ​that grows or crawls - believe me, friends, ​it'​s ​wonderful ​pastime, and the S.B.W. should be proud of its representatives. 
-bassies. We have eaten ovorytt4rig ​that grogg or aratp g . believe me, friends, + 
-wenderflal ​pastime, and the $44114 Oil:411d betrblid f - repregontatives+Water it the only problem ​not washing but drinking water, which must be boiled. One Yark we met claimed he rinses his teeth in Pepsi Cola. 
-Water it the only problem ​ not washing butdrinking water, which must be boiled. One Yark we met claimed he rinses his teeth in Pepsi Cola. + 
-I had high hopes of being the first white man to travel from Singapore ​te London without a bath. Halfway through India my most cherished dreams ​wore shattered by an Englishwoman on a tea estate. +I had high hopes of being the first white man to travel from Singapore ​to London without a bath. Halfway through India my most cherished dreams ​were shattered by an Englishwoman on a tea estate. 
-"​You ​=et all take a bathe, she said.  + 
-nA hot one in a real bath tub?n. asked Lynette excitedly. ​'Yes," she replied modestly, ​!Who's first+"​You ​must all take a bathe, she said.  
 + 
 +"​A ​hot one in a real bath tub?" ​asked Lynette excitedly. 
 + 
 +"Yes," she replied modestly, ​"Who's first." 
 "​Don'​t argue girls,"​ I butted in sarcastically. "​Don'​t argue girls,"​ I butted in sarcastically.
-Then all -fingers pointed to 'me. "You' ​go fir Et  ​You haven'​t had one this trip."​ + 
-nI haven'​t a clean towell or "soap," I replied confidently. +Then all fingers pointed to me. "You go first. ​You haven'​t had one this trip."​ 
-nYoul.11 ​find aclean towell and soai6 handy. ​4ing for the boy if you need any other requirements."​ + 
-nut," I faltered, looking pleadingly at the girls, "​Remember I was soaked by a tropical downpour in the jungle for one week, surely ​7- it +'​I ​haven'​t a clean towell or soap," I replied confidently. 
-20.+ 
 +"​You'​ll ​find a clean towell and soap handy. ​Ring for the boy if you need any other requirements."​ 
 + 
 +"But," I faltered, looking pleadingly at the girls, "​Remember I was soaked by a tropical downpour in the jungle for one week, surely.... " 
 "That s not a bath," interrupted Louise. "That s not a bath," interrupted Louise.
-l'And that I a no excuse, ​ir added Lynette in terms most definit a+ 
-For a moment I he sit at ad, and t hen sulked off to t he bathroom. Five minutes later I stood staring at the draining tub. Three things have gone down that drain other than water - my jungle mud, including some Aussie dust my beeAtiful ​suntan and my wildest dream.+"And that'​s ​no excuse," ​added Lynette in terms most definite. 
 + 
 +For a moment I hesitated, and then sulked off to the bathroom. Five minutes later I stood staring at the draining tub. Three things have gone down that drain other than water - my jungle mud, including some Aussie dustmy beautiful ​suntan and my wildest dream. 
 Now to relate how we did the hundred miler in a Land Rover. First, the road must be well watered by a tropical downpour and second, the bridges rotten or already collapsed. When the road becomes saturated, it becomes boggy and bogs mean sticky business. Now to relate how we did the hundred miler in a Land Rover. First, the road must be well watered by a tropical downpour and second, the bridges rotten or already collapsed. When the road becomes saturated, it becomes boggy and bogs mean sticky business.
-I clearly remember Tess' first bog. It was only a little one. I was the culprit, all because of a movie which was to be staged, bit turned out to be a reality. Tess wasted no time in pulling out of that bog - only three quart srs of an hour. Some days old Tess averaged two to four miles per day, which included two or three bogs. Generally one before lunch and one before tea. Her one before tea was always at some goddamed forsaken place. Tess is a stubborn old girl when in the middle of a bog and refuses to budge. She's been pushed, pulled and jacked up. Dozens of jungle folk, Obang the elephant, bulldozers, lorries and brengun carriers have all pulled old Tess. The most amazing and quickest haul was by Co'​hang. At this point I seriously recommend that the club consider purchasing a couple of Elephants for jungle ​bushWaThing ​- they'​re terrific ​ The jungle folk wore characters. First, they would take up positions and if Tess sank deeper into the bog or our wheels ​wont through a bridge, they would all laugh. Eventually they wouldcome to the rescue. These people are very kind, simple and trusting. I could tell an experience of their hospitality that you would never believe. + 
-A jungle without leeches is like a man without a woman. I consider myself a leech expert as I've been bitten in all parts of N.S.W. and Victoria and slept with leeches in Tassie, but never have I seen one like the Thai leeches. In the water they appear like little black snakes. The villagers are scared of them - who wouldn'​t be, their length is between ​611 and 911. When they attach themselves it is a job to remove them. To add further to +I clearly remember Tess' first bog. It was only a little one. I was the culprit, all because of a movie which was to be staged, bit turned out to be a reality. Tess wasted no time in pulling out of that bog - only three quarters ​of an hour. Some days old Tess averaged two to four miles per day, which included two or three bogs. Generally one before lunch and one before tea. Her one before tea was always at some goddamed forsaken place. Tess is a stubborn old girl when in the middle of a bog and refuses to budge. She's been pushed, pulled and jacked up. Dozens of jungle folk, Chang the elephant, bulldozers, lorries and brengun carriers have all pulled old Tess. The most amazing and quickest haul was by Chang. At this point I seriously recommend that the club consider purchasing a couple of Elephants for jungle ​bushwalking ​- they'​re terrificThe jungle folk were characters. First, they would take up positions and if Tess sank deeper into the bog or our wheels ​went through a bridge, they would all laugh. Eventually they would come to the rescue. These people are very kind, simple and trusting. I could tell an experience of their hospitality that you would never believe. 
-our misery, ​sandilies ​- not just one or two, but dozens biting away to the tune of the William Tell Overture. Personally, I preferred the leeches and squelchy yellow mud. About two weeks after this episode, we wore all rewarded with jungle foot, which is similar to athlete'​s foot only ten times worse and accompanied by a maddening desire to scratch. It takes weeks to cure and there'​s ​ nothing like mosquitoes to add to One s discomfort. We also had our fair share of those. + 
-If To wasn't stuck in a bog, she was participating in a bridge crossing. One old bridge I was testing with my foot fell down and Eo did I. Being an engineer, I viewed the problem and made some calculations and speculations. Meanwhile, whilst diligently applying my theoretical knowledge, the jungle folk wore busy adding a few pieces of timber. Whilst in the middle of a calculation,​ I was rudely interrupted by Eric. +A jungle without leeches is like a man without a woman. I consider myself a leech expert as I've been bitten in all parts of N.S.W. and Victoria and slept with leeches in Tassie, but never have I seen one like the Thai leeches. In the water they appear like little black snakes. The villagers are scared of them - who wouldn'​t be, their length is between ​6" ​and 9". When they attach themselves it is a job to remove them. To add further to our misery, ​sandflies ​- not just one or two, but dozens biting away to the tune of the William Tell Overture. Personally, I preferred the leeches and squelchy yellow mud. About two weeks after this episode, we were all rewarded with jungle foot, which is similar to athlete'​s foot only ten times worse and accompanied by a maddening desire to scratch. It takes weeks to cure and there'​s nothing like mosquitoes to add to one's discomfort. We also had our fair share of those. 
-to you coming?'' ​Eric was on the other side of the,:bank rearing to + 
-go. +If Tess wasn't stuck in a bog, she was participating in a bridge crossing. One old bridge I was testing with my foot fell down and so did I. Being an engineer, I viewed the problem and made some calculations and speculations. Meanwhile, whilst diligently applying my theoretical knowledge, the jungle folk were busy adding a few pieces of timber. Whilst in the middle of a calculation,​ I was rudely interrupted by Eric. 
-FOR ALL YOUR TRANSPORT PRCBL.M CONTACT + 
-HATSVELL S TAXI & tOURt8T +"​Are ​you coming?" ​Eric was on the other side of the bank rearing to go. 
-RING, WRilh, WIRE or CALL + 
-ANY HOUR -DAY OR NIGHT +One thing is certain with my calculations - the average ​bushwalker ​who walks 15 miles per day (including morning and afternoon tea) would take 7 days approximately. 
-'​PHONE:​ Blackheath W459 or W151 BOOKING OFFICE: 4 doors from Gardners Inn Hotel (LOOK FOR THE NEON SIGN) +
-SPEEDY 5 OR 8 PASSENGER CARS AVAILABLE +
- LARGE OR SELL PARTIES CIA MED FOR +
-FARES: KriNtiNGR21.1AUT:​M 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers) +
-PERRY tS LOOEDOWN V_ 11 It It +
-JENGLAN STATE FOREST 20/- Yt Ii If If 11 +
-CARLON'​S FARM 10/- f fITII +
-WE WILL BE PLEASED TO QUOTE TRIPS OR SPECIAL PARTIES ON APPLICATION +
-One thing is certain with my calculations - the average ​budhwalker ​who walks 15 miles per day (including morning and afternoon tea) would take 7 days approximately.+
 Best wishes, Best wishes,
 +
 John Bookluck. John Bookluck.
-P.S. Busbies, Lynn and I agree there is no country like Aussie land for camping. Eric Edis, who is returning to England, says the best camps on the trip, in fact the best in his life, were in Australia and when an Englishman agrees, that's something to boast about. 
-PICTORIAL ILLUSTRATIONS 
-The Business Manager advises us that the Magazine finances are ntw in sach a satisfactory state that we are able to resume the reproduction of black and white scenes, maps, etc. within reasonable quantity. Contributors are therefore invited to confer with the Editor with a view to enhancing their articles in this manner. 
-226 
  
-COUNTER MISAISN - Dung Khan +P.SBushiesLynn and I agree there is no country ​like Aussie land for campingEric Edis, who is returning ​to England, says the best camps on the trip, in fact the best in his lifewere in Australia ​and when an Englishman agrees, that's something ​to boast about.
-The page by Brian Harvey "THEY DID NOT mAKE IT" contains a few sensible suggestions swamped in much moralistic nonsenseBrian wags a finger at all whose walking activities do not fit into his own mouldAbout those who have a taste for material comfort he says"The true walker has no other weekend vices" and, they are dissuaded by "the discovery that scrub bashing in the harsh sandstone ​country ​surrounding Sydney is not a Sunday school picnic with string bag and one cut lunch". +
-To the group whose taste is for longer walks than he cares to dohe says, "Just for a change, some leaders might put on official walks which prospectives could reasonably attend and not some super severe bash, which, boiled dew, is only a private walk for the leader'​s group of waning friends under the cloak of an official walk"​. +
-In walking tastes I belong to the latter group, and I am moved to defend myself. The members of this rather ill-defined group go only on those walks they think they will enjoy. This is because they believe walking is a recreation rather than a religion. The group contains personalities ranging from "​veterans"​ such as Paddy Pallin, who recently did a S.W. Tassy trip, to youngsters such as John Manning. It is incorrect to suggest that it is just a knot of cliquey friends. It may seem to Brian that walks marked with a name such as "Snow Brown" as loader must be "super severe bashes which no prospective could reasonably attend"​ but they are occasionally attended by Dot artlorts children ranging ​in age from eight to fourteen, and they attract a steady stream of new comers. Unlike ​the general run of prospective s56% of these do not desert ​ Most soon to become permanent and enthusiastic club members. In tho last couple of years now recruits have included Mick Elfick, Arthur Peters, Evelyn Esgato and Barry Higgins. The recent ill-fated S.W. Tasmanian party contained two prospectives,​ Mike Peryman and Karl Doherty. The group would, therefore, appear to successfully attract one class of prospective. +
-The other class, those who prefer easier walking, are not forgotten either, for the bash group harbors ​in its ranks three members, Frank Rigby, Brian Anderson ​and Bob Duncan, who are declared white arta and who, while enjoying hard trips themselves, will for the sake of prospoctives resort to any subterfuge to shorten and soften all walks on which they are engaged. +
-It would soon, therefore, that the (nub will be best propagated by a friendly attitude to new members and a diverse Walks Programme so that all may find somewhere a trip to their liking.+
  
 +----
 +
 +=== Hatswell'​s Taxi and Tourist Service. ===
 +
 +For all your transport problems contact Hattswell'​s Taxi and Tourist Service. Ring, write, wire or call any hour, day or night.
 +
 +'​Phone:​ Blackheath W459 or W151. Booking Office - 4 doors from Gardner'​s Inn Hote1 (look for the neon sign.)
 +
 +Speedy 5 or 8 passenger cars available. Large or small parties catered for.
 +
 +Fares:
 +
 +  * Kanangra Walls - 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Perry'​s Lookdown - 3/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Jenolan State Forest - 20/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Carlon'​s Farm - 10/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +
 +We will be pleased to quote other trips or special parties on application.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=== Pictorial Illustrations. ===
 +
 +The Business Manager advises us that the Magazine finances are now in such a satisfactory state that we are able to resume the reproduction of black and white scenes, maps, etc. within reasonable quantity. Contributors are therefore invited to confer with the Editor with a view to enhancing their articles in this manner.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== Counter Mission. =====
 +
 +- Dung Khan.
 +
 +The page by Brian Harvey "They Did Not Make It" contains a few sensible suggestions swamped in much moralistic nonsense. Brian wags a finger at all whose walking activities do not fit into his own mould. About those who have a taste for material comfort he says, "The true walker has no other weekend vices" and, they are dissuaded by "the discovery that scrub bashing in the harsh sandstone country surrounding Sydney is not a Sunday school picnic with string bag and one cut lunch"​.
 +
 +To the group whose taste is for longer walks than he cares to do, he says, "Just for a change, some leaders might put on official walks which prospectives could reasonably attend and not some super severe bash, which, boiled down, is only a private walk for the leader'​s group of walking friends under the cloak of an official walk".
 +
 +In walking tastes I belong to the latter group, and I am moved to defend myself. The members of this rather ill-defined group go only on those walks they think they will enjoy. This is because they believe walking is a recreation rather than a religion. The group contains personalities ranging from "​veterans"​ such as Paddy Pallin, who recently did a S.W. Tassy trip, to youngsters such as John Manning. It is incorrect to suggest that it is just a knot of cliquey friends. It may seem to Brian that walks marked with a name such as "Snow Brown" as leader must be "super severe bashes which no prospective could reasonably attend"​ but they are occasionally attended by Dot Butler'​s children ranging in age from eight to fourteen, and they attract a steady stream of new comers. Unlike the general run of prospectives,​ 56% of these do not desert. Most seem to become permanent and enthusiastic club members. In the last couple of years now recruits have included Mick Elfick, Arthur Peters, Evelyn Esgate and Barry Higgins. The recent ill-fated S.W. Tasmanian party contained two prospectives,​ Mike Peryman and Karl Doherty. The group would, therefore, appear to successfully attract one class of prospective.
 +
 +The other class, those who prefer easier walking, are not forgotten either, for the bash group harbors in its ranks three members, Frank Rigby, Brian Anderson and Bob Duncan, who are declared white ants and who, while enjoying hard trips themselves, will for the sake of prospectives resort to any subterfuge to shorten and soften all walks on which they are engaged.
 +
 +It would soon, therefore, that the Club will be best propagated by a friendly attitude to new members and a diverse Walks Programme so that all may find somewhere a trip to their liking.
 +
 +----
195903.txt · Last modified: 2018/11/29 02:20 by tyreless