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195506 [2016/01/30 06:19]
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 Jim Hooper, discussing the Federation report, said that the report printed in the current issue of the magazine gave a wrong impression. The Police had not expressed any opinion on the efficacy of the practice or the part played by Army Signals, for it is not their business to express opinions. Nor did they "thank the Bush walkers for their patience and forbearance"​ but the Senior Police Officer had asked Jim to pass an thanks for our cooperation. Jim Hooper, discussing the Federation report, said that the report printed in the current issue of the magazine gave a wrong impression. The Police had not expressed any opinion on the efficacy of the practice or the part played by Army Signals, for it is not their business to express opinions. Nor did they "thank the Bush walkers for their patience and forbearance"​ but the Senior Police Officer had asked Jim to pass an thanks for our cooperation.
  
-Brian Harvey made reference to the unfortunatedelay ​in issuing the Walks Programme. Though he fully appreciated the difficulties it was a matter of some concern to a leader if the programme came out only three days before a walk for which 7 days notice was required of starters.+Brian Harvey made reference to the unfortunate delay in issuing the Walks Programme. Though he fully appreciated the difficulties it was a matter of some concern to a leader if the programme came out only three days before a walk for which 7 days notice was required of starters.
  
-A motion to limit Club entertainments to "about an hour" was then discussed. Neil Schaefer referred to a previous motion which requested the social secretary to organise the slides in advance. Jack Wren thought that we would only be "​cutting our own throats"​ if we limited showings to an hour because some very enjoyable slide nights, particularly by visitors, had gone far beyond that time. Malcolm McGregor said that in his experience as a lecturer he found that an hour was about enough as even a very interested audience seemed to become somewhat restless after that. The dscomfort ​of eyestrain in looking at bright fixed images for a long period was also nentioned. The motion was amended to refer not to entertainments generally, or to slide nights generally, but to members'​ slide nights; and was carried in this form.+A motion to limit Club entertainments to "about an hour" was then discussed. Neil Schaefer referred to a previous motion which requested the social secretary to organise the slides in advance. Jack Wren thought that we would only be "​cutting our own throats"​ if we limited showings to an hour because some very enjoyable slide nights, particularly by visitors, had gone far beyond that time. Malcolm McGregor said that in his experience as a lecturer he found that an hour was about enough as even a very interested audience seemed to become somewhat restless after that. The discomfort ​of eyestrain in looking at bright fixed images for a long period was also mentioned. The motion was amended to refer not to entertainments generally, or to slide nights generally, but to members'​ slide nights; and was carried in this form.
  
 The meeting concluded with some magazine business. Jack Gentle, the Business Manager, referred to the rising costs of producing the magazine. He said that though he hoped to maintain or increase advertising matter, the best means of increasing revenue was to sell more magazines, and he therefore asked members to do their best to see that everyone in the Club bought one. The meeting concluded with some magazine business. Jack Gentle, the Business Manager, referred to the rising costs of producing the magazine. He said that though he hoped to maintain or increase advertising matter, the best means of increasing revenue was to sell more magazines, and he therefore asked members to do their best to see that everyone in the Club bought one.
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 Tummies were beginning to send more and more urgent messages through the sympathetic system. when, "Yes, yes, no, no -- it can't be!" But it was; the Kowmung River. We dropped our packs and lit the fire and watched the troups come trickling in. Dot, Grace, Arne and I were in the first group. Then Heather, Don, Gawd, Snow and Bob followed by the two Time Machines in company with Ken and finally steaming down the bank with all the appearance of power and inexhaustible energy of a goods train came Peter, Col and Garth. Soon everything was still except for the muffled sound of steady crunching as lightweight Rye-vitas yielded to persistent molars. But one set of jaws was not working. Alas poor Bob. He had walked so well that he got ahead of the three slower members of his party, then John ("​Pills"​) White damaged his knee, quite unknown to Bob, who got even further ahead. But Mr. Abernethy'​s misfortune hinges on the fact the party of four were only carrying two rucksacks and Bob didn't have the one with lunch in it. Hard cheddar! Last seen he was wandering disconsolately back along the Cox in search of Food. Tummies were beginning to send more and more urgent messages through the sympathetic system. when, "Yes, yes, no, no -- it can't be!" But it was; the Kowmung River. We dropped our packs and lit the fire and watched the troups come trickling in. Dot, Grace, Arne and I were in the first group. Then Heather, Don, Gawd, Snow and Bob followed by the two Time Machines in company with Ken and finally steaming down the bank with all the appearance of power and inexhaustible energy of a goods train came Peter, Col and Garth. Soon everything was still except for the muffled sound of steady crunching as lightweight Rye-vitas yielded to persistent molars. But one set of jaws was not working. Alas poor Bob. He had walked so well that he got ahead of the three slower members of his party, then John ("​Pills"​) White damaged his knee, quite unknown to Bob, who got even further ahead. But Mr. Abernethy'​s misfortune hinges on the fact the party of four were only carrying two rucksacks and Bob didn't have the one with lunch in it. Hard cheddar! Last seen he was wandering disconsolately back along the Cox in search of Food.
  
-From about two thirty, with every indication of reluctance, parties began moving out. Putto aad team who had been last to arrive showed great conscientiousness by being first off with Dot, Grace and me following. The rear where we two strugg1ed ​to keep up was the ideal place to compare Dot's nimble lightness with Colin'​s massive power, Garth'​s square determination and the lithe strength of Peter and Arne. I have the clearest mental picture of Stitt making a crossing as we saw it from ten feet higher up the bank. There he was, chest deep with his pack floating high up behind him, surging across with the current, which must have been pretty strong, having no apparent effect. After an hour Grace and I stopped for a rest and that was the last we saw of them that day.+From about two thirty, with every indication of reluctance, parties began moving out. Putto and team who had been last to arrive showed great conscientiousness by being first off with Dot, Grace and me following. The rear where we two struggled ​to keep up was the ideal place to compare Dot's nimble lightness with Colin'​s massive power, Garth'​s square determination and the lithe strength of Peter and Arne. I have the clearest mental picture of Stitt making a crossing as we saw it from ten feet higher up the bank. There he was, chest deep with his pack floating high up behind him, surging across with the current, which must have been pretty strong, having no apparent effect. After an hour Grace and I stopped for a rest and that was the last we saw of them that day.
  
 When we started again we felt that the miles were beginning to take their toll, for Grace had a kink in one of her thigh muscles and I was getting rather tired too. Black Dog Canyon was kind to us, but after crossing, the knee-high grass on the flat before Cedar Creek was heavy going and the seeds made our socks prickle like introverted pin cushions. When we started again we felt that the miles were beginning to take their toll, for Grace had a kink in one of her thigh muscles and I was getting rather tired too. Black Dog Canyon was kind to us, but after crossing, the knee-high grass on the flat before Cedar Creek was heavy going and the seeds made our socks prickle like introverted pin cushions.
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 Somehow twenty to six didn't seem so late on Sunday as it had on Saturday morning, but there was much to do. Some food parties were splitting up, there was breakfast to eat and so on, but for the Admiral there was even more. There was a Decision. The night before he had been sure he would go on but now with stiff muscles and in the chilly morning air he sat debating with himself. "If I don't finish"​ he said "​they'​ll say I'm a piker and if I do they'​ll say I'm made so I can't win. And I always pull out of things anyway so it would be a shame to spoil the record now". Then the decision made he turned his psychology on Neil who was half out of his bag in the process of getting up. "Look Neil, there'​s no need for you to carry that heavy sleeping bag all the way to Picton. Just give it to me and I'll carry it to Bimlow and let you have it on Wednesday night. No, I assure you it's no trouble, and don't bother to pack it up, I'll fix it for you. Now you'd better be getting a move on." So Neil was coaxed out and no sooner was he out than the Admiral was in "This is the first time I've been warm all night!"​ he chortled. Somehow twenty to six didn't seem so late on Sunday as it had on Saturday morning, but there was much to do. Some food parties were splitting up, there was breakfast to eat and so on, but for the Admiral there was even more. There was a Decision. The night before he had been sure he would go on but now with stiff muscles and in the chilly morning air he sat debating with himself. "If I don't finish"​ he said "​they'​ll say I'm a piker and if I do they'​ll say I'm made so I can't win. And I always pull out of things anyway so it would be a shame to spoil the record now". Then the decision made he turned his psychology on Neil who was half out of his bag in the process of getting up. "Look Neil, there'​s no need for you to carry that heavy sleeping bag all the way to Picton. Just give it to me and I'll carry it to Bimlow and let you have it on Wednesday night. No, I assure you it's no trouble, and don't bother to pack it up, I'll fix it for you. Now you'd better be getting a move on." So Neil was coaxed out and no sooner was he out than the Admiral was in "This is the first time I've been warm all night!"​ he chortled.
  
-Twentyfive minutes it took us to eat and sort and pack and then we were off (that is Neil and I were off) for of the seven bodies that lay down the prevous ​evening only our two heaps of "bones could rise again" -- at five forty anyway. The morning was already bright with the promise of another glorious day and the sharp air tempered the spring in our step. About half a mile along the track we sighted Jim and Kev. also pushing on, and came up with them just at the perilous McMahon'​s crossing. We could see Snow and Heather on the opposite bank so we knew at least that they had not been swept away. We entered the water cautiously, making sure of each fresh step, expecting at any moment to be immersed up to our waists, but no it looked safe. It was safe. Two steps from the opposite side Neil said "Be careful. There'​s a twelve foot channel there with a quicksand bottom!"​ but it was just another rumor and we stepped ashore not wet above the knees. So much for the Admiral.+Twentyfive minutes it took us to eat and sort and pack and then we were off (that is Neil and I were off) for of the seven bodies that lay down the previous ​evening only our two heaps of "bones could rise again" -- at five forty anyway. The morning was already bright with the promise of another glorious day and the sharp air tempered the spring in our step. About half a mile along the track we sighted Jim and Kev. also pushing on, and came up with them just at the perilous McMahon'​s crossing. We could see Snow and Heather on the opposite bank so we knew at least that they had not been swept away. We entered the water cautiously, making sure of each fresh step, expecting at any moment to be immersed up to our waists, but no it looked safe. It was safe. Two steps from the opposite side Neil said "Be careful. There'​s a twelve foot channel there with a quicksand bottom!"​ but it was just another rumor and we stepped ashore not wet above the knees. So much for the Admiral.
  
 We learned from Snow later that they would have come further the previous night only during the elaborate precautions - changing to swimming costume, wrapping clothes in plastic etc. - to cross the knee deep stream, Heather'​s watch became mislaid so they had to camp near by and look for it in the morning. Of course it was about two feet from where it was lost. We learned from Snow later that they would have come further the previous night only during the elaborate precautions - changing to swimming costume, wrapping clothes in plastic etc. - to cross the knee deep stream, Heather'​s watch became mislaid so they had to camp near by and look for it in the morning. Of course it was about two feet from where it was lost.
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 The three of us started off then, rolling up the miles as quickly as we could. Nine o'​clock brought us to Bimlow and the first real rest since we started. There was a general patching up of feet and in a few minutes Heather and Snow came along; Heather still impatient to be moving; then Kevin arrived looking as though he was out for a morning'​s stroll. The three of us started off then, rolling up the miles as quickly as we could. Nine o'​clock brought us to Bimlow and the first real rest since we started. There was a general patching up of feet and in a few minutes Heather and Snow came along; Heather still impatient to be moving; then Kevin arrived looking as though he was out for a morning'​s stroll.
  
-Soon they were all on the way again except Neil, whose feet would take him no further, and except me still busy patching blisters. When I did start I found I was horribly stiff but I said goodbye to Neil and hobbled after the others. Just down the road I came upon Kev talking to Gladys and Len Fall, the first of the kind people with cars who came in to take out survivors. Kev and I walked together for a while until it was time for Kevin'​s hourly rest (union rules) and I went on alone till I met David Ingram. David was our real fairygodmother,​ producing all sorts of comforts for the troops - everything from fruit drops to detailed directions, not to mention the encouraging words. We had a short chat about the weather and such then went our ways. The weather, ​incidently, was perfect, which was good but bad because it tended to hatch out plagues of tourist types in all sorts of sporting vehicles, so one had to be pretty agile to stay whole. A few bends later and who should I meet but Arne brandishing something and obviously highly delighted. It turned out to be a cardboard box (much better than bark to walk on). I was very, very footsore by the time I drew near to Spring Corner, where David had said that he would pick me up if I decided to drop out. The nearer I got to the corner the more undecided I became but of course there was no real decision. The corner came and my legs kept swinging and my feet kept plodding, then next thing I was going downhill to the Nattai and I knew I wouldn'​t be back.+Soon they were all on the way again except Neil, whose feet would take him no further, and except me still busy patching blisters. When I did start I found I was horribly stiff but I said goodbye to Neil and hobbled after the others. Just down the road I came upon Kev talking to Gladys and Len Fall, the first of the kind people with cars who came in to take out survivors. Kev and I walked together for a while until it was time for Kevin'​s hourly rest (union rules) and I went on alone till I met David Ingram. David was our real fairygodmother,​ producing all sorts of comforts for the troops - everything from fruit drops to detailed directions, not to mention the encouraging words. We had a short chat about the weather and such then went our ways. The weather, ​incidentally, was perfect, which was good but bad because it tended to hatch out plagues of tourist types in all sorts of sporting vehicles, so one had to be pretty agile to stay whole. A few bends later and who should I meet but Arne brandishing something and obviously highly delighted. It turned out to be a cardboard box (much better than bark to walk on). I was very, very footsore by the time I drew near to Spring Corner, where David had said that he would pick me up if I decided to drop out. The nearer I got to the corner the more undecided I became but of course there was no real decision. The corner came and my legs kept swinging and my feet kept plodding, then next thing I was going downhill to the Nattai and I knew I wouldn'​t be back.
  
 At the Nattai Bridge I caught a glimpse of Snow and Heather down the bank. How indefatigable those two seemed as they lightly and steadily ate up the miles. When they stopped in a shady spot I came up with them and gladly spread myself out while we took stock of the situation. It seemed there would be only four of us left to finish so we decided to wait for Arne then all go on together. Soon he was along with his dot and carry one stride, and we all made off along the river track. This was like a holiday after the dusty road and the Sunday drivers, so we made the most of it. Sheehy'​s Creek seemed to come along in no time, and after making sure it was the right spot we settled down to lunch. You really can't settle down to anything worthwhile in forty minutes but we did our best and I scored a tin of baked beans and sausage (N.B. one sausage) off Snow and felt quite pleased with myself. While we were eating we saw two bods crossing the river about a hundred yards up and thinking they must be some of our crew tried a few tentative names like "​Colin"​ and "​Garth!"​ but the two mysterious ones with scarcely a wave and certainly not a shout, continued on their way. Perhaps they belong to some other club we thought, but what any sane walker would be doing out here at this time in the afternoon we couldn'​t imagine. At the Nattai Bridge I caught a glimpse of Snow and Heather down the bank. How indefatigable those two seemed as they lightly and steadily ate up the miles. When they stopped in a shady spot I came up with them and gladly spread myself out while we took stock of the situation. It seemed there would be only four of us left to finish so we decided to wait for Arne then all go on together. Soon he was along with his dot and carry one stride, and we all made off along the river track. This was like a holiday after the dusty road and the Sunday drivers, so we made the most of it. Sheehy'​s Creek seemed to come along in no time, and after making sure it was the right spot we settled down to lunch. You really can't settle down to anything worthwhile in forty minutes but we did our best and I scored a tin of baked beans and sausage (N.B. one sausage) off Snow and felt quite pleased with myself. While we were eating we saw two bods crossing the river about a hundred yards up and thinking they must be some of our crew tried a few tentative names like "​Colin"​ and "​Garth!"​ but the two mysterious ones with scarcely a wave and certainly not a shout, continued on their way. Perhaps they belong to some other club we thought, but what any sane walker would be doing out here at this time in the afternoon we couldn'​t imagine.
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 After the waterfall the grade lessened and we coasted easily along and were just starting to expect the main road when we saw a car parked. It was David again, all smiles, more kind words and - bless him - another handout. "Only eight more miles,"​ he encouraged, "and most of them are down hill". After the waterfall the grade lessened and we coasted easily along and were just starting to expect the main road when we saw a car parked. It was David again, all smiles, more kind words and - bless him - another handout. "Only eight more miles,"​ he encouraged, "and most of them are down hill".
  
-I remember we set off at ten past four, thoroughly elated. Eight miles sounded ever so short and there were even a few snatches of song. As we went along however, we found that downhill was even harder on the feet than uphill and as Heather and Arne went faster and faster Snow and I went slower and slower and our spirits sank lower and lower. We'd have sold out cheap. We stopped only once along the way and Oooo! the agony of getting started again. Then there was the joyous moment when the lights of Picton appeared and the tedious hour as we dawdled with the road towards them. Eventually we arrived; we could see David and Arne, it was just another three steps, two, one, then blessed relief as we sat down on the pavement, plop! Rigor mortis set in very quickly so that we could scarcely stagger and we had to look both ways very carefully and give ourselves plenty of time when crossing roads. We finished up with an exciting dash for the train, Heather almost streaming out behind as she was hauled aboard, and I think that's the whole story. I suppose we missed a few intrguing ​sights such as Putt and Stitt sitting down to a picnic lunch complete with tablecloth but all things considered it was worth it. Yet one can't deny the truth of the statement made by Ian, our loudest critic, that the best thing about the Eighty Five Miler was the conversation it provoked.+I remember we set off at ten past four, thoroughly elated. Eight miles sounded ever so short and there were even a few snatches of song. As we went along however, we found that downhill was even harder on the feet than uphill and as Heather and Arne went faster and faster Snow and I went slower and slower and our spirits sank lower and lower. We'd have sold out cheap. We stopped only once along the way and Oooo! the agony of getting started again. Then there was the joyous moment when the lights of Picton appeared and the tedious hour as we dawdled with the road towards them. Eventually we arrived; we could see David and Arne, it was just another three steps, two, one, then blessed relief as we sat down on the pavement, plop! Rigor mortis set in very quickly so that we could scarcely stagger and we had to look both ways very carefully and give ourselves plenty of time when crossing roads. We finished up with an exciting dash for the train, Heather almost streaming out behind as she was hauled aboard, and I think that's the whole story. I suppose we missed a few intriguing ​sights such as Putt and Stitt sitting down to a picnic lunch complete with tablecloth but all things considered it was worth it. Yet one can't deny the truth of the statement made by Ian, our loudest critic, that the best thing about the Eighty Five Miler was the conversation it provoked.
  
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 ====Resignation Of Vice President, John Cotter:==== ====Resignation Of Vice President, John Cotter:====
  
-John Cotter asked to be relieved of his postiton ​as Vice President and his resignation was received with regret.+John Cotter asked to be relieved of his position ​as Vice President and his resignation was received with regret.
  
-====DHeathcote ​Primitive Area:====+====Heathcote ​Primitive Area:====
  
 A further letter from the Trustees of the Primitive Area outlining the reasons for their objection to the use of the Area for Re-unions.. A further letter from the Trustees of the Primitive Area outlining the reasons for their objection to the use of the Area for Re-unions..
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 ====Kuring-gai Chase Trust:==== ====Kuring-gai Chase Trust:====
  
-Notices appearing in the Sydney Press indicate that the Kuring-gai Chase will again be attacked.... this time for the establishment of an aerodrome. The Federation will ask the Trust to resist any action of this kind and members of Club are asked to write as citizens, to the Minister for Lands or their local Members of Parliament ​esting ​against the policy of Park "​Filching"​ and this latest move to remove part of Kuring-gal Chase for an aerodrome.+Notices appearing in the Sydney Press indicate that the Kuring-gai Chase will again be attacked.... this time for the establishment of an aerodrome. The Federation will ask the Trust to resist any action of this kind and members of Club are asked to write as citizens, to the Minister for Lands or their local Members of Parliament ​protesting ​against the policy of Park "​Filching"​ and this latest move to remove part of Kuring-gal Chase for an aerodrome.
  
 ====Corang:​==== ====Corang:​====
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 Some little research has shown that 26,000 acres have been reserved from sale about the head of the Corang River. This is following a recommendation that a National Park be established in the area. Some little research has shown that 26,000 acres have been reserved from sale about the head of the Corang River. This is following a recommendation that a National Park be established in the area.
  
-The Chief Guardian of Fauna is arranging for a Conference of conservation bodies an July 2nd. Two representatives of the Federation will attaad ​and a number of suggestions will be made for the agenda.+The Chief Guardian of Fauna is arranging for a Conference of conservation bodies an July 2nd. Two representatives of the Federation will attend ​and a number of suggestions will be made for the agenda.
  
 370 acres have been recommended by the Fauna Protection Panel for a __Faunal Reserve__. The area is in the St. George'​s Basin District, near Killarney. 370 acres have been recommended by the Fauna Protection Panel for a __Faunal Reserve__. The area is in the St. George'​s Basin District, near Killarney.
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-A section of the Motorised Unit of the Club (the Moppetts, Roots and Browns, with the Harveys, Jess Martin and Sheila Binns as passengers) took to the hills for Anzac Wekend ​and made a standing camp at Whalan'​s Hut (near Rocky Top) about 6 miles from Kanangra. Two very pleasant half days were spent rambling around Kanangra Plateau in perfect autumn weather, with every land mark from Big Misty, Medlow, right around to The Gib, Bowral, and beyond, gleaming in the bright sunlight. The hollow rocks to the right of the Kanangra Road terminus proved interesting and highly delighted the four kiddies in tow. Sunday was spent in a walk down Morong Creek to the falls where it tumbles 1,200' into the Upper Kowmung. Morong Creek is a very fascinating waterway rushing over a wild profusion of rocky drops and is said to harbour trout.+A section of the Motorised Unit of the Club (the Moppetts, Roots and Browns, with the Harveys, Jess Martin and Sheila Binns as passengers) took to the hills for Anzac Weekend ​and made a standing camp at Whalan'​s Hut (near Rocky Top) about 6 miles from Kanangra. Two very pleasant half days were spent rambling around Kanangra Plateau in perfect autumn weather, with every land mark from Big Misty, Medlow, right around to The Gib, Bowral, and beyond, gleaming in the bright sunlight. The hollow rocks to the right of the Kanangra Road terminus proved interesting and highly delighted the four kiddies in tow. Sunday was spent in a walk down Morong Creek to the falls where it tumbles 1,200' into the Upper Kowmung. Morong Creek is a very fascinating waterway rushing over a wild profusion of rocky drops and is said to harbour trout.
  
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 Baa, baa, baa." Baa, baa, baa."
  
-A refrain soon tO become the theme-song of our trip, little though we knew it at the time.+A refrain soon to become the theme-song of our trip, little though we knew it at the time.
  
 Having made arrangements to leave for Kanangra at 5 a.m., we retired to the spartan comfort of the nearest bus shelter to bed down for a short nap. The electric light, being connected with the street lighting, couldn'​t be turned off. A peaceful night, broken only by incessant mile-long goods trains some 20 feet away, came to an end at 5 a.m. when the driver poked his head in. At the most critical moment, just as we were hastily stowing our sleeping bags, the cursed light went out. Having made arrangements to leave for Kanangra at 5 a.m., we retired to the spartan comfort of the nearest bus shelter to bed down for a short nap. The electric light, being connected with the street lighting, couldn'​t be turned off. A peaceful night, broken only by incessant mile-long goods trains some 20 feet away, came to an end at 5 a.m. when the driver poked his head in. At the most critical moment, just as we were hastily stowing our sleeping bags, the cursed light went out.
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 Mist and light rain greeted us at the Walls. Then occurred one of the most exasperating experiences that could happen to any walker. In the confusion at the bus-shelter,​ Jack Perry'​s rucksack had been placed in the boot of a car, the driver of which had subsequently swapped cars for a larger vehicle. There was nothing for it but that Jack return to Blackheath - he didn't even have a look at the scenery - there wasn't any. "​We'​ll see you at Cedar Creek Junction on Sunday night Jack" we said, consigning him to a solo weekend. Mist and light rain greeted us at the Walls. Then occurred one of the most exasperating experiences that could happen to any walker. In the confusion at the bus-shelter,​ Jack Perry'​s rucksack had been placed in the boot of a car, the driver of which had subsequently swapped cars for a larger vehicle. There was nothing for it but that Jack return to Blackheath - he didn't even have a look at the scenery - there wasn't any. "​We'​ll see you at Cedar Creek Junction on Sunday night Jack" we said, consigning him to a solo weekend.
  
-After breakfasting at the overhanging cave under the road-loop, we traversed to scrubby tops end down Gordon Smith'​s Pass. Except for a brief glimpse down Murdering Gully we saw nothing of the Spires nor Kanangra Deep. For a short while we got below the cloud ceiling in Gabe's Gap, then ascended up into the woolliness again. A rockpool just past Mt. Berry supplied tea-water for lunch. It was like Pitt Street on Gangerang, a line of bodies would break out of the encircling swirl to disappear again, capes adripping. Nobody knew quite where they were along the ridge - nobody, that is, except Jess Martin. Jess always knew exactly where we were without the map. It was past 4 p.m. when, after puffing and panting up the ever-rising saw-tooth, we arrived at the top of a round hill which, for all we could see, might have.been 100 feet above sea level, but was found to be the Cloudmnker ​Trig Station, 3,819' above the Bondi breakers.+After breakfasting at the overhanging cave under the road-loop, we traversed to scrubby tops end down Gordon Smith'​s Pass. Except for a brief glimpse down Murdering Gully we saw nothing of the Spires nor Kanangra Deep. For a short while we got below the cloud ceiling in Gabe's Gap, then ascended up into the woolliness again. A rockpool just past Mt. Berry supplied tea-water for lunch. It was like Pitt Street on Gangerang, a line of bodies would break out of the encircling swirl to disappear again, capes adripping. Nobody knew quite where they were along the ridge - nobody, that is, except Jess Martin. Jess always knew exactly where we were without the map. It was past 4 p.m. when, after puffing and panting up the ever-rising saw-tooth, we arrived at the top of a round hill which, for all we could see, might have.been 100 feet above sea level, but was found to be the Cloudmaker ​Trig Station, 3,819' above the Bondi breakers.
  
-By this time we had decided to camp on Mt. Tiwilla instead of the cheerless Dex Creek, in the famous "​100-man Cave" discovered by Max Gentle in the manner we will relate later. As mentioned, the top of Cloudmaker is a dome with no ridge formation apparent, ​particu1ar1y ​in the misty gloom. Alan, who had not been there before, did a skilful piece of navigation to lead us diagonally across the head of Tiwilla Creek. Darker it became, with no sign of the tell-tale clue of the commencement of the cliffs forming the Eastern rim of Tiwilla Canyon, in whose line was the cave. Visibility was 75 yards. The creek was rapidly gullying, when a minor rebellion in the rear persuaded the leader of the wisdom of camping "here and now" on what level ground remained. Nobody could be sure where the cave was, except Jess, who told us where we were, where the cave was and how to get there, but as so often happens in this wicked world, the small still voice of knowledge was drowned in the clamour of opinion. We started pitching our tents in one of the most depressing places it has been the sorry lot of walkers to find on a wet night. A recent fire had destroyed all vegetation, and sprouting suckers were all that had grown since. Lumps of shale covered the ground. When removed, yellow squelchy clay remained. But one had faith - may his shadow never grow less, may his moustache become more bushy; Don Mattnews ​went on alone, and lo and behold, just about 200 yards down the ravine he found the cave. Tents were pulled down and tucked in bundles under arms as we hastened there, snatching up sticks for firewood as we went. It is truly a magnificent cave, high, dry, with a floor of sand nearly flat, and about 200 feet long. There was even dry wood left by the previous occupants (they must have read the Code of Ethics). Had the world'​s best hotel opened its doors, it could not have been more appreciated. It was rather a weird scene as the smoke reflected the red-glow of the spaced-out cooking fires, giving a curious optical illusion of great distance, with figures moving in and out of the orbits of red light.+By this time we had decided to camp on Mt. Tiwilla instead of the cheerless Dex Creek, in the famous "​100-man Cave" discovered by Max Gentle in the manner we will relate later. As mentioned, the top of Cloudmaker is a dome with no ridge formation apparent, ​particularly ​in the misty gloom. Alan, who had not been there before, did a skilful piece of navigation to lead us diagonally across the head of Tiwilla Creek. Darker it became, with no sign of the tell-tale clue of the commencement of the cliffs forming the Eastern rim of Tiwilla Canyon, in whose line was the cave. Visibility was 75 yards. The creek was rapidly gullying, when a minor rebellion in the rear persuaded the leader of the wisdom of camping "here and now" on what level ground remained. Nobody could be sure where the cave was, except Jess, who told us where we were, where the cave was and how to get there, but as so often happens in this wicked world, the small still voice of knowledge was drowned in the clamour of opinion. We started pitching our tents in one of the most depressing places it has been the sorry lot of walkers to find on a wet night. A recent fire had destroyed all vegetation, and sprouting suckers were all that had grown since. Lumps of shale covered the ground. When removed, yellow squelchy clay remained. But one had faith - may his shadow never grow less, may his moustache become more bushy; Don Matthews ​went on alone, and lo and behold, just about 200 yards down the ravine he found the cave. Tents were pulled down and tucked in bundles under arms as we hastened there, snatching up sticks for firewood as we went. It is truly a magnificent cave, high, dry, with a floor of sand nearly flat, and about 200 feet long. There was even dry wood left by the previous occupants (they must have read the Code of Ethics). Had the world'​s best hotel opened its doors, it could not have been more appreciated. It was rather a weird scene as the smoke reflected the red-glow of the spaced-out cooking fires, giving a curious optical illusion of great distance, with figures moving in and out of the orbits of red light.
  
 After our night of luxury, we ascended to the plateau above the cave - the Tiwilla Plateau, a fairly open tableland about two miles long and a quarter to half-a-mile wide, running out like a tongue from the Gangerang Range, with cliffs on both sides and the end. Somewhere on the end was Compagnoni'​s Pass, down which was our route to the Kowmung, via Tiwilla Buttress, to which the Pass gave access. "On the Kowmung for lunch" was the cry "only four miles or so". And a drop of a couple of thousand feet! We trooped along like Brown'​s cows, seeing nothing but the ever-encompassing mist and the scenery under our feet. After about 45 minutes we came to a headland - obviously on the wrong side. Retracing our steps part of the way, we came out on cliffs running more or less North and South. We bore off to the right, sidling the slopes, peering over the edge at intervals, having the cotton-wool pulled over our eyes all the time. Sorties were made ahead, with negative results, so we marched back to a small creek where we had lunch. More investigations - sub-committees went out, still no clues. Then the mist lifted momentarily. Ah, there was the buttress. Onwards. The way was steep and slippery and the mist worse. Rain started in earnest. To brighten and console the party the haunting melody of the opera fell on our ears: After our night of luxury, we ascended to the plateau above the cave - the Tiwilla Plateau, a fairly open tableland about two miles long and a quarter to half-a-mile wide, running out like a tongue from the Gangerang Range, with cliffs on both sides and the end. Somewhere on the end was Compagnoni'​s Pass, down which was our route to the Kowmung, via Tiwilla Buttress, to which the Pass gave access. "On the Kowmung for lunch" was the cry "only four miles or so". And a drop of a couple of thousand feet! We trooped along like Brown'​s cows, seeing nothing but the ever-encompassing mist and the scenery under our feet. After about 45 minutes we came to a headland - obviously on the wrong side. Retracing our steps part of the way, we came out on cliffs running more or less North and South. We bore off to the right, sidling the slopes, peering over the edge at intervals, having the cotton-wool pulled over our eyes all the time. Sorties were made ahead, with negative results, so we marched back to a small creek where we had lunch. More investigations - sub-committees went out, still no clues. Then the mist lifted momentarily. Ah, there was the buttress. Onwards. The way was steep and slippery and the mist worse. Rain started in earnest. To brighten and console the party the haunting melody of the opera fell on our ears:
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 A number by train and taxi, others by motor bike, reached Perry'​s Lookdown at about the same time and set off down the track by torchlight, and some time this side of midnight we were down in the forest having a goodnight "​cuppa"​ before turning in. A number by train and taxi, others by motor bike, reached Perry'​s Lookdown at about the same time and set off down the track by torchlight, and some time this side of midnight we were down in the forest having a goodnight "​cuppa"​ before turning in.
  
-Morning saw us early astir as the ground had been somewhat damp and cold to camp on, and life was more comfortable by the fire cooking breakfast. As the Works Manager and Foreman hadn't yet arrived and we didn't expect them before lunch, most of us formed ourselves into a photographic and rock-climbing expedition and set out with cameras and rope on shoulder to assail Lockley'​s Pylon. We found a beautiful sun-warmed rock face and chimney, and it wasn't long before roped bods were spreadeagled up and down the architecture. We were coming back up the cliff face, and a particularly steep pinch it was too. Geof was having a turn at belaying the party up. Grace had been left till last as she had the brightest pants on and Geof wanted to do justice to the colour snap. Half a dozen of us are perched wherever we can find a foothold on a narrow ledge waiting for the last one to come up so we can use the rope for the next pitch. Ah, here comes Grace, gingerly inching her way up the dubious toe and finger holds. As her head appears over the crumbling edge of the precipipe ​the following conversation takes place:+Morning saw us early astir as the ground had been somewhat damp and cold to camp on, and life was more comfortable by the fire cooking breakfast. As the Works Manager and Foreman hadn't yet arrived and we didn't expect them before lunch, most of us formed ourselves into a photographic and rock-climbing expedition and set out with cameras and rope on shoulder to assail Lockley'​s Pylon. We found a beautiful sun-warmed rock face and chimney, and it wasn't long before roped bods were spreadeagled up and down the architecture. We were coming back up the cliff face, and a particularly steep pinch it was too. Geof was having a turn at belaying the party up. Grace had been left till last as she had the brightest pants on and Geof wanted to do justice to the colour snap. Half a dozen of us are perched wherever we can find a foothold on a narrow ledge waiting for the last one to come up so we can use the rope for the next pitch. Ah, here comes Grace, gingerly inching her way up the dubious toe and finger holds. As her head appears over the crumbling edge of the precipice ​the following conversation takes place:
  
 Geof: "Can you hold it there Grace? I want to take a photo of you." Geof: "Can you hold it there Grace? I want to take a photo of you."
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 Midnight saw numerous slumbering bodies by the camp fire, much warmer than the previous night let me add. Midnight saw numerous slumbering bodies by the camp fire, much warmer than the previous night let me add.
  
-Next day there was another hour or so work on the river project, then we played "​follow the leader",​ chasings through the trees: and leap-frog over the tents. Geof thought it was time the climbing rope was "​tested"​ so we tied it part way up a 140 foot dead tree and pulled it down, what time the axemen ​valiently ​chopped at its base. Through all these hilarious goings-on the Prospectives were receiving four hours of instructional,​ which we all felt was much too much. Even the instructors agreed with us, so something ought to be done about it.+Next day there was another hour or so work on the river project, then we played "​follow the leader",​ chasings through the trees: and leap-frog over the tents. Geof thought it was time the climbing rope was "​tested"​ so we tied it part way up a 140 foot dead tree and pulled it down, what time the axemen ​valiantly ​chopped at its base. Through all these hilarious goings-on the Prospectives were receiving four hours of instructional,​ which we all felt was much too much. Even the instructors agreed with us, so something ought to be done about it.
  
 Parties began pulling out some time after lunch, and so back up the hill to the waiting cars and motor bikes, or (happy prospect) the 5-mile road bash back to Blackheath railway. Parties began pulling out some time after lunch, and so back up the hill to the waiting cars and motor bikes, or (happy prospect) the 5-mile road bash back to Blackheath railway.
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 =====Paddy Made===== =====Paddy Made=====
  
-Juneeis ​here and already there is snow on the slopes with a promise of good ski-ing.+June is here and already there is snow on the slopes with a promise of good ski-ing.
  
 For those of you with such thoughts who intend to go to the snow this year Paddy has the best range of gear yet, and the quality and prices are keen (but they won't cut too big holes in your pocket). You'll be surprised at some of the low prices. For those of you with such thoughts who intend to go to the snow this year Paddy has the best range of gear yet, and the quality and prices are keen (but they won't cut too big holes in your pocket). You'll be surprised at some of the low prices.
195506.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/01/30 06:40 by tyreless