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195903 [2018/11/28 05:18]
tyreless
195903 [2018/11/28 05:29]
tyreless
Line 383: Line 383:
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-RUGGED WALKING IN TASMA.NIA+===== Rugged Waling In tasmania===== 
 - Heather Joyce - Heather Joyce
 +
 Many people have asked me to tell them of our trip to Tasmania and of all the difficulties that befell us whilst walking in the roughest country in the world, so let me tell you of some of our more intrepid adventures. Many people have asked me to tell them of our trip to Tasmania and of all the difficulties that befell us whilst walking in the roughest country in the world, so let me tell you of some of our more intrepid adventures.
-Leaving Hobart we were farewelled by our friends, who wished us luck and good weather, and for a while everything went well and according to plan. Our transport took us through the suburbs and out to the more interesting surrounding country areas. About 30 miles out of Hobart we stopped for a lightmeal and there our troubles started. We found ourselves in what was surely the loneliest part of Tasmania and certainly the quietest and most unfrequented. From our maps we could see which way we should go, but how to get there was the problem; after a brief conference the party split into two groups and moved off separately in an attempt to solve the dilemma. + 
-It must have been three-quarters of an hour of slow walking with frequent stops for rests before help arrived - a car was approaching ​At last our trip up the East Goast was no longer without hitches - hero was an actual ​bitch+Leaving Hobart we were farewelled by our friends, who wished us luck and good weather, and for a while everything went well and according to plan. Our transport took us through the suburbs and out to the more interesting surrounding country areas. About 30 miles out of Hobart we stopped for a light meal and there our troubles started. We found ourselves in what was surely the loneliest part of Tasmania and certainly the quietest and most unfrequented. From our maps we could see which way we should go, but how to get there was the problem; after a brief conference the party split into two groups and moved off separately in an attempt to solve the dilemma. 
-Snow and I thumbed frantically and yes, the cars vintage ​129 era so older than tho Renault, ground to a stOp for us. Thankfully ​wo piled in - no great need to worry about pack frames on this  car' s boat horwork ​- and rested from our strenuous walking. And soon there was the rest of our party still on the track, Mick Peryman standing with an appealing smile on his face, hopefully moving a thumb. I replied, with a somewhat different gesture, but our car driver, good Samaritan that he was, decided there was room for one more. And so there was. Well, almost. + 
-At the next road junction we got a quick hitch on a dirt lorry for a mile or so, arid then we had a long rest near the top of a range where there was a fallen log in the shade of a tree and a good uphill stretch of road on which to play a game of Hflyil ​until a festering car came by, scattering our sticks and not even stopping to offer us a lift* +It must have been three-quarters of an hour of slow walking with frequent stops for rests before help arrived - a car was approachingAt last our trip up the East Coast was no longer without hitches - here was an actual ​hitch. 
-So, once more we had to face reality and get back to Let 240 tell you, it was a tough trip and I've slides to prove it. + 
-I won't bore you with all the painful details of our tour, but like all Tasmanian walking, it isn't the mileage but the rate that counts, and our pa cc was very slow indeed and in short bursts with long rests between each stretch. +Snow and I thumbed frantically and yes, the car, vintage ​'​29 ​era so older than the Renault, ground to a stop for us. Thankfully ​we piled in - no great need to worry about pack frames on this car'​s ​leatherwork ​- and rested from our strenuous walking. And soon there was the rest of our party still on the track, Mick Peryman standing with an appealing smile on his face, hopefully moving a thumb. I replied, with a somewhat different gesture, but our car driver, good Samaritan that he was, decided there was room for one more. And so there was. Well, almost. 
-NOT was our making camp an easy thing to accomplish - Duncan will agree with me here when I say that getting a tent up in Tasmania is a long job involving great skill and patience. So, for example, at Triabunna we had to cunningly pitch our tent behind the only patch of bush in such a manner as to hide it from the oyes of the local constabulary. Or at St. Helens, where we were unable to persuade the camp ranger that wo should spend the night in the Youth Hostel and where that same ligentlemann ​generously gave us the choice of two adjoining campsites of some twenty foot in this camping area of ? acres. But never mind, the nreservedli ​notices of other unused campsites made good firewood. Or again at The Basin at Launceston ​whore we sneaked in the park gates after dark to avoid the ranger. + 
-18. +At the next road junction we got a quick hitch on a dirt lorry for a mile or so, and then we had a long rest near the top of a range where there was a fallen log in the shade of a tree and a good uphill stretch of road on which to play a game of "​fly" ​until a festering car came by, scattering our sticks and not even stopping to offer us a lift
-But at last our groat advanture was ended and we saw the great sides of the good ship wTaruna" loom above us. Now our waThing ​days wore over andwe could end our period of starvation by pestering our table steward for second helpings of eVory course on the menu (after allfor the past five days we had had to exist on meals of fresh fish and crayfish at 2/9 a pound). + 
-And the fact that we wore almost tossed out of the first class dining room 'of the "Tarunan ​just because we had no ties or long pants proved how dangerous and rugged can be a walking trip to Tasmania. +So, once more we had to face reality and get back to __walking__. ​Let me tell you, it was a tough trip and I've slides to prove it. 
-who'd be a walker- + 
-i was +I won't bore you with all the painful details of our tour, but like all Tasmanian walking, it isn't the mileage but the rate that counts, and our pace was very slow indeed and in short bursts with long rests between each stretch. 
-i was in the bushwalkers once + 
-they gave me a pack a rucsac +Nor was our making camp an easy thing to accomplish - Duncan will agree with me here when I say that getting a tent up in Tasmania is a long job involving great skill and patience. So, for example, at Triabunna we had to cunningly pitch our tent behind the only patch of bush in such a manner as to hide it from the eyes of the local constabulary. Or at St. Helens, where we were unable to persuade the camp ranger that we should spend the night in the Youth Hostel and where that same "​gentleman" ​generously gave us the choice of two adjoining campsites of some twenty foot in this camping area of ? acres. But never mind, the "​reserved" ​notices of other unused campsites made good firewood. Or again at The Basin at Launceston ​where we sneaked in the park gates after dark to avoid the ranger. 
-haversaa + 
-call it what you will they gave me one +But at last our great advanture was ended and we saw the great sides of the good ship "​Taruna" loom above us. Now our walking ​days were over and we could end our period of starvation by pestering our table steward for second helpings of every course on the menu (after allfor the past five days we had had to exist on meals of fresh fish and crayfish at 2/9 a pound). 
-quite new + 
-with a frame +And the fact that we were almost tossed out of the first class dining room of the "Taruna" ​just because we had no ties or long pants proved how dangerous and rugged can be a walking trip to Tasmania. 
-a present from the president + 
-the old fellows +---- 
-fdalked ​over 'mountains with theirs + 
-forded rivers +===== who'd be a walker ​===== 
-climbed cliffs + 
-camped at night +i was 
-and the president said jolly good show chaps + 
-that was the day i showed a prospective +i was in the bushwalkers once\\ 
-how to be +they gave me a pack\\ 
-a walker +a rucsac\\ 
-i put this pack on his back +haversac\\ 
-we wont on a marathon we came to a cliff +call it what you will\\ 
-take a Short cut i said he did +they gave me one\\ 
-he fell on his head the +quite new\\ 
-president +with a frame\\ 
- was +a present from the president\\ 
-genuinely+the old fellows\\ 
 +walked ​over mountains\\ 
 +with theirs\\ 
 +forded rivers\\ 
 +climbed cliffs\\ 
 +camped at night\\ 
 +and the president said\\ 
 +jolly good show chaps\\ 
 +that was the day i showed a prospective\\ 
 +how to be\\ 
 +a walker\\ 
 +i put this pack on his back\\ 
 +we went on a marathon\\ 
 +we came to a cliff\\ 
 +take a short cut i said\\ 
 +he did\\ 
 +he fell on his head\\ 
 +the\\ 
 +president\\ 
 +was\\ 
 +genuinely\\
 distressed. distressed.
-CORRIGENDUM + 
-In the February ​lime of our magazine a typographical error occurred +---- 
-on Page 14 where it was stated ​*Chat 54 of Prospective Members do not become members"​. This of course should read 56%.+ 
 +=== Corrigendum. === 
 + 
 +In the February ​issue of our magazine a typographical error occurred on Page 14 where it was stated ​"that 56 1/2 of Prospective Members do not become members"​. This of course should read 56%. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 19. 19.
 by a Special Correspondent. by a Special Correspondent.
195903.txt · Last modified: 2018/11/29 02:20 by tyreless