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195701 [2018/10/22 02:25]
tyreless
195701 [2018/10/23 02:33] (current)
tyreless
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 In business arising from minutes Frank Ashdown again raised the question of obituary notices in the magazine. He said that two persons with names identical with two club members had recently died and premature condolences had been expressed. The Editor said that, if you wrote to the editor when you died, it would be published, (e.g. "Dear Editor, I'm dying. P.S. I'm dead"​). In business arising from minutes Frank Ashdown again raised the question of obituary notices in the magazine. He said that two persons with names identical with two club members had recently died and premature condolences had been expressed. The Editor said that, if you wrote to the editor when you died, it would be published, (e.g. "Dear Editor, I'm dying. P.S. I'm dead"​).
  
-The Conservation Secretary said that he had received a letter from Myles Dunphy asking us to protest to the Minister for Mines and the Minister for Lands against the granting of mining leases in the Colong Caves area - as we did in 1939 about other leases at Yerranderie. He said the leases had not yet been granted. Tom Moppett said that the mining was on behalf of the Metropolitan Cement Co., and that the cement would go their works at Maldon, near Picton. It was said that the Rural Bank and the B.H.P. were interested. The Tourist Bureau had succeeded in stopping a quarry at Wombeyan Caves. In the dicussion ​that followed it was pointed out that this move was connected with the intention of discontinuing quarrying at Bungonia. Limestone was required for industry, and it might be necessary to indicate other deposits not in scenic areas. In the absence of any motion no action was taken.+The Conservation Secretary said that he had received a letter from Myles Dunphy asking us to protest to the Minister for Mines and the Minister for Lands against the granting of mining leases in the Colong Caves area - as we did in 1939 about other leases at Yerranderie. He said the leases had not yet been granted. Tom Moppett said that the mining was on behalf of the Metropolitan Cement Co., and that the cement would go their works at Maldon, near Picton. It was said that the Rural Bank and the B.H.P. were interested. The Tourist Bureau had succeeded in stopping a quarry at Wombeyan Caves. In the discussion ​that followed it was pointed out that this move was connected with the intention of discontinuing quarrying at Bungonia. Limestone was required for industry, and it might be necessary to indicate other deposits not in scenic areas. In the absence of any motion no action was taken.
  
 Ron Knightley told us that no trail had yet been cut over Clear Hill as the organiser was not available on the week-end arranged. Ron Knightley told us that no trail had yet been cut over Clear Hill as the organiser was not available on the week-end arranged.
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 In his Conservation Report Tom Moppett said that about 20 bushwalkers and about 20 from the Sutherland Brigade had turned out to fight a fire in National Park one evening a couple of weeks earlier. He said that the bushwalkers,​ who were on the job until about 11.30 p.m., were able to do really useful work in putting out the remnants of the fire, which could have broken out again the next day. Tom also announced that a meeting was planned on the afternoon of Sat. 16th Feb., to form the National Parks Association. In his Conservation Report Tom Moppett said that about 20 bushwalkers and about 20 from the Sutherland Brigade had turned out to fight a fire in National Park one evening a couple of weeks earlier. He said that the bushwalkers,​ who were on the job until about 11.30 p.m., were able to do really useful work in putting out the remnants of the fire, which could have broken out again the next day. Tom also announced that a meeting was planned on the afternoon of Sat. 16th Feb., to form the National Parks Association.
  
-Most of the rest of the meeting was devoted to a discussion of a motion that the Club was in favour of the acquisition of a suitable ski hut in the Kosciusko area. Alex Colley said that a great deal of discussion and several unofficial meetings had already taken place. There was much enthusiasm, and those interested felt that the project was now definite enough to be placed before the meeting. He said that accommodation in the snow country was expensive and had to be shared with other organisations. He had found that ski holidays were much easier to organise and more enjoyable with an S.B.W. party who knew each other well, and could be depended on to do their share of the many chores in a hut. Many members enjoyed summer holidays too in the snow country, and the hut would be suitable for one of two families. It was a very worth while project, but it should be realised from the outset that the difficulties were formidable. We needed money, labour and organisation. Though the hut now under offer, and believed to be suitable, would cost £300, it had to be moved, foundations built, septic tank, water supply, plumbing, stove and internal fittings installed, and painting to be done. John Scott had estimated, on the scrappy information which could be supplied at this stage, that it would cost altogether £800, but, as building always costs more than estimated, it would be well to budget for at least £1,000. There appeared to be a fair prospect of getting the bulk of this in shares and loans. Finance, however, would probably be the easiest part. Building a hut in a remote place meant constant difficulty in organising materials, transport etc. He thought that between thirty and fifty man-weeks of labour would be required to do the job. This meant thirty to fifty members would have to be prepared to give a week to the work, or, alternatively,​ less members for longer. It was very tiring to travel 350 miles, work hard, and travel back, and not much could be done in less than a four day trip. The organising of all this meant a great deal of work and then the running of the hut, collecting of fees, maintenance - e.g. painting every 3 years - and getting in supplies, called for persons willing to give considerable time to it. But so long as members clearly realised what was involved, and were willing to put their backs into it, there was no difficulty we could not overcome. Other organisations had done it and so could we. In fact we had great advantages because we had a wide variety of practical talent in the club and we met frequently and regularly. The project would be a wonderful thing for the Club. It would bring the members together more and give us a common objective. It would probably ​attact ​new members. A big camp on the hut site attended by 30 or more members and families would be most enjoyable.+Most of the rest of the meeting was devoted to a discussion of a motion that the Club was in favour of the acquisition of a suitable ski hut in the Kosciusko area. Alex Colley said that a great deal of discussion and several unofficial meetings had already taken place. There was much enthusiasm, and those interested felt that the project was now definite enough to be placed before the meeting. He said that accommodation in the snow country was expensive and had to be shared with other organisations. He had found that ski holidays were much easier to organise and more enjoyable with an S.B.W. party who knew each other well, and could be depended on to do their share of the many chores in a hut. Many members enjoyed summer holidays too in the snow country, and the hut would be suitable for one of two families. It was a very worth while project, but it should be realised from the outset that the difficulties were formidable. We needed money, labour and organisation. Though the hut now under offer, and believed to be suitable, would cost £300, it had to be moved, foundations built, septic tank, water supply, plumbing, stove and internal fittings installed, and painting to be done. John Scott had estimated, on the scrappy information which could be supplied at this stage, that it would cost altogether £800, but, as building always costs more than estimated, it would be well to budget for at least £1,000. There appeared to be a fair prospect of getting the bulk of this in shares and loans. Finance, however, would probably be the easiest part. Building a hut in a remote place meant constant difficulty in organising materials, transport etc. He thought that between thirty and fifty man-weeks of labour would be required to do the job. This meant thirty to fifty members would have to be prepared to give a week to the work, or, alternatively,​ less members for longer. It was very tiring to travel 350 miles, work hard, and travel back, and not much could be done in less than a four day trip. The organising of all this meant a great deal of work and then the running of the hut, collecting of fees, maintenance - e.g. painting every 3 years - and getting in supplies, called for persons willing to give considerable time to it. But so long as members clearly realised what was involved, and were willing to put their backs into it, there was no difficulty we could not overcome. Other organisations had done it and so could we. In fact we had great advantages because we had a wide variety of practical talent in the club and we met frequently and regularly. The project would be a wonderful thing for the Club. It would bring the members together more and give us a common objective. It would probably ​attract ​new members. A big camp on the hut site attended by 30 or more members and families would be most enjoyable.
  
-Paddy Pallin quoted the experience of the Orana Hut, which had started out as just a shack for 8 people, containing three stretchers at the beginning, and with the members doing all the work. But it had been necessary to spend £2,500 over the last 3 or 4 years. Nevertheless he thought the project would raise enthusiasm, ​attact ​members, and be a fillip to the Club generally.+Paddy Pallin quoted the experience of the Orana Hut, which had started out as just a shack for 8 people, containing three stretchers at the beginning, and with the members doing all the work. But it had been necessary to spend £2,500 over the last 3 or 4 years. Nevertheless he thought the project would raise enthusiasm, ​attract ​members, and be a fillip to the Club generally.
  
 Arthur Gilroy raised the question of foundations,​ which might prove very expensive, and Bob Duncan said that the foundations of the C.S.I.R.O. hut had cost £300. Peter Stitt said that the Trust no longer insisted on a stonemason doing the job. Dot Butler said that the project would draw the members together as had Bluegum Forest. Mr. Cleary had advanced the money to buy the forest and over a period of years, dances, theatre parties and other functions had been arranged to raise funds. These social activities were enjoyed for themselves quite apart from their purpose. Arthur Gilroy raised the question of foundations,​ which might prove very expensive, and Bob Duncan said that the foundations of the C.S.I.R.O. hut had cost £300. Peter Stitt said that the Trust no longer insisted on a stonemason doing the job. Dot Butler said that the project would draw the members together as had Bluegum Forest. Mr. Cleary had advanced the money to buy the forest and over a period of years, dances, theatre parties and other functions had been arranged to raise funds. These social activities were enjoyed for themselves quite apart from their purpose.
  
-Tom Moppett said that the poject ​had come up before but few people had been interested. He thought it would help the Club spirit. Distance was the greatest difficulty, and the work would have to be done on holidays, Easter and Christmas. The Trust had rejected the huts of the Snowy Mountains Authority because they warped when taken apart and the warping would be worse if the hut was left lying around. (Here it was suggested that the President could insure us against warping). The site was most important because a good summer site - e.g. on Mount Stilwell, would be very unsuitable for winter. We should seek advice from others who had built huts.+Tom Moppett said that the project ​had come up before but few people had been interested. He thought it would help the Club spirit. Distance was the greatest difficulty, and the work would have to be done on holidays, Easter and Christmas. The Trust had rejected the huts of the Snowy Mountains Authority because they warped when taken apart and the warping would be worse if the hut was left lying around. (Here it was suggested that the President could insure us against warping). The site was most important because a good summer site - e.g. on Mount Stilwell, would be very unsuitable for winter. We should seek advice from others who had built huts.
  
 Peter Stitt said that some of the dismantled huts had been left lying about for a couple of months, and warping was understandable. In N.Z. Clubs smaller than ours had built huts 80 to 200 miles from the city, and one to four hours walk from the road. A whole hut and ski-tow had been carried up a "real mountainside - an ice-axe job." Peter Stitt said that some of the dismantled huts had been left lying about for a couple of months, and warping was understandable. In N.Z. Clubs smaller than ours had built huts 80 to 200 miles from the city, and one to four hours walk from the road. A whole hut and ski-tow had been carried up a "real mountainside - an ice-axe job."
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 Colin Putt said that huts on low foundations were most practical, since the main danger was that the hut would be pushed off the foundations,​ and the lower it was the less this danger. Paddy Pallin said that it might be worth our while to consider buying the Alpine Club Hut, which was for sale for £1,200. It was not on a road. Colin Putt said that huts on low foundations were most practical, since the main danger was that the hut would be pushed off the foundations,​ and the lower it was the less this danger. Paddy Pallin said that it might be worth our while to consider buying the Alpine Club Hut, which was for sale for £1,200. It was not on a road.
  
-The motion to acquire a suitable hut was then carried without dissent. Another motion - that members be circularised to ascertain the amount of financial support, labour, and administrative assistance they were prepared to give, was also carried. It was decided to give Frank Duncan, who is going to Kosicusko for a holiday, a letter from the Club to the Park Trust, saying that he was empowered to make inquiries on our behalf and to inform the manager of the Trust and the Snowy Mountains Authority of the steps we had already ​takan. It was considered this would ensure that the hut under offer would be kept for us.+The motion to acquire a suitable hut was then carried without dissent. Another motion - that members be circularised to ascertain the amount of financial support, labour, and administrative assistance they were prepared to give, was also carried. It was decided to give Frank Duncan, who is going to Kosicusko for a holiday, a letter from the Club to the Park Trust, saying that he was empowered to make inquiries on our behalf and to inform the manager of the Trust and the Snowy Mountains Authority of the steps we had already ​taken. It was considered this would ensure that the hut under offer would be kept for us.
  
 A Committee was appointed to consider the project further and report back to the next meeting. It consisted of Peter Stitt, Frank Duncan, Bob Duncan, Colin Putt, John Scott, Arthur Gilroy, Dot Butler, Neil Monteith and Alex Colley. A Committee was appointed to consider the project further and report back to the next meeting. It consisted of Peter Stitt, Frank Duncan, Bob Duncan, Colin Putt, John Scott, Arthur Gilroy, Dot Butler, Neil Monteith and Alex Colley.
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-Overheard at the Christmas Party:- Digby and Geof wagering dangerous bets - if our teetotaller Walks Secretary could be persauded ​to completely imbibe one (1) only glass of the hard stuff, then Digby promised to dance round the floor on his hands! Apparently the awful consequences of either escapade suddenly struck both parties simultaneously as they were seen to quickly come to a gentleman'​s agreement (?) and call the whole thing quits.+Overheard at the Christmas Party:- Digby and Geof wagering dangerous bets - if our teetotaller Walks Secretary could be persuaded ​to completely imbibe one (1) only glass of the hard stuff, then Digby promised to dance round the floor on his hands! Apparently the awful consequences of either escapade suddenly struck both parties simultaneously as they were seen to quickly come to a gentleman'​s agreement (?) and call the whole thing quits.
  
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 From there we went via Cirencester,​ the town where King Arthur celebrated his coronation about the year dot, on to Inglesham. The least said about this, our first Wiltshire hostel the better. The only good thing about it was that the weather had cleared up again and was really lovely. From Inglesham to Ashton Keynes, a beautiful old farm house where my duty was to chop down an old apple tree in the orchard. The bike shed here was also used as a roosting shed by the fowls. We spent a very interesting afternoon at the Criklade (a small town about 4 miles from Ashton Keynes) Pottery where a young couple are turning out some wonderfully artistic pottery. From there we went via Cirencester,​ the town where King Arthur celebrated his coronation about the year dot, on to Inglesham. The least said about this, our first Wiltshire hostel the better. The only good thing about it was that the weather had cleared up again and was really lovely. From Inglesham to Ashton Keynes, a beautiful old farm house where my duty was to chop down an old apple tree in the orchard. The bike shed here was also used as a roosting shed by the fowls. We spent a very interesting afternoon at the Criklade (a small town about 4 miles from Ashton Keynes) Pottery where a young couple are turning out some wonderfully artistic pottery.
  
-Next stop was Marlborough. Here we ran into the last night of the National Wardens'​ Conference of the British Y.H.A. What a wonderful welcome they gave us, and how we sang till the early hours of the morning. The next day enroute to the ancient Roman city of Bath we called in at Avebury. It is here that the earliest traces of mankind in the British Isles is to be found. We wandered down avenues lined on either side with huge monoliths, saw the outlines of their temples and how they kept the good sperits ​in and the bad ones out by surrounding the whole area with a water filled moat.+Next stop was Marlborough. Here we ran into the last night of the National Wardens'​ Conference of the British Y.H.A. What a wonderful welcome they gave us, and how we sang till the early hours of the morning. The next day enroute to the ancient Roman city of Bath we called in at Avebury. It is here that the earliest traces of mankind in the British Isles is to be found. We wandered down avenues lined on either side with huge monoliths, saw the outlines of their temples and how they kept the good spirits ​in and the bad ones out by surrounding the whole area with a water filled moat.
  
 Bath - a beautiful old city built in a natural amphitheatre of hills. It is here that the Romans had a flourishing city, much of which has been excavated and is now on show to whoever is interested. We spent a very full weekend roaming round Bath, exploring its little winding back streets and by attending a full choral service in the Old Bath Abbey. From here we visited the famous Well's Cathedral. Bath - a beautiful old city built in a natural amphitheatre of hills. It is here that the Romans had a flourishing city, much of which has been excavated and is now on show to whoever is interested. We spent a very full weekend roaming round Bath, exploring its little winding back streets and by attending a full choral service in the Old Bath Abbey. From here we visited the famous Well's Cathedral.
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 +===== Christmas Hop Of '56. =====
 +
 +- Jim Brown.
 +
 +If you wanted a sound factual report of the American Civil War you may not approach a Confederate General - but you certainly wouldn'​t seek it from a conscientious objector; and in this wise I feel that the Deputy Editor does you an unkindness in getting me to record the doings at a __dance__!
 +
 +Well there were 78 present - not 730 or 88 or 89 as variously stated during the evening, and that makes it numerically a small "​hop"​ for Sydney Bush Walkers. At the same time it was a pleasantly cosy sort of evening, all very amiable and informal - I can't recall seeing any "ties and tails" on the men, and precious few elaborate ball gowns on the ladies. A few of the troops wore shorts, including John Noble and Ron Knightley, as well as Alex Colley who gets his fifth or sixth "​bar"​ to the initial decoration for such valour.
 +
 +The floor, they tell me, was very sluggish, and that was probably true enough, but not heavy enough to discourage most of the light fantastic feet. Presently (about 9.30) some white goo was broadcast over the deck, and this coupled with the dew falling from heated foreheads produced a surface slippery enough to cause Binnsie'​s downfall (and one other - was it Stan Madden?)
 +
 +It was a goodly and representative sort of gathering, with rather less of the Old Brigade than in other years, but a nice sprinkling of the newer crew, and enough of the middling group, so that there were no lonely and lost souls.
 +
 +We remember, particularly,​ Peter Stitt putting aside his crutches and bobbing vigorously on the floor; a highly irregular competition with some Past (and the current) Presidents vying with potential Presidents to maintain the exultant cry of "​Cheee-eee-eeeeee-eeers!"​ It seems certain that some of the Presidents to be will be audible all over the Meeting Room, but I'd give the award to the old and the bold at the Party. Better trained or better lubricated - or both.
 +
 +I heard it said that we managed to beef out so much uproar, in spite of our meagre numbers - that the R.S.L. had a couple of stern-looking characters waiting in the foyer to remove the more sodden objectionables. Of course, as ever, we bewildered them by becoming, suddenly, respectable and peaceable citizens, going about our law abiding pursuits. Just for a little while a small portion of the City had held something of the temper of a Bush Reunion.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== The Odd Australian. =====
 +
 +- Bernard Peach, Coast & Mountain Walkers.
 +
 +In many an odd corner of France I had put up my small tent without comment, and late on one dark night, stretched out in my sleeping bag in a market garden mistaking it for open land.
 +
 +Morning found me comfortably curled up in an onion bed, but the young French workers were more interested in the quality of my sleeping bag than in the dent I'd made in their onions.
  
-CHRISTMAS HOP OF 156. 
-- Jim Brawn. 
-If you wanted a sound factual report of the American Civil War you may not approach a. Confederate General - but you certainly wouldn'​t seek it from a conscientious objector; and in this wise I feel that the Deputy Editor does you an unkindness in getting me to record the doings at a DANCE! 
-Well there were 78 present - not 730 or 88 or 89 as variously stated during the evening, and that makes it numerically a small ',​hop"​ for Sydney Bush Walkers. At the same time it was a pleasantly cosy sort of evening, all very amiable and informal - I can't recall seeing any "ties and tails" on the men, and precious few elaborate bail gowns on the ladies. A few of the troops wore shprts, including John Noble and Ron Knightley, as well as Alex Colley who gets his 
-16. 
-fifth or sixth "​bar"​ to the initial decortian for such valour. 
-The floor, they tell me, was very sluggish, and that was probably true enough, but not heavy enough to discourage most of 
-the light fantastic feet. Presently (about 9.30) some white goo was broadcast over the deck, and this coupled with the dew falling from heated faeheads produced a surfact slippery enough to cause Binnsiefs downfall (and one other - was it Stan Madden?) 
-It was a goodly and representative sort of gatheAng, with rather less of the Old Brigade than in other years, but a nice sprinkling of the newer crew, and enough of the middling group, so that there were no lonely and lost souls. 
-We remember, particularly,​ Peter Stitt putting aside his crutches and bobbing vigorously on the floor; a highly irregular competition with some Past (and the current) Presidents vying with potential Presidents to maintain the exultait cry of "​Cheee-eee-eeeeee-eeers0 It seems certain that some of the Presidents to be will be audible all over the Meeting Room, but I'd give the award to the old and the bold at the Party. Better trained or better lubricated - - or both. 
-I heard it said that we managed to beef out so much uproar, in spite of our meagre numbers - that the R.S.L. had a couple of stern-looking characters waiting ​ in the foyer to remove the more sodden objectionables. Of course, as ever, we bewildered them by becoming, suddenly, respectable and peaceable citizens, going about our law abiding pursuits. Just for a little while a small portion of the City had held something of the temper of a Bush Reunion. 
-TIM ODD AUSTRALIAN. 
-- Bernard Peach 
-Coast & Mountain Walkers. 
-In many an odd ocrner of France I had put up my small tent without comment, and late on one dark night, stretched out in my sleeping bag in a market garden mistaking it for open land. 
-Morning found me comfortably curled up in an onion bed, but the young French workers were mae interested in the quality of my sleeping bag than in the dent I'd made in their onions. 
 I believe you could sleep on the cobbles of any French village square without arousing any curiosity beyond, "Oh, La, La," from the passers-by, who would give a friendly grin and leave you to doze off in peace. I believe you could sleep on the cobbles of any French village square without arousing any curiosity beyond, "Oh, La, La," from the passers-by, who would give a friendly grin and leave you to doze off in peace.
-It is different with the English. A traditional conservatism is still alive. The shelter of a barn would readily be given to a wanderer caught between town at nightfall and more kindness than that for the asking, but one who spends a night by the wayside in a sleeping + 
-17-6, +It is different with the English. A traditional conservatism is still alive. The shelter of a barn would readily be given to a wanderer caught between town at nightfall and more kindness than that for the asking, but one who spends a night by the wayside in a sleeping bag is regarded as an odd character. I had experience of this on my way to the English ​mountains. 
-bag is regarded as an odd character. I had experience of this on myway to the English ​mountdLns+ 
-Feeling tired, and knowing that the Stratford ​ Hostel couldn'​t ​ be reached by nightfall, I bedded down in deep grass by the roadway - thorn and wild rose hedge above MB and the singing of nightingales making the twilight very pleasant as it settled in. +Feeling tired, and knowing that the Stratford Hostel couldn'​t be reached by nightfall, I bedded down in deep grass by the roadway - thorn and wild rose hedge above me and the singing of nightingales making the twilight very pleasant as it settled in. 
-Then my first visitor strolled along and said, "I say, Are you all right?"​ I assured him that I was quite comfortable until morning, when I would move on to Stratford. + 
-. +Then my first visitor strolled along and said, "I say, are you all right?"​ I assured him that I was quite comfortable until morning, when I would move on to Stratford. 
-With a shocked expression he came close (as if to study g)me.: ​peculiarity). "But you're not going to sleep in that bag th.ing,are you? It might rain." He went off sCratching ​his head and, having found out that I was Australian, no doubt wondered at the odd type being produced in the Commonwealth. + 
-The second visitor refused to be convinced that it was right or normal behaviour on my party and firmly and courteously he carried ​Me off to be installed in the barn of a nearby farm. +With a shocked expression he came close (as if to study some peculiarity). "But you're not going to sleep in that bag thing, are you? It might rain." He went off scratching ​his head and, having found out that I was Australian, no doubt wondered at the odd type being produced in the Commonwealth. 
-This was an introduction to the English way of doing things, + 
-SONG OF THE BUSHWALKER ​(We hopes +The second visitor refused to be convinced that it was right or normal behaviour on my party and firmly and courteously he carried ​me off to be installed in the barn of a nearby farm. 
-As free as air-bound anywhere ... along the lanes I stray; + 
-So keep your cars and handlebars - on foot I take my way; Beneath the trees - just as I please, I saunter in the sun, My humble pack upon by back that'​s ​my idea of fun. +This was an introduction to the English way of doing things. 
-No tax I pay for this highway - no licence I must buy - + 
-For I'm complete with two good feet(?)-why pedal, drive or fly? The pace is sLow, but so I go, I see so many things - +---- 
-Sheep, rabbits, cows - and mills and ploughs-queer folk, and flowers + 
-and wings. The woods are grand if you can stand and listen all alone; +===== Song Of The Bushwalker ​(We hope!) ===== 
-There'​s mystery round every tree, in every leaf and cone. + 
-It's good to stroll-with no set goals just where your fancies lead, Away from all the rush and noise, the clamour and the speed. +As free as air-bound anywhere... along the lanes I stray;\\ 
-The fields and brooks are open books-the mountains and the skies- And as I roam-from Nature'​s tome, I read...and so grow wise. Such happiness as I possess demands no worldly wealth, +So keep your cars and handlebars - on foot I take my way;\\ 
-For on I plod-just thanking God for life and strength and health.+Beneath the trees - just as I please, I saunter in the sun,\\ 
 +My humble pack upon by back... that'​s ​__my__ ​idea of fun. 
 + 
 +No tax I pay for this highway - no licence I must buy -\\ 
 +For I'm complete with two good feet(?) - why pedal, drive or fly?\\ 
 +The pace is slow, but so I go, I see so many things -\\ 
 +Sheep, rabbits, cows - and mills and ploughs - queer folk, and flowers and wings. 
 + 
 +The woods are grand if you can stand and listen all alone;\\ 
 +There'​s mystery round every tree, in every leaf and cone.\\ 
 +It's good to stroll - with no set goal, just where your fancies lead,\\ 
 +Away from all the rush and noise, the clamour and the speed. 
 + 
 +The fields and brooks are open books - the mountains and the skies -\\ 
 +And as I roam - from Nature'​s tome, I read... and so grow wise.\\ 
 +Such happiness as I possess demands no worldly wealth,\\ 
 +For on I plod - just thanking God for life and strength and health. 
 - mostly Patience Strong. - mostly Patience Strong.
-WHAT EVERY TROGO SHOULD KNOWS:+ 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== What every Trogo should know!! === 
 Holes that go six inches into the ground vertically are not necessarily limestone caves, neither are holes that go horizontally into a hillside and end in a wombat. Holes that go six inches into the ground vertically are not necessarily limestone caves, neither are holes that go horizontally into a hillside and end in a wombat.
-f #+ 
-or 1957. May we see the bush kept green.W Paddy wishes Bushwalkers all good things +---- 
-1 .  + 
- and lovely - freefrom fires, ​draughts f  1 4,: +===== Paddy Made===== 
-and despoilers. ​,p t ; 0 + 
-t , 4;i: 'r '​X'​ ' +=== One Nine Five Seven. === 
-y 4A 1 A . + 
-and good luck to the proposed ski huts+Paddy wishes Bushwalkers all good things for 1957. May we see the bush kept green. and lovely - free from fires, ​droughts ​and despoilers. 
 May many more youngsters this year join the Club to learn in full the joy of their heritage in the Bush. May many more youngsters this year join the Club to learn in full the joy of their heritage in the Bush.
-Make a habit of calling in on Paddy when in the city. There'​s always something ​NEW.+ 
 +and good luck to the proposed ski hut! 
 + 
 +Make a habit of calling in on Paddy when in the city. There'​s always something ​new. 
 + 
 +For the breakfast-in-bed-brigade.... 
 Quart tins of Shellite - 3/9 Quart tins of Shellite - 3/9
-For the mechanised transport  ​ 
-Wallans Lightweight Car Tents Price List Free. 
-Phone:​BM2685 
-For the breakfast-in-bed-brigade .... 
-N, 
-U. 
-.A0 
-1-0( 
-V W4?'N 1111r.A 
-PADDY PALLIN 15TY.LTD. 
- ​4:,​..41 
-PADDY FAL.L.1N 
-Lightweight Camp Ceqr 
-201 CASTLEREACH St SYDNEY 
-ONE NINE FIVE SEVEN- 
  
-YOU ARE INVITED ​  +For the mechanised transport.... 
-TO SUBSCRIBE TO +   
-"THE SYDNEY BUSHUALKER"​ +Wallans Lightweight Car Tents Price List Free.
-MONTHLY MAGAZINE +
-ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: +
-POSTED TO ADDRESS ​  10/-d(incl.Fostage) +
-RESERVED IN CLUBROOM ​  7/-d. +
--1D0 o- +
-The Business Manager, "The Sydney BushWalker"​ Box 4476, G.P.O., SYDNEY. +
-I enclose Magazine for the twelve inclusive+
-Name   +
-Magazine, +
-,/-dbeing Annual Subscription to your months February, 1957 to January, 1958 +
-Address (if magazine to be posted)+
  
-Please make CHEQUES payable: "The Sydney Bushwalker"​ Magazine Account +Paddy Palling Pty LtdLightweight Camp Gear.
-Please make POSTAL NOTES payable: "The Sydney Bushwalkers"​ at G.P.0.0 Sydney.+
  
 +201 Castlereagh St., Sydney. Phone: BM2685.
 +
 +----
 +
 +You are invited to subscribe to "The Sydney Bushwalker"​ monthly magazine.
 +
 +Annual subscription rates:
 +
 +  * Posed to address... 10/-d. (incl. Postage)
 +  * Reserved in Clubroom... 7/-d.
 +
 +The Business Manager,\\
 +"The Sydney Bushwalker"​ Magazine,\\
 +Box 4476, G.P.O., Sydney.
 +
 +I enclose /-d. being Annual Subscription to your Magazine for the twelve months February, 1957 to January, 1958 inclusive.
 +
 +Name...\\ ​
 +Address (if magazine to be posted)...
 +
 +Please make cheques payable: "The Sydney Bushwalker"​ Magazine Account.
 +
 +Please make Postal Notes payable: "The Sydney Bushwalkers"​ at G.P.O., Sydney.
 +
 +----
195701.txt · Last modified: 2018/10/23 02:33 by tyreless