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vievems
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vievems
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 Over the years I have had some very happy holidays with Marian and Harry Ellis - more particularly in Tasmania and Victoria. This year, however, we proved that to revisit haunts nearer home can be equally enjoyable. Over the years I have had some very happy holidays with Marian and Harry Ellis - more particularly in Tasmania and Victoria. This year, however, we proved that to revisit haunts nearer home can be equally enjoyable.
-Easter on the Dogs had been rather a horror. Rain, mist and leeches. Our holidays started the following Friday and we altered our original plans and decided on a week at Carlons - no wet tents, no leeches - and if we had to walk in the rain every day, at least we had a dry spot to return tol It was a great success. Theweather was 
-perfect - sunny days with just the right walking temperature. After 
-the rains all the falls were grand, and every creek had its frequent delightful vistas. Upper Breakfast Creek, Galong, Megalong, etc. were all revisited and we had long leisurely lunch times, usually with a dip in the bracing creeks and a thaw out in the sun. We would return in the evening to Mrs. Carlon'​s famous and filling dinners. I particularly remember the lower part of Megalong Creek with the water pouring over the masses of pink granite in falls and cascades. The Cox at this point was tumultuous. Coming home over the paddocks that night all the well-known tops stood out against a clear blue sky, and it was all very satisfying. 
-On the following Saturday Bert Carlon drove us out to Kanangra where it was planned we would spend a few days with a set camp and Harry would do a lot of colour photography. The further the car travelled the worse the prospects became; great heavy clouds which looked full of snow, and a biting wind. We decided to camp in the cave above the track leading to the Plateau and this proved a very good move, That night we had a very violent rain, wind and thunder 
-storm, but were quite sheltered. The lightning was in blue-green 
-sheets and we were very glad that our little tents were not standing 
-the strain of the deluge. It rained all next morning and we were 
-beginning to become apprehensive and visualise walking back to Jenolan 
-when it cleared. The wind, however, was terrific and it continued 
-all the week. It was hard to retain your balance on the tops and we were continually buffetted. The visibility was wonderful - clear and cold - but it was not good weather for photography. The Palls 
-were exceptionally lovely and we had a pleasant wander up the river 
-above the falls. We decided to leave on the Tuesday morning and got an early start. (Marion and I suspected that Harry wondered how we 
-would make out with fairly heavy packs on the Gangerangs). It was 
-tough going in the wind but we made the 100-man cave by 1.45 p.m., 
-which we thoughbnot bad going. This cave-dwelling was a very 
-pleasant experience - more particularly as we were so sheltered, 
-and it was good to look out to the starry sky. When we used our tents again it was quite dulll 
-Next morning we enjoyed the Tiwilla Tops, and then came Compagnonils Pass, which I did not enjoy. The narrow track was very wet 
-and everything I touched came away in my hand. I quite expected to finish in the depths of the valley below - a mangled mass Z As we struggled down I wondered if the pass had deteriorated badly - or 
-- 17. 
-did the trouble lie in the 17 years since I last walked this route? On the previous occasion by coincidence we followed the Compagnoni brothers up the pass - they were just ahead of us - and although glad to have their footmatks to guide us I don't remember that there was any particular difficulty. Time marches on 
-The walk down the Tiwilla ridge was grand hut we were somewhat nonplussed when we saw the Kowmung. It was a brown raging torrent and we hated to think what the Cox must be like. It was decided to try to cross and go out through Burragorang. It was now 5 p.m. and you can imagine how cold the water was. Harry went across to test the depth - choosing a spot where it was relatively quiet and not too much depth or drag in the river - and the water was up to his 
-armpitsl Not wishing to risk any damage to photographic gear he 
-finally carried his own and our pack 6 over on his shoulder - making four trips in all in the icy water. Marion and I went over hand in hand - the water up to Marion'​s neck even when she walked an her toes: It was interesting to see that one of the boys' schools had taken over "​Branjan"​ for their walking club. Very enterprising. 
-The Cox for the half day after we joined it was a horror. Banks scoured out by the river,'​road washed away,, bridge washed away, no trees (except the ones which had been felled and were a frightful Pest to climb over), dust everywhere, weeds head high where there had been cultivations,​ etc. Then in the evening light whilst we were vainly trying to find a pleasant place to camp, Marion and I were scared by A bull. Harry was a long way ahead out of sight and this huge animal started bellowing and pawing the ground and making towards us. Marion, who is country born, was saying "Never run from a bull, Ed," and at the same time going for her life trying to find a place to slide down the embankment to the river: Needless to say we did find a place and I am happy to say the bull lost its interest and I did not have to plunge into the river - which I was quite prepared to do. 
-That night we might just as well have been camping in the Sahara. The wind was still strong and blowing the sand and dust everywhere. The tents blew down as soon as they were erected and had to be given a lot a special attention. The food was seasoned with  sand. However we did sleep. 
-Fortunately next morning after an' hour or so going through weeds over Harry'​s head, black"​Oerry.bushes,​ etc., we came to Some workmen rebuilding the road, and from there on all was well, 'It was very exasperating because on the opposite bank the farms still appeared to be occupied and do 'doubt the going would have been more normal. 
-% When we got on to the Wollondilly it was just as lovely as we always remembered it, and we proceeded home with vivid memories of the wide river, fine trees, cliff faces and the heavenly blue sky - 
-" ​ ready as always to forget the small difficultiesand unpleasant moments which, after all, contribute to the making of a happy holiday. 
-18. 
  
-===== HeyHell And ? (Could ​it be Duncan?) =====+Easter on the Dogs had been rather a horror. Rainmist and leeches. Our holidays started the following Friday and we altered our original plans and decided on a week at Carlons - no wet tents, no leeches - and if we had to walk in the rain every day, at least we had a dry spot to return to! It was a great success. The weather was 
 +perfect - sunny days with just the right walking temperature. After the rains all the falls were grand, and every creek had its frequent delightful vistas. Upper Breakfast Creek, Galong, Megalong, etc. were all revisited and we had long leisurely lunch times, usually with a dip in the bracing creeks and a thaw out in the sun. We would return in the evening to Mrs. Carlon'​s famous and filling dinners. I particularly remember the lower part of Megalong Creek with the water pouring over the masses of pink granite in falls and cascades. The Cox at this point was tumultuous. Coming home over the paddocks that night all the well-known tops stood out against a clear blue sky, and it was all very satisfying.
  
 +On the following Saturday Bert Carlon drove us out to Kanangra where it was planned we would spend a few days with a set camp and Harry would do a lot of colour photography. The further the car travelled the worse the prospects became; great heavy clouds which looked full of snow, and a biting wind. We decided to camp in the cave above the track leading to the Plateau and this proved a very good move. That night we had a very violent rain, wind and thunder storm, but were quite sheltered. The lightning was in blue-green sheets and we were very glad that our little tents were not standing the strain of the deluge. It rained all next morning and we were beginning to become apprehensive and visualise walking back to Jenolan when it cleared. The wind, however, was terrific and it continued all the week. It was hard to retain your balance on the tops and we were continually buffetted. The visibility was wonderful - clear and cold - but it was not good weather for photography. The Falls were exceptionally lovely and we had a pleasant wander up the river above the falls. We decided to leave on the Tuesday morning and got an early start. (Marion and I suspected that Harry wondered how we would make out with fairly heavy packs on the Gangerangs). It was tough going in the wind but we made the 100-man cave by 1.45 p.m., which we thought not bad going. This cave-dwelling was a very pleasant experience - more particularly as we were so sheltered, and it was good to look out to the starry sky. When we used our tents again it was quite dull!
 +
 +Next morning we enjoyed the Tiwilla Tops, and then came Compagnoni'​s Pass, which I did not enjoy. The narrow track was very wet and everything I touched came away in my hand. I quite expected to finish in the depths of the valley below - a mangled mass! As we struggled down I wondered if the pass had deteriorated badly - or did the trouble lie in the 17 years since I last walked this route? On the previous occasion by coincidence we followed the Compagnoni brothers up the pass - they were just ahead of us - and although glad to have their footmarks to guide us I don't remember that there was any particular difficulty. Time marches on!
 +
 +The walk down the Tiwilla ridge was grand hut we were somewhat nonplussed when we saw the Kowmung. It was a brown raging torrent and we hated to think what the Cox must be like. It was decided to try to cross and go out through Burragorang. It was now 5 p.m. and you can imagine how cold the water was. Harry went across to test the depth - choosing a spot where it was relatively quiet and not too much depth or drag in the river - and the water was up to his armpits! Not wishing to risk any damage to photographic gear he finally carried his own and our packs over on his shoulder - making four trips in all in the icy water. Marion and I went over hand in hand - the water up to Marion'​s neck even when she walked on her toes! It was interesting to see that one of the boys' schools had taken over "​Branjan"​ for their walking club. Very enterprising.
 +
 +The Cox for the half day after we joined it was a horror. Banks scoured out by the river, road washed away, bridge washed away, no trees (except the ones which had been felled and were a frightful pest to climb over), dust everywhere, weeds head high where there had been cultivations,​ etc. Then in the evening light whilst we were vainly trying to find a pleasant place to camp, Marion and I were scared by a bull. Harry was a long way ahead out of sight and this huge animal started bellowing and pawing the ground and making towards us. Marion, who is country born, was saying "Never run from a bull, Ed," and at the same time going for her life trying to find a place to slide down the embankment to the river! Needless to say we did find a place and I am happy to say the bull lost its interest and I did not have to plunge into the river - which I was quite prepared to do.
 +
 +That night we might just as well have been camping in the Sahara. The wind was still strong and blowing the sand and dust everywhere. The tents blew down as soon as they were erected and had to be given a lot a special attention. The food was seasoned with sand. However we did sleep.
 +
 +Fortunately next morning after an hour or so going through weeds over Harry'​s head, blackberry bushes, etc., we came to some workmen rebuilding the road, and from there on all was well, It was very exasperating because on the opposite bank the farms still appeared to be occupied and no doubt the going would have been more normal.
 +
 +When we got on to the Wollondilly it was just as lovely as we always remembered it, and we proceeded home with vivid memories of the wide river, fine trees, cliff faces and the heavenly blue sky - ready as always to forget the small difficulties and unpleasant moments which, after all, contribute to the making of a happy holiday.
 +
 +===== HEY, HELL AND ? (Could it be Duncan?) =====
  
 by Monica 2 by Monica 2
  
 I've just been to Kossi, and it was beaut - lots and lots of snow, blue skies, sunshine, fun and trouble. I've just been to Kossi, and it was beaut - lots and lots of snow, blue skies, sunshine, fun and trouble.
-On the way down we ran into a bit of bother in the shape of fog and hoar frost which froze the windscreen solid and reduced ​ity to the minimum. Every few miles Bob had to get out and chip the ice off his side of the windscreen so he could see for at least a few miles more.  Finally he gave up and for the last 50 miles to Cooma he drove with his head (with the "​Yak"​ hat in No,5 position) stuck out of the window. + 
-From Cooma up to Smigginsthe ​sun shone and the breeze breezed and all was bright and gay. But trouble wasn't far away and it came in the shape of a hitching girl and a broken-down bus. Bob pulled up with a scream of brakes ​44 and jumped out to see what was.wrong. The startled occupants from the bus scattered to the four winds - they evidently had never seen a "​Duncan"​ dressed in a Yak suit and with a day's growth on face. +On the way down we ran into a bit of bother in the shape of fog and hoar frost which froze the windscreen solid and reduced ​visibility ​to the minimum. Every few miles Bob had to get out and chip the ice off his side of the windscreen so he could see for at least a few miles more.  Finally he gave up and for the last 50 miles to Cooma he drove with his head (with the "​Yak"​ hat in No5 position) stuck out of the window. 
-Half an hour later we started off again loaded down to the gunwhales with two Chalet types. A few miles further along the car started to make queer clanging noises so we stopped hurriedly. ​Eeek41 ​the fan was kaput, the engine was boiling and we were in danger of blowing up An hour later we got going again and eventually made Smiggins where we met the rest of the mob. + 
-The ride up in the Snowmobile was as eventful as usual, with the mobile going hippity hop over the small bumps and tottering to the top of big ones, then taking a head-first dive and landing with a bump which makes you think that all your birthdays have come at lance. We were dumped off at the road and climbed on to skiis and into packs for the long climb to the hut. I started off first as I had no climbing skins and skidded the first hundred yards on the seat of my pants till I came to a flat bit and managed to get to my feet. About half way up the hill I heard a loud skidding sound and as I wasn't moving at the time was concluding that it must be someone else when +From Cooma up to Smiggins the sun shone and the breeze breezed and all was bright and gay. But trouble wasn't far away and it came in the shape of a hitching girl and a broken-down bus. Bob pulled up with a scream of brakes!! and jumped out to see what was wrong. The startled occupants from the bus scattered to the four winds - they evidently had never seen a "​Duncan"​ dressed in a Yak suit and with a day's growth on face. 
-a voice said, "Hullo love. I'll take your pack," and there was a tall handsome bearded ​skijor, namely Mr. Schafer. All arrived at the hut for lunch except Bob who had taken the car back to the Hotel to bed it down for the fortnight. + 
-The days after that all run together, punctuated by memories of climbs to Cooma Hut and the Perisher Tow, excursions to Guthega and days when we just played around the valley. All theBe doings were nicely timed to coincide with meals which were large and delightlaily ​often. Tuesday of the second week saw us climbing Mt. Duncan with Mr. Duncan as the intrepid leader. We did take an offering to the gods, but I don't think that they could have liked Marcelle'​s scones for that night we got a blizzard. However, it did not blizzard so hard that we could not go to a party at Warragang the following night. The party was to celebrate Bob Strizek'​s (the snowmobile driver) birthday. He told us after that it was the best birthday that he had +Half an hour later we started off again loaded down to the gunwhales with two Chalet types. A few miles further along the car started to make queer clanging noises so we stopped hurriedly. ​Eeek!! ​the fan was kaput, the engine was boiling and we were in danger of blowing upAn hour later we got going again and eventually made Smiggins where we met the rest of the mob. 
-19. + 
-ever had and we agreed heartily and only wished that it had been ours. I was the only non-drinker in the party and drank Coco Cola while the others had a variety of things from Punch to Vodka. Surprisingly ​nnough ​though, it.was I who had the hangover the following day. Whatever we did drink, however, had the desired effect for we skiied the mile home in just over 10 minutes. The following morning this verse appeared in the Trips Book of the hut:- +The ride up in the Snowmobile was as eventful as usual, with the mobile going hippity hop over the small bumps and tottering to the top of big ones, then taking a head-first dive and landing with a bump which makes you think that all your birthdays have come at once. We were dumped off at the road and climbed on to skiis and into packs for the long climb to the hut. I started off first as I had no climbing skins and skidded the first hundred yards on the seat of my pants till I came to a flat bit and managed to get to my feet. About half way up the hill I heard a loud skidding sound and as I wasn't moving at the time was concluding that it must be someone else when a voice said, "Hullo love. I'll take your pack," and there was a tall handsome bearded ​skiier, namely Mr. Schafer. All arrived at the hut for lunch except Bob who had taken the car back to the Hotel to bed it down for the fortnight. 
-There was a young skier named Duncan Staggered home from Warragang drunken, As he fell on his bed+ 
 +The days after that all run together, punctuated by memories of climbs to Cooma Hut and the Perisher Tow, excursions to Guthega and days when we just played around the valley. All these doings were nicely timed to coincide with meals which were large and delightfully ​often. Tuesday of the second week saw us climbing Mt. Duncan with Mr. Duncan as the intrepid leader. We did take an offering to the gods, but I don't think that they could have liked Marcelle'​s scones for that night we got a blizzard. However, it did not blizzard so hard that we could not go to a party at Warragang the following night. The party was to celebrate Bob Strizek'​s (the snowmobile driver) birthday. He told us after that it was the best birthday that he had ever had and we agreed heartily and only wished that it had been ours. I was the only non-drinker in the party and drank Coco Cola while the others had a variety of things from Punch to Vodka. Surprisingly ​enough ​though, it was I who had the hangover the following day. Whatever we did drink, however, had the desired effect for we skiied the mile home in just over 10 minutes. The following morning this verse appeared in the Trips Book of the hut:- 
 + 
 +There was a young skier named Duncan 
 +Staggered home from Warragang drunken, 
 +As he fell on his bed
 In low tones he said, In low tones he said,
-"​Never,​ never no more double-bunken4+"​Never,​ never no more double-bunken!" 
-Saturday morning we were up early nclad left the hut by 9 ofclook. At Smiggins we found that the road was closed at the Hotel, so we had to ski down. Uggl Five miles to the Hotel but it felt like fiftyl ​Two hours later we rrived ​there to find that Bob had nearly dug the car out. The engine was behaving itself but didnft ​seem to want to go for very long. Then we discovered that the exhaust was completely blocked with ice, and spent the next two hours trying to free it. + 
-Finally we got to Cooma and stopped for a meal. The people in the cafe must have had a bit of a shock when we walked ​int Bob capering about in his "skin of a sacred pie-eyed wombat and a pair of socks, and Marcell ​and I looking very elegant in baggy ski pants, damp windjackets and our climbing skins wound around our waists. But the meal was super.+Saturday morning we were up early and left the hut by 9 o'​clock. At Smiggins we found that the road was closed at the Hotel, so we had to ski down. Ugg! Five miles to the Hotel but it felt like fifty! ​Two hours later we arrived ​there to find that Bob had nearly dug the car out. The engine was behaving itself but didn'​t ​seem to want to go for very long. Then we discovered that the exhaust was completely blocked with ice, and spent the next two hours trying to free it. 
 + 
 +Finally we got to Cooma and stopped for a meal. The people in the cafe must have had a bit of a shock when we walked ​in, Bob capering about in his "skin of a sacred pie-eyed wombat" ​and a pair of socks, and Marcelle ​and I looking very elegant in baggy ski pants, damp windjackets and our climbing skins wound around our waists. But the meal was super. 
 One thing about going to Kossi, you appreciate home when you get back. One thing about going to Kossi, you appreciate home when you get back.
  
-===== Federation Report ​August ​=====+===== FEDERATION REPORT ​AUGUST ​=====
  
 by Brian Harvey by Brian Harvey
Line 407: Line 401:
 **Federation Ball:​** ​ Walkers are reminded that this will be held at Hotel Australia on Sat., 6th Oct.  Early bookings will be necessary with Club Social Secretaries as the number of tickets is limited. **Federation Ball:​** ​ Walkers are reminded that this will be held at Hotel Australia on Sat., 6th Oct.  Early bookings will be necessary with Club Social Secretaries as the number of tickets is limited.
  
-===== Paddy Made =====+===== PADDY MADE =====
  
 Hand made Italian Boots Hand made Italian Boots
195609.txt · Last modified: 2019/03/14 13:35 by vievems