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 +               THE SYDNEY BUSHWALKER ​
 +
 +A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney ​
 +Bushwalkers„ 0/- Ingersoll Hall, 256 Crown St., Sydney. ​
 +   Box No.4476 G.P.O., Sydney. '​Phone:​ JW 1462.
 +
 +
 +
 +No.263 ​              ​OCTOBER,​ 1956.             Price 9d.
 +
 +
 +Editor: Dot Butler, Boundary Rd.,  Sales & Subs.: Jess Martin
 +        Wahroonga, (JW 2208)       Typed by: Dot Butler
 +Business Manager: Jack Gentle ​     Reproduction:​ Jess Martin
 +
 +
 +                      CONTENTS ​                Page
 +
 +  At Our September, Half-Yearly Meeting - A.G.Colley .2
 +  The Sanitarium Health Food Shop (Advt.) ​       3
 +  The Frontier Traverse - Colin. Putt            4
 +  Leica Photo Service (Advt.) ​                   5
 +  Siedlecky'​s Taxi & Tourist Service (Advt.) ​    7
 +  Walks Report for August - Malcolm McGregor ​    F
 +  Hattswell'​s Taxi & Tourist Service (Advt.) ​    9
 +  Letter from Dave Ingram ​                      10
 +  Walking for Profit - Alex Colley ​             12
 +  Night Ascent of the Pons Portus - "Liar Bird" 13
 +  What a Leaden or What, a Leader? - Goof Wagg  17
 +  "​BushwaarUF:​ Mugs, etc,' (Paddy'​s advt.) ​     20
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +                       • • • • •
 +
 +
 +
 +       Who walks with beauty never feels alone,
 +       His constant comrades are the moon and sun. 
 +       ​Shared bushland walks recall the friend now gone 
 +       ​Invisible hands restore the absent one.
 +
 +       One camp still holds the footprints of the moon 
 +       That came and went a hushed and secret hour;
 +       A glowing campfire yields the lasting boon - 
 +       ​Remembered friendship'​s white immortal flower.
 +
 +       Who takes of beauty wine and daily bread 
 +       Will know no lack when empty years are lean; 
 +       The brimming .cup is by, the feast is spread,
 +       The sun, the moon, the stars his eyes have seen 
 +       Shall still his hunger, and his thirst he stays 
 +       With wine of friendship from remembered days.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +                                      - Mostly David Morton.
 +
 +2.
 +
 +            AT OUR SEPTEMBER HALF-YEARLY MEETING.
 +
 +    The Meeting commenced at 8,20 with the President in the Chair 
 +and about 35 members present. First business was a welcome to our
 +newest member - Margaret Innes.
 +
 +    Next Joan Walker, although not present, was elected to the 
 +Committee vacancy. As nobody wanted'​ to be Federation delegate the 
 +election of a successor to Tom Kenny-Royal was deferred to the next
 +meeting.
 +
 +    A motion was pUt by Heather Joyce and carried by the meeting, ​
 +that we should write to the Sydney Morning Herald pointing out that 
 +a suggestion made by a correspondent for the formation of volunteer ​
 +fire fighting squads to protect the park lands had already been
 +carried out.
 +
 +    The President conveyed the good, though unofficial, news that 
 +a large part of the survey work for the Blue Mountains National ​
 +Park had been done, and that land north of the Western line and
 +between Kings Tableland end the Cox might be declared as part of the 
 +park.
 +
 +    The proposed Constitutional amendment, designed to make the 
 +Literary Editor'​s membership of the Committee conditional on the 
 +wish of the Editor and of the general meeting, was not approved by 
 +the Committee and failed to obtain the required three quarters ​
 +majority of the meeting.
 +
 +    The sub-committee appointed to report on the celebration of the 
 +Club's 30th anniversary - in October next year - recommended, ​
 +that no action be taken.
 +
 +     ​General business started with a discussion of the printing of 
 +a new songbook. Frank Young pointed out that it was a big job and 
 +a typiste was esselatial on the proposed song-book committee.
 +Alan Wilson thought the song-book was a waste of time so far as camp 
 +fire entertainment was concerned. It was seldom seen at camp fires 
 +and added nothing to their enjoyment. Renee Brown, speaking from 
 +long experience, said that 50% or more people didn't know the words 
 +of songs but liked to sing and the book was for their benefit.
 +Jane Putt's opinion was that the best way to.learn,​the songs was to 
 +listen while they were being sung. In reply to a question Jim Brown, ​
 +who was on the last Committee, said that the book had been designed ​
 +to prevent the singers from getting on to "​la-la-la-la"​ after the 
 +first few lines. About 300 song-books had been sold, and many songs 
 +were included because some people liked them and they might well 
 +become popular. Jack Wren councilled more care in. selection of 
 +songs as about a third.of the songs in the book were never sung.
 +A sub-committee consisting of Malcolm McGregor, Frank Young, Grace 
 +Aird, Colin Putt, Margaret Innes and Yvonne Renwick was appointed. ​
 +to produce a new book. Next it was debated whether or not the 
 +sub-committee should submit a list of proposed songs before the book 
 +was typed. Frank Barlow thought we should trust the Committee - 
 +the title didn't tell you anything about the song and many doubtful .
 +
 +                                                             3.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +  THE SANITARIUM HEALTH FOOD SHOP 
 +
 +                     ​OFFERS
 +
 +          QUALITY DRIED FRUITS, NUTS and BISCUITS
 +
 +          DELICIOUS FRUIT SWEETS
 +
 +          WHOLSOME, LIGHT RY-KING CRISP BREAD
 +
 +          AMAZING, LOW ECONOMY PRICES
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +   COME TO OUR STORE, ​     13 HUNTER STREET, SYDNEY
 +
 +     AND SEE OUR WONDERFUL RANGE. OF HEiLTH-FOODS ​
 +
 +      -  FOR WALKING TRIPS AND HOME USE
 +
 +
 +
 +songs had the most innocuous titles - and this seemed to be the 
 +general view.
 +
 +    By this time nearly everybody at the meeting had had their say 
 +and the next motion provided an opportunity for the remainder.
 +Frank Ashdown moved that the library be disbanded, the books sold by 
 +auction and the money added to Club funds. The President immediately ​
 +declared the motion, in the form proposed, to be unconstitutional, ​
 +because a motion to sell the Club's assets required fourteen days 
 +notice to all members. The motion was altered to read that a notice ​
 +of intention to move should be sent to members, and the debate ​
 +proceeded. Jack Wren supported thn alotion in this form. He said the 
 +library had served its purpose and ow only harboured silverfish. ​
 +Other speakers pointed out that this was just another attempt to 
 +whittle away yet another of the features which had made the Club hat 
 +it is now, and instanced the discontinuance of the Club 's Annua? ​
 +Concerts, Christmas treat for children, the publication of the 
 +Eashwalker Annual etc. as cases in point. The motion was put and
 +lost.  (At the close of the meeting a crowd assembled outside the 
 +library cabinet and at least one member was seen to leave with fonr 
 +borrowed books in his hand.)
 +
 +    Finally a motion was put, rather tentatively,​ by Jim Brown Cat 
 +Prospectives be allowed to attend Re-unions. Wal Rootes spoke aalnat ​
 +the motion saying it was, as its name implied, a re-union of me ml,
 +But people were getting tired of debating, the hour was
 +motion was put and (much to Jimrs secret surprise, I'm sure) was 
 +carried; ​  with which the meeting terminated.
 +                                                 - A.G. Colloy.
 +
 +4.
 +
 +                THE FRONTIERTRAVERSE ​  ​AUGUST 1956.  Cmlin Putt,
 +  Signal Koppe  Lyskamm East Lyskamm West  Castor ​  ​Pollux
 +  14,980 ft.    14,850 ft.    11,680 ft.  13,850 ft. 13,400 ft.
 +
 +
 +     "​Tempo bruto,"​ roared the but guardian, shining a powerful tortth ​
 +in our faces. I prised an eye open and looked at my watch 3.20 ail 
 +What on earth did 'tempo brutof mean? BQtter get up anyway.
 +
 +     The stars shone cold and bright, but the but shook and the guy 
 +wires strummed and twanged in the grip of a vicious'​wind. With some 
 +misgivings about the weather we forced down some black bread, cheese ​
 +and coffee, then put on storm clothing, crampons and rope inside the 
 +hut. As we stepped into the dark outside the wind enveloped us, it 
 +smote and cut at us, it tried even to invade that corner of conscious- ​
 +ness which is reserved to control the placing of cramponed feet and the 
 +handling of the rope. We nearly ran. down the broad ice ridge from 
 +the Signalkuppe in our eagerness to escape the wind, and in the lee
 +of the Parrotspitze we were rewarded by an excruciating return of 
 +circulation to fingers and toes, As we stepped into the Lys jock saddle ​
 +the sun was already touching the top of the long steep ridge before us 
 +and the wind seemed less determined.
 +
 +     In two ropes of two we worked steadily up our ridge which was 
 +very steep, very narrow, but not complicated by rock steps or ice 
 +overhangs. Wind crusted snow and blue ice alternated with bewilder- ​
 +ing frequency, some large cornices required care, and sudden gusts
 +of wind tried to catch us off balance, but crampons overcame all these 
 +things and an hour and a half later we found ourselves rather unexpec- ​
 +tedly on the main summit of Lyskamm, a little sloping ice hummock ​
 +with sheer depths of rock and ice cliff all around it except to the 
 +west where a mile or so of narrow winding ridge led to the other peak. 
 +The wind had dropped right away,, the sky was cloudless and the sun 
 +unusually hot. With thoughts of soft snow later in the day we tight- ​
 +rope walked the ridge at top speed, one foot in Switzerland,​ the other 
 +in Italy, and the ice-axe. for a balancing pole. We were feeling fine 
 +in spite of the altitude, and we raced over: the rock steps in the 
 +ridge non-stop, crampons and all. On the West summit we found a party 
 +which had just come up the other side, with a guide who seemed to be 
 +something of a leg-puller. "Voila le Cervint"​ he shouted to his 
 +patrons, pointing to the bulky unmistakable mass of Monte Rosa across ​
 +the way.
 +
 +    At a good pace we cramponed down the west ridge ofe Lyskamm on 
 +to the Felikjoch, a broad snow plateau feeding two glaciers. Here 
 +we began to strike soft snow and really hot sun. We took off our 
 +crampons and ploughed on, The ridge up Castor is broad, gentle and 
 +long; under conditions of slushy snow and extreme heat it is best 
 +not remembered. The west side of the mountain, however, is not a
 +ridge but a steep ice face, complete with bulges of hard blue ice, ice-. 
 +cliffs and threatening seracs,. It was advisable to move one at a
 +time over part of this, and when we had reached the saddle between ​
 +Castor and Pollux and moved out from below the seracs, it was time 
 +for lunch. The meal was shortened by the reappearance of our old
 +
 +                           ​PHOTOGRAPHY I 1? I                  t
 +
 +
 +       You press the button, we' 11 do the rest !
 +
 +
 +   ​Finegrain ​                                                  Your
 +        Developing ​                                                ​Rollfilms
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +  Sparkling ​                                                   or
 +        Prints ​                                                    Lei ca. films
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +  Perfect ​                                                      ​deserve the
 +        Enlargements ​                                              best SERVICE
 +
 +                         LEI CA PHOTO SERVICE
 +
 +
 +                               31 Macquarie Place
 +
 +                                    SYDNEY N.S.W.
 +
 +
 +
 +  enemy the wind, only as a chilly breeze this time, but enough to call 
 +  for a sweater and parka again. At the same time "​hogsback"​ clouds ​
 +  suddenly appeared, very, high .pp, over some of the distant peaks, We 
 +  took the hint and hurried on to the next climb, Pollux. After a short 
 +  uphill wallow over deep wet snow and a conventional bergschrund,​ we 
 +  were at the foot of the east face, our first rock climb of the day, 
 +  and never have I teen such rotten, broken, unstable rock. Although ​
 +  the _face is steep, there is literally nothing sound on it; if you 
 +  pulled out one fair-sized luzp at the bottom,'​ the whole mountain
 +  would fall down on top of you. Winding its way up the face of 
 +  shattered, contorted stone, is the culprit - a band of jet-black ​
 + ​-porphyritic rock of obviously igneous origin.. We picked our way
 +. carefully upward, close together to avoid the dangers of displaced
 +  rocks, and hardly daring to speak above a. whisper. When , near the 
 +  top of the mountain, we at last got on to snow, it was no better for 
 +  it was only a thin layer of slush on top of steep ice. A piece which 
 +  broke away, from under my foot started a fair-sized avalanche with the 
 +  greatest of ease.
 +
 +        At last we reached the top, a short curved piece of snow ridge, ​
 +  and considered what to do next. The huge mass of the Breithorn was
 +
 +6.
 +
 +temptingly close, but it was getting late and the snow was becoming ​
 +dangerously soft, in fact the immediate problem was how to get off 
 +Pollux without being mixed up with an avalanche. We chose the north 
 +.face directly below us; in almost perpetual shadow, it had kept a 
 +thin layer of firm snow, well bonded to the ice. As we left the 
 +summit a few streaks of racing mist formed around us out of the clear 
 +sky; minutes later, as we prepared to leap the bergschrund,​ the air 
 +around us '​thickened into dense cloud. Once off the steep face we set 
 +off down a broad snow ridge atA jog-trot, with the bad weather right 
 +behind us. On and on for hours, as fast as we could go, wallowing ​
 +through knee-deep snow. There was one brief pause to negotiate a 
 +steep and avalanchy slope, and another when I broke•throUgh a 
 +crevasse'​bridge. At last, sf•aked in sweat and snow-melt, we reached ​
 +the left lateral moraine of the Gorner Glacier while volloys of 
 +thunder sounded out of black clouds on our peaks of the morning.
 +Two miles of slithering and jumping over the ice-hummocks of the • 
 +Gorner and we were safe on the track to Zermatt. I stopped to take 
 +off two sweaters and a pair of long trousers, and raced off to catch 
 +up the others. People of various nationalities all along the track 
 +greeted me in English, for who but an Englishman would run uphill ​
 +with a heavy pack, clad in apparently nothing but a beard, ancient ​
 +filthy parka and heavy boots.
 +
 +    At the rack railway a train stopped for us, its doors invitingly ​
 +open, but knowing that the fare to Zermatt is some 15/-, we made
 +rude signs at it until it moved off. Apparently the conductor was 
 +in league with the powers of darkness, for immediately there was a 
 +deafening thunderclap,​ and we were deluged with enormous hailstones. ​
 +More surprised than pleased, we slithered and skidded down the five
 +miles of steep hail-covered track in record time, and were in Zermatt ​
 +in time for an excellent and fabulously cheap meal at the Hotel 
 +leisshorn. One of the party went to sleep at the table and dropped ​
 +his head into his plate of food; I was asleep before I was properly ​
 +in the tent, my feet were out in the rain all night and I never even 
 +noticed it. But what a day, what a terrific day it had beenl
 +
 +
 +
 +           ​COMING SOCIAL EVENTS for OCTOBER. ​
 +
 +   Oct. 17th. "​WHAT'​S WRONG WITH THAT SLIDE"​.
 +              Bring along your slides, both good and bad, and
 +              have them expertly criticised.
 +              There will also be a talk on the scope of colour film. 
 +              Keith Renwick would like to have your slides handed
 +                in as soon as possible.
 +                                   ​••■1•=1.1.
 +   ​Oct.24th. MEMBERS'​ SLIDE NIGHT. Bring along your slides and
 +              let us see what you've been taking.
 +                          aMINRIMa.ml.gwIMMIMM.
 +   ​Oct.31. ​ SWITZERLAND. Slides and talk by Don Shepherd.
 +
 +                                                   7,
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +           ​IMPORTANT TRANSPORT NOTICE ​
 +
 +
 +   B U S H W A L K E R S REQUIRING TRANSPORT FROM BLACKHEATH
 +
 +
 +
 +     ANY HOUR            RING, WRITE or CALL ... 
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +             ​SIEDLECKYIS TAXI 8c TOURIST SERVICE ​
 +
 +
 +
 +               116 STATION STREET, BLACKHEATH ​
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +   24 HOUR SERVICE
 +
 +
 +
 +        BuSHWALKERS arriving late at night without transport ​
 +
 +        bookin can ring fOr car from Railway Station, or call 
 +
 +        at above address ​  ​IT'​S NEVER TOO LATE 
 +
 +
 +
 +   '​PHONE:​ B'​HEATH.S1„ or SYDNEY No. 1E3563 after hours
 +
 +                          or MA3467
 +
 +
 +
 +   ​FARES:​ KLNANGRA WALLS 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +                          3/ " ​  ​H ​    n u
 +         ​PERRYAS LOOKDOWN ​
 +         ​JENOLAN STATE FOREST 20/-' " ​ if  ft if
 +         ​CARLON'​S FARM   ​10/​- ​   u     "​ n    n
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +   LOOK FOR T.C.3210 or PAC}W4RD T.V.270
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +            OFFICIAL WALK OCTOBER 19 20 21.
 +
 +
 +
 +        BOMATERRY-CAMBEWARRI,​-BARREN-GROUNDS-KIAMA
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +    This walk, with variations, at this timo of year was once a 
 +
 +regular feature of the '​programme and :was well attendedi The leader ​
 +
 +hopes it wille againgi ' Thera- will. be about two miles-to walk the 
 +
 +first night' a full moon has bean arranged'​.
 +
 +
 +
 +    Next day is mostly walking on back roads with about an hour !s 
 +uphill scrub baShng thrOWn'​in.
 +
 +
 +
 +    On Sunday we walk over the Barren Grounds which are just a garden ​
 +of wild flowers at this time of year.
 +
 +
 +
 +    Most of the walk is on the coastal side of a 2000 ft. range 
 +with almost unobstructed views which extend from Cape Banks on ithe 
 +
 +north to Mount Dromedary on the south.
 +
 +
 +
 +    It is fair/medium test walk standard, mostly on tracks.
 +    For further details see leader:- - '​AleexColley.
 +
 +8.
 +
 +               WALKS REPORT for AUGUST 1956. 
 +
 +       The prcgramme for August opened with Yvonne Renwick'​s Field 
 +  Week-end at Euroka. Beautiful weather brought out 12 members and 
 +   3 prospectives and 4 youngsters. Altogether a good week-end.
 +
 +       Snow Brown did not get enough starters for Kanangra, but Heather ​
 +   ​Joyce,​ not to be done out of her week-end away, gathered up three 
 +   ​others and set off down Black Jerry'​s for Harry'​s River, Bees Nest 
 +   ​Creek,​ Little River, etc. However, with a little extra time ,in bed 
 +   on Saturday they didn't make Bees Nest and finally came home a bit 
 +   late on Slinday.
 +
 +       The Saturday trip with Jess Martin in charge, saw. some very fine 
 +   wild flowers in the Willawarra area of The Chase, and the participants, ​
 +   six members and 1 prospective,​ enjoyed themselves.
 +
 +       The Blackheath-Bell trip with John White gave a typical white 
 +   ​welcome to 3 trippers (2 members and 1 prospective). Snow was 
 +   ​encountered on Saturday night, which continued through most of Sunday ​
 +   on the walk into Bell.
 +
 +       On this same week-end the President led seven others, including ​
 +   2 prospectives,​ to South Trig for a Corroboree. Dull weather was
 +   the order of the day but the flowers were good and a pleasant week-end ​
 +   was the result.
 +
 +       For the last week-end in this report I am rearranging the trip 
 +   order to give full scope to the Friday night walk. On the Sunday ​
 +   walk Joan Cordell had 5 members, 1 prospective and 1 visitor. She 
 +   ​reported that it was a little early for the flowers but all had a 
 +   good time.   Len Fall had only one offer of a starter and by mutual ​
 +   ​consent the Saturday trip was called off.
 +
 +       Now for itl   Four members and 1 prospective began the Rigby
 +   70 miles. ​ The party camped in snow on Narrow Neck on Friday night 
 +   and after a brisk walk on Saturday morning the leader, at the foot 
 +   of Debert'​s knob, stated his legs were sore and he was going home. 
 +   The party, minus leader, continued. On Sunday morning the party, ​
 +   ​(still minus leader) steamed up past Bimlow and on arrival at 
 +   ​Sheehy.'​s Creek they noticed an immaculately dressed "​gentleman"​ near 
 +   a Renault. On closer inspection it proved to be the "​leader"​ who 
 +   had nipped home on Saturday, slept at home, and had taken the 
 +  .opportunity for a pleasant run on Sunday in the car, no doubt to 
 +   jeer at any walkers who might come by. . However, I am pleased to 
 +   ​report that his white-anting was somewhat mitigated by his stowing ​
 +   all 5 bodies and 4 packs into the Renault and driving them home.
 +
 +       So for August the programme trips drew 41 members and 8 pros- 
 +   ​pectives.
 +
 +
 +                    PAGING TEE PAGES. ​
 +
 +       You will note on consulting the Walks Programme that on the week- 
 +   end of 3/4/5/ November the Friday night and Saturday afternoon walks
 +
 +                                                            9.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +               FOR ALL YOUR TRANSPORT PROBLEMS ​
 +
 +
 +                       ​CONTACT
 +
 +
 +             ​HATTSWELL'​S TaXI & TOURIST SERVICE ​
 +
 +
 +                 RING, WRITE, WIRE or CALL
 +
 +                  LILEEILDIE_2EEIEE.
 +
 +
 +      '​Phone:​ Btheath 128 or 249        Booking Office -. 4 doors
 +                                         from Gardner'​s Inn Hotel 
 +                                         (LOOK FOR THE NEON SIGN).
 +
 +
 +              SPEEDY 5 OR 8 PASSENGER CARS AVAILABLE ​
 +
 +
 +                LARGE OR SMALL PARTIES CATERED FOR
 +
 +
 +   ​FARES:​ KLNANGRA WALLS      30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
 +          PERRY'​S LOOKDOWN ​         " ​           If II   Ie
 +          JENOLAN STATE FOREST 20k- " ​   " ​         If   If
 +          CARLON'​S FARM       10/- " ​     11     II If   II
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +   WE WILL BE PLEASED TO QUOTE OTHER TRIPS OR SPECIAL PARTIES ​
 +                       ON APPLIGATION.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +both converge on Peter Page's homestead at Jamberoo, for the Saturday ​
 +
 +night camp. This has been cunningly arranged so that the S.B.W. ​
 +Light Opera Company can do "​Excerpts from' the Operas",​ in honour of 
 +Mr. and Mrs. Page of the Old Hands Division, and for the enjoyment of 
 +the many walkers who are expected. to .come by CAR - in fact, we know. 
 +of so many it going to be a minor Reunion. Roll upi Bring your 
 +Chronic Opera Books and join'​in the fun!
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +        Dorothy BriOden has just come back from a six-weeks'​ tour of 
 +the centre where she naturally visited Ayer's Rock, Mt. Olga, 
 +McDOnnel Ranges, Simpson'​s Gap and all the usual attractions. She 
 +says there is an organised service out to the Rock and Mt. Olga by 
 +
 +Tuit's Motor Service operating from Alica Springs. The trip is of 
 +
 +five days duration, and food and accommodation is provided, the cost 
 +being 2,40 per head. This gives a complete day at each of the two 
 +features, where one can either get around with the guide or jug 4.; do 
 +as one fancies.
 +
 +10.
 +
 +             ​LETTER FROM DAVE INGRAM
 +                                       ​T.S.S. "​Southern Cross" ​
 +                                          Atlantic Ocean.
 +
 +Dear S B.W1s,
 +
 +     I have delayed this letter till the sea voyage is nearly over. 
 +Now I can give you a.resum6 of my activities,
 +
 +     The ship is very comfortable,​ modern and convenient. The food 
 +is generally not up to standard although we occasionally get a really
 +appetising dish. Some of the Belgium waiters are highly amused .at the 
 +way in which the English chefs on the ship ruin good food - and 
 +with some justification. Possibly becalms the ship doesn'​t carry 
 +cargo,. it has an unusual.pitching motion which upsets some of the 
 +.passengers. There was a patch of rough weather off the Southern
 +Coast of Australia which laid about half the passengers low. I 
 +.missed breakfast and lost the next two meals, and then felt hungry ​
 +again. All in all I didn't feel any the worse for the temporary ​
 +indisposition.
 +
 +     As we approached Western Australia the sunny days were delight- ​
 +ful. I went to the University to see Shirley Dean. It is a beautiful ​
 +spot - Shirl took me over most of it - their open air theatres
 +are really good. Then we drove' through King's Park to an open air 
 +tea house overlooking Perth, for lunch. Most of the passengers were 
 +sorry to leave Perth.
 +
 +     It was ton days' steaming to Durban, or 4,300 miles, mostly ​
 +through warm sunny days and cool nights. Durban is very colourful.- ​
 +rather reminiscent of Brisbane but more modern than B. I had a bus 
 +tour to the Valley of 1,000 Hills. and was impressed by the number of 
 +eucalypts and acacias being used as windbreaks and for beautification ​
 +It was two'​days,​ steaming to .Cape Town where we arrived on a.bright ​
 +cool day - visibility marvellous. Table Mountain is really im- 
 +pressive and so is the trip by cableway from Kloof Nek to the summit, ​
 + OW- a go, but well worth it.) As it was Sunday we saw several ​
 +walking and climbing parties. With my cabin mates we hired a gar
 +and drove 200 miles through the neighbouring fruit and vinegrowing ​
 +towns of Paarl, Transsh Hoek and Elgin, crossing and recrossing the 
 +Drakenstein Mts. Some of the mountaih passes are most interesting, ​
 +one being lined by eucalypts instead .of a retaining fence. I hope 
 +to have a few nice transparencies of the area as I have met an old 
 +friend on board who is a great camera-enthusiast and has given me 
 +considerable advice on the'​subject. We'​have.already made plans to 
 +visit Spain together.
 +
 +     From Cape Town to Canary Is. at Las Palmas was another 4,000 
 +miles. We didn't see a thing other than ocean until a day out of
 +Las Palmas when several ships passed, iLcluding the "​Stirling Castle" ​
 +bound for Cape Town, She was a fine sight.
 +
 +     Las Palmas is a free port, so that things are fairly cheap.
 +If the colour in the gardens and the palatial hotels are a sample of 
 +what we'll meet in Spain, I'm already keen about it. A party of us
 +
 +                                                         11.
 +
 + had a car trip of about 30 miles to Monte in the hills amongst ​
 + ​citrus and vegetable gardens - the island is intensely cultivated; ​
 + most of the produce goes to Great Britain. Lunch at the Santa 
 + ​Brigida Hotel was a treat, just slightly better than the "​Taiping." ​
 + ​Bargaining with the various hawkers was fun, but the beggars were
 + a nuisance. ​ Since leaving Las Palmas the weather has been mainly ​
 + dull and cool with a fair' swell. In fact, it looks like a shower ​
 + of rain at the moment.
 +
 +     ​Th.e'​task of packing. up will be on today as I hear thatthere ​
 + will be a party pn tomorrow night in our cabin. Being Sunday night 
 + there will be no farewell dance. We're due in Southampton on 
 + ​MOnday. ​  My three cabin mates have been very pleasant company - 
 + two are English and the. other a Swede with an American accent.
 +
 +     I don't know when I'll get a chance to write again, so don'​t ​
 + ​expect too much. I trust that the rain has eased at last (we read
 + of the recent floods on the South Coast), and that the Walks program- ​
 +-MB is in full swing.
 +
 +                        With best wishes,
 +                                                  DAVID.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +           IT WILL BE NEW COUNTRY FOR SOME.
 +
 +     Just a few words on what to expect on Jean Harvey'​s Official ​
 + Walk of Oct. 26/27/28. The train is the 6.33 p.m., tickets to 
 + ​Glenbrook. There is a walk of about six miles on Friday night to 
 + the Oaks, where the camp will be a fixed one until Sunday morning. ​
 + Good camp site - plenty of tent-poles waiting from last time.
 + Be sure your battery is fresh.
 +
 +     On Saturday morning, not TOO early, the way will be along an 
 + easy ridge to Monkey Vines Creek and down on to Erskine Creek, which 
 + just abounds in deep, smooth rock swimming pools, Following the 
 + creek two or three miles, and after lunch the party will move off up 
 + back to the tops and so back. to camp along a pleasant track to the 
 + ​waiting camp.
 +
 +     On Sunday morning, again not TOO early, the route is down a 
 + long gentle ridge to Euroka Clearing for lunch, thence into Glen- 
 + ​brook,​ catching the 5.3 p.m, back to the Big Smoke.
 +
 +     Note: White-ants may remain ensconced safely in camp all day 
 + ​Saturday if desired. ​        ​Enquiries to JW1462.
 +
 +
 + ​CORRECTION:​ In the report of our August General Meeting it was
 + ​stated that the Youth Hostels Assn. was planning to sell shares for 
 + the building of aski but at'​Kiandra,​ whereas it is the BUSHCRAFT
 + ,f .SSN. which is sponsoring the scheme. We trust no inconvenience ​
 + has been caused to the Youth Hostels Assn. by this error.
 +
 +12.
 +WALKING FOR PROFIT ​
 +- Alex Colley
 +
 +"Beat the vultures
 +walk;• exhorted the Harbour Bridge footway
 +philosopher in his chalked message of July 1st. The fare rise must  ​
 +really have got under his skin becaube a little further on, in place  ​
 +of the usual "​Repent",​ or a specific appeal directed just to the  ​
 +sinners f this extra wicked State in the form "​Repent N.S.W.",​ he  ​
 +had written "​Repent,​ or go to Hell!"
 +Though doubtful whether any amount of repentance could affect my  ​
 +future, it seemed to me that he might be right abOut the vUltUres.  ​
 +Approaching the problem ,​scientifically I have estimated how mach. can be  ​
 +saved in time and money by walking instead of catching a tram.
 +The assumptions I have made are:
 +1. that the average wait for a tram is five minutes,
 +2. that trams do a mile in 10 minutes,
 +3. that a pair of shoes., three helf soles and four pairs.of  ​
 +socks, at a cost. of E,8 in all, will do about 1,000 miles,  ​
 +making cost per mile 2d.
 +4. that a bushwalker can do a mile "track and easy," without a  ​
 +pack, in 16 minutes.
 +The profits of walking would then be as follows: (The lower  ​
 +profits are when you start at the beginning of the section, and the  ​
 +higher limit for journeys which involve an additional section.)
 +Walking Time saved Fares Footwear Profit  ​
 +Time
 +or lost
 +Cost
 +Minutes
 +32 save 
 +
 +2
 +rt
 +lost
 +
 +7
 +2
 +
 +13
 +rr
 +
 +19
 +ft
 +rr
 +25
 +Distance Travelling  ​
 +and wait- 
 +in  time 
 +miles
 +Minutes Minutes ​
 +2
 +4
 +2
 +10
 +8
 +1
 +15
 +16
 +2
 +25
 +32
 +3
 +35
 +48
 +4
 +45
 +64
 +5
 +55
 +BO
 +s. d.
 +d.
 +d.
 +
 +6d.-9d
 +1
 +2
 +5-1--8i-
 +
 +6d.-9d
 +1
 +5-8
 +
 +6d.-9d
 +2
 +4-7
 +9d.-y-
 +4
 +5-8
 +
 +1/- 1 3
 +6
 +
 +6-9
 +
 +1/3
 +8
 +7
 +
 +1/3-1/6
 +10
 +5-8
 +For distances over 5 miles the profit margin narrows, until it  ​
 +cuts out altogether at 13 miles.
 +There are, I admit, some imperfections in this accounting. You may  ​
 +not have to wait 5 minutes for a tram, particularly in the city. But  ​
 +it
 +not often than a city tram does a mile in 10 minutes. It may 
 +average better than a mile in 10 minutes when it gets outside the city  ​
 +approaches, but the odds are you will have to wait longer for.it if
 +it is a long distance tram. If you catch a bus it will save more time]  ​
 +but the same amount of money will be lost. So, for distances up to one  ​
 +mile you will save no time by catching a tram and you will certainly  ​
 +lost financially. For distances between 1 and 13 miles, how far you  ​
 +walk will depend on how much you galue your time. Myself, I shall wan
 +
 +                                                              13.
 +
 +             NIGHT ASCENT OF THE PONS PORTUS.
 +
 +                                                  - By "Liar Bird"
 +
 +     We were talking in the Club one evening, and the gist of the 
 +subject matter was that we wanted to get high.
 +
 +     "​Stitt and Garth have already achieved that noble distinction," ​
 +said Colin, "But why the rest of you?"
 +
 +    "​Bathing weakens you, doesn'​t it Garth:"​ cried Snow gaily. This 
 +seemed to law to be apropos of nothing in particular. I put it down 
 +wo just one of Snow's inscrutible witticisms.
 +
 +     "​There'​s a limit to how high you can get before the President ​
 +throws you out," said Geoffo.
 +
 +     We attributed these remarks on the part of Putt and company to 
 +sheer lack of soul and continued our discuss ion. Suddenly we. had it: 
 +"What about a night climb of the Pons.Portus?"​
 +
 +     ​Agreedl And over our coffee and drinks we excitedly sketched ​
 +our plan of attack. Beryl was a bit abashed at our audacity and 
 +some thought to deter us by hinting at likely hidden •ambushes and 
 +uttered grim warnings on the danger of trying to infiltrate this 
 +forbidden territory, but that only inflamed our desire the more; 
 +we would be particularly careful to respect the rights of the 
 +natives, and no act of vandalism or defacing of shrines or holy_ 
 +relics wouldisully the splendour of our passage.
 +
 +     Garth and Peter organised the transporttiand our expedition set 
 +out. We journeyed ever towards ​ the north.
 +At one of the native encampment ​           Jr AA.
 +we surprised some animals of              fLA.4
 +the genus Felis scavenging ​
 +amongst the native middens.
 +We marvelled at their          C14--Njj
 +apparent tameness but did
 +not disturb them. Small 
 +rodent-like animals were
 +also in evidence.
 +
 +     As our party proceeded, sudden rain sheeted down, but excep 
 +that it made us slightly uneasy about our prospects, it failed to 
 +dampen our determination.
 +
 +     ​Leaving behind at last the mundane traffic and somewhat squalid ​
 +dwellings of the natives, we wound through the foothills and estab- ​
 +lished base camp in a grassy area among trees. To the west, between ​
 +us and a great drop-away into space, was a rounded hill supporting ​
 +some magnificent specimens of giant Ficus, their broad, glossy green 
 +leaves making a dense canopy over the thick branches, contoured ​
 +strangely like human limbs and torsos. ​   On the east we were shel- 
 +tered by a great white wall, practically vertical but curiously free 
 +from avalanches. To the north soared our objective flanked by two
 +
 + 14.
 +
 + great symmetrical bastions of granite.
 +
 +     ​Canada may.have its Rockies; Switzerland may have its AlPs; 
 + these mountains, cold, remote and antiseptic, are all inland, far 
 + ​removed from the wild tang of the ocean whose salt is TRV7 very • 
 + blood of all Sydneysiders. As we gazed on our Heart'​s Desire we 
 + felt that here,for us, was the answer to the mountaineer'​s dream
 + a magnificent challenge, its feet actually.bathed,​ by the bottle.. ​
 + green waters of the Pacific while its summit soared above us into 
 + the night - mysterious depths of ocean below and equally mysteriau ​
 + ​heights of sky above - not to mention great chunks of mysterious ​
 + ​mystery all the way up to the summit, and the same again, no doubt, ​
 + down the other side. As Snow, I think it was, so aptly put it on a 
 + ​previous occasion, "the mysteriousness of it sorta gets. you in."
 +
 +     ​Almost always, when mountaineering,​ before the climbing ​
 + ​actually begins, you find yourself obliged to plug for miles up a 
 + ​glacier flanked with rather monotonous grey mounds of lateral moraine ​
 + The moist air beaded our hair and eyebrows with tiny white droplets ​
 + as we plugged along the curved sweep, the walls on either side 
 + ​shining with a grey metallic gleam. And so tb the base of the climb
 +
 +     "​Forward,​ Onward and Upward!"​ cried Colin. "When danger ​
 + ​threatens and adventure calls only the pedestrian fool would fail
 + to heed. Excellsiorl "​rt'​s all yours; ​    wait for you down here."
 +
 +     So Pete and Garth and Nobby and I hi-tolled up our pants and 
 + ​tucked our whatnots into our underbelows respectively and prepared ​
 + to climb over the first obstacle. Suddenly, with the thunderous ​
 + roar of an avalanche, a hissing, screaming death from the darkness ​
 + bore down towards us. A great blast of wind engulfed us, our ears 
 + were filled with a deafening clatter, then the noise gradually ​
 + ​diminished as this harbinger of death disappeared into some dark 
 + ​crevasse or underground cave.
 +
 +     We peered into the murk of night, as black as the back side of 
 + the moon, listening intently for any further hint of danger, then 
 + took our courage in both hands and made swift individual dashes over 
 + the avalanche chute to relative safety.
 +
 +     Now the climbing really began. We surmounteA the first ob- 
 + ​stacle with some difficulty - real toe and_ finger work of a spiky 
 +unpleasant nature, but once surmounted we found Ourselves on a 
 + ​veritable stairway, wet and slippery, but nevertheless a stairway. ​
 + This led us to the first terrace, so to speak.
 +
 +     I recalled the two other occasions I had been on this climb. ​
 + Once with Geof and Ross, the latter unsuitably clad in dancing ​
 +pumps - Geof and I had waylaid him for a brief workout to improve ​
 +his dancing steps. He was at great pains to keep his footwear free 
 + of scratches, but didn't succeed. "​Serves him right!"​ said Colin, ​
 + "​I have no patience with Mountaineers who go round masquerading as
 + ​Citizens,'"​ - with which sentiments all, including Rosso, concurred
 +
 +     On this.occasion we had found ourselves trapped at the beginning
 +
 +                                             15.
 +
 +of the summit sweep by an impassible obstacle which would have 
 +necessitated an unjustifiably risky traverse over a great space 
 +filled with nothingness,​ or, alternately,​ a return to the base of
 +the climb and the choosing of another route, which time did not permit ​
 +if Rosso'​s social life was to remain unsh4tered, so we called it a 
 +glorious failure and postponed our attempt to the sweet future.
 +
 +    On the other occasion our party had done a.cqmplete traverse ​
 +and come down the northern arrete. Snow was Optatic. "​Gee, ​
 +Colin would like this," he cried, "No filthy vegetation. This is 
 +about the first climb I've been on where there'​s been no waste 
 +rabbit-food to clutter up the prospect:"​
 +
 +   And now here we were again. The lie of the terrain now 
 +necessitated a bit -'of extremely steep upward progression,​ dark and 
 +windy and exposed, then the long sweep to the main BUrfillit began.
 +
 +   How. can one best describe that glorious ascent? The sense of 
 +depth and space all around us, accentuated by the moonless night, ​
 +so that we felt ithat if we stepped either to right or left of the 
 +narrow arr'​dte we were on, we would surely be walking on air.
 +
 +   At one place a dark rectangular obstacle caused us some concern. ​
 +We thought it wisest to avoid it altogether and were forced to make
 +a risky detour out on to the grey slabs, fingers scribbling over a 
 +scattering of nobbly handholds, feet scratting desperately for '​holds. ​
 +It is strange how the mind, in times of stress, turns to extraneous ​
 +subjects, as if unwilling'​to acknowledge the existance of the 
 +obstacle confronting it - I distinctly remember that at this
 +stage Pete and Nobby were engrossed in a discussion on electronic ​
 +eyes, to which Garth lent an attentive ear.
 +
 +   There were no further obstacles as we followed the beautiful ​
 +curve and sweep to the summit. "Gee, this is crack-on t" cried 
 +Garth enthusiastically. Although thebe was no moon, there was 
 +sufficient light from the stars to give visibility. "Gee, this is 
 +collossal,"​ said Garth. "This is mighty:"​ Away to the east the 
 +ocean stretched, dark and mysterious. Below us the flat area
 +gleamed and shone with an unearthly radiance. "Gees this is bang-onr ​
 +said Garth. How some people do burble when they'​re happy -
 +can't hold their beans.
 +
 +   The photographers wished and mourned for their cameras. They 
 +would not mind waiting round for a lengthy time exposure either - 
 +the resulting picture would offset frostbitten ears and fingers ​
 +caused by loitering around in the rarefied atmosphere at that height ​
 +However they had no cameras, and after admiring the view for a while 
 +longer we commenced the descent, noting below us at least four 
 +avalanche troughts, two of:which we would have to cross on the 
 +return route.
 +
 +   ​Eventually we dropped down to the avalanche chutes and dashed ​
 +swiftly across without being overwhelmed with black ruin. Then the 
 +long plug back along the glacier bed. We had a wash and a drink
 +at a spring bubbling up under a rocky overhang, and sighted one lone
 +
 + 16.
 +
 + ​native who might have been hostile. Then back to our base camp 
 + and a great welcome by Colin and the waiting others.
 +
 +      "So you weren'​t copped:"​ said Putt°.
 +
 +     "​It wasn't an electronic eye," explained Pete, "It was a hot 
 + water system,"​
 +
 +      What a curious thing for him to say. Now what the Hell are 
 + they talking about?
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +            FEDERATION REPORT SEPTEMBER
 +                                                   - Allen A. Strom
 +
 +     Two important matters arose from the discussion on the Committee ​
 +Report on The Decline in Membership of Bushwalking Clubs:-
 +
 +   1. A Committee has been set up to organise "​Junior Walks" for boys 
 +        and girls 14 to 16 years. It will meet with Paddy Pallin as 
 +        convenor, wo work out a working plan.
 +
 +   2. It was decided to proceed with Trail Blazing, in oushlands near 
 +        Sydney. By the November meeting, Clubs are asked to submit ​
 +        personelle for a Committee to be set up to handle this work.
 +
 +     Other points raised by the Report are being followed up by 
 +further contacts and enquiries.
 +
 +     A new Publi21I7 Officer is required and Clubs have been asked 
 +to advertise the vacancy.
 +
 +     The Assistant Information Officer complains that new Walks 
 +Programmes and Walks ReportS are not being forwarded —to him with 
 +regularity. This is defeating the purpose of the Officer'​s work 
 +and bushwalkers are asked to give greater co-operation.
 +
 +     ​Assistance with repairs to the Main Entrance Track at The 
 +Bouddi Natural Park is required on week-end Out.2V27/​28, ​
 +Phone: UA2983,
 +
 +     The Member for Bulli, The Minister for Lands and The Premder ​
 +have all promised attention to protests against alienating portion ​
 +of The Royal National Park for housing.
 +
 +     The Dept. of Lands reports that information for a National ​
 +Parks Act is being collected.
 +
 +     Now that The Barren Grounds has been declared Faunal Reserve ​
 +No.3, bushwalkers are asked to impress upon their friends its 
 +true significance. A party will visit the area on Oct.12/​13/​14. ​
 +'​Phone:​ UA2983.
 +
 +                                                            17.
 +
 +      WHAT A LEADER or WHAT, A LEADER?
 +                                              Geof Wagg.
 +
 +     The miles, the miles, the miles, the weary miles. Once more 
 +walkers fling themselves against the barrier of miles and time, 
 +with little hope of auccess.
 +
 +     The programme stated: Katoomba-Black-Dog-Cox R.-Wollondilli R.- 
 +Fattai R,​-Hilltop;​. distance 72 miles. ​ How often and hov/ fruit- ​
 +lessly has this appeared on a programme, and how often must rnrro and 
 +Miles have laughed up their sleeves at the hollow bravado of the Idoa, 
 +So why should four walkers, conscious of all this, pit their puny
 +strength against the impossible? I'll tell you°   It was the name 
 +in the last column but one - the column marked "​Leaders"​ This name, 
 +this man, whose calm detached thinking and quiet unanswerable logic 
 +has landed so many tough trips at Blue Gum, and so many Blue Gum
 +trips at the Hydro Majestic "from the highest point of which,"​ so he 
 +says, "you can obtain a splendid view of Kanangra Walls."​
 +
 +     I scarcely remember the memorable night at the meeting when our 
 +leader sprang to his feet and in his ringing voice cried, "Who will 
 +venture forth to Hilltop with me, to glory in his manhood with toil 
 +and sweat, to feel the heat that blisters and the stinging snows?"​
 +
 +     John Scott, John Manning and Snow all shouted "​I"​.
 +
 +     ​Hadn'​t been listening myself so only caught the last bit and 
 +murmured "​Aye"​ from force of habit then found it too late to retract.
 +
 +     Our leader is a man of democratic character, and '​although he 
 +owns a blue Renault car he travelled up with his party by train, ​
 +leading. them successfully on to the train at Central and off again 
 +at Katoomba. But at Katoomba] We stepped out of our steam-heated ​
 +compartment•just as the first fluttering silver snowflake. landed on 
 +the pavement like a speck of dandruff on a navy blue coat. That was 
 +only the first. More came - and more and-mare and mpre.
 +twirled and twizzled and did a little dance .round our logs and • 
 +settled on our cold noses. ​  Over the frosted pavements o' leader ​
 +led us, past the Carrington, past, the Homeadale and the Belvedere, ​
 +out into the teeth of the blizzard on Narrow Neck. Snow uttered a 
 +small wail as we passed within sight of his warm bed at home in 
 +Lurline .Street.
 +
 +     It was only masterful leadership that got the party past the 
 +warm dry cave at Coral Swamp, but on the second neck, as we received ​
 +the full unchecked force of the biting south-west wind, he finally ​
 +realised that he could drive us no further and gratefully we sank 
 +into oblivion in the '​meagre shelter of the overhang beside the track. ​
 +We had been oblivious for scarcely 15-minutes when along came John 
 +Manning who had caught a train an hour later than ours, so must have 
 +accomplished the distance in approximately half the time it had taken 
 +us, This seemed a phenomenal feat, particularly for an unled party.
 +
 +     We spent an extremely cold and uncomfortable night, and at 
 +times could not help making the perhaps. rather unfair comparison
 +
 +18.
 +
 +between this shelter and the luxurious cave at Coral Swamp. However ​
 +the wisdom of the leader'​s decision was obvious when he roused us 
 +shortly before dawn next morning, because every one of the party with- 
 +out exception was almost pleased to be moving again. After driving ​
 +the prospective out to light the fire we ate a dark breakfast and 
 +thawed our boots.- Our wet long trousers which.had frozen in the 
 +night we folded, being careful not to snap off the legs, and stowed ​
 +in our packs.
 +
 +     It must have snowed heavily during-the night, because all the 
 +ridges towards Jenolan, were carrying quite a mantle of white, and 
 +so indeed was the Neck itself, which made the bush-brushing even
 +more than usually painful.'​ • Going down to Glenraphael an unfortun- ​
 +ate accident occurred which caused the party some discomfort. It
 +was just one of those little things for which, no one can be blamed ​
 +suddenly we noticed that the prospective,​ John Manning, had been 
 +allowed to slip into the lead, and from then on the pace began to 
 +blister. But we didn't notice the cold any more.
 +
 +     Snow Brown'​aecured the premier position in the skither down 
 +Tarots Ladder and we looked forward eagerly to a reduction in pace. 
 +Instead he broke into a run. The impetut of this carried us over 
 +Debert'​s where we re-assembled. Somehow„.(probably to assure a 
 +moderation of pace) I was thrust into the lead. But what was wrong 
 +this morning? I found that Black Dog was all down hill, that it was 
 +a beautiful morning and the wattle was out, and suddenly the ground ​
 +started racing backwards under my foot. Next thing I knew I was on 
 +the Cox and the. others were tumbling down the hill like apples out 
 +of a barrel. John Scott found that the pace wasn't the only thing 
 +that had been blistering.
 +
 +     But where was our leader? ​ Whipping in stragglers? go, he
 +alone was missing. We decided, however, that some leaderly task must 
 +be delaying him and made the rather rash decision to push on knowing ​
 +that he would soon overtake us. In this forbidding country we felt 
 +very much the lack of leadership and were quite relieved to find 
 +ourselves at Harry'​s Humpy by lunchtime, especially as' the oranges ​
 +were on. We waited here for an hour and a half, expecting at any 
 +moment to see our leader'​s countenance come into view,. but as neither ​
 +his nor John Scott'​s did we assumed that they were either having lunch 
 +at Kill's Defile or they knew a better orchard elsewhere. (As regards ​
 +our Leader, this may easily have been the case.) When we tried to 
 +move on after lunch we again felt the lack of wise counsel as some- 
 +thing told us we might have been somewhat immoderate with the oranges..
 +
 +     By the time we reached the McMahon'​s crossing we knew most of the 
 +fire was out of us and we barely had the energy to drive the prospect- ​
 +ive accross so we could see how deep it was. As it appeared to be 
 +quite safe Snow and I made the attempt and received our first of 
 +several clues that finally led us to deduce the fact theitJohn'​s legs 
 +are about 12" longer than ours. Now we found the once beautiful. Cox 
 +Valley a desolation of blackberry and erosion. Also, with no leader ​
 +we mistook our route and,taking the new road for a timber track, We 
 +tried to pick our way 'along the remains of . the old one which got us 
 +into all sorts of trouble because there are now no bridges. Each
 +
 +                                                                                                                                                                                                               19.
 + ​successive crossing was deeper and colder, and sometimes even John 
 +had trouble. We felt great sympathy for our absent leader, whose 
 +legs are shorter than ours.
 +
 +                These troubles had cost us time, and although we walked for more 
 +than an hour after dark, we made our miserable camp only a few hund- 
 +red yards short of Bimlow. As we cooked on a fire of fence posts
 +we tried to comfort ourselves but it was useless. Here we were, 
 +three lonely bods in a strange and alien landscape with no shelter ​
 +for the night, but worst of all, no leader. ​                                                                                                           No one woke us shOrtly ​
 +before dawn next morning, no one had us striding gaily ahead by 6 
 +o'​clock,​ no one was alwaysvready with a cheery confidence to assure ​
 +us we were on the right track. Is it any wonder our stride became a 
 +stroll, or our stroll became a struggle? At the Nattai Bridge our 
 +struggle became a fullstop while we talked things over. It was 
 +clear by now that with the loss of our expert guidance we had lost 
 +our chance of reaching Hilltop. So what did it matter? It was just
 +a pleasant stroll up the Nattai to Sheehy'​s Creek, then an easy .climb ​
 +to the road. Perhaps it was rather a long way to Picton, but certain- ​
 +ly no worse than Narrow Neck.                                                                            Lots of worse ways of spending a 
 +Sunday.
 +                                                                                         • • • • • •
 +
 +               John and I were just stepping out of the scrub on to the Picton ​
 +Road as a blue Renault drove past. Much to our surprise it slowed ​
 +down - stopped - the door opened and out climbed the last person ​
 +we expected to see.                                                     Hair combed, clean face, an ironed shirt and 
 +knife-edge creases in his trousers, shined shoes. It was our leaders
 +
 +               "​G/​day fellers'​ Just thought I'd drive out to see how you were 
 +getting '​on."​
 +               Oh, the relief with which we punched him to make sure he was 
 +real. How we pounded and pummelled him, swung him round and tossed ​
 +him in the air. Snow coming up just then struck him with a large 
 +piece of wood while passing motorists stared. Yes, he was real all 
 +right. ​                             John Scott was there too (he'd been picked up .at Bimlow),
 +so we were all together again. ​                                                                             Packs were stowed aboard, walkers ​
 +likewise, and the prospective in the back seat with his head between ​
 +his knees found a disadvantage in long legs. The leader climbed in 
 +and away we went.
 +
 +               And so it ended. Once more our leader was leading us, assuring ​
 +us about the route, passing the hours with cheerful anecdote - the 
 +old immaculate Digby• Everything was right.
 +
 +                                                                                    . • • • • •
 +
 +Footnote: The story of how and why he met us where he did is Digby/​s„ ​
 +                                          and he appears to be sticking to itl
 +
 +
 +
 +WANTED TO BUY:                                                A sleeping bag.                                                If anyone has one they wish
 +to dispose of please contact Tom Moppott (Phone: JA8873)
 +
 +       ??'​
 +
 +                          I
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +       ​WALKERS,​ MUGS, ETC.
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +    Paddy doesn'​t suggest that walkers ​
 +have any connection with mugs except when .";rte
 +they are drinking. However, on a recent ​   ;SS
 +trip with the Brisbane Bushwalkers it.. 
 +transpired that one of the most remark- ​
 +able things about the Sydney walkers, in 
 +the eyes of the B.Bts,'​ was that they 
 +didn't use plastic bowls. .
 +
 +
 +    With the B.B's the flexible plastic ​
 +bowl (about 1 pint capacity) is the 
 +maid-of-all-work. It acts as drinking ​
 +cup, plate, mixing bowl and (with a 
 +pressed in lid) a food container.
 +
 +
 +    The B.B's like them so much that 
 +they seem to carry 3 each, and to avoid 
 +confusion each person has his own device ​
 +or initials painted thereon.
 +
 +
 +    It certainly is an idea.
 +
 +
 +    Paddy has prepared himself for the 
 +rush and has bowls complete with lids -
 +
 +
 +        3 for 8/9. 
 +
 +
 +           or
 +
 +
 +         3/- each.
 +
 +
 +
 +       ​■■••••■■•■■■ ​
 +
 +
 +
 +                      '​Phone:​ BM2685
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +
 +      PADD PAWN
 +
 +       ​Lighttleight Camp Gear
 +       201 CASTURFACH St SYDNEY ​  ​r",​
 +
  
195610.txt · Last modified: 2020/03/12 08:56 (external edit)