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195606 [2018/09/13 04:56]
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 A.G. Colley A.G. Colley
  
-The meeting commenced at 8.20 p.m. with the President, Brian Harvey, in the Chair, and about 30 members present. Apologies were received from Paul Barnes and Heather Joyce. The President extended a welcome to Jim Cuthbertson,​ a visitor from the Brisbane ​Bushwalkeres, and to Ron Knightley who has come back to live in Sydney and is looking forward to some walking.+The meeting commenced at 8.20 p.m. with the President, Brian Harvey, in the Chair, and about 30 members present. Apologies were received from Paul Barnes and Heather Joyce. The President extended a welcome to Jim Cuthbertson,​ a visitor from the Brisbane ​Bushwalkers, and to Ron Knightley who has come back to live in Sydney and is looking forward to some walking.
  
 Jack Gentle said he had been in touch with Ansett Airways. The Company was now prepared to go anywhere and Clubs were advised to get together if they wished to take advantage of the discount offers and discuss it with Mr. Brown, one of the Company officials. Jack Gentle said he had been in touch with Ansett Airways. The Company was now prepared to go anywhere and Clubs were advised to get together if they wished to take advantage of the discount offers and discuss it with Mr. Brown, one of the Company officials.
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 Unfortunately Peter could not came with us and so on Good Friday we set off from Perth in the Holden Utility with another interested couple. Lunch on a gravel road running between Porongorups and Stirling Ranges, then a quick look at Chester Pass which crosses the range through a low saddle. The range itself is spectacular and vaguely reminiscent of the Warrumbungle and McPherson Ranges - a low main range with violent upthrusts of decomposed quartzite dominated on the western end by Mt. Toolbrinup and the eastern end by Bluff Knoll and Ellen'​s Peak. Viewed from Chester Pass, Bluff Knoll looks like a cresting wave and this is probably its most spectacular aspect. From the south it merges with another two peaks and loses its individuality. The road to Cooper'​s farm was located and there ensued 16 miles of road which could well have been included in the Redex Trial. The height of the range in otherwise flat country makes distance deceptive and we were surprised to find from Mr. Cooper that it was 8 miles from the farm to the foot of the range. During our conversation we learned that the Knoll had been climbed first by his parents in the early twenties and he pointed out the route which they had taken as far as he could remember. There was a track in for 8 miles and another party had just gone in driving a 3-ton ex-army Blitz waggon. Unfortunately Peter could not came with us and so on Good Friday we set off from Perth in the Holden Utility with another interested couple. Lunch on a gravel road running between Porongorups and Stirling Ranges, then a quick look at Chester Pass which crosses the range through a low saddle. The range itself is spectacular and vaguely reminiscent of the Warrumbungle and McPherson Ranges - a low main range with violent upthrusts of decomposed quartzite dominated on the western end by Mt. Toolbrinup and the eastern end by Bluff Knoll and Ellen'​s Peak. Viewed from Chester Pass, Bluff Knoll looks like a cresting wave and this is probably its most spectacular aspect. From the south it merges with another two peaks and loses its individuality. The road to Cooper'​s farm was located and there ensued 16 miles of road which could well have been included in the Redex Trial. The height of the range in otherwise flat country makes distance deceptive and we were surprised to find from Mr. Cooper that it was 8 miles from the farm to the foot of the range. During our conversation we learned that the Knoll had been climbed first by his parents in the early twenties and he pointed out the route which they had taken as far as he could remember. There was a track in for 8 miles and another party had just gone in driving a 3-ton ex-army Blitz waggon.
  
-Asz it was getting late we decided to try the track and that last 8 miles took 1 1/4 hours, a few rude words, much pushing over scrub and bushes and a muffler for the utility before we reached the already established camp of the other four enthusiasts. They were YMCA chaps with a common love of walking, led by Peter Thorne who had started the whole thing as far as we were concerned. They had climbed the Knoll from the north side but had been beaten on another attempt from the south by inclement weather last year.+As it was getting late we decided to try the track and that last 8 miles took 1 1/4 hours, a few rude words, much pushing over scrub and bushes and a muffler for the utility before we reached the already established camp of the other four enthusiasts. They were YMCA chaps with a common love of walking, led by Peter Thorne who had started the whole thing as far as we were concerned. They had climbed the Knoll from the north side but had been beaten on another attempt from the south by inclement weather last year.
  
 As a matter of interest to web-footed walkers in Sydney, we had had one day's rain in 5 months up till Easter and consequently carried water with us, although there was a small creek running further up in the range. As a matter of interest to web-footed walkers in Sydney, we had had one day's rain in 5 months up till Easter and consequently carried water with us, although there was a small creek running further up in the range.
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   * Kanangra Walls: 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)   * Kanangra Walls: 30/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
-  * Perry'​s ​lookdown: 3/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)+  * Perry'​s ​Lookdown: 3/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
   * Jenolan State Forest: 20/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)   * Jenolan State Forest: 20/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
   * Carlon'​s Farm: 10/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)   * Carlon'​s Farm: 10/- per head (minimum 5 passengers)
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   - A monthly walks programme report to be submitted to Committee and to the General Meeting each month. Contents - Details of the previous month'​s trips, including numbers attending, prospectives,​ any interesting details, and leader'​s or members'​ comments (possibly prospectives'​ comments). Also, if a walk did not go it is to be listed and reasons given.   - A monthly walks programme report to be submitted to Committee and to the General Meeting each month. Contents - Details of the previous month'​s trips, including numbers attending, prospectives,​ any interesting details, and leader'​s or members'​ comments (possibly prospectives'​ comments). Also, if a walk did not go it is to be listed and reasons given.
   - At every meeting the Walks Secretary or his deputy will announce the walks programmed for the following week-end, giving as many details as possible about each walk. The leader or his representative (a member who will be attending the walk, or the Walks Sec.) should be present on the Wednesday before his walk, so that prospectives will be able to meet the leader and any members who have indicated that they will be present.   - At every meeting the Walks Secretary or his deputy will announce the walks programmed for the following week-end, giving as many details as possible about each walk. The leader or his representative (a member who will be attending the walk, or the Walks Sec.) should be present on the Wednesday before his walk, so that prospectives will be able to meet the leader and any members who have indicated that they will be present.
-  - A walks committee to draw up a list of walks of __all__ types in __all__ localities. These trips to be recorded and as time progresses any details (transport, points of interest, side trips, etc.) will be added to each listed trip, so that a very comprehensive trip catalogue will be developed. Details contained in the catagogue ​to be published periodically in the magazine, and the same catalogue will be used in setting up future walks programmes.+  - A walks committee to draw up a list of walks of __all__ types in __all__ localities. These trips to be recorded and as time progresses any details (transport, points of interest, side trips, etc.) will be added to each listed trip, so that a very comprehensive trip catalogue will be developed. Details contained in the catalogue ​to be published periodically in the magazine, and the same catalogue will be used in setting up future walks programmes.
  
 Further details of the workings of the scheme will be submitted to members in due course. Further details of the workings of the scheme will be submitted to members in due course.
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 === Attention All Skiers. === === Attention All Skiers. ===
  
-We don't want to cast a hoodoo over our skiers just because Peter Stitt was unfortunate enough to break his leg up in the snow country, but hospital and ambulance expenses being what they are today, prospective skiers can obtain a policy to cover up to £100 Medical Expenses. This will give protection whilst on snow-covered ground ​anythere ​in the Commonwealth. You don't have to be actually skiing at the time - falling over in the snow and breaking your arm whilst wandering about is sufficient. And the price - __£1/8/3 per year__. The policy will not cover you whilst taking part in ski races, nor jumps. For further particulars contact Robinson & Mitchell Pty.Ltd., 26/30 Bridge St., Sydney, Insurance Brokers.+We don't want to cast a hoodoo over our skiers just because Peter Stitt was unfortunate enough to break his leg up in the snow country, but hospital and ambulance expenses being what they are today, prospective skiers can obtain a policy to cover up to £100 Medical Expenses. This will give protection whilst on snow-covered ground ​anywhere ​in the Commonwealth. You don't have to be actually skiing at the time - falling over in the snow and breaking your arm whilst wandering about is sufficient. And the price - __£1/8/3 per year__. The policy will not cover you whilst taking part in ski races, nor jumps. For further particulars contact Robinson & Mitchell Pty. Ltd., 26/30 Bridge St., Sydney, Insurance Brokers.
  
 ---- ----
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 Waterfall, Saturday. Waterfall, Saturday.
  
-Hoping to stimulate Club membership I waited on the railway station this morning on the lookout for typical ​bushmalkers. Sighted Mr. W.F. Cosden, a sun-bronzed character with worn pack and boots, who appeared to be an experienced and ardent bushwalker and put a leading question. "You appear,"​ I said, "to be a lover of fresh air and exercise. Might I have your impression of bushwalking for publication in the S.B.W. Magazine?"​ "Fresh air and exercise be blowed!"​ replied Mr. COsden, "I am the President of the Anti-Taxation League. It is at week-ends, when a man relaxes to drink, smoke, have a bet or drive his car, that the depredations of the tax-gatherer are most insidious. In the bush I earn nothing and spend nothing, and so for two days a week I incur no taxation."​+Hoping to stimulate Club membership I waited on the railway station this morning on the lookout for typical ​bushwalkers. Sighted Mr. W.F. Cosden, a sun-bronzed character with worn pack and boots, who appeared to be an experienced and ardent bushwalker and put a leading question. "You appear,"​ I said, "to be a lover of fresh air and exercise. Might I have your impression of bushwalking for publication in the S.B.W. Magazine?"​ "Fresh air and exercise be blowed!"​ replied Mr. COsden, "I am the President of the Anti-Taxation League. It is at week-ends, when a man relaxes to drink, smoke, have a bet or drive his car, that the depredations of the tax-gatherer are most insidious. In the bush I earn nothing and spend nothing, and so for two days a week I incur no taxation."​
  
 ---- ----
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 Bell, Thursday. Bell, Thursday.
  
-Manufacturerst ​specifications for this car are:+Manufacturers' ​specifications for this car are:
  
   * Length: 22 feet   * Length: 22 feet
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 ---- ----
  
-=== Help1 Help! Help! Help! ===+=== Help! Help! Help! Help! ===
  
 The ship is sinking! Barbara Brown has just informed us that she will be unable to duplicate the Magazine after this issue as she has taken on a second job - that of usherette at night. Barbara has done a marvellous job over the past two years and now we wonder is there someone else who would take the job on? It isn't very difficult to turn the handle. The ship is sinking! Barbara Brown has just informed us that she will be unable to duplicate the Magazine after this issue as she has taken on a second job - that of usherette at night. Barbara has done a marvellous job over the past two years and now we wonder is there someone else who would take the job on? It isn't very difficult to turn the handle.
Line 353: Line 353:
 ---- ----
  
-THE S.B.W. versus TASMLNIa +===== The S.B.W. ​Versus ​Tasmania - Round Three=====
- Round Three Digby. +
-The angels who are assigned to bushwalkers smiled sweetly on us all that Tuesday we hitched from Lake St. Clair to Queenstown. Within four hours our four separate parties had been shifted sixty odd miles over a road that carried only a modicum of eligible cars and almost as many hitchhikers. There was much to do in Queenstown - letters to be mailed, collected and read; malted milks and ice cream to be consumed in quantity; personal shopping to be done; victuals to be replenished for the Frenchman'​s Cap trip; and a city +
-campsite to be found This latter is no pushover in a town where +
-grass grows only in pampered front gardens. Our Public Relations Officers Joan and Don, were despatched on this important task and produced the goods in next to no time - a lush vacant allotment +
-with protecting trees, a loan of the owner'​s special cooking gadget and use of his "​edible filtered"​ water. We immediately raised their rations and decided to celebrate by having dinner at one of the local; +
-pubs. This was our drop of luxury in the bucket of bushwalking +
-austerity but it nearly cost us a king's ransom - we felt sure we +
-would lose our Don (Juan) to the friendly young waitress who gave us +
-double helpings. However we managed to save him from his fate by +
-all sorts of artful lures and trumped up stories of-the fickleness +
-of women. One for the S.B.W. +
-Score: ​Tasmania ​+
-S.B.W. 5 +
-Clr. +
-The next day was rest day and the party minus Grace and Geof eked it out on board the most fantastic little train this side of +
-toyland. It was the Mt. Lyell Company'​s rack aid pinion loco that chug-chugs its leisurely way for three hours over the 24 miles to +
-Strahan. There were some fine views of the King River Gorge en rout +
-but the river water carrying waste from the smelters would surely put even the best pea soup to shame. +
-Thursday morn found us out on the road again with thumbs up +
-hopefully, this tiIie bound for the Cap. It must have been an angels +
-holiday that day and progress was slow, but with the help of the devil aid a few of his devious ways we managed the Frenchman'​s track +
-turn-off in dribs aid drabs. That night we pitched camp at the Lodden River in the customary drizzle, and it is at this point I musJ +
-record the infamous episodes of the Roots end the Mossies. Now. I +
-have nothing against the roots of trees in their proper place - after all, without roots there would be no trees - but I object strongly to their sinewy tentacles weaving in and out of the only bi +
-of earth, that sacred strip of earth where one must lay one's tired +
-body. Of course my comrades protest their innocence. It was pure coincidence that they were all at my end of the tenti Why they +
-weren'​t even there when it was pitched - they must have sprout3d +
-up like mushrooms1, Well, I would be a silent martyr, I thought, and +
-put on a brave Yogi act. Ha ha J It was a tortuous experiment. I found the body will stand just so much and after being twisted into all the letters of the alphabet it finally gives up the ghost at 27,, +
- this being some three hours after A. Worse was to follow. The +
-_ ,​Digby-eating mosquito that only the Lodden Plains can breed suddenly +
-attacked in force. You'd swear it was a giant conspiracy for they wanted only me (perhaps to carry off to their eyrie). It had gone +
-far enough. The others were awakened as I engaged in a torchlight +
-battle with the invaders. The only human sympathy I could get were the uncontrollable bursts of hysterical mirth that robbed my co-. tenters of five minutes of their precious sleep. At the first light of dawn I got up on the wrong side of the sleeping bag and had no hesitation in conceding Tasmania a double victory (a sort of private +
-one). +
- ​Score:​ Tasmania O000  7 +
-S.B.W. ​ o 6 0 5 +
-All that Friday we pushed upwards in threatening weather; up +
-to Lake Vera over the Barron Gap, and at last Tahune Hut, the final goal. We had not yet sighted the peak of Frenchman'​s Cap although we were now less than half a mile away. It reminded us of Ossa - +
-never happy unless it was brewing its own dirty weather. Writings in the Hut Book like U.. been here fourdays - have yet to see the Cap" did nothing to reassure us. If we could only have seen but a short 12 hours ahead.... +
-The time was 5 a.m. I was half conscious of a movement in the +
-tangled mass of sleeping beds that filled Tahune Hut. The vague +
-green shape of Goof arose end stumbled to the window, There was an awed gasp of wonder from his lips, a moment'​s pause, and then dynamic action as seven moved as one out into the still crisp mornin, air of 3,500 ft. We stood for a moment rubbing sleepy eyes, trying +
-to believe it was not a dream. Across the Tahune Lake rose the greaL +
-sheer precipice of Frenchman'​s Cap, its white quartzite now tinted pastel pink in the first rays of the rising sun. A deep lavender sk, +
-formed the perfect background for this majestic peak, which, as though not content with itself alone, threw its image into the glass +
-waters of the lake beneath our feet. Behind us and stretching far +
-away into the north lay the Cradle Mt, Park, its valleys filled with mist, the baseless peaks jutting up into the clear sky above. Within minutes the Frenchman had faced a veritable battery of cameras and then we were all action plus to gobble up some breakfast and climb the mountain. We had never had more incentive. +
-It was indeed a morning to remember - the great quartzite masse5 all around us as we climbed and finally the reward of magnificent summit views on every side - peeks and jagged ranges stretching away to the horizon; tiny lakes tucked away in deep valleys from which the mist swirled up in eerie shapes. Nature had never been in +
-more impressive form. Up the S.B.W. +
- Score Tasmania .. 7 +
-S.B.W. ...... 8 +
-(No correspondence will be entered'​into re' the referee'​s apparent bias.- If you don't believe me, order some Grade A. Super Tassie weather and poke your head out the window of Tahune Hut at five o'​clock in the morning.) +
-It was very nearly a repeat per2ormance the nbxt morning at the same unearthly hour. Something was lacking though (I'll leave this +
-16. +
-to your imaginations) forcnly Geof and I could dig up the desire to +
-go jaunting off again. , We explored the Lion'​s'​Head and some of the +
-lakes beyond the North Col of Frenchman'​s Cap - where else could +
-you get scenery like this? We basked in the early morning sun and wondered - some day we might return and .... +
-It was a happy carefree stay at Tahune Hut, full of good fun anc humour. I could tell of such things as Don't Sudden collapse into the lake while posing for a picture; the full-scale clothes-washing drive that made the hut look like a Chinese laundry; the high- altitude corn that sprouted profusely from the mouths of one and all +
-the hopeful ceremonial dipping of Joan's new (ex Queenstown) hat in the sacred waters of the lake in a vain attempt to make it stiff and +
-stylish; the bushcookery experiments that were won and lost and the +
-King Billy Pine that looked like wood but burned like a lost cause. When we bade farewell I'm afraid the hut book copped a bashing from +
-my sentimental pencil, much to the amusement of the others. They +
-talked in undertones about odes (or was it "​odious"​) and tacked on a "We liked it too" to bring it all back to earth. +
-On the way out we camped overnight at Lake Vera and in the morning Geof decided to straighten out the tangled and monstrous financial (or unfinancial) position of each and every member. This was +
-so eahausting that we put on the old termite act and devised an +
-artful policy of passive resistance to our leader re packing up. +
-Well, when it comes to crushing rebellions there'​s no one quite like +
-Gdof. Order was churned into chaos in seconds; tents collapsed as if struck by a hurricane; there was water everywhere without rain +
-and bodies and their chattels littered the landscape. Suffice it to +
-say that we moved off very smartly. +
-Scene: Our overnight campsite on the lush riverside greenery at Ouse, en route to Hobart. +
-Weather: Perfect - cloudless sky all day. Time: 7 p.m. +
-General Mood: Not over energetic - delight at good fortune with recent weather, +
-Conversation:​ Me: We'd be crazy to stick up tents on a night like this. It couldn'​t LossiLielv rain, not even in Tasmania. +
-Geof: You're darn tootinl right. It's under the stars for us tonight. +
-Result: Pouring rain by 2 a.m. - seven saps soaked and shivering - grumblings aid rumblings as tents go up in the dark - never again! +
-Score: Tasmania 0..0 8 +
-0.04 8 +
-The next day we were due in Hobart whence Goof and I must return +
-17. +
-to the workaday world while the others did a spot of touring. Despitr the rain, Joan and Don tried their luck on the highway and, of course, they immediately wound up in a plush sedan heading straight for Hobart - Public Relations Plus; (Plus what? That's what we can't figure t) +
-The rest of us, deterred by a bit of a debacle the previous day, decided to play safe and catch the bus +
-Reunited in the little Big Smoke Down Under, the 134.g Food Orgy soon got under way. Hobart is famous for its food and it all started +
-when we couldn'​t pass the first cake shop we saw It was just too +
-much for stomachs hungering again for the delicacies of civilization. There were ham and tomato rolls, cream puffs, rich buns and all the usuals and unusuals defying description. Luuch consisted of a com- +
-bined multiple cake-shop-fruit-stall-milk-bar-crawl spread over about +
-two hours in which vast quantities of edibles both good and not so good for you were consumed. How we weathered that 'plane trip +
-back to Sydney was undoubtedly a miracle, and as miracles still +
-happen, I have lived to tell the tale of the S.B.W. versus Tasmania, 1956 Contest. +
-(P.SDon't let this score business fool you We really had +
-a mighty bonno superiarer time) +
-(THE END)+
  
-EDITOR'​S ​COMPLAINT +- Digby. 
-ought to write to Colin, + 
-I ought to write to Jane, +The angels who are assigned to bushwalkers smiled sweetly on us all that Tuesday we hitched from Lake St. Clair to Queenstown. Within four hours our four separate parties had been shifted sixty odd miles over a road that carried only a modicum of eligible cars and almost as many hitchhikers. There was much to do in Queenstown - letters to be mailed, collected and read; malted milks and ice cream to be consumed in quantity; personal shopping to be done; victuals to be replenished for the Frenchman's Cap trip; and a city campsite to be found. This latter is no pushover in a town where grass grows only in pampered front gardens. Our Public Relations Officers, Joan and Don, were despatched on this important task and produced the goods in next to no time - a lush vacant allotment with protecting trees, a loan of the owner'​s special cooking gadget and use of his "​edible filtered"​ water. We immediately raised their rations and decided to celebrate by having dinner at one of the local pubs. This was our drop of luxury in the bucket of bushwalking austerity but it nearly cost us a king's ransom - we felt sure we would lose our Don (Juan) to the friendly young waitress who gave us double helpings. However we managed to save him from his fate by all sorts of artful lures and trumped up stories of the fickleness of women. One for the S.B.W. 
-I ought to write that thing for Geof+ 
 +__Score__: Tasmania 5, S.B.W. 5. 
 + 
 +The next day was rest day and the party minus Grace and Geof eked it out on board the most fantastic little train this side of toyland. It was the Mt. Lyell Company'​s rack and pinion loco that chug-chugs its leisurely way for three hours over the 24 miles to Strahan. There were some fine views of the King River Gorge en route but the river water carrying waste from the smelters would surely put even the best pea soup to shame. 
 + 
 +Thursday morn found us out on the road again with thumbs up hopefully, this time bound for the Cap. It must have been an angels holiday that day and progress was slow, but with the help of the devil and a few of his devious ways we managed the Frenchman'​s track turn-off in dribs and drabs. That night we pitched camp at the Lodden River in the customary drizzle, and it is at this point I must record the infamous episodes of the Roots and the Mossies. Now I have nothing against the roots of trees in their proper place - after all, without roots there would be no trees - but I object strongly to their sinewy tentacles weaving in and out of the only bit of earth, that sacred strip of earth where one must lay one's tired body. Of course my comrades protest their innocence. It was pure coincidence that they were all at __my__ end of the tent! Why they weren'​t even there when it was pitched - they must have sprouted up like mushrooms! Well, I would be a silent martyr, I thought, and put on a brave Yogi act. Ha ha! It was a tortuous experiment. I found the body will stand just so much and after being twisted into all the letters of the alphabet it finally gives up the ghost at Z, this being some three hours after A. Worse was to follow. The Digby-eating mosquito that only the Lodden Plains can breed suddenly attacked in force. You'd swear it was a giant conspiracy for they wanted only me (perhaps to carry off to their eyrie). It had gone far enough. The others were awakened as I engaged in a torchlight battle with the invaders. The only human sympathy I could get were the uncontrollable bursts of hysterical mirth that robbed my co-tenters of five minutes of their precious sleep. At the first light of dawn I got up on the wrong side of the sleeping bag and had no hesitation in conceding Tasmania a double victory (a sort of private one). 
 + 
 +__Score__: Tasmania 7, S.B.W. 5. 
 + 
 +All that Friday we pushed upwards in threatening weather; up to Lake Vera over the Barron Gap, and at last Tahune Hut, the final goal. We had not yet sighted the peak of Frenchman'​s Cap although we were now less than half a mile away. It reminded us of Ossa - never happy unless it was brewing its own dirty weather. Writings in the Hut Book like "... been here four days - have yet to see the Cap" did nothing to reassure us. If we could only have seen but a short 12 hours ahead.... 
 + 
 +The time was 5 a.m. I was half conscious of a movement in the tangled mass of sleeping beds that filled Tahune Hut. The vague green shape of Geof arose and stumbled to the window. There was an awed gasp of wonder from his lips, a moment'​s pause, and then dynamic action as seven moved as one out into the still crisp morning air of 3,500 ft. We stood for a moment rubbing sleepy eyes, trying to believe it was not a dream. Across the Tahune Lake rose the great sheer precipice of Frenchman'​s Cap, its white quartzite now tinted pastel pink in the first rays of the rising sun. A deep lavender sky formed the perfect background for this majestic peak, which, as though not content with itself alone, threw its image into the glass waters of the lake beneath our feet. Behind us and stretching far away into the north lay the Cradle Mt. Park, its valleys filled with mist, the baseless peaks jutting up into the clear sky above. Within minutes the Frenchman had faced a veritable battery of cameras and then we were all action plus to gobble up some breakfast and climb the mountain. We had never had more incentive. 
 + 
 +It was indeed a morning to remember - the great quartzite masses all around us as we climbed and finally the reward of magnificent summit views on every side - peaks and jagged ranges stretching away to the horizon; tiny lakes tucked away in deep valleys from which the mist swirled up in eerie shapes. Nature had never been in more impressive form. Up the S.B.W. 
 + 
 +__Score__: Tasmania 7, S.B.W. 8. 
 + 
 +(No correspondence will be entered into re the referee'​s apparent bias. If you don't believe me, order some Grade A. Super Tassie weather and poke your head out the window of Tahune Hut at five o'​clock in the morning.) 
 + 
 +It was very nearly a repeat performance the next morning at the same unearthly hour. Something was lacking though (I'll leave this to your imaginations) for only Geof and I could dig up the desire to go jaunting off again. We explored the Lion's Head and some of the lakes beyond the North Col of Frenchman'​s Cap - where else could you get scenery like this? We basked in the early morning sun and wondered - some day we might return and .... 
 + 
 +It was a happy carefree stay at Tahune Hut, full of good fun and humour. I could tell of such things as Don's sudden collapse into the lake while posing for a picture; the full-scale clothes-washing drive that made the hut look like a Chinese laundry; the high-altitude corn that sprouted profusely from the mouths of one and all; the hopeful ceremonial dipping of Joan's new (ex Queenstown) hat in the sacred waters of the lake in a vain attempt to make it stiff and stylish; the bushcookery experiments that were won and lost and the King Billy Pine that looked like wood but burned like a lost cause. When we bade farewell I'm afraid the hut book copped a bashing from my sentimental pencil, much to the amusement of the others. They talked in undertones about odes (or was it "​odious"​) and tacked on a "We liked it too" to bring it all back to earth. 
 + 
 +On the way out we camped overnight at Lake Vera and in the morning Geof decided to straighten out the tangled and monstrous financial (or unfinancial) position of each and every member. This was so exhausting that we put on the old termite act and devised an artful policy of passive resistance to our leader re packing up. Well, when it comes to crushing rebellions there'​s no one quite like Geof. Order was churned into chaos in seconds; tents collapsed as if struck by a hurricane; there was water everywhere without rain and bodies and their chattels littered the landscape. Suffice it to say that we moved off very smartly. 
 + 
 +__Scene__: Our overnight campsite on the lush riverside greenery at Ouse, en route to Hobart. 
 + 
 +__Weather__:​ Perfect - cloudless sky all day. 
 + 
 +__Time__: 7 p.m. 
 + 
 +__General Mood__: Not over energetic - delight at good fortune with recent weather. 
 + 
 +__Conversation__:​ Me: We'd be crazy to stick up tents on a night like this. It couldn'​t __possiblly__ rain, not even in Tasmania. Geof: You're darn tootin'​ right. It's under the stars for us tonight. 
 + 
 +__Result__: Pouring rain by 2 a.m. - seven saps soaked and shivering - grumblings and rumblings as tents go up in the dark - never again! 
 + 
 +__Score__: Tasmania 8, S.B.W. 8. 
 + 
 +The next day we were due in Hobart whence Geof and I must return to the workaday world while the others did a spot of touring. Despite the rain, Joan and Don tried their luck on the highway and, of course, they immediately wound up in a plush sedan heading straight for Hobart - Public Relations Plus! (Plus what? That's what we can't figure!) 
 + 
 +The rest of us, deterred by a bit of a debacle the previous day, decided to play safe and catch the bus. 
 + 
 +Reunited in the little Big Smoke Down Under, the big Food Orgy soon got under way. Hobart is famous for its food and it all started when we couldn'​t pass the first cake shop we saw. It was just too much for stomachs hungering again for the delicacies of civilization. There were ham and tomato rolls, cream puffs, rich buns and all the usuals and unusuals defying description. Lunch consisted of a combined multiple cake-shop-fruit-stall-milk-bar-crawl spread over about two hours in which vast quantities of edibles both good and not so good for you were consumed. How we weathered that 'plane trip back to Sydney was undoubtedly a miracle, and as miracles still happen, I have lived to tell the tale of the S.B.W. versus Tasmania, 1956 Contest. 
 + 
 +(P.S. Don't let this score business fool you. We really had a mighty bonno superiarer time) 
 + 
 +(__THE END__) 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Editor'​s Complaint. ===== 
 + 
 +ought to write to Colin,\\ 
 +I ought to write to Jane,\\ 
 +I ought to write that thing for Geof\\
 I promised in the train. I promised in the train.
-I ought to write to Ian, I ought to write to Pat, + 
-Here's a letter from the Alpine Club -+I ought to write to Ian,\\ 
 +I ought to write to Pat,\\ 
 +Here's a letter from the Alpine Club -\\
 I ought to answer that. I ought to answer that.
-I ought to write to Garth, I ought to write to Snow '​ind ​finalise the details of That trip with Prof. Munro. + 
-The Warrumbungle trip we had At Easter'​s still to do, :-,nd I'm committed to produce "The Aqua Lung - Part Two."​ +I ought to write to Garth,\\ 
-And then there'​s Betty'​s wedding - "​I'​ll write it up," I said. +I ought to write to Snow\\ 
-HellJ What a lot of things to write! I think I'll go to bed.+And finalise the details of\\ 
 +That trip with Prof. Munro. 
 + 
 +The Warrumbungle trip we had\\ 
 +At Easter'​s still to do,\\ 
 +And I'm committed to produce\\ 
 +"The Aqua Lung - Part Two." 
 + 
 +And then there'​s Betty'​s wedding -\\ 
 +"​I'​ll write it up," I said.\\ 
 +Hell! What a lot of things to write!\\ 
 +I think I'll go to bed. 
 D.B. D.B.
- ​.1M1.111...1.1.111 + 
-We regret to hear that Vice Pres. Malcolm McGregor has bunged up +---- 
-his knee. Here's hoping for your speedy recovery, Malc. + 
-18. +We regret to hear that Vice Pres. Malcolm McGregor has bunged up his knee. Here's hoping for your speedy recovery, Malc. 
-BANGUI + 
-LE222:rt Vrke Syda2y_By.fh Talkers+---- 
-Monthly General Meeting- Geof + 
-Now every Wenfsdfy ​night or so we '​as ​aGeneral ​Meeting, +===== Bang!!! ===== 
-An' all the Talkers gather roun' an' give their zums a beatin'​. Well, usyully its pretty safe - just Conservation stuff, + 
-An' "Those in favour please say Aye," ​anA all that kind of gaff, But this last meetinf ​took a turn fat lei'me fair unfurled - Into our carefree walkin'​ works a spanner 'as been hurled. +=== A Report of the Sydney Bush Talkers' ​Monthly General Meeting. === 
-The Talkers, as it fappened, coulda took no better cue + 
-!Cos lots of Walkers was away at Bet Swain'​s ​Weddinf ​do; +- Geof Wagg. 
-An' that's why, when we entered, the tole 'all seemed sort of Tuehed ​Annothin'​ like the Club at all - a bit like laughter crushed So we feels a mite uneasy, but we're 'ardly in our seat + 
-When Frank Ashcan moves a motion ​tat we feels we must defeat. +Now every Wen'​sd'​y ​night or so we '​as ​a General ​Meeting,\\ 
-Seems the Coast and Mountain Talkers puts the word on Federation An' complains: "that its Reunion is a source of consternation From the Tooligan befaviour ​of a mob ogirls and boys +An' all the Talkers gather roun' an' give their gums a beatin'​.\\ 
-foo lets down tents an!, bangs on tins an' makes a lot of noise" An' they say because o' this the Fed. Reunion'​s 'ad it's chips Anthey moves to put the kybosh on these get-together ​trip30 +Well, usyully its pretty safe - just Conservation stuff,\\ 
-Frank moves we gets our delegates to vote Reunions out +An' "Those in favour please say Aye," ​an' ​all that kind of guff,\\ 
-"'​Cos it's no good favinf ​them," 'e says, "​if ​fooligans wt11 shout." ​Ant Jack Wren says, "The trouble is these blokes can'​t ​fold their +But this last meetin' ​took a turn 'at lef' ​me fair unfurled -\\ 
-liquor"​ +Into our carefree walkin'​ works a spanner 'as been hurled. 
-Because they aren't all quite like fim when they gets on the shikker. Frank Young fe says 'reckons ​fat Reunions is all right,+ 
 +The Talkers, as it '​appened, coulda took no better cue\\ 
 +'Cos lots o' ​Walkers was away at Bet Swain'​s ​Weddin' ​do;\\ 
 +An' that's why, when we entered, the '​ole ​'all seemed sort of '​ushed\\ 
 +An' ​nothin'​ like the Club at all - a bit like laughter crushed.\\ 
 +So we feels a mite uneasy, but we're 'ardly in our seat\\ 
 +When Frank Ashcan moves a motion ​'​at ​we feels we must defeat. 
 + 
 +Seems the Coast and Mountain Talkers puts the word on Federation\\ 
 +An' complains: "that its Reunion is a source of consternation\\ 
 +From the '​ooligan be'​aviour ​of a mob o' ​girls and boys\\ 
 +'​oo ​lets down tents an' ​bangs on tins an' makes a lot of noise"\\ 
 +An' they say because o' this the Fed. Reunion'​s 'ad it's chips\\ 
 +An' ​they moves to put the kybosh on these get-together ​trips. 
 + 
 +Frank moves we gets our delegates to vote Reunions out\\ 
 +"'​Cos it's no good '​avin' ​them," 'e says, "​if ​'​ooligans __wi11__ ​shout."​\\ 
 +An' ​Jack Wren says, "The trouble is these blokes can'​t ​'​old ​their liquor"​\\ 
 +Because they aren't all quite like '​im ​when they gets on the shikker.\\ 
 +Frank Young '​e ​says 'reckons ​'​at ​Reunions is all right,\\
 An' lots uv other people adds their voices to the fight. An' lots uv other people adds their voices to the fight.
-An' Snow Brown says 'isn't sure if fe's in order 'era+ 
-But fe thinks they 'old Reunions at the wrong time of the -year. So the President informs ​Tim, with a glare right down the Tall, "​If ​te don't speak to the motion then to shouldn'​t speak at all I" Then Frank Ashcan in !is summinf ​up says everything again, +An' Snow Brown says 'isn't sure if 'e's in order 'ere,\\ 
-Yet when at last we gets a vote '​is ​jawrinf ​seems in vain For it's "​thumbs down" on 'is motion - this Reunion enjoys Too good a reputation to be finished by a noises +But '​e ​thinks they 'old Reunions at the wrong time of the year.\\ 
-Then the President ​le starts up, 'an he lays us in the aisles - When we 'ears is propasiL3hun ​y' could 'ear us roar for miles, Because 'e says 'at, in the old days, when the club was just a squirt On trips y'as task th' leader before ​yf doffs yshirt. Then the leader ​/as to think it out, an' answer yes or no, An! Te says, in 'is opinion, "fat's too good a rule to soPt +So the President informs ​'im, with a glare right down the 'all,\\ 
-Not many takes Tim serious - they all laughs, anyway - But Frank Ashcan recons ​anylow !Gill up an lave a say. +"​If ​'​e ​don't speak to the motion then to shouldn'​t speak at all!"\\ 
-So fo 'olds forth far a while until the Pres. says, as a notion ​fe might just collect 'is sentiments ​!an frame 'em as a motion. +Then Frank Ashcan in 'is summin' ​up says everything again,\\ 
-"Good-ohs" says Frank, "alal '​opin'​ that there'​s no-one'​s feelins 'urt I move we leaves the big decision to thremover of thshirt."​ Then we 'ears a few more speakers ​ant the motion'​s moved with thanks, An' it's the fIrst time !at I knows of !at I've raised me !and with +Yet when at last we gets a vote '​is ​jawrin' ​seems in vain\\ 
-Frank'​s. +For it's "​thumbs down" on 'is motion - this Reunion enjoys\\ 
-Well, there'​s silence for a moment while the Talkers gets their bratl, Then Alex Colley'​s on !is feet andoinus to death. +Too good a reputation to be finished by a noise1 
-It seems as !ow !e doesn'​t like the way committee'​s ​tuadin' Out donations to th' Bushwakkers with reckerless abandon + 
-An! te says, in !is opinion, "​the ​tole system is unsound,"​ An' ​le wants tl sec us "​puttinit upon so= safer ground."​ +Then the President ​'​e ​starts up, 'an he lays us in the aisles -\\ 
-So moves :at to accomplish this an' save our finance ​fleetinl ​We itinise ​accounts for payment at every General Meetin'​. Someone moves a slight amendment on the form !at it should take, Anthis lot is just sinkinin then, rigt into the break Frank Ashcan ​Tops - of jaw 'e never seems to feel a dearth - An'e gives us !is opinions fer what they may be worth. An re tells us 'at it'​s ​sumpthint le could never underatand Why the Bushwakkers don't just get paid like any other band. +When we 'ears is propasishun ​y' could 'ear us roar for miles,\\ 
-Then Jim Brown To louts 'is spoke in; with the feclin's gettin'​ warm fe says !at la's aginthe thing in any shape or form, +Because 'e says 'at, in the old days, when the club was just a squirt,\\ 
-Anexplains tMr. Ashcan, ​Which I s'pose is very kind, +On trips y' ​'as t' ​ask th' leader before ​y' ​doffs y' ​shirt.\\ 
-But I still doubt if he'll see it far yknow, "​there'​s none mblindcThere's a few more verbal ​salliessthen ​we puts it tthe vote, Anwe beats its so it seems we've got our troubles by the throat. +Then the leader ​'as to think it out, an' answer yes or no,\\ 
-We relaxes while the Walks Sec. gets the meetinon !is back; +An' '​e ​says, in 'is opinion, "'at's too good a rule to go!" 
-Seems !is programme'​s 4 weeks overdue - le must be gettinslack. The President frowns down at lim says, "Come clean, me lad, Antell us what's become uv it - the truth can't be so bad As this hinfernal ​wait in' for the darned thing to qppearll" But the culprit ​!e just stands up anstops to scratch 'is ear; + 
-An! !e clears ​!is throat, an! Iums an! alas, ansays, "Er - I dunno",​ Then the Pres. 7e thumps the table with a great resounding blow An' says, "Cor strike me IansomeJ ​Blow me down an! spare me day Li" While theSecretary ​says, "Oh dear;" an' "Cor, strike me bloody ​loora.7' At which the Walks Sec., loo's subsided, sinks downlover ​in 7j seat, But Mister Robert Abernethy scrambles to 'is feet.  +Not many takes '​im ​serious - they all laughs, anyway -\\ 
-'arc's a bloke loos if just talkincould insure yer right t! fames Then mighty gales uv 'is own breath would echo with 'is name. But sad it is frum deeds alone y' gets yer earthly praise - +But Frank Ashcan recons ​any'ow '​e'​ll ​up an '​ave ​a say.\\ 
-le's raised no 'and to 'alp the Club in all !is walkindays. Yet !ere 70 sees 'is duty plain an' moves a motion short: "Next month the Walks Sec. should produce a co!erunt report On where the programme is, tget it overdue so far" - Perlaps ​it's so much overdue we'll call the S. & R. +So '​e ​'olds forth fer a while until the Pres. says, as a notion\\ 
-Well, no one wants to argue - those in favour all say "​Um."​ The meetint ​seems to fizzle out - bids fair to end our fun When Old Jack Wren, that bitter ​mans decides to make a stand:In the name a' "Law anOrder" all our freedom must be bannedJ +'​e ​might just collect 'is sentiments ​'an frame 'em as a motion. 
-20. + 
-But it wasn't just is sentimonts tat'​rocked us to the core, 'Cause some ot what le says is true - none would admit it more. 'E says ie sees the tables in the '031 now lave supports ​Ant we didilt ?am; ,a:6=o what we didn't ought, Or kick tern over during leckchers an smash tern all tt bits- Wells we still thinks this part funny, ​ant Snow ant me's in fits. +"Good-oh," says Frank, "an' ​'​opin'​ that there'​s no-one'​s feelins 'urt\\ 
-Ant yet, we wou]dlitt ,​J2rtue ​like at what ie Flaid vls t72.1,1- Except ​-0 say we oftHp 6iinb tt P;it th+I move we leaves the big decision to th' ​remover of th' ​shirt."​\\ 
-An' it's not us too sfLtsfl watc7iuc; hinter:,​7,,​to ​the z!how +Then we 'ears a few more speakers ​an' ​the motion'​s moved with thanks,\\ 
-But same other cove too creeps in late ant sends fr +An' it's the first time 'at I knows of 'at I've raised me 'and with Frank'​s. 
-Still, ​we don't mind, because we feels tat we the rub; But theR-te ​glares at Snow an' sez tat we're in a dolt' ​ club + 
-fat's a bit rough on Snow," I thinks. 1,),It Jack -_,ohs vory grave ant soz 'at we're an adult club'ant so we should ​r ohave +Well, there'​s silence for a moment while the Talkers gets their breath,\\ 
-Like grown-ups do; (which ​meanS, I stposemot u7 the TLAs kids On'y jist a bit more vicious - NO! We won'​t ​de that far quids) But le says we gotta mend our ways or git our 'at an coat - Well, yt know tow ultimatums ​seam tt get sortie ​people'​s goat - The Walks Sec. le gets toppinl ​mad an' says, "Yt can't do that 'cause Walkers won't be bullied, an' I can tell yer flat 'at all yer plans '11 COMB to nort!Frank Ashcan, like a flash, +Then Alex Colley'​s on 'is feet an' ​doin' ​us to death.\\ 
-le snatches up the gauntlet an' ​te cries, "​Let'​s ​lave a bash Ant show these cheeky ​youngtuns ​we can keep 'em neath our +It seems as 'ow 'e doesn'​t like the way committee'​s 'andin'​\\ 
-But blessed are the peacemakers,​ an' thus Up pips Frank 7oL:r. +Out donations to th' Bushwakkers with reckerless abandon\\ 
-too says that now they'​re mended, ​ptraps ​they won't fall down no more But Jack Wren, the old pessamists ​says, "Yes they will, fer sure!" So when we 'as a vote on it, the motion wins the day, +An' '​e ​says, in 'is opinion, "​the ​'​ole ​system is unsound,"​\\ 
-With which the meetint ​closes ​ant we goes our merry way. +An' ​'​e ​wants t' see us "​puttin' ​it upon some safer ground."​ 
-Only.....we don't feel so merry, 'cause it seams there'​s + 
-wrong,.. There'​s ​Therels ​a motion on the Minute ​book 'at doesn'​t quite belong +So moves 'at to accomplish this an' save our finance ​fleetin'​\\ 
-An' I seem to see tem shapint allour.Walkers to a mould +We itimise ​accounts for payment at every General Meetin'​.\\ 
--Until they looks jist like poor Jack, as sour...ant crabbedmani ​old. Imagine cramping all Stitt'​s power into that foreshortened ​Style, Or masking Garth'​s endearing grin behind that hitter ​smile - Or Dots or Snows or Put, or Stan - there 'as tf be a noisel ​The Clubld ​be jist.like a tomb without them kind el boy51 +Someone moves a slight amendment on the form 'at it should take,\\ 
-That's why it seems a big mistake. ..What are the?- th4.nktrt ​uv? Because,​it'​s like Tom Moppett says, "​Bushwalkers won'​t ​,be,druvIl +An' ​this lot is just sinkin' ​in then, right into the break\\ 
-FORTHCOMING SOCIAL EVENTS+Frank Ashcan ​'​ops ​- of jaw 'e never seems to feel a dearth -\\ 
-Wed. June 20th GREECh ​'Talk and pictures by Peter Antoniades. +An' ​'e gives us 'is opinions fer what they may be worth.\\ 
-Wed. June 27th ELLCK-AND-IITITE PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION ER:MEMyAlKs PROGRAMME +An '​e ​tells us 'at it'​s ​sumpthin'​ '​e ​could never underatand\\ 
-13/14/15th July Frank Rigby - read Frank Young +Why the Bushwakkers don't just get paid like any other band. 
-21+ 
-THE WEDDING OF BETTY SWAIN _TO PETER ARMSTRONG+Then Jim Brown 'e puts __'​is__ ​spoke in; with the feelin's gettin'​ warm\\ 
 +'​e ​says 'at 'e's agin' ​the thing in any shape or form,\\ 
 +An' ​explains t' ​Mr. Ashcan, ​which I s'pose is very kind,\\ 
 +But I still doubt if he'll see it fer y' ​know, "​there'​s none so blind."​\\ 
 +There's a few more verbal ​sallies, then we puts it t' ​the vote,\\ 
 +An' ​we beats it, so it seems we've got our troubles by the throat. 
 + 
 +We relaxes while the Walks Sec. gets the meetin' ​on 'is back;\\ 
 +Seems 'is programme'​s 4 weeks overdue - '​e ​must be gettin' ​slack.\\ 
 +The President frowns down at 'im an' ​says, "Come clean, me lad,\\ 
 +An' ​tell us what's become uv it - the truth can't be so bad\\ 
 +As this hinfernal ​waitin' for the darned thing to appear!!"\\ 
 +But the culprit ​'e just stands up an' ​stops to scratch 'is ear; 
 + 
 +An' 'e clears ​'is throat, an! '​ums ​an' ahs, an' ​says, "Er - I dunno",​\\ 
 +Then the Pres. '​e ​thumps the table with a great resounding blow\\ 
 +An' says, "Cor strike me '​ansome! ​Blow me down an! spare me day!!"\\ 
 +While the Secretary ​says, "Oh dear!" an' "Cor, strike me bloody 'ooray"​ 
 +At which the Walks Sec., 'oo's subsided, sinks down lower in '​is ​seat,\\ 
 +But Mister Robert Abernethy scrambles to 'is feet.  
 + 
 +'ere's a bloke '​oo, ​if just talkin' ​could insure yer right t' fame,\\ 
 +Then mighty gales uv 'is own breath would echo with 'is name.\\ 
 +But sad it is frum deeds alone y' gets yer earthly praise -\\ 
 +'e's raised no 'and to 'elp the Club in all 'is walkin' ​days.\\ 
 +Yet 'ere '​e ​sees 'is duty plain an' moves a motion short:\\ 
 +"Next month the Walks Sec. should produce a co'erunt report\\ 
 +On where the programme is, t' ​get it overdue so far" -\\ 
 +Per'​aps ​it's so much overdue we'll call the S. & R. 
 + 
 +Well, no one wants to argue - those in favour all say "​Um."​\\ 
 +The meetin' ​seems to fizzle out - bids fair to end our fun\\ 
 +When Old Jack Wren, that bitter ​man, decides to make a stand:\\ 
 +In the name o' "Law an' ​Order" all our freedom must be banned! 
 + 
 +But it wasn't just 'is sentiments ​'at rocked us to the core,\\ 
 +'Cause some o' ​what '​e ​says is true - none would admit it more.\\ 
 +'E says '​e ​sees the tables in the 'all now '​ave ​supports\\ 
 +An' ​we didn't oughta sit on 'em'​at'​s ​what we didn't ought,\\ 
 +Or kick '​em ​over during leckchers an' ​smash '​em ​all t' ​bits-\\ 
 +Well, we still thinks this part funny, ​an' ​Snow an' ​me's in fits. 
 + 
 +An' ​yet, we wouldn'​t argue like 'at what 'e said was true,\\ 
 +Except ​t' ​say we often 'as t' climb t' git the view. 
 +An' it's not __us__ 'oo sits an' watches 'at hinterrupts ​the show\\ 
 +But some other cove '​oo ​creeps in late an' ​sends 'em fer a row. 
 +Still, ​__we__ ​don't mind, because we feels '​at ​we can stand the rub;\\ 
 +But then '​e ​glares at Snow an' sez '​at ​we're in a dolt' club. 
 + 
 +"'​at's a bit rough on Snow," I thinks, ​but Jack looks very grave\\ 
 +An' sez 'at we're an adult club an' so we should ​behave\\ 
 +Like grown-ups do; (which ​means, I s'posemost uv the time like kids\\ 
 +On'y jist a bit more vicious - NO! We won'​t ​do that fer quids!)\\ 
 +But '​e ​says we gotta mend our ways or git our 'at an' ​coat -\\ 
 +Well, y' ​know '​ow ​ultimatums ​seem t' ​get some people'​s goat -\\ 
 +The Walks Sec. '​e ​gets '​oppin' ​mad an' says, "Y' ​can't do that!\\ 
 +'cause Walkers won't be bullied, an' I can tell yer flat\\ 
 +'at all yer plans 'll come to nort!" ​Frank Ashcan, like a flash,\\ 
 +'​e ​snatches up the gauntlet an' ​'​e ​cries, "​Let'​s ​'​ave ​a bash\\ 
 +An' ​show these cheeky ​young'​uns ​we can keep 'em neath our thumb!"​\\ 
 +But blessed are the peacemakers,​ an' thus up pipes Frank Young\\ 
 +'​oo ​says that now they'​re mended, ​p'​raps ​they won't fall down no more,\\ 
 +But Jack Wren, the old pessamist, ​says, "Yes they will, fer sure!"\\ 
 +So when we 'as a vote on it, the motion wins the day,\\ 
 +With which the meetin' ​closes ​an' ​we goes our merry way. 
 + 
 +Only..... we don't feel so merry, 'cause it seems there'​s ​somthin' ​wrong...\\ 
 +There'​s a motion on the minute ​book 'at doesn'​t quite belong.....\\ 
 +An' I seem to see 'em shapin'​ all our Walkers to a mould\\ 
 +Until they looks jist like poor Jack, as sour... ​an' crabbed... an' ​old.\\ 
 +Imagine cramping all Stitt'​s power into that foreshortened ​style,\\ 
 +Or masking Garth'​s endearing grin behind that bitter ​smile -\\ 
 +Or Dot, or Snow, or Putt, or Stan - there __'​as__ t' be a noise!\\ 
 +The Club'​d ​be jist like a tomb without them kind o' boys! 
 + 
 +That's why it seems a big mistake.... What are they thinkin' ​uv?\\ 
 +Because, it's like Tom Moppett says, "​Bushwalkers won't be __druv__!! 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== Forthcoming Social Events=== 
 + 
 +Wed. June 20th: Greece ​- Talk and pictures by Peter Antoniades. 
 + 
 +Wed. June 27th: Black-and-white Photographic Competition. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== ErrataWalks Programme=== 
 + 
 +13/14/15th JulyFrank Rigby - read Frank Young. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== The Wedding Of Betty Swain To Peter Armstrong===== 
 - Dot Butler - Dot Butler
-The trouble was my mind was straying and I was carried on past Vaucluse before I woke up to where I was and leapt out of the bus. The church bells had stopped ringing as I came chasing back through the windy blue darkness along the shadowy serpentine above the bay. There rose the dark pile of stones that was St.Michaells, a gleam of soft yellow light at the entrance. I crushed my hat on to my head, shook my skirt straight, took a deep breath and stepped ​inside.+ 
 +The trouble was my mind was straying and I was carried on past Vaucluse before I woke up to where I was and leapt out of the bus. The church bells had stopped ringing as I came chasing back through the windy blue darkness along the shadowy serpentine above the bay. There rose the dark pile of stones that was St. Michael'​s, a gleam of soft yellow light at the entrance. I crushed my hat on to my head, shook my skirt straight, took a deep breath and stepped inside. 
 And suddenly there was silence. And suddenly there was silence.
-Outside the wind might call, the lights glare, ​thstraffic ​rush past, but in here all was still. I slipped into a place amongst the small gathering of well-loved friends who had come to see Betty and Peter start out on their new life. + 
-Down there in front was a pink-petalled bridesmaid and a little flower girl, and over there the earnest serious profile ​ff thsbest maA - gleaming white collar and one lavender glove holding a drooping other...(Gee,​ Garth, how short while ago we saw you daagling ​half naked on the end of a rope half-way down a precipice, a world remove, ​from this solemn splendour of spotless suit, clean white collar ​ard the sartorial magnificence of lavender gloves). +Outside the wind might call, the lights glare, ​the traffic ​rush past, but in here all was still. I slipped into a place amongst the small gathering of well-loved friends who had come to see Betty and Peter start out on their new life. 
-The two young people were kneeling high up in front. The priest'​s voice pulsated in a low monotone through ​taesoftly-lit hush like the sound of bees in a cave buzzing through a contented afternoon + 
-'And then the book, mad I didn't here, I felt, was their first steps through green, pie up sUnkissed,​rugge road-bash,,​oo...voice had Stopped are. they had gone out to sign the regret having missed all the preliminaries ​becaue. ​the core of the matter - two young folk taking together on the long walk through life, whether ​as ant valleys, down leaping, laughing waterways, ​ridges, or bearing patiently the long monotonous +Down there in front was a pink-petalled bridesmaid and a little flower girl, and over there the earnest serious profile ​of the best man - gleaming white collar and one lavender glove holding a drooping other... (Gee, Garth, how short while ago we saw you dangling ​half naked on the end of a rope half-way down a precipice, a world removed ​from this solemn splendour of spotless suit, clean white collar ​and the sartorial magnificence of lavender gloves). 
-"​It'​s we two, it's we two for aye, + 
-All the world and we two, end Heaven be our stay. +The two young people were kneeling high up in front. The priest'​s voice pulsated in a low monotone through ​the softly-lit hush like the sound of bees in a cave buzzing through a contented afternoon
-What's the world, my lass, my love; what can it do? I an thine and thou art mine; life is fresh and new. + 
-Take a kiss from me, my lass - Now the song begins... Life was made afresh for us and the brave heart wins. +And then the voice stopped and they had gone out to sign the book, and I didn'​t ​regret having missed all the preliminaries ​because here, I felt, was the core of the matter - two you folk taking ​their first steps together on the long walk through life, whether ​through green, pleasant ​valleys, down leaping, laughing waterways, ​up sunkissed, rugged ​ridges, or bearing patiently the long monotonous ​road-bash..... 
-If the darker days should come when no sun will shine Thou wilt dry my tears, my lass, end I'll dry thinIt's we two, it's we two, While the world'​s away, Hand in hand together, lass, on our wedding day."​ + 
-1 +"​It'​s we two, it's we two for aye,\\ 
-P7Z. +All the world and we two, and Heaven be our stay. 
-A h + 
-II +What's the world, my lass, my love; what can it do?\\ 
-PI +am thine and thou art mine; life is fresh and new. 
-MORE ABOUT + 
-From Jamberoo ​ftwas Peter 7vrcte, "I want a collar for the +Take a kiss from me, my lass - Now the song begins...\\ 
-No, not the nanny, ​donft b rLly; I want a strong one for the billy. 30 inches is the fit, +Life was made afresh for us and the brave heart wins. 
-Above all else it must have VV0I.T + 
-It must have W.I.T. '​cause ​he7s so strong It must be 30 inches long. +If the darker days should come when no sun will shine\\ 
-Mind you see it Ts just the ticket Because it has to hold Ben Rickett."​ +Thou wilt dry my tears, my lass, and I'll dry thine. 
-The collar was made stout and strong And it was 30 inches long... + 
-Strong enough to hold a steer +It's we two, it's we two, While the world'​s away,\\ 
-But Ben looked at it with a sneer. "How dare they hold me back in chains When love is surging through my volnsl" A mighty heave - It cane away And Ben' ​was loose to love and play. l',​11 ​lack-a-day, Oh what a pits+Hand in hand together, lass, on our wedding day."​ 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Paddy Made. ===== 
 + 
 +=== More About W.I.T. === 
 + 
 +From Jamberoo ​'​twas ​Peter wrote,\\ 
 +"I want a collar for the goat;\\ 
 +No, not the nanny, ​don't be silly;\\ 
 +I want a strong one for the billy.\\ 
 +30 inches is the fit,\\ 
 +Above all else it must have W.I.T\\ 
 +It must have W.I.T. '​cause ​he'​s ​so strong,\\ 
 +It must be 30 inches long.\\ 
 +Mind you see it'​s ​just the ticket\\ 
 +Because it has to hold Ben Rickett."​ 
 + 
 +The collar was made stout and strong\\ 
 +And it was 30 inches long...\\ 
 +Strong enough to hold a steer\\ 
 +But Ben looked at it with a sneer.\\ 
 +"How dare they hold me back in chains\\ 
 +When love is surging through my veins!"\\ 
 +A mighty heave - It came away\\ 
 +And Ben was loose to love and play.\\ 
 +Ah lack-a-day, Oh what a pit!\\
 The collar just did not have W.I.T. The collar just did not have W.I.T.
-"​I'​ll not be thwarted,"​ Paddy cried, 4 chap fs not beaten till he f s tried:"​ A double collar now adorns 
-Ben Rickett fs neck behind t he horns, And this the secret is, to wit, 
-If aught proves weak we strengthen It: 
-= WELT IT TAKES - the built-in ingredient of PADDY-MADE CAMP GEAR 
-light6eight Ccrrip Clear 
-201 CASTLFREACri S SYDNEY 
-ageSaglhalMuthebAreigemaleigmairgKeD. - 
-17,s1, 
-40 '4.4 s.1,1 
-Ako-,. 
  
 +"​I'​ll not be thwarted,"​ Paddy cried,\\
 +A chap's not beaten till he's tried!"​\\
 +A __double__ collar now adorns\\
 +Ben Rickett'​s neck behind the horns,\\
 +And this the secret is, to wit,
 +__If aught proves weak we strengthen it__!
 +
 +W.I.T. = What It Takes - the built-in ingredient of Paddy-Made Camp Gear.
 +
 +Paddy Pallin. Lightweight Camp Gear.
 +
 +201 Castlereagh St., Sydney.
 +
 +----
195606.txt · Last modified: 2018/09/17 03:16 by tyreless