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195710 [2016/03/29 02:04]
kennettj [Seven Weeks in New Zealand -- Part VIII]
195710 [2018/11/12 03:05] (current)
tyreless
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-**THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER**+====== The Sydney Bushwalker. ======
  
-A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers, c/- Ingersoll Hall, 256 ,Crown Street, Sydney. Box No, 4476, G.P.O., Sydney. Phone: JW 1462.+A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers, c/- Ingersoll Hall, 256 Crown Street, Sydney. Box No, 4476, G.P.O., Sydney. Phone: JW 1462.
  
-**274 OCTOBER, 1957 Price 9d.**+---- 
 + 
 +=== No. 274. October, 1957Price 9d. === 
 + 
 +|**Editor:​**|Frank Rigby, 70 Beach Road, Darling Point. MU 4411 (b)| 
 +|**Reproduction:​**|Jess Martin| 
 +|**Sales & Subs:​**|Jess Martin| 
 +|**Business Manager:​**|Jack Gentle| 
 +|**Typed By:**|Elsie Bruggy|
  
-|**Editor:**| Frank Rigby, 70 Beach Road, Darling Point. MU 4411 (b)| +===== In This Issue=====
-|**Reproduction:​**| Jess Martin| +
-|**Sales & Subs:**| Jess Martin| +
-|**Business Manager:**| Jack Gentle| +
-|**Typed By:**| Elsie Bruggy|+
  
-|CONTENTS|| Page| +| | | Page| 
-|At our September Meeting|Alex Colley|1| +|At our September Meeting|Alex Colley| 1| 
-|Back of the Castle|Alex Colley|4| +|Back of the Castle|Alex Colley| 4| 
-|Confessions of an Admiral||10| +|Confessions of an Admiral| |10| 
-|Climbing Expedition - Pigeon House, The Castle, Tallatarang| Digby, Geoff and Dot|12| +|Climbing Expedition - Pigeon House, The Castle, Tallatarang|Digby,​ Geoff and Dot|12| 
-|Your Walking Guide||15| +|Your Walking Guide| |15| 
-|Letter from George Swenson||17| +|Letter from George Swenson| |17| 
-|Federation Meeting - September||18|+|Federation Meeting - September| |18|
 |Seven Weeks in New Zealand|Dot Butler|20| |Seven Weeks in New Zealand|Dot Butler|20|
  
-===== At Our September (Half Yearly) Meeting ​=====+===== Advertisements: ​=====
  
-by Alex Colley+|Page| | 
 +|Sanitarium Health Food Shop| 3| 
 +|Leica Photo Service| 8| 
 +|Hattswell'​s Taxi & Tourist Service|19| 
 +|Golden Tan Tents (Paddy'​s Advt.)|24| 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== At Our September (Half Yearly) Meeting. ===== 
 + 
 +Alex Colley.
  
 The President occupied the chair and there were some 65 members present at our half-yearly meeting. The President occupied the chair and there were some 65 members present at our half-yearly meeting.
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 Overheard in the Church at Geof and Grace'​s Wedding: "Is that really Stitt?"​ in tones of unbelieving surprise. And, sure enough, there was the Best Man attired impeccably in the smartest of suits, complete with button-hole flower and with not a hair on his head out of its appointed place - you could have mistaken him easily for the Smart-Young-Man-About-Town. At the reception, however, Pete shed his veneer when he got up to speak - "The Bride and Groom, ladies and gentleman, SLOBS and Dung Khan, ---", (PS. The reception was informal and had a very strong bushwalking flavour.) Overheard in the Church at Geof and Grace'​s Wedding: "Is that really Stitt?"​ in tones of unbelieving surprise. And, sure enough, there was the Best Man attired impeccably in the smartest of suits, complete with button-hole flower and with not a hair on his head out of its appointed place - you could have mistaken him easily for the Smart-Young-Man-About-Town. At the reception, however, Pete shed his veneer when he got up to speak - "The Bride and Groom, ladies and gentleman, SLOBS and Dung Khan, ---", (PS. The reception was informal and had a very strong bushwalking flavour.)
  
-===== Back of the Castle =====+----
  
-by Alex Colley+=== The Sanitarium Health Food Shop. === 
 + 
 +For health foods at their best. 
 + 
 +Ovaltine tablets - in light metal containers. Dried fruits - delicious and energy-giving. Nuts - in infinite range to suit all tastes. Biscuits - ideal for that 'tween meals snack. 
 + 
 +And many other exciting foods ideal for the walker. 
 + 
 +See our recipe page for meatless meals. All these available at our store: 
 + 
 +13 Hunter Street, Sydney. '​Phone:​ BW 1725. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Back Of The Castle. ===== 
 + 
 +Alex Colley.
  
 Between the Upper Clyde River and the Nowra-Braidwood road there lies some of the weirdest and most fascinating country that I know. It is not the roughest country in the world, nor even in New South Wales, but it is some of the most difficult to find your way in. This is partly because of the lack of maps. An un-contoured,​ inch-to-the-mile military map takes you about 12 miles south of the road, and in the clear weather, when you can see the conformation of the landscape, is a good guide. But south of this there are no maps except a 4 mile to the inch one which is almost useless where cliffs abound a 1939 sketch map of the Clyde River by Herb Freeman, and a tracing by Ken Angel, which I found in the forgotten recesses of our map' cabinet. Between the Upper Clyde River and the Nowra-Braidwood road there lies some of the weirdest and most fascinating country that I know. It is not the roughest country in the world, nor even in New South Wales, but it is some of the most difficult to find your way in. This is partly because of the lack of maps. An un-contoured,​ inch-to-the-mile military map takes you about 12 miles south of the road, and in the clear weather, when you can see the conformation of the landscape, is a good guide. But south of this there are no maps except a 4 mile to the inch one which is almost useless where cliffs abound a 1939 sketch map of the Clyde River by Herb Freeman, and a tracing by Ken Angel, which I found in the forgotten recesses of our map' cabinet.
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 The view from Everest (The Peak) is extensive the most interesting section being that across the 3000 feet valley of Yadbora Creek to the rounded cupolas of granite (?) that top Currockbilly (3,709 ft.) From here I was able to study the worst ridge in the world - a succession of piles of loose, vertical rock slabs leading from Currockbilly to Yadbora Creek, which caused a bus load of Bush Walkers to miss their waiting bus by 10 minutes on an Easter trip, We looked far down the Coast to the mountains of the Araluen and Dromedary near the sea. To the East was Pigeon House and the Clyde. This was a view which, with foreground variations, we frequently enjoyed during the trip. The view from Everest (The Peak) is extensive the most interesting section being that across the 3000 feet valley of Yadbora Creek to the rounded cupolas of granite (?) that top Currockbilly (3,709 ft.) From here I was able to study the worst ridge in the world - a succession of piles of loose, vertical rock slabs leading from Currockbilly to Yadbora Creek, which caused a bus load of Bush Walkers to miss their waiting bus by 10 minutes on an Easter trip, We looked far down the Coast to the mountains of the Araluen and Dromedary near the sea. To the East was Pigeon House and the Clyde. This was a view which, with foreground variations, we frequently enjoyed during the trip.
  
-Our attention soon focussed on our route to the East. Some six miles along the edge of the Yadboro escarpment, just beyond, and possibly joined by high ground to a treeless hill, rose a long slab of the conglomerate layer. To the North of the escarpment was a wide shallow valley - the upper Corang or a tributary. Rather than risk a night on the dry, stony, treeless escarpment, we decided to make for it. Though less than 500 feet below us, there was a rock face to negotiate, and in these parts the rock-faces have a way of curving round and down to the vertical. It is easy to pick a way up from below, but only trial and error will find a way down from the top. On the second try we found a way down the rocks easy enough for the sneaker wearers, but requiring caution by the hobnailers. Our wide valley gave us some shelter from the cold westerly. Its southern slopes were treeless and the upper portion convex surfaces of bare rock. Lower down parallel bands of vegation ​followed the strata, and near the bottom parallel bands of shrubs looked like hedges.+Our attention soon focussed on our route to the East. Some six miles along the edge of the Yadboro escarpment, just beyond, and possibly joined by high ground to a treeless hill, rose a long slab of the conglomerate layer. To the North of the escarpment was a wide shallow valley - the upper Corang or a tributary. Rather than risk a night on the dry, stony, treeless escarpment, we decided to make for it. Though less than 500 feet below us, there was a rock face to negotiate, and in these parts the rock-faces have a way of curving round and down to the vertical. It is easy to pick a way up from below, but only trial and error will find a way down from the top. On the second try we found a way down the rocks easy enough for the sneaker wearers, but requiring caution by the hobnailers. Our wide valley gave us some shelter from the cold westerly. Its southern slopes were treeless and the upper portion convex surfaces of bare rock. Lower down parallel bands of vegetation ​followed the strata, and near the bottom parallel bands of shrubs looked like hedges.
  
-Next morning we struck a happy compromise between the bee-liners, the-ridge-walkers and the valley-followers,​ and by 10.30 were within half a mile of our table top - a smooth vertical slab 300 feet or more high and a mile long. There was broken rock at the northern end and this looked like the only possible access to the top. We debated whether we would make straight for the broken rock, over the little gully below us but decided to play safe and head it. How glad we were when we looked through it from its source a quarter of an hour later and saw the cliffs on either side! Soon we were at the bottom of the cliff face and climbing up'a fissure, Half way up we took to the rock- that rounded conglomerate - but were turned back by a vertical slab. So we followed the fissure, which runs right across the table-top, to its highest point, where we had lunch, and afterwards climbed to the top without much difficulty. But for all we knew this was the only way up and we had to be sure we could find it again from above. Compasses were out, formations aligned, arrows drawn and breakfast food packets affixed to sticks.+Next morning we struck a happy compromise between the bee-liners, the-ridge-walkers and the valley-followers,​ and by 10.30 were within half a mile of our table top - a smooth vertical slab 300 feet or more high and a mile long. There was broken rock at the northern end and this looked like the only possible access to the top. We debated whether we would make straight for the broken rock, over the little gully below us but decided to play safe and head it. How glad we were when we looked through it from its source a quarter of an hour later and saw the cliffs on either side! Soon we were at the bottom of the cliff face and climbing up a fissure, Half way up we took to the rock- that rounded conglomerate - but were turned back by a vertical slab. So we followed the fissure, which runs right across the table-top, to its highest point, where we had lunch, and afterwards climbed to the top without much difficulty. But for all we knew this was the only way up and we had to be sure we could find it again from above. Compasses were out, formations aligned, arrows drawn and breakfast food packets affixed to sticks.
  
 From the top we saw the most fantastic rock formation it has been my lot to look upon. I have seen photographs of the valley in the Barklay Tablelands called the "​Ruined City" and this was similar except that it was on the mountaintop instead of in the valley. The horizontal strata has been weathered into great blocks some of which resemble multi-floored buildings along streets. But others are crevassed and buttressed and taper towards the top like steep, flat-topped pyramids, ​ Ray Kirkby, who has also seen them, likens them to pagodas. They reminded me of the ruins of ancient Mesopotamian cities. A certain local character known as "the galloping Major" - a soldier of World War 1, has named many of them after Egyptian ruins. From the top we saw the most fantastic rock formation it has been my lot to look upon. I have seen photographs of the valley in the Barklay Tablelands called the "​Ruined City" and this was similar except that it was on the mountaintop instead of in the valley. The horizontal strata has been weathered into great blocks some of which resemble multi-floored buildings along streets. But others are crevassed and buttressed and taper towards the top like steep, flat-topped pyramids, ​ Ray Kirkby, who has also seen them, likens them to pagodas. They reminded me of the ruins of ancient Mesopotamian cities. A certain local character known as "the galloping Major" - a soldier of World War 1, has named many of them after Egyptian ruins.
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 Now about the latest Mara --- (sorry, long walk) fiasco. The four "​ninety miler" turncoats were seen at Blackheath Ck - Cox Junction on the Saturday afternoon - come, come Snow, better spill the beans or people will be saying you didn't know which way the Cox was flowing! Now about the latest Mara --- (sorry, long walk) fiasco. The four "​ninety miler" turncoats were seen at Blackheath Ck - Cox Junction on the Saturday afternoon - come, come Snow, better spill the beans or people will be saying you didn't know which way the Cox was flowing!
  
 +----
 +
 +=== Photography!?​!?​! ===
 +
 +You press the button, we'll do the rest!
 +
 +Finegrain Developing. Sparkling Prints. Perfect Enlargements. Your Rollfilms or Leica films deserve the best service.
 +
 +Leica Photo Service.
 +
 +31 Macquarie Place, Sydney, N.S.W.
 +
 +----
  
-===== Confessions ​of an Admiral =====+===== Confessions ​Of An Admiral=====
  
-Sydney ​ 28.8.57.+Sydney ​28.8.57.
  
 Dear Mr. Peter Stitt, Dear Mr. Peter Stitt,
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 It was about half an hour later when things began to happen. Previously we had agreed to keep all torches off. At all cost, we weren'​t going to let anyone sponge on our navigation. (Ha Has). So by starlight only we strained our eyes to read the map, keeping one point in our minds - watch out for Jerusalem Bay. It was about half an hour later when things began to happen. Previously we had agreed to keep all torches off. At all cost, we weren'​t going to let anyone sponge on our navigation. (Ha Has). So by starlight only we strained our eyes to read the map, keeping one point in our minds - watch out for Jerusalem Bay.
  
-Soon on our port side appeared three lights. These, we thought were the lights above Rhode'​s Boatshed. As we conferred together at the blunt end of the boat, on the prospects of this being Jerusalem Bay +Soon on our port side appeared three lights. These, we thought were the lights above Rhode'​s Boatshed. As we conferred together at the blunt end of the boat, on the prospects of this being Jerusalem Bay our hearts suddenly leapt into our mouths and a sickly feeling developed in our stomachs. An expensive torch which John Thornwaite had lent us slipped into the water.
-our hearts suddenly leapt into our mouths and a sickly feeling developed in our stomachs. An expensive torch which John Thornwaite had lent us slipped into the water.+
  
 With very uneasy feelings we squatted down on the seats, moaning over the loss, completely disregarding the fact that Lion Island was straight in front of us on the distant horizon. With very uneasy feelings we squatted down on the seats, moaning over the loss, completely disregarding the fact that Lion Island was straight in front of us on the distant horizon.
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 (Is this the full story, Admiral, or are you still holding out? There is a strong rumour that you all went ashore at this unknown place with full intent to enquire from the residents just what town they lived in -- Ed.) (Is this the full story, Admiral, or are you still holding out? There is a strong rumour that you all went ashore at this unknown place with full intent to enquire from the residents just what town they lived in -- Ed.)
  
-===== Special Walk for New Members and Prospectives ​ =====+----
  
-The walk of 18/19/20 October to be led by Brian Harvy has been designed for new members and prospective members who have not been walking in the Blue Mountains, so as to give them the opportunity to +===== Special Walk For New Members And Prospectives. ​ ===== 
-view the scenery of main walking country at their eases with plenty of time to take photographs and have the peaks named. Trip starts with the 6.26 p.m. train to Katoomba on the Friday night, travelling in + 
-second carriage from front. Clothes not required on the voyage may be cloaked at the Station. Descending Nellies Glen, the first camp will be the "old Pub site". The folk will meet the Carlons next forenoon, +The walk of 18/19/20 October to be led by Brian Harvey ​has been designed for new members and prospective members who have not been walking in the Blue Mountains, so as to give them the opportunity to view the scenery of main walking country at their eases with plenty of time to take photographs and have the peaks named. Trip starts with the 6.26 p.m. train to Katoomba on the Friday night, travelling in second carriage from front. Clothes not required on the voyage may be cloaked at the Station. Descending Nellies Glen, the first camp will be the "old Pub site". The folk will meet the Carlons next forenoon, then press along the Black Dog Track to Glenalan Crossing for the night. The way will then be via Taro's Ladder and Clear Hill on Sunday morning an early lunch at Glenraphael Swamp, thence along Narrow Neck Plateau to Katoomba. Excellent scenery all day Sunday. Total trip is about 25 miles, all track walking - descent and ascent of about 1300 feet, otherwise fairly level going - 5 meals to be carried - tea at Katoomba on Sunday night. Fares about 24/-
-then press along the Black Dog Track to Glenalan Crossing for the night. The way will then be via Taro's Ladder and Clear Hill on Sunday morning an early lunch at Glenraphael Swamp, thence along Narrow Neck Plateau to Katoomba. Excellent scenery all day Sunday. Total trip is about 25 miles, all track walking - descent and ascent of about 1300 feet, otherwise fairly level going - 5 meals to be carried - tea at Katoomba on Sunday night. Fares about 24/-,+ 
 +----
  
-===== Climbing Expedition - Pigeon House The Castle Tallatarang ===== +===== Climbing Expedition - Pigeon HouseThe CastleTallatarang =====
-JUNE 14-15-16-17+
  
-Part II +=== June 14-15-16-17. ​Part II. ===
  
--- By Malcolm, Digby, Geof and Dot.+- By Malcolm, Digby, Geof and Dot.
  
 (As you may remember, it's high time Geoff had a finger in this communal pie so stand by while he tells you how the Tallatarang party fared: Says Geoffo) (As you may remember, it's high time Geoff had a finger in this communal pie so stand by while he tells you how the Tallatarang party fared: Says Geoffo)
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 "​It'​s five o'​clock,"​ he cried as though it was some great good news he was announcing. "Time to get up!" "​It'​s five o'​clock,"​ he cried as though it was some great good news he was announcing. "Time to get up!"
  
-As I dragged myself from the superdown the cold hit me like an icy wave and washed some of the sleep out of my head. I remembered where I'd put my boots and took them from under the pillow and pulled +As I dragged myself from the superdown the cold hit me like an icy wave and washed some of the sleep out of my head. I remembered where I'd put my boots and took them from under the pillow and pulled them on with shaking fingers. Oh, the cold! The cold! After three icy minutes scratching in the pack Ltd the ingredients of a breakfast and thankfully headed for Putt's fire. Ah! that's better!
-them on with shaking fingers. Oh, the cold! The cold! After three icy minutes scratching in the pack Ltd the ingredients of a breakfast and thankfully headed for Putt's fire. Ah! that's better!+
  
-With the breakfast beginning to sizzle and a deliciously warm feeling on the side of me nearest the fire I began to take an interest in the world around. The trees and the sky above were all so still that you could hear a star fall. But beneath the trees things were beginning to move. In the nearest tent, cunningly pitched so as to gain the maximum warmth from the fire, Malcolm was reclining in his fleabag directing Colin in the production of his breakfast. His main concern seemed to be that it would be cooked before he was ready to arise. Beside me Manning John, bless him, was warming his little petrol primus in the flames. All was quiet in the Matthews'​ tent where Don and Tine slumbered on, being under a misapprehension about actual starting time. Nor is the Dalai Lama showing much enthusiasm about the +With the breakfast beginning to sizzle and a deliciously warm feeling on the side of me nearest the fire I began to take an interest in the world around. The trees and the sky above were all so still that you could hear a star fall. But beneath the trees things were beginning to move. In the nearest tent, cunningly pitched so as to gain the maximum warmth from the fire, Malcolm was reclining in his fleabag directing Colin in the production of his breakfast. His main concern seemed to be that it would be cooked before he was ready to arise. Beside me Manning John, bless him, was warming his little petrol primus in the flames. All was quiet in the Matthews'​ tent where Don and Tine slumbered on, being under a misapprehension about actual starting time. Nor is the Dalai Lama showing much enthusiasm about the great outdoors. We hear him trying to rationalise his reluctance to leave his sleeping bag. His voice comes emphatically through the chill pre-dawn gloom: "​I'​m not like that Snow Brown person; I'm a gentleman. I don't sneak up on my sausages in the dark; I wait for the daylight and give them a sporting chance."​
-great outdoors. We hear him trying to rationalise his reluctance to leave his sleeping bag. His voice comes emphatically through the chill pre-dawn gloom: "​I'​m not like that Snow Brown person; I'm a gentleman. I don't sneak up on my sausages in the dark; I wait for the daylight and give them a sporting chance."​+
  
 Silently the darkness dissolves and the faint light in the sky becomes the subject of arguments. Is it sidereal twilight? Is it astronomical twilight? Is it nautical twilight? Is it civil twilight? Is it twilight? Silently the darkness dissolves and the faint light in the sky becomes the subject of arguments. Is it sidereal twilight? Is it astronomical twilight? Is it nautical twilight? Is it civil twilight? Is it twilight?
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 "​A-a-aw-a-a-ahr-rr!"​ growls the Dalai. "It makes me mad!" "​A-a-aw-a-a-ahr-rr!"​ growls the Dalai. "It makes me mad!"
  
-At this stage the patient Putt could wait no longer but shouldered his pack and made for the icy Clyde. At last things began to happen. Malcolm climbed leisurely from his flea bag - a few of the faithful followed Colin to an icy baptism accentuated by splashes from the Tallatarang boys (who didn't have to cross the river). In ones and twos they reached the other bank and stamped their feet in the frost till Malcolm, a picture of sartorial elegance, sauntered across. We saw them crunch away along the frosted flat, then it was time for us to go. Strap on the caribeena and the slings, shoulder the pack, coil tho rope and away. Tallatarang and adventure, here we come!+At this stage the patient Putt could wait no longer but shouldered his pack and made for the icy Clyde. At last things began to happen. Malcolm climbed leisurely from his flea bag - a few of the faithful followed Colin to an icy baptism accentuated by splashes from the Tallatarang boys (who didn't have to cross the river). In ones and twos they reached the other bank and stamped their feet in the frost till Malcolm, a picture of sartorial elegance, sauntered across. We saw them crunch away along the frosted flat, then it was time for us to go. Strap on the caribeena and the slings, shoulder the pack, coil the rope and away. Tallatarang and adventure, here we come!
  
-We ran through a world on the very brink of day with the ice white bracken brushing our legs, and our breath streaming out behind us. Across the river flats we went and through the dry stream beds, Manning John leading with his great long legs taking great long strides and never seeming quite under control. Dot went skipping like a little girl out of school, and Mick moved with that muscular economy that +We ran through a world on the very brink of day with the ice white bracken brushing our legs, and our breath streaming out behind us. Across the river flats we went and through the dry stream beds, Manning John leading with his great long legs taking great long strides and never seeming quite under control. Dot went skipping like a little girl out of school, and Mick moved with that muscular economy that makes him seem to glide up hills. Grace and the Dalai and I, who don't get quite so much exercise, were quite satisfied to keep up.
-makes him seem to glide up hills. Grace and the Dalai and I, who don't get quite so much exercise, were quite satisfied to keep up.+
  
-The well-worn cowpads led us along the Clyde and up Byangee spur within coo-ee of the rocks that had rebuffed us in an attempt we had made on Byangee the previous evening. They looked more friendly in the morning light and for a moment almost snared our fancy, but just one glance at Tallatarang'​s stern and sunless face, and as though he were a wizard we found ourselves in his power. We stood in his shadow by +The well-worn cowpads led us along the Clyde and up Byangee spur within coo-ee of the rocks that had rebuffed us in an attempt we had made on Byangee the previous evening. They looked more friendly in the morning light and for a moment almost snared our fancy, but just one glance at Tallatarang'​s stern and sunless face, and as though he were a wizard we found ourselves in his power. We stood in his shadow by the Clyde with the frost about our feet and gazed at the forbidding wall; like the wall of some ancient castle, chipped and battered by the centuries but nowhere broken. Johnnie said he knew a way up the first cliff line, though as we looked it seemed not possible. Possible or not, Johnnie said he knew a way, and all we had to do was follow, So we followed up the steep and shaley ridge.
-the Clyde with the frost about our feet and gazed at the forbidding wall; like the wall of some ancient castle, chipped and battered by the centuries but nowhere broken. Johnnie said he knew a way up the first cliff line, though as we looked it seemed not possible. Possible or not, Johnnie said he knew a way, and all we had to do was follow, So we followed up the steep and shaley ridge.+
  
 "Not a plant that prickles or scratches,"​ said Dalai, beaming beatitude on the vegetation round about. We should have known that the prickles and the scratches were reserved for our entertainment higher up. "Not a plant that prickles or scratches,"​ said Dalai, beaming beatitude on the vegetation round about. We should have known that the prickles and the scratches were reserved for our entertainment higher up.
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 (At this juncture Geof runs out of breath and hands the narrative over to Dot to continue) ..... (At this juncture Geof runs out of breath and hands the narrative over to Dot to continue) .....
  
-Up the first precipice we go without stopping, following in John's eager wake, and gain the first shelf. From then on it is unknown country, but everyone now has his ears back and almost without breaking +Up the first precipice we go without stopping, following in John's eager wake, and gain the first shelf. From then on it is unknown country, but everyone now has his ears back and almost without breaking our pace we shoot up the second cliff wall. Then we can see we have just a steep slope to climb to the top of the mountain. We sweep round in a wide circle to the right to get on high ground and avoid a heavy tangle of swampy growth, but eventually we find we are into it despite our precautions. Here we find that Johnnie'​s well nourished frame is a great advantage. He goes in front with tireless energy, literally bashing down the undergrowth like a bulldozer. He falls forward on to the dense matted growth of reeds and vines and spear grass and effectively flattens them, and the rest of his party follow in comfort through the beaten down swathe. (The report that circulated round the Club, that he would fall forward on the obstacles and his party would then use his prostrate form as a bridge, is not quite correct however.)
-our pace we shoot up the second cliff wall. Then we can see we have just a steep slope to climb to the top of the mountain. We sweep round in a wide circle to the right to get on high ground and avoid a heavy +
-tangle of swampy growth, but eventually we find we are into it despite our precautions. Here we find that Johnnie'​s well nourished frame is a great advantage. He goes in front with tireless energy, literally bashing down the undergrowth like a bulldozer. He falls forward on to the dense matted growth of reeds and vines and spear grass and effectively flattens them, and the rest of his party follow in comfort +
-through the beaten down swathe. (The report that circulated round the Club, that he would fall forward on the obstacles and his party would then use his prostrate form as a bridge, is not quite correct however.)+
  
-Out of this tangle at last, and we got into a queer tall growth almost resembling bamboo, and through its dry rustling stems we moved easily, looking round every now and then to see if there were pandas about, for this could easily be a bamboo forest in the foothills of the Himalayas. A final rock-climb, which we carefully marked with a cairn to show us the way down again, and then it was just a scrub walk +Out of this tangle at last, and we got into a queer tall growth almost resembling bamboo, and through its dry rustling stems we moved easily, looking round every now and then to see if there were pandas about, for this could easily be a bamboo forest in the foothills of the Himalayas. A final rock-climb, which we carefully marked with a cairn to show us the way down again, and then it was just a scrub walk up to the summit. Here we had lunch and made a cairn and lit a fire for the benefit of our friends on the Castle, but they didn't see it.
-up to the summit. Here we had lunch and made a cairn and lit a fire for the benefit of our friends on the Castle, but they didn't see it.+
  
 Then, as it was still quite early we thought we would shoot down and climb Byangee on the way back to camp, but this heroic decision gradually seeped away as we descended. A side trip around the top of the second plateau to see the view, of the Clyde country took up some time, and as it turned out we had to scoot somewhat to get back,to camp in the last fading gleam of light. Pete Stitt had a big pot of soup on and welcomed back our triumphant party, and some time later the Castle crowd returned by torchlight and we all swapped experiences. Then, as it was still quite early we thought we would shoot down and climb Byangee on the way back to camp, but this heroic decision gradually seeped away as we descended. A side trip around the top of the second plateau to see the view, of the Clyde country took up some time, and as it turned out we had to scoot somewhat to get back,to camp in the last fading gleam of light. Pete Stitt had a big pot of soup on and welcomed back our triumphant party, and some time later the Castle crowd returned by torchlight and we all swapped experiences.
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 And then back to the waiting cars, The Dalai Lama is cajoled into taking Snow in his car as passenger, and we watch them drive off in their forlorn search for Snow's lost buggy. The rest of us cram ourselves into the Puttmobile) then heigh-ho for home after a most dam fine splendiferous capital letter Adventure. And then back to the waiting cars, The Dalai Lama is cajoled into taking Snow in his car as passenger, and we watch them drive off in their forlorn search for Snow's lost buggy. The rest of us cram ourselves into the Puttmobile) then heigh-ho for home after a most dam fine splendiferous capital letter Adventure.
 +
 +----
  
 ===== Help! Help! ===== ===== Help! Help! =====
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 Thank you, Thank you,
 +
 Brian Anderson (Walks Secretary) Brian Anderson (Walks Secretary)
  
 +----
  
-===== Your Walking Guide=====+===== Your Walking Guide=====
  
-|October 18-19-20|Narrow Neck - Megalong Area| See Page for Leaders own comments.|+|October| | | 
 +|18-19-20|Narrow Neck - Megalong Area| See Page for Leaders own comments.|
 |19-20|Yellow Rock-Grose R.-Vale Lookout| A balanced mixture of easy, medium, rough, creek, river, ridge walking. An approximate three mile dirt road walk involved from Yellow Rock to the headwaters of Blue Gum Swamp Ck. Medium walking type climbs up onto Yellow Rock and out of Blue Gum Swamp Ck. Possibly a scratchy scramble up onto Vale Lookout. Views from Yellow Rock of the Nepean and Grose River from Vale Lookout are worthwhile. Good swimming along lower Grose River. Bus or Taxi transport available from Kurrajong to Richmond. A General Transfer letter for rail tickets will be arranged by leader. Rail fare 10/5 return. Bus or taxi 3/- to 5/-. N.B. Omit Mt. Bowen from particulars of Walk.| |19-20|Yellow Rock-Grose R.-Vale Lookout| A balanced mixture of easy, medium, rough, creek, river, ridge walking. An approximate three mile dirt road walk involved from Yellow Rock to the headwaters of Blue Gum Swamp Ck. Medium walking type climbs up onto Yellow Rock and out of Blue Gum Swamp Ck. Possibly a scratchy scramble up onto Vale Lookout. Views from Yellow Rock of the Nepean and Grose River from Vale Lookout are worthwhile. Good swimming along lower Grose River. Bus or Taxi transport available from Kurrajong to Richmond. A General Transfer letter for rail tickets will be arranged by leader. Rail fare 10/5 return. Bus or taxi 3/- to 5/-. N.B. Omit Mt. Bowen from particulars of Walk.|
 |20|Marley Pool-Winfred Falls area|Walking is very easy to medium along bush tracks and roads. The falls and pool along this walk present a very pleasing pibture of the Royal National Park. Wildflowers should still be in bloom. The 8.59 a.m. electric train from Central catches the 10.5 a.m. ferry to Bundeena. Combined train and ferry fare 6/6.| |20|Marley Pool-Winfred Falls area|Walking is very easy to medium along bush tracks and roads. The falls and pool along this walk present a very pleasing pibture of the Royal National Park. Wildflowers should still be in bloom. The 8.59 a.m. electric train from Central catches the 10.5 a.m. ferry to Bundeena. Combined train and ferry fare 6/6.|
 |25-26-27|Mini Mini Range - Six Foot Track area|This is a very pleasant medium test walk, From Jenolan Caves Road to Gibraltar Rocks the way is a combination of timber roads and tracks with a little scrub bashing as you approach the end of the Mini Mini Range. Very good views of the Megalong Valley and Upper Cox from Gibraltar Rocks. A graded track from the Rocks to Katoomba. The track itself passes through the picturesque Gibralter Ck.-Cox River-Megalong area. Climb out of Megalong is approx. 1500 ft., but is easily overcome by a tourist track. For this time of year the Cox River offers many good swimming holes. Train fare 24/9. Car approx. 15/- to 20/-| |25-26-27|Mini Mini Range - Six Foot Track area|This is a very pleasant medium test walk, From Jenolan Caves Road to Gibraltar Rocks the way is a combination of timber roads and tracks with a little scrub bashing as you approach the end of the Mini Mini Range. Very good views of the Megalong Valley and Upper Cox from Gibraltar Rocks. A graded track from the Rocks to Katoomba. The track itself passes through the picturesque Gibralter Ck.-Cox River-Megalong area. Climb out of Megalong is approx. 1500 ft., but is easily overcome by a tourist track. For this time of year the Cox River offers many good swimming holes. Train fare 24/9. Car approx. 15/- to 20/-|
-|October ​26-27|Carrington and Minnamurra Falls area| Don't forget your camera on this trip as both falls and coastal views give the photographer some decent subject matter. Walking is easy to medium. No major climbs - only one descent. The route intended is a mixture of tracks and bush roads over flat upland swamps common to this area. Permission to use Robertson tickets from Kiama will be arranged by leader. Return fare 26/3| +|26-27|Carrington and Minnamurra Falls area| Don't forget your camera on this trip as both falls and coastal views give the photographer some decent subject matter. Walking is easy to medium. No major climbs - only one descent. The route intended is a mixture of tracks and bush roads over flat upland swamps common to this area. Permission to use Robertson tickets from Kiama will be arranged by leader. Return fare 26/3| 
-|November 1-2-3|Fraser Park|An easy two mile stroll - swimming, fishing (with spears of course), sunbathing etc. In other words a first class spine-bash. Train fare 20/5. Bus from approx 5/-.|+|November| | | 
 +|1-2-3|Fraser Park|An easy two mile stroll - swimming, fishing (with spears of course), sunbathing etc. In other words a first class spine-bash. Train fare 20/5. Bus from approx 5/-.|
 |2-3| Era - Instructional Weekend| Whether walking in from the lookout or Garie Beach, the way is an easy 1/2 to 1 mile walk. Ideal camp spots. Good swimming in surf and also small rock pool. For those who like to potter around rocks, this is an ideal location. From Waterfall bus or taxi transport is available. Check with leader re bus times on Saturday to Garie Beach. Approx. combined bus and train fare| |2-3| Era - Instructional Weekend| Whether walking in from the lookout or Garie Beach, the way is an easy 1/2 to 1 mile walk. Ideal camp spots. Good swimming in surf and also small rock pool. For those who like to potter around rocks, this is an ideal location. From Waterfall bus or taxi transport is available. Check with leader re bus times on Saturday to Garie Beach. Approx. combined bus and train fare|
 |8-9-10| Camberwarra Dugong Ck. area| From Camberwarra Lookout and Upper Eugong Ck. views of this part of the South Coat are extensive. Good area for colour photography. The going is mainly medium with a few rough spots. The rough areas are mostly belts of rain forest you have to pass through. Good chance of a feed of fruit from the few deserted farms along the track. Return fare 31/6 plus car to Camberwarra 6/- to 10/-.| |8-9-10| Camberwarra Dugong Ck. area| From Camberwarra Lookout and Upper Eugong Ck. views of this part of the South Coat are extensive. Good area for colour photography. The going is mainly medium with a few rough spots. The rough areas are mostly belts of rain forest you have to pass through. Good chance of a feed of fruit from the few deserted farms along the track. Return fare 31/6 plus car to Camberwarra 6/- to 10/-.|
-|9-10 | Mt. Solitary| Best described as easy-medium,​ hard going. The hard going is the pull up onto Solitary. The easy is the track from the Ruined Castle to the Scenic Railway or Stairway and the medium parts being the road into Kedumba ​Ok. and the track along Solitary. If Scenic Railway isn't used for climb out of valley the other way out is via a tourist track. From Solitary are good views across to Katoomba and down Kedumba Ck. As this will probably be in warm sunny weather don't forget to take your hat. Train fare 22/2. Taxi to Queen Victoria Homes, 15/- for five bods.| +|9-10 |Mt. Solitary| Best described as easy-medium,​ hard going. The hard going is the pull up onto Solitary. The easy is the track from the Ruined Castle to the Scenic Railway or Stairway and the medium parts being the road into Kedumba ​Ck. and the track along Solitary. If Scenic Railway isn't used for climb out of valley the other way out is via a tourist track. From Solitary are good views across to Katoomba and down Kedumba Ck. As this will probably be in warm sunny weather don't forget to take your hat. Train fare 22/2. Taxi to Queen Victoria Homes, 15/- for five bods.| 
-|10| Heathcote Ck| Easy Sunday walk. Walking is of a medium nature. Many pools in this creek make it ideal for a swimming crawl. Return fare 5/-|+|10|Heathcote Ck| Easy Sunday walk. Walking is of a medium nature. Many pools in this creek make it ideal for a swimming crawl. Return fare 5/-|
  
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 About 120 bushwalkers gathered at the Harvey'​s Wahroonga home on 14th September for the highly successful Bon Voyage to the McGregors. Highlight of the evening was the new Chronic Opera, designed especially for Malcolm and so obviously conjured up without his foreknowledge or censorship. That with all the Highland brogue floating around and the rakish kilts worn by the "​Characters",​ the evening had more Scotch flavour than a bottle of White Horse. About 120 bushwalkers gathered at the Harvey'​s Wahroonga home on 14th September for the highly successful Bon Voyage to the McGregors. Highlight of the evening was the new Chronic Opera, designed especially for Malcolm and so obviously conjured up without his foreknowledge or censorship. That with all the Highland brogue floating around and the rakish kilts worn by the "​Characters",​ the evening had more Scotch flavour than a bottle of White Horse.
  
 +----
  
-===== Letter from George Swenson =====+===== Letter from George Swenson=====
  
 +University of Illinois\\
 +College of Engineering\\
 +Urbana, Illinois.
  
-UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
-College of Engineering 
-URBANA, ILLINOIS 
 August 30 1957. August 30 1957.
  
-The Sydney Bushwalkers. Dear Friends,+The Sydney Bushwalkers. 
 + 
 +Dear Friends,
  
 I promised Malcolm McGregor in March that I'd write a piece for your newsletter, giving a Yank's impression of Australian bushwalking. The press of duty and a tight itinerary, combined with the debilitating effects of one or another of your more virulent Australian "​wogs",​ have led to this unforgivable delay, Please forgive me, anyway. I promised Malcolm McGregor in March that I'd write a piece for your newsletter, giving a Yank's impression of Australian bushwalking. The press of duty and a tight itinerary, combined with the debilitating effects of one or another of your more virulent Australian "​wogs",​ have led to this unforgivable delay, Please forgive me, anyway.
  
-When I heard that I was to be travelling around the world I was spending the summer in Alaska. One of my mountaineering friends advised me that "​bushwalking"​ is one of the finest of sports and that the Sydney +When I heard that I was to be travelling around the world I was spending the summer in Alaska. One of my mountaineering friends advised me that "​bushwalking"​ is one of the finest of sports and that the Sydney Bushwalkers are among its foremost exponents. I believe he'd been talking to Leon Blumer; even so, he gave me the best of advise and made possible the highlight of the entire round-the-world trip. As for the bushwalkers themselves, I expected to meet a group of warms friendly, hospitable people. People who love the wide, open spaces are invariably like that, with a feeling of kinship for anyone who shares this love. Naturally then, I wasn't surprised, just delighted when these expectations were realized. One of the characteristics of the typical bushwalker is his pride in his own Blue Mountains. This is proper and fully justified; the Blue Mountains are worth flying around the world to see. Another characteristic is his lively curiosity about other places, and this, in particular, helps the stranger to feel at home.
-Bushwalkers are among its foremost exponents. I believe he'd been talking to Leon Blumer; even so, he gave me the best of advise and made possible the highlight of the entire round-the-world trip. As for the +
-bushwalkers themselves, I expected to meet a group of warms friendly, hospitable people. People who love the wide, open spaces are invariably like that, with a feeling of kinship for anyone who shares this love. Naturally then, I wasn't surprised, just delighted when these expectations were realized. One of the characteristics of the typical bushwalker is his pride in his own Blue Mountains. This is proper and fully justified; the Blue Mountains are worth flying around the world to see. Another characteristic is his lively curiosity about other places, and this, in particular, helps the stranger to feel at home.+
  
-As some of you will remember, I was able to participate in two +As some of you will remember, I was able to participate in two outings while visiting in Sydney, the first to Pearl Beach and Warrah, ​the second through some of the rough country along the Cox Drainage, near Katoomba. I remember particularly,​ from the first trip, the careful briefing on the local flora, the fascinating library at the botanical station at Warrah, the search for souvenir seashells along Pearl Beach, the midnight search on the hilltop for my foolishly forgotten film cassette. Oh, yes, and the mosquitoes! Say, Yank, are you a vegetarian? (Why smoke up your billy when a fresh, juicy pineapple is a meal fit for a king?)
-outings while visiting in Sydney, the first to Pearl Beach and Warrahl ​the second through some of the rough country along the Cox Drainage, near Katoomba. I remember particularly,​ from the first trip, the careful briefing on the local flora, the fascinating library at the botanical station at Warrah, the search for souvenir seashells along Pearl Beach, the midnight search on the hilltop for my foolishly forgotten film cassette. Oh, yes, and the mosquitoes! Say, Yank, are you a vegetarian? (Why smoke up your billy when a fresh, juicy pineapple is a meal fit for a king?)+
  
 About the second trip, perhaps the less said the better. At least that's what I might have thought as I left the Matthewses that night at Railway Square. But time heals all wounds, and the disappointment at having to take the short way home gives way to vivid recollection of the spectacular scenery along Narrow Neck and Breakfast Creek, and gratitude to the conscientious Leaders who patiently led the rubber-legged straggler up the last, interminable pitch before the blessed haven of a frontier farm. Lest any suspicion arise that collusion between a Leader and a visiting stranger could result in a white-ant type of play, let it be known that a virus can be as effective an obstacle as a bergschrund or a grizzly bear. Anyway, it nearly broke the leader'​s heart to lounge around the farmhouse while the walkers toiled upward in the rain. About the second trip, perhaps the less said the better. At least that's what I might have thought as I left the Matthewses that night at Railway Square. But time heals all wounds, and the disappointment at having to take the short way home gives way to vivid recollection of the spectacular scenery along Narrow Neck and Breakfast Creek, and gratitude to the conscientious Leaders who patiently led the rubber-legged straggler up the last, interminable pitch before the blessed haven of a frontier farm. Lest any suspicion arise that collusion between a Leader and a visiting stranger could result in a white-ant type of play, let it be known that a virus can be as effective an obstacle as a bergschrund or a grizzly bear. Anyway, it nearly broke the leader'​s heart to lounge around the farmhouse while the walkers toiled upward in the rain.
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 Other impressions:​ Nettles along Breakfast Creek. The luxury of the clear creek water after the long, dry walk along the ridge. The smell of burning gum leaves. Disappointment when the plump, wild melons turn out to be green. A wallaby, at last. A kookaburra chorus at the head of Breakfast Creek -- no sound like it elsewhere in the world. A friendly farm couple with an interest in world affairs and plenty of fresh milk in the cooler. On the train, a covey of young girls with box lunches -- how they can eat! Other impressions:​ Nettles along Breakfast Creek. The luxury of the clear creek water after the long, dry walk along the ridge. The smell of burning gum leaves. Disappointment when the plump, wild melons turn out to be green. A wallaby, at last. A kookaburra chorus at the head of Breakfast Creek -- no sound like it elsewhere in the world. A friendly farm couple with an interest in world affairs and plenty of fresh milk in the cooler. On the train, a covey of young girls with box lunches -- how they can eat!
  
-The visit to Australia was too soon over. I was able to fly to Hobart to visit a colleague and to explore for a weekend. The flu was still nagging, so I had to take a bus up Mt. Wellington, Alas for a +The visit to Australia was too soon over. I was able to fly to Hobart to visit a colleague and to explore for a weekend. The flu was still nagging, so I had to take a __bus__ ​up Mt. Wellington, Alas for a mountaineer'​s principles. The Derwent is blue, the roofs of Hobart are red, and the hillsides are golden. The parakeets are bright green, and there'​s a tree of vivid green that shines yellow in the sunlight. They were loading apples into ships from England and Germany. A Devonshire tea is delicious, but fattening. Hobart would be a wonderful place in which to live.
-mountaineer'​s principles. The Derwent is blue, the roofs of Hobart are red, and the hillsides are golden. The parakeets are bright green, and there'​s a tree of vivid green that shines yellow in the sunlight. +
-They were loading apples into ships from England and Germany. A Devonshire tea is delicious, but fattening. Hobart would be a wonderful place in which to live.+
  
 I hope I can walk in the Blue Mountains again. Take care of them until I can return. Australians are entirely too casual about bush fires. Years ago in America it was thought that burning was good for forests and grazing lands. Now too much of our inherited wealth is gone, and others should profit by the example. I hope I can walk in the Blue Mountains again. Take care of them until I can return. Australians are entirely too casual about bush fires. Years ago in America it was thought that burning was good for forests and grazing lands. Now too much of our inherited wealth is gone, and others should profit by the example.
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 Sincerely, Sincerely,
-George 
-(G.W. Swenson, Jr.) 
  
-===== Notes of Federation Meeting - September =====+George (G.W. Swenson, Jr.) 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Notes Of Federation Meeting - September=====
  
 Eighteen delegates, representing ten Clubs, constituted almost a record attendance for recent months. Among the more mundane items on the agenda, the following pearls emerged. Eighteen delegates, representing ten Clubs, constituted almost a record attendance for recent months. Among the more mundane items on the agenda, the following pearls emerged.
  
-1. THE ANNUAL BALL at the University Refectory was reported as "an outstanding social success"​ with two birthdays and one engagement (guess who?) being announced. It was also a financial success (for the Federation)and it was estimated that S. &. R. funds would benefit by about L20.+1. __The Annual Ball__ ​at the University Refectory was reported as "an outstanding social success"​ with two birthdays and one engagement (guess who?) being announced. It was also a financial success (for the Federation)and it was estimated that S. &. R. funds would benefit by about L20.
  
-2. S. & R. Over the weekend of September 7th and 8th, some Boy Scouts became lost while on a hike in connection with their "​Adventurer'​s Badge"​. S. & R. went into action on Tuesday night and into the Jamieson Valley at 5 a.m. on Wednesday morning. The lost ones came in along Narrow Neck under their own steam the same day.+2. __S. & R__. Over the weekend of September 7th and 8th, some Boy Scouts became lost while on a hike in connection with their "​Adventurer'​s Badge"​. S. & R. went into action on Tuesday night and into the Jamieson Valley at 5 a.m. on Wednesday morning. The lost ones came in along Narrow Neck under their own steam the same day.
  
 The next weekend - September 14-15th - you guessed it! Another "​Adventurer'​s Badge" hike - and another party of Boy Scouts missing. They turned up on the Tuesday evening, just in time to stop panic action. The next weekend - September 14-15th - you guessed it! Another "​Adventurer'​s Badge" hike - and another party of Boy Scouts missing. They turned up on the Tuesday evening, just in time to stop panic action.
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 Among correspondence tabled during the evening was a letter from the Boy Scouts Association offering to defray expenses incurred by searchers. Among correspondence tabled during the evening was a letter from the Boy Scouts Association offering to defray expenses incurred by searchers.
  
-3. PEPPING-UP of FEDERATION: Re the S.B.W. inspired motion, "that "​Federation examine its position and procedure as figurehead of the bushwalking movement",​ Federation examined itself.+3. __Pepping-Up of Federation__: Re the S.B.W. inspired motion, "that "​Federation examine its position and procedure as figurehead of the bushwalking movement",​ Federation examined itself.
  
 As an upshot, Federation officers will soon begin personal lecture tours of Clubs other than their own. As an upshot, Federation officers will soon begin personal lecture tours of Clubs other than their own.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=== Hattswell'​s Taxi and Tourist Service. ===
 +
 +For all your transport problems contact Hattswell'​s Taxi and Tourist Service. Ring, write, wire or call any hour, day or night.
 +
 +Telephone: Blackheath 129 or 249. Booking Office - 4 doors from Gardner'​s Inn Hote1 (look for the neon sign.)
 +
 +Speedy 5 or 8 passenger cars available. Large or small parties catered for.
 +
 +Fares:
 +
 +  * Kanangra Walls - 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Perry'​s Lookdown - 3/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Jenolan State Forest - 20/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +  * Carlon'​s Farm - 10/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +
 +We will be pleased to quote other trips or special parties on application.
  
 ---- ----
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 ===== Seven Weeks in New Zealand -- Part VIII ===== ===== Seven Weeks in New Zealand -- Part VIII =====
  
-by Dot Butler.+Dot Butler.
  
-The Almer hut is situated at the head of the Almer Glacier which makes a steep drop to join the Franz Josef Glacier about a thousand feet below. From a rocky platform a short way in front of the hut one gets an enormous sense of spaciousness. Away to the west extends a long horizon bounding the mist blue sea. In the fading twilight the slopes of the low hills are steeped in colours rich as a satin bower bird's wing. Back towards the east rises the snowy Main Range swathed in the lacy mist of a summer evening, and the wide snow basin of the Franz Josef neve through which we had come that afternoon. But our eyes looked +The Almer hut is situated at the head of the Almer Glacier which makes a steep drop to join the Franz Josef Glacier about a thousand feet below. From a rocky platform a short way in front of the hut one gets an enormous sense of spaciousness. Away to the west extends a long horizon bounding the mist blue sea. In the fading twilight the slopes of the low hills are steeped in colours rich as a satin bower bird's wing. Back towards the east rises the snowy Main Range swathed in the lacy mist of a summer evening, and the wide snow basin of the Franz Josef neve through which we had come that afternoon. But our eyes looked down to where tomorrow'​s route would take us, and there below lying wickedly expectant, like a white dragon exuding cold from its wrinkled scales, we saw the Franz Josef glacier waiting. "Come on down," we heard it calling. "Come down, you four little crawling creatures and see what happens."​
-down to where tomorrow'​s route would take us, and there below lying wickedly expectant, like a white dragon exuding cold from its wrinkled scales, we saw the Franz Josef glacier waiting. "Come on down," we +
-heard it calling. "Come down, you four little crawling creatures and see what happens."​+
  
 The morning of 24th January dawned fine and calm. We weren'​t due in Christchurch till the afternoon of the 28th to catch our plane back to Sydney. It wouldn'​t take us two days to get to Christchurch,​ so it was with a fine sense of leisure that we dawdled around, and didn't set out from the hut till about 9 a.m. We had read in the hut book of a party which did the journey in three hours. We would allow ourselves at least six hours, which would give us ample time for photographs and lunch and generally playing about. The morning of 24th January dawned fine and calm. We weren'​t due in Christchurch till the afternoon of the 28th to catch our plane back to Sydney. It wouldn'​t take us two days to get to Christchurch,​ so it was with a fine sense of leisure that we dawdled around, and didn't set out from the hut till about 9 a.m. We had read in the hut book of a party which did the journey in three hours. We would allow ourselves at least six hours, which would give us ample time for photographs and lunch and generally playing about.
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 "Go back to sleep Snow. It's boulders rumbling down the watercourses under the glacier ice,​.."​... Doom! Boom-de-Boom:​ Snow shut his eyes tight to the torture of reality, pulled his sodden sleeping bag around his ears and tried to recapture his dream. "Go back to sleep Snow. It's boulders rumbling down the watercourses under the glacier ice,​.."​... Doom! Boom-de-Boom:​ Snow shut his eyes tight to the torture of reality, pulled his sodden sleeping bag around his ears and tried to recapture his dream.
  
-About 4 a.m. a sickly pallor crept into the snow fog. Thank God we can get moving; We prodded George and Snow awake and they unwillingly got out of the comparative dryness of their sleeping bags and +About 4 a.m. a sickly pallor crept into the snow fog. Thank God we can get moving; We prodded George and Snow awake and they unwillingly got out of the comparative dryness of their sleeping bags and dragged on their boots and we got going. My legs were solid ice up to the knees, and I guess Whaka was as badly off, and I could barely totter along the ice ridges as we made our way off the glacier.
-dragged on their boots and we got going. My legs were solid ice up to the knees, and I guess Whaka was as badly off, and I could barely totter along the ice ridges as we made our way off the glacier.+
  
 As we ascended the rocky ridge the snowing changed to raining, and by the time we had struggled up the snow grass slopes to the hut, which we reached at 7 a.m, we were running with water and as wet as if we had gone swimming in all our clothes, packs included. At the doorway of the hut we struggled painfully out of our boots, dropped off our wet clothes, then wrapped ourselves in hut blankets (luckily there were dozens), and fell into our bunks. The ocean of sleep washed over our exhausted bodies and we lay on the sea floor drowned and still. Oh, what a sleep we slept! It wasn't till evening that anyone stirred, and then it was only to eat some food, then back to sleep again till next day. As we ascended the rocky ridge the snowing changed to raining, and by the time we had struggled up the snow grass slopes to the hut, which we reached at 7 a.m, we were running with water and as wet as if we had gone swimming in all our clothes, packs included. At the doorway of the hut we struggled painfully out of our boots, dropped off our wet clothes, then wrapped ourselves in hut blankets (luckily there were dozens), and fell into our bunks. The ocean of sleep washed over our exhausted bodies and we lay on the sea floor drowned and still. Oh, what a sleep we slept! It wasn't till evening that anyone stirred, and then it was only to eat some food, then back to sleep again till next day.
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 On the night of the 28th, when by rights we should have been in the plane approaching Sydney, the barometer showed a favourable rise. The wind had dropped, so by 3 a.m. we were up and soon on our way on the long trip back to the Tasman. This was the first fine day anywhere in the Cook area and for the first time a plane could come out. We saw the tourist plane, on its way over to the Fox, circle round the Almer hut several times, but we had left the hut several hours earlier and by now were way up in the neve near the pass so the pilot didn't see us. On the night of the 28th, when by rights we should have been in the plane approaching Sydney, the barometer showed a favourable rise. The wind had dropped, so by 3 a.m. we were up and soon on our way on the long trip back to the Tasman. This was the first fine day anywhere in the Cook area and for the first time a plane could come out. We saw the tourist plane, on its way over to the Fox, circle round the Almer hut several times, but we had left the hut several hours earlier and by now were way up in the neve near the pass so the pilot didn't see us.
  
-The weather was incredibly still. The sky, softly blue, seemed chastened and contrite after its stormy excess. The Minarets were breath takingly ​lovely with diaphanous swathed of white mist floating round their lower slopes. The whole of the western side of the Main Range, under its mantle of new snow, radiated tranquility and peace. But the eastern side, from the top of Grahams Saddle down to the Rudolph and then the Tasman, was a scene of complete and incredible wreckage. I have never seen so much destruction following a storm. The whole mountain side was scoured out. The snow couloirs we had climbed up only a few days previously were gouged out to the virgin rock. Huge rock avalanches had ploughed deep and dirty troughs down the mountain side and lay scattered in dark fans away below. As we gingerly climbed down, a whole face of the mountain dropped away in one terrific snow avalanche.+The weather was incredibly still. The sky, softly blue, seemed chastened and contrite after its stormy excess. The Minarets were breathtakingly ​lovely with diaphanous swathed of white mist floating round their lower slopes. The whole of the western side of the Main Range, under its mantle of new snow, radiated tranquility and peace. But the eastern side, from the top of Grahams Saddle down to the Rudolph and then the Tasman, was a scene of complete and incredible wreckage. I have never seen so much destruction following a storm. The whole mountain side was scoured out. The snow couloirs we had climbed up only a few days previously were gouged out to the virgin rock. Huge rock avalanches had ploughed deep and dirty troughs down the mountain side and lay scattered in dark fans away below. As we gingerly climbed down, a whole face of the mountain dropped away in one terrific snow avalanche.
  
 Eventually we got down to the Tasman, then, as Whaka had unfortunately sprained his ankle, we sent George and Snow on ahead to tell the Mt. Cook bus driver at Ball hut that we might be about an hour late for the bus back to the Hermitage, and slowly came on our way. George went back with the bus, while Snow and a young Australian guide came back to meet us, and a special bus was sent back for us later (at our expense). We got down to the Hermitage and sent off telegrams and cablegrams to announce the fact that we were overdue and had been weather bound in a hut for several days, then we went down to the Unwin hut for the night and caught the next day's bus to Christchurch,​ That evening we saw Whaka off on his boat to Wellington. We slept that night in a local motor camp, and were on the doorstep of the Airways office bright and early next morning to explain why we were three days late and try to get another booking. There was no plane available that day, so we trailed out to Summer beach and slept in a shed in the park, and next day (Feb. 1st.) returned to Sydney. To leave Christchurch at 5 and get to Sydney at 8 (having put our watches back the regulation 2 hours) seemed all wrong. It made New Zealand as close as a train journey to Katoomba. However, it was a long time before the unreality wore off. For many days I found myself thinking I was still in those lovely little green islands with their snowy mountain peaks. For a few years hot dry sunny Australia will fill our thoughts, but one day we will find that strong, sensitive fingers are again rapping at the mind and we needs must leave our shores and go whither the stranger beckons - back to the high hills, the hard life, the effort and the striving, and the merry companions, all of which stir the soul to a depth and tenderness past the power of words to describe. Eventually we got down to the Tasman, then, as Whaka had unfortunately sprained his ankle, we sent George and Snow on ahead to tell the Mt. Cook bus driver at Ball hut that we might be about an hour late for the bus back to the Hermitage, and slowly came on our way. George went back with the bus, while Snow and a young Australian guide came back to meet us, and a special bus was sent back for us later (at our expense). We got down to the Hermitage and sent off telegrams and cablegrams to announce the fact that we were overdue and had been weather bound in a hut for several days, then we went down to the Unwin hut for the night and caught the next day's bus to Christchurch,​ That evening we saw Whaka off on his boat to Wellington. We slept that night in a local motor camp, and were on the doorstep of the Airways office bright and early next morning to explain why we were three days late and try to get another booking. There was no plane available that day, so we trailed out to Summer beach and slept in a shed in the park, and next day (Feb. 1st.) returned to Sydney. To leave Christchurch at 5 and get to Sydney at 8 (having put our watches back the regulation 2 hours) seemed all wrong. It made New Zealand as close as a train journey to Katoomba. However, it was a long time before the unreality wore off. For many days I found myself thinking I was still in those lovely little green islands with their snowy mountain peaks. For a few years hot dry sunny Australia will fill our thoughts, but one day we will find that strong, sensitive fingers are again rapping at the mind and we needs must leave our shores and go whither the stranger beckons - back to the high hills, the hard life, the effort and the striving, and the merry companions, all of which stir the soul to a depth and tenderness past the power of words to describe.
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 Cupid strikes again at the Sydney Bushies, Congratulations to David Bennett and Betty Sisley who announced their engagement at the Federation Ball. Cupid strikes again at the Sydney Bushies, Congratulations to David Bennett and Betty Sisley who announced their engagement at the Federation Ball.
  
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 +
 +===== Paddy Made. =====
 +
 +=== Golden Tan Tents. ===
 +
 +Golden Tan Japara is a cloth made in England to Paddy'​s specifications for the walkers of Australia (you lucky people!!) Six months ago a shipment arrived, but alas it was not up to standard and had to be rejected. It has taken a long time to replace the shipment but at last it has arrived and Golden Tan tents are available again.
 +
 +Golden Tan Japara is a very special cloth with a thread count of 120 threads to the inch in each direction. The threads are of silky long staple cotton and the cloth is more water-repellant. It weighs only 2 1/2 ounces to the square yard and is an ideal cloth for those who want a reliable tent of the lightest possible weight.
 +
 +Willesden Japara is standard 4 ounces (to the square yard) japara treated with an ammoniacal solution of copper sulphate which has the effect of coating each thread with a layer of copper impregnated cellulose which is water repellant and mildew resistant. This cloth is heavier than japara and is very suitable for those who desire a sturdy exceptionally weatherproof tent.
 +
 +Take your choice folks. Paddy'​s got the lot. Price list gladly posted to any address.
 +
 +Write, phone or call at -
 +
 +Paddys, for the best in lightweight camp gear.
 +
 +Paddy Pallin. Lightweight Camp Gear.
 +
 +201 Castlereagh St., Sydney. '​Phone:​ BM 2685.
 +
 +----
195710.txt · Last modified: 2018/11/12 03:05 by tyreless