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195608 [2018/09/25 04:04]
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 - Jim Brown - Jim Brown
  
-In "South Col" the writer, Wilfred-Noyce,​ offers a sub-title "One man's adventure on the Ascent of Everest 1953," and without prejudice I could farly dub this "one man's recollections of Paralyser, 1956" - You see, by noon on Sunday we were so widely scattered no one could hope to tell the story of all the parties and sub-parties and strays and individuals (of which I was one of the last named.)+In "South Col" the writer, Wilfred-Noyce,​ offers a sub-title "One man's adventure on the Ascent of Everest 1953," and without prejudice I could fairly ​dub this "one man's recollections of Paralyser, 1956" - You see, by noon on Sunday we were so widely scattered no one could hope to tell the story of all the parties and sub-parties and strays and individuals (of which I was one of the last named.)
  
-dareaay ​we should have realised it was going to be 'one of them trip'​s'​ when the leading locomotive stumbled over some debris carelessly knocked off an overhead bridge and did in its right semi-lunar cartilage. The second engine made valiant bids to lift back the crippled "​pilot"​ plus train on the 1 in 35 grade near Woodford, gave it away after some fine fireworks with slipping wheels and showering sparks and cinder-charged smoke, and we settled down to wait almost two hours for succour.+daresay ​we should have realised it was going to be 'one of them trip'​s'​ when the leading locomotive stumbled over some debris carelessly knocked off an overhead bridge and did in its right semi-lunar cartilage. The second engine made valiant bids to lift back the crippled "​pilot"​ plus train on the 1 in 35 grade near Woodford, gave it away after some fine fireworks with slipping wheels and showering sparks and cinder-charged smoke, and we settled down to wait almost two hours for succour.
  
-The Admiral and the others, to a total of six who had gone forward in the Madden car, were still sitting or sleeping in our tourist bus outside Katoomba station, where we dragged in at 11.45 p.m., 5 1/4 hours out of Central and pursued by sundry Mails - almost as though our hussy of a train were Marelyn ​Munroe.+The Admiral and the others, to a total of six who had gone forward in the Madden car, were still sitting or sleeping in our tourist bus outside Katoomba station, where we dragged in at 11.45 p.m., 5 1/4 hours out of Central and pursued by sundry Mails - almost as though our hussy of a train were Marilyn ​Munroe.
  
 The coach trip out to Morong Creek was, as you must know, singularly uneventful. Some dozed fitfully and a nearly full moon silvered the frosty landscape, and the head-lamps wheeled ahead on a succession of white posts and avenues of quivering foliage. Up the hill past Jenolan we began to see patches of snow, and at the Oberon Road junction it was lying thickly in sheltered places. A quarter to three it was when we shuffled out into the tingling air at Morong Crk. and I had just enough time to pitch my tent hastily before my fingers became quite helpless. The pain of circulation returning after I was in my sleeping bag kept me awake long enough to hear the leader'​s final threat to "move off at seven o'​clock."​ The coach trip out to Morong Creek was, as you must know, singularly uneventful. Some dozed fitfully and a nearly full moon silvered the frosty landscape, and the head-lamps wheeled ahead on a succession of white posts and avenues of quivering foliage. Up the hill past Jenolan we began to see patches of snow, and at the Oberon Road junction it was lying thickly in sheltered places. A quarter to three it was when we shuffled out into the tingling air at Morong Crk. and I had just enough time to pitch my tent hastily before my fingers became quite helpless. The pain of circulation returning after I was in my sleeping bag kept me awake long enough to hear the leader'​s final threat to "move off at seven o'​clock."​
  
-Of course we didn'​t. No one stirred until about seven, and the overcast morning with some ground mist wasn't exactly inspiring. To think our lovely moonlit night had degenerated into this! At least it was fairly mild, and once the Admiral, by great exertions, had his party moving, they managed to be on the road at 8.30. The formula was 1.7 miles back along the road, then rorth-east on to the ridge and then east. There was plenty of icy, crystalline snow in places - as though a giant had carelessly ​spripkled ​the landscape with his salt-shaker - and when we left the road and took to the scrub I soon found my sneakers were icing up.+Of course we didn'​t. No one stirred until about seven, and the overcast morning with some ground mist wasn't exactly inspiring. To think our lovely moonlit night had degenerated into this! At least it was fairly mild, and once the Admiral, by great exertions, had his party moving, they managed to be on the road at 8.30. The formula was 1.7 miles back along the road, then north-east on to the ridge and then east. There was plenty of icy, crystalline snow in places - as though a giant had carelessly ​sprinkled ​the landscape with his salt-shaker - and when we left the road and took to the scrub I soon found my sneakers were icing up.
  
 For about a mile the terrain was fairly flat, and so damnably featureless. The Admiral dashed around out in front, wending a compass and curbing those who were persistently swinging away to the north. Knowing there were a few others who had "​Paralysed"​ in previous years I thought they were being tough on the Admiral and withholding counsel. Only later I realised that the 1954 and 1955 Paralyser expeditions had also found a measure of strife in picking up the spur - so probably no one knew anyway. Half an hour off the road came the crucial moment. Ahead our "​ridge"​ dipped into a small saddle. To the 1eft a creek was forming which appeared to flow north-east; to the right another gully deepened to the south. "Damn the torpedoes!"​ quoth the Admiral in effect. "​I'​m too cold to linger. Full speed ahead!"​ And we walked plumb on to the Paralyser spur just like that. For about a mile the terrain was fairly flat, and so damnably featureless. The Admiral dashed around out in front, wending a compass and curbing those who were persistently swinging away to the north. Knowing there were a few others who had "​Paralysed"​ in previous years I thought they were being tough on the Admiral and withholding counsel. Only later I realised that the 1954 and 1955 Paralyser expeditions had also found a measure of strife in picking up the spur - so probably no one knew anyway. Half an hour off the road came the crucial moment. Ahead our "​ridge"​ dipped into a small saddle. To the 1eft a creek was forming which appeared to flow north-east; to the right another gully deepened to the south. "Damn the torpedoes!"​ quoth the Admiral in effect. "​I'​m too cold to linger. Full speed ahead!"​ And we walked plumb on to the Paralyser spur just like that.
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 Breakfast Creek was a shock. You know how it's usually a trickle of clear water over a bed of lovely smooth pebbles of many colours? Well, here it was, bashing and boiling along, almost waist deep at some of the crossings, discoloured and with quite respectable pressure waves. I honestly believe I'd have abandoned it and pushed on up the Cox to Tinpot Ridge if I hadn't come up with Dorothy Barr and Geoff Broadhead here. As it was, we forced a passage as a trio, linking arms to negotiate the worst crossings and cutting down the 37 fords to about 11. That meant, of course, clambering along some very slender pads, often going high, and sometimes wading around the foot of projecting ridges. At about 3 o'​clock,​ after more than two hours of the battle, we snatched a hasty lunch, standing on a few boulders while the rain rattled on our capes; that is, it rattled on theirs, and on the tattered remains of mine. Breakfast Creek was a shock. You know how it's usually a trickle of clear water over a bed of lovely smooth pebbles of many colours? Well, here it was, bashing and boiling along, almost waist deep at some of the crossings, discoloured and with quite respectable pressure waves. I honestly believe I'd have abandoned it and pushed on up the Cox to Tinpot Ridge if I hadn't come up with Dorothy Barr and Geoff Broadhead here. As it was, we forced a passage as a trio, linking arms to negotiate the worst crossings and cutting down the 37 fords to about 11. That meant, of course, clambering along some very slender pads, often going high, and sometimes wading around the foot of projecting ridges. At about 3 o'​clock,​ after more than two hours of the battle, we snatched a hasty lunch, standing on a few boulders while the rain rattled on our capes; that is, it rattled on theirs, and on the tattered remains of mine.
  
-We came to Carlon'​s Creek shortly after four, and Geoff decided to remove some of the rubbish which had entered his boots. I knew if I stayed during this operation I'd probably freeze up entirely. Also I had some notion that, if the racehorses ahead had made a proper ​luuch halt, I may chance to overtake, and could give a progress report on the movements of at least two of the party, plus a negative on the Admiral and his team who must be having a shocking journey. At all events, I parted from Dot and Geoff and strode out, still trying to walk some warmth into my shivering carcase.+We came to Carlon'​s Creek shortly after four, and Geoff decided to remove some of the rubbish which had entered his boots. I knew if I stayed during this operation I'd probably freeze up entirely. Also I had some notion that, if the racehorses ahead had made a proper ​lunch halt, I may chance to overtake, and could give a progress report on the movements of at least two of the party, plus a negative on the Admiral and his team who must be having a shocking journey. At all events, I parted from Dot and Geoff and strode out, still trying to walk some warmth into my shivering carcase.
  
 I Passed Carlon'​s in fading light about 5.10, and decided against calling in as I was just thawing slightly, and my spurt of energy carried me on to the top of the hill, where I rested a few minutes in the old shed, pulled on a sweater and draped my ragged pieces of plastic about me and went on by torchlight. I Passed Carlon'​s in fading light about 5.10, and decided against calling in as I was just thawing slightly, and my spurt of energy carried me on to the top of the hill, where I rested a few minutes in the old shed, pulled on a sweater and draped my ragged pieces of plastic about me and went on by torchlight.
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 The next couple of hours merge into a strange dreamlike kind of march. Rain was still falling, and everywhere water was cascading, running, flowing. The night was full of the sounds - the thousand soft and angry, gentle and fierce, soothing and disturbing sounds that water can make. My feet splashed and swished through a succession of pools and gutters and creeks. By now my spasm of energy was spent; I was dragging, and my pack getting wetter and heavier. If I had seen any shelter, any place tolerably dry, in Megalong, I believe I'd have stopped then and there. I didn't - the whole landscape was awash. I traced the approach to Devil'​s Hole by following what seemed like a creek. The next couple of hours merge into a strange dreamlike kind of march. Rain was still falling, and everywhere water was cascading, running, flowing. The night was full of the sounds - the thousand soft and angry, gentle and fierce, soothing and disturbing sounds that water can make. My feet splashed and swished through a succession of pools and gutters and creeks. By now my spasm of energy was spent; I was dragging, and my pack getting wetter and heavier. If I had seen any shelter, any place tolerably dry, in Megalong, I believe I'd have stopped then and there. I didn't - the whole landscape was awash. I traced the approach to Devil'​s Hole by following what seemed like a creek.
  
-In a dazed, numb kind of way I made the climb, and finally came to the overhan:​gjust ​below the Hole itself. There I stopped abruptly. From the darkness ahead came a frightening sound of a great volume of tumbling water. It occurred to me that it might be dangerous to try the Hole itself solo, and with a failing torch it was not the time to take chances. Here was refuge of a kind - the gravel at the back of the overhang was almost dry.+In a dazed, numb kind of way I made the climb, and finally came to the overhang just below the Hole itself. There I stopped abruptly. From the darkness ahead came a frightening sound of a great volume of tumbling water. It occurred to me that it might be dangerous to try the Hole itself solo, and with a failing torch it was not the time to take chances. Here was refuge of a kind - the gravel at the back of the overhang was almost dry.
  
 The decision made, I lost no time. Off with my wettest clothes, on with the driest in my pack, and into my rather moist sleeping bag. As my hands became warm I realised that "​dry"​ was quite a relative term - my bag was really very wet, as were the slacks and shirt that came from my sodden pack. Yet in a short while I was comfortably warm in a humid sort of way, and I fished out some fragments of food. For the first time I looked at my watch and found it was just after 9 p.m. I assumed I had reached my funk-hole about 8.30, after almost 12 hours literally on my feet. (I sat down for 2 or 3 minutes only twice all day). All that to make some 22 miles or so! The decision made, I lost no time. Off with my wettest clothes, on with the driest in my pack, and into my rather moist sleeping bag. As my hands became warm I realised that "​dry"​ was quite a relative term - my bag was really very wet, as were the slacks and shirt that came from my sodden pack. Yet in a short while I was comfortably warm in a humid sort of way, and I fished out some fragments of food. For the first time I looked at my watch and found it was just after 9 p.m. I assumed I had reached my funk-hole about 8.30, after almost 12 hours literally on my feet. (I sat down for 2 or 3 minutes only twice all day). All that to make some 22 miles or so!
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 === Club membership === === Club membership ===
  
-In all the discussions we have had in meetings about maintaining or increasing Club membership, we have discussed only the means of attracting new members. Even if we had unlimited resources for publicity we would be up against it to sell bushwalking to a public which prefers to leave exertion to horses, dogs and top-line sportsmen and only walks when forced to do so by parking restrictions. Carrying a pack up and down mountains through the bush in heat, cold or wet, and camping in a little tent on the ground just doesn'​t appeal to a public that can absorbe ​its pleasures and see the countryside without any exertion or discomfort.+In all the discussions we have had in meetings about maintaining or increasing Club membership, we have discussed only the means of attracting new members. Even if we had unlimited resources for publicity we would be up against it to sell bushwalking to a public which prefers to leave exertion to horses, dogs and top-line sportsmen and only walks when forced to do so by parking restrictions. Carrying a pack up and down mountains through the bush in heat, cold or wet, and camping in a little tent on the ground just doesn'​t appeal to a public that can absorb ​its pleasures and see the countryside without any exertion or discomfort.
  
 In our discussions the fact has been overlooked that we do, nevertheless,​ induce quite a number of hardy or adventurous souls to come into the Club, pay their application fee, and probably attend a walk or two. Perhaps one in five become members. Of these a big percentage drop out fairly soon. Perhaps one in ten become active walkers, and one in a hundred take a lifelong interest in the Club. All we need do, then, is to reduce our turnover, of both prospectives and members, and our numbers will be adequate. In our discussions the fact has been overlooked that we do, nevertheless,​ induce quite a number of hardy or adventurous souls to come into the Club, pay their application fee, and probably attend a walk or two. Perhaps one in five become members. Of these a big percentage drop out fairly soon. Perhaps one in ten become active walkers, and one in a hundred take a lifelong interest in the Club. All we need do, then, is to reduce our turnover, of both prospectives and members, and our numbers will be adequate.
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   - For those who like hard walks:- Encourage the prospectives and new members who are capable of them to join in. These walks are a kind of challenge to new members, and there is no better way of getting to know members than to go on them.   - For those who like hard walks:- Encourage the prospectives and new members who are capable of them to join in. These walks are a kind of challenge to new members, and there is no better way of getting to know members than to go on them.
  
-If everybody does what they can towards helping the prospecttves ​and making them feel welcome, I don't think we need worry about keeping up our numbers.+If everybody does what they can towards helping the prospectives ​and making them feel welcome, I don't think we need worry about keeping up our numbers.
  
 Yours sincerely, Yours sincerely,
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   * Hon. Treasurer - (Mrs.) M.L. Fox   * Hon. Treasurer - (Mrs.) M.L. Fox
  
-__Affiliation Fees__: 9d. per. member based on the membership on June 30th, 1956, with a mimimum ​rate of 10/-. Interstate clubs to pay 7/6 per hundred members with a maximum of 15/-+__Affiliation Fees__: 9d. per. member based on the membership on June 30th, 1956, with a minimum ​rate of 10/-. Interstate clubs to pay 7/6 per hundred members with a maximum of 15/-
  
 === July Meeting. === === July Meeting. ===
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 Bob Duncan led his team of seven (1 prospective) as per programme. The weather was good and the trip enjoyable, even if Jack Perry did start breaking sticks at 4 a.m. on Sunday morning waking the rest of the party up. Bob reported that a long road bash can be avoided by walking around the side of Mt. Shipley; gullies are few and the going good. Bob Duncan led his team of seven (1 prospective) as per programme. The weather was good and the trip enjoyable, even if Jack Perry did start breaking sticks at 4 a.m. on Sunday morning waking the rest of the party up. Bob reported that a long road bash can be avoided by walking around the side of Mt. Shipley; gullies are few and the going good.
  
-The President led the Signday ​walk in the Roach Trig - Terry Hills area. It was a bit early for flowers but the attendance of eleven members and three prospectives made a very pleasant day out.+The President led the Sunday ​walk in the Roach Trig - Terry Hills area. It was a bit early for flowers but the attendance of eleven members and three prospectives made a very pleasant day out.
  
 Now we come to __the__ trip ("I deny it," said the Admiral.) Friday night, good weather and 15 starters, including one prospective. A slight variation to the trip was made in that Breakfast Creek would be the exit route. Another variation was that less than half the party returned home on time. To give you some of the atmosphere I quote from the trip report: "From Kanangra Rd. at Morong Crk. to the Cox River on Saturday no views were possible due to thick fog and mist. Sunday was different, no views were possible due to continuous rain and low clouds."​ And there you have it. Very heavy rains caused the waterways to rise sharply, with consequences such as you shall read in the articles appearing in this issue. Now we come to __the__ trip ("I deny it," said the Admiral.) Friday night, good weather and 15 starters, including one prospective. A slight variation to the trip was made in that Breakfast Creek would be the exit route. Another variation was that less than half the party returned home on time. To give you some of the atmosphere I quote from the trip report: "From Kanangra Rd. at Morong Crk. to the Cox River on Saturday no views were possible due to thick fog and mist. Sunday was different, no views were possible due to continuous rain and low clouds."​ And there you have it. Very heavy rains caused the waterways to rise sharply, with consequences such as you shall read in the articles appearing in this issue.
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 Air embolism is a condition in which air enters the vascular system - veins and arteries - and may cause a variety of symptoms and signs depending on where it settles. Air embolism is a condition in which air enters the vascular system - veins and arteries - and may cause a variety of symptoms and signs depending on where it settles.
  
-The mechanism of entry of air into the circulacion ​is as follows. Whilst underwater, air breathed from the aqualung is at the same pressure as the surrounding water, and this pressure increases one atmosphere for every 33 ft. below the surface. At 20 ft. down the pressure exerted is 10 lbs. per sq. inch above the normal atmospheric pressure. Whilst remaining submerged and breathing, even at much greater depths, the diver is quite safe, but should he surface without exhaling, or at least keeping a free airway between lungs and open mouth, the air in his lungs will expand as the external pressure diminishes. This expanding air can rupture the thin alveolar wall which separates air and blood, and access to the circulation is achieved. A pressure of 10 lb. is more than enough to rupture the alveolar wall. Fright is said sometimes to cause spasm of the glottis, thus preventing exhalation.+The mechanism of entry of air into the circulation ​is as follows. Whilst underwater, air breathed from the aqualung is at the same pressure as the surrounding water, and this pressure increases one atmosphere for every 33 ft. below the surface. At 20 ft. down the pressure exerted is 10 lbs. per sq. inch above the normal atmospheric pressure. Whilst remaining submerged and breathing, even at much greater depths, the diver is quite safe, but should he surface without exhaling, or at least keeping a free airway between lungs and open mouth, the air in his lungs will expand as the external pressure diminishes. This expanding air can rupture the thin alveolar wall which separates air and blood, and access to the circulation is achieved. A pressure of 10 lb. is more than enough to rupture the alveolar wall. Fright is said sometimes to cause spasm of the glottis, thus preventing exhalation.
  
 Once in the bloodstream,​ the air may go to one or more of several places. It may go to the limbs where it can cause transient pain, and perhaps will do little damage. It may travel to the heart and lodge in one of the coronary arteries supplying blood to the muscular wall of that organ causing what is in effect a coronary occlusion, or it may go to the brain and cause a cerebral catastrophe. Spontaneous collapse of a lung is another possibility. Once in the bloodstream,​ the air may go to one or more of several places. It may go to the limbs where it can cause transient pain, and perhaps will do little damage. It may travel to the heart and lodge in one of the coronary arteries supplying blood to the muscular wall of that organ causing what is in effect a coronary occlusion, or it may go to the brain and cause a cerebral catastrophe. Spontaneous collapse of a lung is another possibility.
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 The gods who shape the course of man sat together on Mt. OlYmpus locking down on the 15 unsuspecting individuals who had embarked on the Admiral'​s Paralyser trip. "​It'​s time we had some fun," they rumbled, rubbing their hands together in anticipation. The gods who shape the course of man sat together on Mt. OlYmpus locking down on the 15 unsuspecting individuals who had embarked on the Admiral'​s Paralyser trip. "​It'​s time we had some fun," they rumbled, rubbing their hands together in anticipation.
  
-The Admiral was very cocky right from the start; Garth was on time at the Hyde Post Office, I was on time at Hyde station with the down train, Brian was on time with the up train. Despite a last-minute dash of packing Stan was not late to pick us up and we drove on towards Parramatta collecting a waiting Dawn, and Vivian was on time at Parramatta station. "This is faatastic," crowed the Admiral. "This is the first time a trip of mine has gone according to schedule!"​ "​Don'​t speak too soon," we warned him. (The gods winked and moved in their seats. "Not yet," they smirked - Not yet!")+The Admiral was very cocky right from the start; Garth was on time at the Hyde Post Office, I was on time at Hyde station with the down train, Brian was on time with the up train. Despite a last-minute dash of packing Stan was not late to pick us up and we drove on towards Parramatta collecting a waiting Dawn, and Vivian was on time at Parramatta station. "This is fantastic," crowed the Admiral. "This is the first time a trip of mine has gone according to schedule!"​ "​Don'​t speak too soon," we warned him. (The gods winked and moved in their seats. "Not yet," they smirked - Not yet!")
  
 We made good time and reached Katoomba by 9, and there was our hired bus waiting to take us on to Kanangra just as soon as the train should arrive with the rest of the party. The Admiral glowed visibly (and audibly) at this further sign of his good management. Stan shot off down Lurline St. and parked his car at Snow's parents'​ house and was back in a quarter of an hour as the train was due in at 9.15. Then we settled ourselves into the bus to await the others. And we waited... and waited.... and waited. By about 10.15 Garth could stand the suspense no longer and went over and asked the Station Master the reason for the delay. "An overhead bridge at Linden has subsided due to an explosion and the engines can't fit through,"​ said the Station Master. "​They'​re shunting the carriages through and some engines will be sent down from this end to fetch them on their way. It'll take a couple of hours."​ Garth came back and reported the matter. We made good time and reached Katoomba by 9, and there was our hired bus waiting to take us on to Kanangra just as soon as the train should arrive with the rest of the party. The Admiral glowed visibly (and audibly) at this further sign of his good management. Stan shot off down Lurline St. and parked his car at Snow's parents'​ house and was back in a quarter of an hour as the train was due in at 9.15. Then we settled ourselves into the bus to await the others. And we waited... and waited.... and waited. By about 10.15 Garth could stand the suspense no longer and went over and asked the Station Master the reason for the delay. "An overhead bridge at Linden has subsided due to an explosion and the engines can't fit through,"​ said the Station Master. "​They'​re shunting the carriages through and some engines will be sent down from this end to fetch them on their way. It'll take a couple of hours."​ Garth came back and reported the matter.
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 With the Junction in sight, half the party bashed ahead to get a lunch fire going, leaving the leader to follow at a slower pace with the others. The vanguard were just shooting off on the wrong spur when Garth recognised the right one and we called the Madden crowd back. But no! To retrace their steps a hundred yards would be too great an effort - they would go down their spur. The result was Garth and I were down at the junction at 1.30 and it was well over half an hour before the Madden group showed up after a mile or so extra along the ridge and fighting their way down the overgrown creek. With the Junction in sight, half the party bashed ahead to get a lunch fire going, leaving the leader to follow at a slower pace with the others. The vanguard were just shooting off on the wrong spur when Garth recognised the right one and we called the Madden crowd back. But no! To retrace their steps a hundred yards would be too great an effort - they would go down their spur. The result was Garth and I were down at the junction at 1.30 and it was well over half an hour before the Madden group showed up after a mile or so extra along the ridge and fighting their way down the overgrown creek.
  
-By 3 o'​clock all the early arrivals had finished lunch but we were still minus the others. But now into our peaceful midst crashed numerous bods declaring hotly that __it was all Snow's fault__! He had set off with them down one spur, which wasn't the right one, admitted his blunder and returned, to go down another. The Admiral, shepherding his harem along, followed. His blood pressure was just sinking to normal after his ire at having been led down a wrong ridge when Snow's voice came quavering up from below, "​Admiral,​ I've blundered again!"​ About turn. Back up again with an anxious eye on Vivian and Dawn who by this time were visably ​wilting, and off on a third attempt. This brought Snow's gang into our midst, but it was some time before the volcanic Admiral put in an appearance... __and where the hell is Ernie__? He had been with the Admiral ten minutes back on the ridge, but now? Odearodearodear! (So __it was all Ernie'​s fault__, huh?) The Admiral wiped his fevered brow and decided to camp right where he was and collect Ernie, then come on and join us at Kanangra Clearing by 8 o'​clock tomorrow. So the rest of us pushed off to Kanangra Clearing, which took little over an hour, had tea and a short session round the camp fire till the rain started, then hit the bracken and didn't wake up till 7 a.m.+By 3 o'​clock all the early arrivals had finished lunch but we were still minus the others. But now into our peaceful midst crashed numerous bods declaring hotly that __it was all Snow's fault__! He had set off with them down one spur, which wasn't the right one, admitted his blunder and returned, to go down another. The Admiral, shepherding his harem along, followed. His blood pressure was just sinking to normal after his ire at having been led down a wrong ridge when Snow's voice came quavering up from below, "​Admiral,​ I've blundered again!"​ About turn. Back up again with an anxious eye on Vivian and Dawn who by this time were visibly ​wilting, and off on a third attempt. This brought Snow's gang into our midst, but it was some time before the volcanic Admiral put in an appearance... __and where the hell is Ernie__? He had been with the Admiral ten minutes back on the ridge, but now? Odearodearodear! (So __it was all Ernie'​s fault__, huh?) The Admiral wiped his fevered brow and decided to camp right where he was and collect Ernie, then come on and join us at Kanangra Clearing by 8 o'​clock tomorrow. So the rest of us pushed off to Kanangra Clearing, which took little over an hour, had tea and a short session round the camp fire till the rain started, then hit the bracken and didn't wake up till 7 a.m.
  
-No sign of the rear party by 8, so off pushed Jack Perry who had been up and warbling round the breakfast fire since crack of dawn. No sign by 9. At 9.15 action seemed to be called for. Stan and Snow would burn through to Katoomba and bring Stan's car back to Megalong Post Office for the Admiral'​s halt and lame. The rest of the party would go with them except Garth and I who would run back and take the girls' packs and see what was delaying the Admiral - perhaps a search party for Ernie was on the cards. However we hadn't gone very far when whom should we see but good old Ern himself plodding through the white water down the centre of the stream and giving the uncaring air the benefit of his opinions. "Hi there, Ernie!"​ we called, whereupon the flow of his imprecations ​becare ​more audible.... "fine b-- trip! Four b-- parties and not a b-- one of them knows what the b-- other is doing!"​+No sign of the rear party by 8, so off pushed Jack Perry who had been up and warbling round the breakfast fire since crack of dawn. No sign by 9. At 9.15 action seemed to be called for. Stan and Snow would burn through to Katoomba and bring Stan's car back to Megalong Post Office for the Admiral'​s halt and lame. The rest of the party would go with them except Garth and I who would run back and take the girls' packs and see what was delaying the Admiral - perhaps a search party for Ernie was on the cards. However we hadn't gone very far when whom should we see but good old Ern himself plodding through the white water down the centre of the stream and giving the uncaring air the benefit of his opinions. "Hi there, Ernie!"​ we called, whereupon the flow of his imprecations ​became ​more audible.... "fine b-- trip! Four b-- parties and not a b-- one of them knows what the b-- other is doing!"​
  
-"Did you meet up with the Admiral,"​ we asked. Yes, he had, and had left them back yonder still having breakfast. So we brought Ernie up to date on the movements of the rest of the mob and despatched him in pursuit, and continued back. Ha! Here at last is the valiant Anderson leading his party from behind with a vengeance. We took the girls' packs and trotted back through the rain to Kanangra Clearing. By now it was after 10. I kept Vivian'​s great heavy unweildy ​pack and gave her my light one, and Garth made it even lighter and took some of Dawn's weight as well, and so we began to tick off the long miles up the Cox.+"Did you meet up with the Admiral,"​ we asked. Yes, he had, and had left them back yonder still having breakfast. So we brought Ernie up to date on the movements of the rest of the mob and despatched him in pursuit, and continued back. Ha! Here at last is the valiant Anderson leading his party from behind with a vengeance. We took the girls' packs and trotted back through the rain to Kanangra Clearing. By now it was after 10. I kept Vivian'​s great heavy unwieldy ​pack and gave her my light one, and Garth made it even lighter and took some of Dawn's weight as well, and so we began to tick off the long miles up the Cox.
  
 You know, when you pound along the banks behind steam-engines like say Putt and Stitt and Wagg and Arnie the distance between Breakfast Creek and Kanangra River is a mere nothing - it hardly registers. But when you glance behind and see someone crawling on hands and knees over the boulders it comes as a tremendous shock. But no complaining from Vivian - poor little game little wench - just a timid request, "Would you mind not going too fast in front, Dot, I want to see where you put your feet." (!!!) You know, when you pound along the banks behind steam-engines like say Putt and Stitt and Wagg and Arnie the distance between Breakfast Creek and Kanangra River is a mere nothing - it hardly registers. But when you glance behind and see someone crawling on hands and knees over the boulders it comes as a tremendous shock. But no complaining from Vivian - poor little game little wench - just a timid request, "Would you mind not going too fast in front, Dot, I want to see where you put your feet." (!!!)
Line 439: Line 439:
 the hamburgers, and Ernie for the train fare home. the hamburgers, and Ernie for the train fare home.
  
-So into town by 9 p.m. Then as I'd promised ​myselft ​to see a New Zealand Alpine Club couple who were passing through Sydney this day I went straight to the Wentworth Hotel, gum leaf scented pants smoke-impregnated jumper and all, sodden pack dripping on the on the carpet, and edged my way through the dress-shirted,​ evening robed throng in the foyer. To the mountaineering Sims my arrival was like a keen blast of mountain air, but I must say I felt a bit conspicuous. Up to the Sims bedroom where we sat on the beds and talked Alpine Club doings for the rest of the evening. As I slunk out at midnight through the still-crowded lounge room an immaculate overdressed gentleman remarked to his consort in an incredulous voice "​She'​s going hiking!"​+So into town by 9 p.m. Then as I'd promised ​myself ​to see a New Zealand Alpine Club couple who were passing through Sydney this day I went straight to the Wentworth Hotel, gum leaf scented pants smoke-impregnated jumper and all, sodden pack dripping on the on the carpet, and edged my way through the dress-shirted,​ evening robed throng in the foyer. To the mountaineering Sims my arrival was like a keen blast of mountain air, but I must say I felt a bit conspicuous. Up to the Sims bedroom where we sat on the beds and talked Alpine Club doings for the rest of the evening. As I slunk out at midnight through the still-crowded lounge room an immaculate overdressed gentleman remarked to his consort in an incredulous voice "​She'​s going hiking!"​
  
 "Guess again, brother. I'​m'​ going home to bed." "Guess again, brother. I'​m'​ going home to bed."
Line 453: Line 453:
  
 Soft as a dewdrop,\\ Soft as a dewdrop,\\
-Cool ss a willow,\\+Cool as a willow,\\
 She layeth her bright head\\ She layeth her bright head\\
 Beside mine on the pillow. Beside mine on the pillow.
Line 459: Line 459:
 ---- ----
  
-GHASTLY ITTRESSIONS +===== Ghastly Impressions. ===== 
-or - Dawn Askew. + 
-NEVER WALK WITH AN ADIVIIan +- Dawn Askew. 
-UNLESS BE IS ADMIRABLE+ 
-and early and set the ridge leading aptly named. ​Sonieho, reading, the ridge wVat- +Or 
-began to descerid ​to Kanan ra. 4,5,,yr,4, came Snow's superb stroke of genius: white-7.41-1,​Aing,​Afril '4 it-!seIed lips cries of "Wrong ridge, Admiral' ​drifted up atilra o7;​r1.,​tattVe ​tones that we wereimmediately + 
-convinced ​ol8 dity,​$cs ​right. Just as we gained the ridge inSicaed bj-P.bilia-t'​ el al:​Y-eLuide ​we heard his cryagain, +=== Never walk with an Admiral unless he is admirable===== 
-"Wrong:tidgre I" Back ag: the choice we trudgedoi ​and + 
-Snow ga=ing' ​an even more e i +Some say 'it was all Snow's fault,'​ but the more generous of us admit that a few other ruinous elements fused on the night of Friday 23rd June expressly to lead astray the Admiral and his gallant crew. 
-zsv rg:Utation, as well as many new names. ​ISWever ​we soon t,​aus-k ​of all thmishaps: the + 
-ra. - +Actually 'it all began' when Dot threw her emptied gin bottle out of Madden'​s car and damaged the railway bridge. (Of course she denies this, but it's still a rumour). This unfortunate incident caused the first split in of would-be land-lubbers. One group waited trough half of eternity at Katoomba Station before it could be united with the train-travelling peasants of the second group. Eventually the complete party reached Morong Creek and settled down to endure a three hour freezing sleep midst snow and ice. 
-Dalai LaMa had blessed ​1. -0 rorgdt ​to bless the party. + 
-Nevertheless the p6rty-. ',Ards stain -United ​after successfully ​negot- +To the amazement of all and sundry, all the bods arose bright (?) and early and set off on a 1arge-scale treasure hunt, the prize being the ridge leading ​to Mt. Paralyser which, we discovered, was most aptly named. ​Somehowprobably through luck rather than good map-reading, the ridge was found and Paralyser conquered. Then, as we began to descend ​to Kanangra River, came Snow's superb stroke of genius: white-anting in reverseHis cries of "Wrong ridge, Admiral" ​drifted up to us in such authoritative ​tones that we were immediately convinced ​of our error and set off to the right. Just as we gained the ridge indicated by this reliable guide we heard his cry again, "​Wrong ​ridge!" Back again to the original ​choice we trudged, ​and Snow gained ​an even more impressive reputation, as well as many new names. ​However ​we soon hit upon the cause of all the mishaps: the Dalai Lama had blessed ​the ridge but forgot ​to bless the party. Nevertheless the party was again re-united ​after successfully ​negotiating ​'that terrible descent'​ to Kanangra ​River. Here camped four very tired bodies while the rest bashed on to the Cox, whence nine set out early for Carlon's and two waited for the rearguard. 
-iating 1-bl*t terriOlnescent,​ -6(3' ​,0 gra River. Here camped four + 
-s_ +Saturday night and Sunday brought a change from Saturday'​s heavy mist; it brought rainUp came the Cox, along which we had a slow but uneventful journey until we eventually reached Breakfast Creek which was, by this time, running a banquet. Nevertheless,​ so confident were we in our strength that we determined "nor will this gutter atop us from getting home tonight." Thank goodness we had Dot and Garth to encourage us from the front and Long Tack and Ern French to whip up on from behind. Little did we realise that the creek would grow and grow and grow and grow. At last the crossings had to be made six-strong, but with no serious mishap until the Admiral let out a blood-curdling scream: he was wet above the kneesOf course most of us had been in up to the armpits for some time. 
-very tiral-bodie'​d3'​inihile ​the rest bashed on to the Cox, whence nine + 
-set out early for Caxion's and two waited for the rearguard. ​,oec +As darkness descended more and more apt became ​the phrase 'Moan, groan, gloom, despair',​ until we reluctantly decided we must camp until daylight. ​Came a dreadful night in wet sleeping bags with only a handful of rice and apples to sustain us. Never was food more delicious
-Saturday night nnd Sunday brought a change from Saturday'​s heavy mist; it brought rainUp came the Cox, along which we had + 
-a slow but uneventful journey until we eventually reached Breakfast Creek which was, by this time, running a banquet. Nevertheless,​ so confident were we in our strength that we determined "nor will this +On Monday the creek was sidled quite successfully and the tired bodies dragged themselves over land and water to Carlon'​s where an interested audience heard the tales of woe and gave in return news of the advance guard. As wellthese generous people gave us a 'beam, gleam, supreme with steam,' ​cup of tea. 
-gutter atop us from getting home tonight," Thank goodness we had Dot and Garth to encourage us from the front and Long Tack and Ern French to whip up on from behind. Little did we realise that the creek would grow and grow and grow and grow. At last the crossings had to be made six-strong, but with no serious mishap until the Admiral let out a blood-curdling scream: he was wet above the kneesOf course most of us had been in up to the armpits for some time. + 
-As darkness descended more and more apt betathe ​the phrase 'Moan, groan, gloom, despair',​ until we reluctantly decided we must camp until daylight. ​Cpme a dreadful night in wet sleeping bags +And so to Sydney, where we found frantic families, frustrated bosses and jeering, ​hilarious, but very sympathetic work-mates. After all this, only 24 hours overdue! 
-with only a handful of rice and apples to sustain us. Never was food + 
-Some say tit was all Snow's fault,'​ but the more generous of us admit that a.few other ruinous elements fused on th'​6.r4ght of Friday +On recalling ​this trip four serious questions never cease to haunt me:- 
-23rd June expressly to lead astray the Admiral ada.  crew. 03r_ + 
-Actually 'it all began' when Dot threw her emptied 031-bottle out of Madden'​s car and damanged the railway bridge. (Of bourAei.i.he denies this, but it's still a rumour). This unfortunate caused the first slait in of woUld7be land-lubbers. +1. Why do people really give up warm, soft, dry beds and good food for bushwalking?​ 
-group waited trough half of eternity at XataoMba Station before it could be unitecT,Ith the train-travellg peasants of the second group. EventualItr the complete party reacheg Morong Creek and settle-d down to endure a" three hour freezing sleep midst snow and ice. + 
-+2. Why do we all quite honestly say it was 'a mighty trip'? 
-To the amazemen: of all and sun1ry, all the bods arose bright (?) +
-_ron a. 1arge-sc4e treasure hunt, the prie being ,​P4Jral'​yser which(, we discovered, was most TOIAbl7 throughluck rather than good map'-, bard' trid Pth-alyser conquered. Then, as we +
-22. +
-more delicious. +
-On Monday the creek was sidled quite successfully and the tired bodies dragged themselves over land Pn d water to Carlon'​s where an interested audience heard the tales of woe and gave in return news of the advance guard. As well these generouspeople gave us a 'beam, gleam, supreme with steam, cup of tea. +
-And so to Sydney, where we foand frantic families, frustrated bosses and jeering, ​hillarious, but very sympathetic work-mates. After allthis, only 24 hours overduel +
-On recalYing ​this trip four serious questions never cease to haunt me +
-.1 +
-do people really give up warm, soft, dry beds and good food for bushwalking?​ +
-2.. Why do we all quite honestly say it was 'a mighty trip' ?+
 3. Why are our feet not webbed? 3. Why are our feet not webbed?
 +
 4. Why are Snow and the Admiral still alive? 4. Why are Snow and the Admiral still alive?
-r. + 
-C. 4+---
-WHO'D BE PROSFECCItEl ​ + 
-Vivienne Willis +===== Who'd Be Prospective. ===== 
-Everyone was late, and "it was all :Snovi! _ Of course + 
-I don't know Snow, and it certainly ​wcsn:​Spow ​who made the bridge fall down because he was asleep--fn the hat-,rack, nor was it Show who made the weather, first bitterly ​6-old -arrld, ​then torrential ​r,ain'But - it was all Snow Is fault. ​- +Vivienne Willis 
-My family is quit P normaW an,af:therefore ​mo=4;​i_justly ​against Bushwalking. However from sev:​ei4al ​sources they were assured I'd be safely enfolded back into the home on Sunday night. ​ And so I gaily set out. + 
-My ardour was not daunted by queer looks or laughs as I made my +Everyone was late, and "it was all Snow's fault." ​Of course I don't know Snow, and it certainly ​wasn't Snow who made the bridge fall down because he was asleep ​in the hat-rack, nor was it Show who made the weather, first bitterly ​cold and then torrential ​rain. But - it was all Snow'​s ​fault. 
-way to the corner of Parrathattals ​Grace Bros.., nor was it daunted by + 
-the cold as we stepped into Katoomba'​s icy air. It began very quickly +My family is quite normal and therefore ​most justly ​against Bushwalking. However from several ​sources they were assured I'd be safely enfolded back into the home on Sunday night. And so I gaily set out. 
-to wear thin when, in the allotted four hours sleep in the snow at Morong Creek my feet bacame ​colder and colder. + 
-Breakfast over and it began. How long can a nightmare last? "Moan, groan, gloom, despair."​ Yes, I certainly had my share of each How I cursed myself, but we couldn'​t turn back.  "Blast these boots" - new, obviously. And 'then my fleeting contact with Snows "​You'​re on the wrong ridge!"​ And that finished me. My ardour had long since gone and in its place' ​the most frightening misery --. and hunger. +My ardour was not daunted by queer looks or laughs as I made my way to the corner of Parramatta'​s ​Grace Bros., nor was it daunted by the cold as we stepped into Katoomba'​s icy air. It began very quickly to wear thin when, in the allotted four hours sleep in the snow at Morong Creek my feet became ​colder and colder. 
-And then twelve hours peace in the spot to which all prospective, ​should be taken, just to justify themselves for ever walking. Too + 
-23. +Breakfast over and it began. How long can a nightmare last? "Moan, groan, gloom, despair."​ Yes, I certainly had my share of eachHow I cursed myself, but we couldn'​t turn back. "Blast these boots" - new, obviously. And then my fleeting contact with Snow! "​You'​re on the wrong ridge!"​ And that finished me. My ardour had long since gone and in its place the most frightening misery - and hunger. 
-soon we were on the march again, this time a new hazard - RainThe smallest creeks were changing and were soon to become raging torrents. Our consolation was that by seven that night we'd be back in safety. And so somehow we became slower and slower, and the rain became harder and harder. But there were our three guardian angels, and how heaven was thanked for them: + 
-Can anyone in their right minds honestly find joy in sleeping in the wet? But would I do it again? Of course ​ll But now we were late: moan, groan, gloom, despair! +And then twelve hours peace in the spot to which all prospectives ​should be taken, just to justify themselves for ever walking. Too soon we were on the march again, this time a new hazard - RainThe smallest creeks were changing and were soon to become raging torrents. Our consolation was that by seven that night we'd be back in safety. And so somehow we became slower and slower, and the rain became harder and harder. But there were our three guardian angels, and how heaven was thanked for them
-Monday dawned, and as if to encourage us there waa-no rain. Just lank and limp dripping shrubs, lurking nettles and slippery rocks. ​up a mountain, down the same, gained about twenty feet,, But the angels assured us when the fork was reached it would be "​chicken-feed"​ - And I suppose it was - but not to a foot-sore, leg-sore, hungry prospective who only wanted to get to Canon's. + 
-And then we were there. Everything, for the time being, was forgotten. But we still wBren't close enough to real civilization. So - press on After trudging, then shuffling and panting step after step up the mountain, we were in the Megalong Valley. The sun was pouring onto us and the angels by this time had more than a faint illumination above their heads. +Can anyone in their right minds honestly find joy in sleeping in the wet? But would I do it again? Of course!! But now we were late! Moan, groan, gloom, despair! 
-We rode out of the valley in luxurious style warmed by the last luscious pint of soup. And sorpback ​to near-frantic ​p9rents ​and not quite sure of my own sanity, but.; + 
-Yes, I'd be a prouecqve, but don't ask the reason. Probably because it was all SnowAaultX r. +Monday dawned, and as if to encourage us there was no rain. Just lank and limp dripping shrubs, lurking nettles and slippery rocks. ​Up a mountain, down the same, gained about twenty feetBut the angels assured us when the fork was reached it would be "​chicken-feed"​ - And I suppose it was - but not to a foot-sore, leg-sore, hungry prospective who only wanted to get to Carlon's. 
-"​Medical ​PractitionAr" sends us (-bilis mdrith's Health Hint: + 
-,u+And then we were there. Everything, for the time being, was forgotten. But we still weren't close enough to real civilization. So - press onAfter trudging, then shuffling and panting step after step up the mountain, we were in the Megalong Valley. The sun was pouring onto us and the angels by this time had more than a faint illumination above their heads. 
 + 
 +We rode out of the valley in luxurious style warmed by the last luscious pint of soup. And so back to near-frantic ​parents ​and not quite sure of my own sanity, but
 + 
 +Yes, I'd be a prospective, but don't ask the reason. Probably because it was all Snow's fault! 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +"​Medical ​Practitioner" sends us this month's Health Hint: 
 Water taken in moderation cannot hurt anybody. Water taken in moderation cannot hurt anybody.
-****** ​         
-GLOOMY THOUGHTS on th part of the Leader who has ordered a 7 a.m., start: 
-The mob is about to get gatag,... That is, they are all set to start To plan to prepare to get ready To begin to commence to depart. 
  
-AU REVOIR: This month we say good-bye to two members who will ba greatly missed in the Club; Ross to England for two years, and Garth home to New Zealand for who knows how long. +---- 
-"""''​ 1714', + 
-5 +__Gloomy thoughts__ on the part of the Leader who has ordered a 7 a.m. start: 
-HAND MADE ITALIAN BOOTS + 
-Paddy has secured a shipment of medium weight rubber-soled +The mob is about to get going....\\ 
-MOUNTAIN BOOTS+That is, they are all set to start\\ 
-They are hand made and come from Italy. These boots were shipped in error and Paddyhas bought them cheap. +To plan to prepare to get ready\\ 
-They would normally sell at ,E,10+To begin to commence to depart. 
-p_y_can ​sell them for 7+ 
-Sizes available: 6- 10 THEY'​RE ​ GOOD! +---- 
-Phone:​BM2685 + 
-PADDY PA L 1 +__Au revoir__: This month we say good-bye to two members who will be greatly missed in the Club; Ross to England for two years, and Garth home to New Zealand for who knows how long. 
-Licliitz,​KicitP amp Gear + 
-SL+---- 
-2Ch CA RAH SYDNEy + 
-iwo010011.000001wolaskaMPPIt~..10irwr +===== Paddy Made. ===== 
-'​C)U-17-1 + 
-IVA-n(3NR IPACM +=== Hand made Italian boots. === 
-IELDq_ + 
-+Paddy has secured a shipment of medium weight rubber-soled ​__mountain boots__. 
-1 LIAM + 
-0') +They are hand made and come from Italy. These boots were shipped in error and Paddy has bought them cheap. They would normally sell at £10
-0 11 + 
-e-   0 :---\\ +__Paddy can sell them for £7__. 
-,0 (---- /', ---''​----:;------- - + 
-.-, < '​-\--------...----------- '''​ C_RtFfiT 1-1 gc _  +Sizes available: 6 1/2 - 10. 
-,---- + 
-177;----Bil-LRI)NIILOnl ci k' 1-- t)  i 1 YA +__They're good__! 
-0---_,​....._. + 
-...,,  +Paddy PallinLightweight Camping Gear
-GOOL. Q' +201 Castlereagh St., SydneyPhoneBM2685
--0 + 
-- ' b 1 c *`,' ​= +---- 
-4L + 
-+===== The Caloola Club (founded 1945)===== 
--#IL ---i.-" ​ s --1 3 ,. "- _.....--) v + 
-i:,-: :-.:--- 11,..., O - +=== A visit to Wyperfeld National Park and The Grampians=== 
-A e- '''​ ? + 
-..... +[ Map ] 
-; Nve + 
-" ​ 6))0M+The Spring Tour (1956of the Caloola Club goes to the Wyperfeld National Park and The Grampian Mountains.
  
-ECHOCR 
-I '1\ 
-//110:11.-- 
-- 
-sir 
-\I) 
-;  /01 OA ,​-,​1112,​1-7,​ 7- 
-k \ A ( f I( if 
-nil' E 111) \I' 
-- 
-VNCrkS 1j.,. b./. IL- .1/1 ,  
-; Ek: 
-(1) CliaN 
-(1) 
-1r 
-f--1 
-0 
-0 
-t-' 
-Li% 
-THE CALCOLA CLUB 00000..E7ounded 1945J... 
-The Spring Tnur (1956) of the Caloola Club goes to ...... THE WYpERFELD NATIOrAL PARK and THE GRAMPIAN MOUFTAINS. 
 Leaving Sydney on Sunday Morning, August 26th for about twelve days. Final details will be furnished to all members of party daring the week prior to departure. Leaving Sydney on Sunday Morning, August 26th for about twelve days. Final details will be furnished to all members of party daring the week prior to departure.
-Wvoerfeld ​National ​Park is Victoria'​s largest ​rational ​Park (about + 
-138.000 acres) and is situated in the Wlmmera ​District. It consists of a series of old, dry lakes, the oriinal ​course of the Wimmera River before changing conditions of geography terminated the river in Lake Hindmarsh and Lake Albercutya. ​,,​round ​the green lake beds stretching like wide plains, are River Re2d GumsHere abound many Kangaroos and Emus, and in the mallee of the sandy regions, the Mallee Fowl. With the wide rains of the +__Wyperfeld ​National ​Park__ ​is Victoria'​s largest ​National ​Park (about 138,000 acres) and is situated in the Wimmera ​District. It consists of a series of old, dry lakes, the original ​course of the Wimmera River before changing conditions of geography terminated the river in Lake Hindmarsh and Lake Albercutya. ​Around ​the green lake beds stretching like wide plains, are River Red GumsHere abound many Kangaroos and Emus, and in the mallee of the sandy regions, the Mallee Fowl. With the wide rains of the past months, a good show of brilliant wild flowers of the "​desert",​ seems assured. 
-past m.,nths, a good show of brilliant wild flowers of the "​desert",​ seems assured. + 
-And speaking of wildflowers naturally turns the attention to the +And speaking of wildflowers naturally turns the attention to the other chief point of interest in the trip..... ​__The Grampian ​Mountains__... ​the home of many exciting natives of the flower kingdom: Thryptomene,​ Micromyrtus,​ many new Grevilleas, Epacris impressa and others. You'll see them all. There are fascinating rock formations of tilted and eroded ​sandstones, rising out of the plain of western Victoria. This is a skyline not easily forgotten. 
-+
-her cnief point of interest in the trip ..... The Grampian ​Mountains +
-the home of many exciting natives of the flower kingdom: +
-Thryptomene,​ Micromyrtus,​ many new Grevilleas, +
-Epacris impressa and others. You'll see them all. ii.here ​are fascinating rock formations of tilted and eroded ​e.andstones, rising out of the plain of western Victoria. This is a skyline not easily forgotten.+
 The trip will travel via Central Western and Southern New South Wales and return along the Murray Valley to Albury. From here a visit is proposed for the Hume Weir, Tumbarumba, Tumut and Weejasper. As many interesting points as possible will be visited. The trip will travel via Central Western and Southern New South Wales and return along the Murray Valley to Albury. From here a visit is proposed for the Hume Weir, Tumbarumba, Tumut and Weejasper. As many interesting points as possible will be visited.
-COST: Ten Pounds (plus 2/6d affiliation for nonmembers), members of party to supply own food. Deposit of Five Pounds to be with the Booking Clerk, (Mrs) E.M. Dingeldei, 42 Byron St., Croydon (UA 2983 or UA 4914) by August 20th. Cheques to be payable to the Caloola Club Coach Fund; Money Orders and Postal Notes payable to E.M. Dingeldei at Burwood P.O.+ 
 +__Cost__: Ten Pounds (plus 2/6d affiliation for non-members), members of party to supply own food. Deposit of Five Pounds to be with the Booking Clerk, (Mrs) E.M. Dingeldei, 42 Byron St., Croydon (UA 2983 or UA 4914) by August 20th. Cheques to be payable to the Caloola Club Coach Fund; Money Orders and Postal Notes payable to E.M. Dingeldei at Burwood P.O. 
 Farther details and general enquiries from the Booking Clerk or the Leader, Allan M. Fox, 92 Yathong Road, Caringbah, LB 7304. Farther details and general enquiries from the Booking Clerk or the Leader, Allan M. Fox, 92 Yathong Road, Caringbah, LB 7304.
-[See map of route overleaf.... 
  
 +[See map of route overleaf....]
 +
 +----
195608.txt · Last modified: 2018/09/26 02:56 by tyreless