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195505 [2016/01/28 04:32]
tyreless
195505 [2016/01/28 05:50] (current)
tyreless
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 That was in the days when coastal boats brought the supplies to the port at Wyndham, and donkey teams of up to seventy-eight beasts hauled loaded waggons down that primitive road. Recently a man wandered into Thangool homestead just south of Broome and asked for water to fill his waterbag. The station owner was amazed that someone should approach his place without him hearing the car engine. The wanderer said that he had no car, he was pushing a wheelbarrow. He. had come from Broome and was facing the great sandy stretch of"​road"​ which runs parallel to the Ninety Mile Beach where the great central Australian desert continues westward right to the sea. Even at this stage of the station owner'​s story I knew what the tragic end would be; I was facing this road for the second time, having come over it on the upward journey, and not with a wheelbarrow but with a modern utility truck carrying my own provisions and water supply. They did their best at Thangool, but nothing would persuade this nomad that his venture was impossible; even should he make the distance between tanks before the sun struck him down, the water was not always drinkable. They found him in the scant shade of a beefwood tree, his barrow with its silly six inch diameter wheel long since abandoned. That was in the days when coastal boats brought the supplies to the port at Wyndham, and donkey teams of up to seventy-eight beasts hauled loaded waggons down that primitive road. Recently a man wandered into Thangool homestead just south of Broome and asked for water to fill his waterbag. The station owner was amazed that someone should approach his place without him hearing the car engine. The wanderer said that he had no car, he was pushing a wheelbarrow. He. had come from Broome and was facing the great sandy stretch of"​road"​ which runs parallel to the Ninety Mile Beach where the great central Australian desert continues westward right to the sea. Even at this stage of the station owner'​s story I knew what the tragic end would be; I was facing this road for the second time, having come over it on the upward journey, and not with a wheelbarrow but with a modern utility truck carrying my own provisions and water supply. They did their best at Thangool, but nothing would persuade this nomad that his venture was impossible; even should he make the distance between tanks before the sun struck him down, the water was not always drinkable. They found him in the scant shade of a beefwood tree, his barrow with its silly six inch diameter wheel long since abandoned.
 +
 We also asked for water at Thangool, not so much to fill our water bag (an eighteen gallon tank built into the truck), as to soak the hessian that I had laid under the floor mat and poked in around the clutch and brake pedals to keep out the choking dust as fine as talc that comes up in a cloud behind the truck and works its way into every crack of the truck body. We also asked for water at Thangool, not so much to fill our water bag (an eighteen gallon tank built into the truck), as to soak the hessian that I had laid under the floor mat and poked in around the clutch and brake pedals to keep out the choking dust as fine as talc that comes up in a cloud behind the truck and works its way into every crack of the truck body.
  
-Setting off from the station on to the terrible road the mirage mocked at us as it twisted and waved the landscape around in front of us like a nightmare; the horizon out in the direction of Roebuck Bay rose and fell in a wave-like manner until the wave crests broke away from the line and dwindled into the air like a long streamer. I found myself looking into the shadow of the occasional tree, half expecting to see there the body of some hapless barrow-pusher. Soon there are no trees, and there settles over everyone in the truck a silence born of +Setting off from the station on to the terrible road the mirage mocked at us as it twisted and waved the landscape around in front of us like a nightmare; the horizon out in the direction of Roebuck Bay rose and fell in a wave-like manner until the wave crests broke away from the line and dwindled into the air like a long streamer. I found myself looking into the shadow of the occasional tree, half expecting to see there the body of some hapless barrow-pusher. Soon there are no trees, and there settles over everyone in the truck a silence born of monotony - the heat, the dust, the everlasting plain of dried grass, a left-over from the last "​wet"​. Suddenly there! Look! A cat! Out here on this near desert we saw many ordinary domestic cats, hundreds of miles from any dwelling and many generations removed from domesticity;​ probably living on small birds - there seems to be no other sign of life, not even rabbits - and water - there are windmills and water tanks along the sandhills at the back of the beach, for sheep are pastured on the one mile strip of coastal plain between the desert and the sea.
-monotony - the heat, the dust, the everlasting plain of dried grass, a left-over from the last "​wet"​. Suddenly there! Look! A cat! Out here on this near desert we saw many ordinary domestic cats, hundreds of miles from any dwelling and many generations removed from domesticity;​ probably living on small birds - there seems to be no other sign of life, not even rabbits - and water - there are windmills and water tanks along the sandhills at the back of the beach, for sheep are pastured on the one mile strip of coastal plain between the desert and the sea.+
  
 And so this story has to end somehow. Well, it was the barrow-pushers that made me think of Bushwalkers,​ (not that I don't think of them often - lonely campfires at night have induced a nostalgic yearning for the companionship of many). I can understand the old hands not using a rucksac in their unenlightened age, but why a wheelbarrow?​ And so this story has to end somehow. Well, it was the barrow-pushers that made me think of Bushwalkers,​ (not that I don't think of them often - lonely campfires at night have induced a nostalgic yearning for the companionship of many). I can understand the old hands not using a rucksac in their unenlightened age, but why a wheelbarrow?​
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 Flora Hut is set in a grassy clearing, surrounded by beech forest with small creeks running either side of it, the clearing being at the foot of a spur. All the huts in the area were built by the Nelson Tramping Club assisted by a £1 for £1 Government grant, which is an excellent idea in a country where huts are needed, Club enthusiasm high but Club funds low. All the huts we stayed in were of the same design: rectangular,​ divided into 3 sections, either end being living quarters and the centre kept for horses and firewood, the latter being an important item. Fuel is very scarce, green timber rotting as soon as it falls. Wet rot is very prevalent as in all places with a high rainfall. Building materials used for the huts is rough hewn wood slabs and orange painted iron sheeting. Flora Hut is set in a grassy clearing, surrounded by beech forest with small creeks running either side of it, the clearing being at the foot of a spur. All the huts in the area were built by the Nelson Tramping Club assisted by a £1 for £1 Government grant, which is an excellent idea in a country where huts are needed, Club enthusiasm high but Club funds low. All the huts we stayed in were of the same design: rectangular,​ divided into 3 sections, either end being living quarters and the centre kept for horses and firewood, the latter being an important item. Fuel is very scarce, green timber rotting as soon as it falls. Wet rot is very prevalent as in all places with a high rainfall. Building materials used for the huts is rough hewn wood slabs and orange painted iron sheeting.
  
-After a luncheon respite from the drizzling mist we started towards Salesbury Hut which was on the plateau. Our track first went to a river junction then rose to the snowgrass plateau. The walking that afternoon was enjoyable, even with the drizzling rain. The track was inches deep with decaying leaves, small and softening to the footsteps. Lining either side of the track were beech and myrtle forest but not much undergrowth,​ the deer population keeping it down. From +After a luncheon respite from the drizzling mist we started towards Salesbury Hut which was on the plateau. Our track first went to a river junction then rose to the snowgrass plateau. The walking that afternoon was enjoyable, even with the drizzling rain. The track was inches deep with decaying leaves, small and softening to the footsteps. Lining either side of the track were beech and myrtle forest but not much undergrowth,​ the deer population keeping it down. From tree-trunks and branches hung thin greyish-green tendrils of thin-fibred moss, and green and white lichen clung to the trunks. The smell of damp rich earth arose through the drizzling mist.
-tree-trunks and branches hung thin greyish-green tendrils of thin-fibred moss, and green and white lichen clung to the trunks. The smell of damp rich earth arose through the drizzling mist.+
  
-We were walking parallel with Flora Creek, the water level rising swiftly owing to the heavier rains higher on the range. Passing two or three derelict one-roomed huts, we started ascending Salesbury Hut track. Writhing mist and cloud, reminiscent of the Blue Mountains, replaced the drizzle. Bird life became noticable, the Most insistent being the riflemen, little tubby bundles about 1 1/4" long, lime green, with a call like a tinkling bell. About 20 of these small birds kept with us for miles, darting ahead, turning the walk into a Roman +We were walking parallel with Flora Creek, the water level rising swiftly owing to the heavier rains higher on the range. Passing two or three derelict one-roomed huts, we started ascending Salesbury Hut track. Writhing mist and cloud, reminiscent of the Blue Mountains, replaced the drizzle. Bird life became noticable, the Most insistent being the riflemen, little tubby bundles about 1 1/4" long, lime green, with a call like a tinkling bell. About 20 of these small birds kept with us for miles, darting ahead, turning the walk into a Roman triumph. Keeping up a medium steady pace (being too chilly to have many smokes), we arrived at Salesbury Hut by 7.15. It is built on snow-grass country, the orange-ochre colour showing prominently among the thigh-high clumps of yellowing snow tussock. The tussock extended over the floor of this very shallow valley with beech forest running in a strip on either side.
-triumph. Keeping up a medium steady pace (being too chilly to have many smokes), we arrived at Salesbury Hut by 7.15. It is built on snow-grass country, the orange-ochre colour showing prominently among the thigh-high clumps of yellowing snow tussock. The tussock extended over the floor of this very shallow valley with beech forest running in a strip on either side.+
  
-We reached the hut to find one half occupied, a few distant rifle shots telling us where the inhabitants were. The twilight faded, and feeling hungry we lit the fire. Unfortunately the chimney faced into the wind, with the draught coming down, and before long the room was full of smoke, making conditions uncomfortable. With the door open it became too cold. Just as we'd finished eating, the other two bods from the hut returned and called in for a cuppa, carrying a leg of venison. They'd just shot a 3-year old stag and kindly gave us a few pounds to supplement our food ration. It is a dark red neat, with a +We reached the hut to find one half occupied, a few distant rifle shots telling us where the inhabitants were. The twilight faded, and feeling hungry we lit the fire. Unfortunately the chimney faced into the wind, with the draught coming down, and before long the room was full of smoke, making conditions uncomfortable. With the door open it became too cold. Just as we'd finished eating, the other two bods from the hut returned and called in for a cuppa, carrying a leg of venison. They'd just shot a 3-year old stag and kindly gave us a few pounds to supplement our food ration. It is a dark red neat, with a deceptively smooth texture. Being warm, the steam rose in the cold air as Barry carved.
-deceptively smooth texture. Being warm, the steam rose in the cold air as Barry carved.+
  
 Next day, with the same weather, we decided to have a day trip from the hut and visit some caves that were marked on the map. Before long we were on the plateau, crossing it till we reached a maze of small steep gullies and thickly wooded ridges. An air of unreality pervaded all, the mist reducing visibility among the beech trees with their hanging moss-fronds. The tussock, swollen by the rain, was almost swampy. The first cave, (all at the head of gullies), wasn't much more than an underground stream, the floor and walls covered in thick grey mud. More rewarding was the next cave, two tunnels leading from a main chamber, but both blocked by rock falls after a hundred yards or so. Coming out we surprised a fallow doe grazing on the edge of a beech grove. The final cave visited was about a mile off, the entrance small, opening into a chamber about 40 or 50 feet high, roughly the same in depth, and about 100 yards wide, covered mostly with living lime stone and a variety of formations, including some magnificent columns. Near the back were iron-tinted shawls. The limestone looked coarse, maybe the sign of rapid growth. The only passage off was a river cave which we followed for approximately 1/4 mile, disappearing over a waterfall. Not having much faith in our one torch we came back to the open. Next day, with the same weather, we decided to have a day trip from the hut and visit some caves that were marked on the map. Before long we were on the plateau, crossing it till we reached a maze of small steep gullies and thickly wooded ridges. An air of unreality pervaded all, the mist reducing visibility among the beech trees with their hanging moss-fronds. The tussock, swollen by the rain, was almost swampy. The first cave, (all at the head of gullies), wasn't much more than an underground stream, the floor and walls covered in thick grey mud. More rewarding was the next cave, two tunnels leading from a main chamber, but both blocked by rock falls after a hundred yards or so. Coming out we surprised a fallow doe grazing on the edge of a beech grove. The final cave visited was about a mile off, the entrance small, opening into a chamber about 40 or 50 feet high, roughly the same in depth, and about 100 yards wide, covered mostly with living lime stone and a variety of formations, including some magnificent columns. Near the back were iron-tinted shawls. The limestone looked coarse, maybe the sign of rapid growth. The only passage off was a river cave which we followed for approximately 1/4 mile, disappearing over a waterfall. Not having much faith in our one torch we came back to the open.
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 The most urgent need now was a campsite. Between here and the Twins had to be counted out; the ground was even, but at too steep an angle for comfort. Retreating down about 20 feet we found a small tarn formed by the melting snow. Water - one point in its favour, and luckily a small flat area, slightly sheltered from the wind. Through an oversight we were without tent poles so, to serve a double purpose, we constructed a rock wall both as protection from the wind, which was very strong by now, and as something to tie the tent to. Barry crawled into his sleeping bag, then into the tent, holding it up whilst I lashed our tomahawk to his Yukon-type rucksack, making our second tent-pole. Makeshift, yes; but to our delight they held well. Entrance was gained by pulling but a couple of the side pegs and crawling under. Ravenously hungry, we settled for a meal of salami, scroggen, honey and thickly buttered Rye-Vitas. We peeped out of the doorway before settling to sleep. Our sunset was wondrous. The cloud-bank was approaching in over the West Coast, rich fiery colours glowing from the angry clouds. Ah! to have known then what to expect from New Zealand weather! The wind rose in volume, but we were too tired to listen long and slept well. The most urgent need now was a campsite. Between here and the Twins had to be counted out; the ground was even, but at too steep an angle for comfort. Retreating down about 20 feet we found a small tarn formed by the melting snow. Water - one point in its favour, and luckily a small flat area, slightly sheltered from the wind. Through an oversight we were without tent poles so, to serve a double purpose, we constructed a rock wall both as protection from the wind, which was very strong by now, and as something to tie the tent to. Barry crawled into his sleeping bag, then into the tent, holding it up whilst I lashed our tomahawk to his Yukon-type rucksack, making our second tent-pole. Makeshift, yes; but to our delight they held well. Entrance was gained by pulling but a couple of the side pegs and crawling under. Ravenously hungry, we settled for a meal of salami, scroggen, honey and thickly buttered Rye-Vitas. We peeped out of the doorway before settling to sleep. Our sunset was wondrous. The cloud-bank was approaching in over the West Coast, rich fiery colours glowing from the angry clouds. Ah! to have known then what to expect from New Zealand weather! The wind rose in volume, but we were too tired to listen long and slept well.
  
-The morning confirmed our fears. Thick swirling mist, driven by a high wind, put out of the question all thought of the Twins, so we packed up and left quickly, forcing down more honey and Rye-Vitas as breakfast. Finding our way to the right ridge was awkward. The evening before we had taken a very good survey, but as we had a choice with many spurs running off each, we weren'​t certain of it. The mist reduced visibility to about 15 ft. and even our compass behaved erratically. Barry found a rough cairn, making us both happier, and after some cautious travelling we found another. Our track was now down, over rock, greasy with moisture, across shingle fans when we left the ridge in order to pass bluffs, till we were travelling down over swampy tussock. Soon an occasional stunted tree appeared. It had taken 2 1/2 hours to reach tree level, and we were glad of the shelter from the wind and driven rain. Now the path was a muddy track, rivulets dropping and damming behind tree-trunks. Cabbage-trees +The morning confirmed our fears. Thick swirling mist, driven by a high wind, put out of the question all thought of the Twins, so we packed up and left quickly, forcing down more honey and Rye-Vitas as breakfast. Finding our way to the right ridge was awkward. The evening before we had taken a very good survey, but as we had a choice with many spurs running off each, we weren'​t certain of it. The mist reduced visibility to about 15 ft. and even our compass behaved erratically. Barry found a rough cairn, making us both happier, and after some cautious travelling we found another. Our track was now down, over rock, greasy with moisture, across shingle fans when we left the ridge in order to pass bluffs, till we were travelling down over swampy tussock. Soon an occasional stunted tree appeared. It had taken 2 1/2 hours to reach tree level, and we were glad of the shelter from the wind and driven rain. Now the path was a muddy track, rivulets dropping and damming behind tree-trunks. Cabbage-trees appeared among the beech. Flora saddle welcomed us, and down to Flora Hut for lunch and warmth.
-appeared among the beech. Flora saddle welcomed us, and down to Flora Hut for lunch and warmth.+
  
 Retracing our steps over the saddle we almost strolled down the well-made track, stopping near the bottom to fill our billies with mushrooms, remembering what frugality awaited us back in the "​batch."​ Passing by the farm, the farmer'​s wife called us in to tea and scones, enquired after our trip, and then asked us how we planned to get back. As we weren'​t in a hurry we had intended to hitch or walk, but the very kindly farmer'​s wife rang some neighbours further down the road and found one who was going in to Motueka by car in an hour's time. Fatigue and wet weather made us doubly thankful for this very kind gesture both on her part and the driver'​s. The miles quickly passed and later that evening, over a meal of mushrooms and bacon, we discussed the best all-round trip either of us had ever done. So ended Easter 1953. Retracing our steps over the saddle we almost strolled down the well-made track, stopping near the bottom to fill our billies with mushrooms, remembering what frugality awaited us back in the "​batch."​ Passing by the farm, the farmer'​s wife called us in to tea and scones, enquired after our trip, and then asked us how we planned to get back. As we weren'​t in a hurry we had intended to hitch or walk, but the very kindly farmer'​s wife rang some neighbours further down the road and found one who was going in to Motueka by car in an hour's time. Fatigue and wet weather made us doubly thankful for this very kind gesture both on her part and the driver'​s. The miles quickly passed and later that evening, over a meal of mushrooms and bacon, we discussed the best all-round trip either of us had ever done. So ended Easter 1953.
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 - Kevin Ardill - Kevin Ardill
  
-"The longest way round is the sweetest way home" ​ ​0h. ​Yeah  and might I also add, "Therets ​no fool like an old foo1.21 The foregoing is just about enough description of the trip, but a week has passed, the legs are beginning to feel like legs again, the clickitg ​has almost disappeared from the knee caps, blisters healing nicely, thank you, and when I've deseeded my socks I'll stagger in to the Club and resign. +"The longest way round is the sweetest way home" ​- Oh Yeah and might I also add, "There'​s ​no fool like an old foo1." ​The foregoing is just about enough description of the trip, but a week has passed, the legs are beginning to feel like legs again, the clicking ​has almost disappeared from the knee caps, blisters healing nicely, thank you, and when I've deseeded my socks I'll stagger in to the Club and resign. 
-I'm pretty sure it was Jim Brow/​17s ​fault. I consider he talked me into it, but he assures me that the opposite is correct. We thought to gain slight advantage by going to Katoomba on "The Fish," and I booked accordingly. I met Jim at a quarter to five and found seats 50 and 51, Car 7, a little difficult to locate in a carriage of 48 seats. After a little simple calculation by the conductor we found ourselves in eats 2 and 3, Car 9. Amazint ​what? Soot we are Joined by Geof Wagg, Grace Aird, Don Newis and Heather Joyce, all holders of seats 50 and 51. A gentle glow steals through my frame when Heather asks to be allowed to sit next to me. Would I mind? The glow soon departs when Heather mentions that the window seat'is the attraction. Your eyes shall be as full of coal as Bunnerong, Miss Joyce, but I shall not lift handkerchief or dig with'match on your behalf. No Sirs I disclose that I have a 25-lb pack, and Jim with a no-frame pack has slightly less. I've never had such a light pack - it floated like a gossamer. + 
-At Katoomba we marched ​RaEL a line of taxis towards the Deviltc ​Hole - a lovely night, everyone happy and :bright, ​bot Butler looking astoundingly athletic and the whole bunch in to gear along the Western Road. Well, we were last after half a mile, and Ive let tem go. Jim and I had decided to walk at our own steady pace, and walk long hours, if necessary, to cover the milage. We were both badly out of Condition, I had done a couple of day walks since last winter and Jim was nearly in the same condition, but was fortunate enough to have had a trip in Victoria earlier in the year. +I'm pretty sure it was Jim Brown'​s ​fault. I consider he talked me into it, but he assures me that the opposite is correct. We thought to gain slight advantage by going to Katoomba on "The Fish," and I booked accordingly. I met Jim at a quarter to five and found seats 50 and 51, Car 7, a little difficult to locate in a carriage of 48 seats. After a little simple calculation by the conductor we found ourselves in seats 2 and 3, Car 9. Amazin' ​what? Soon we are Joined by Geof Wagg, Grace Aird, Don Newis and Heather Joyce, all holders of seats 50 and 51. A gentle glow steals through my frame when Heather asks to be allowed to sit next to me. Would I mind? The glow soon departs when Heather mentions that the window seat is the attraction. Your eyes shall be as full of coal as Bunnerong, Miss Joyce, but I shall not lift handkerchief or dig with match on your behalf. No Sir! I disclose that I have a 25-lb pack, and Jim with a no-frame pack has slightly less. I've never had such a light pack - it floated like a gossamer. 
-Never having fallen before in the Devilts'Hole, I rectified that omission, but was dopey enough to get up again. The picking up Process, plus cursing time, allowed the torches ahead to disappear, and we were alone. Now I'll tell you about the private tripJim Brown and I did from Katoomba to Picton. + 
-The sloppy tracks in Megalong damped both our feet and enthusiasm for the Cox on the morrowHowever, the road was firm and dry, the moon shone brightly, we shared an orange under a gum and registered the first complaint from the lower limbs as the road consistent: ​climbed ​towaLdsBlack ​Jerry'​s. As ten years had eltipsed sinCe Jim came up that way, and I had never been there before, the gentle reader may not be surprised to learn that we went adrift. We walked about 2 miles trying to find the start of the track, survived a number of determined attacks by a sheep or ram who wanted to butt and then resorted to tracking the gyin boots worn by members of the loading ​bunch.. Jim had just about qualified for his Tenderfoot'​s +At Katoomba we marched ​__past__ ​a line of taxis towards the Devil'​s ​Hole - a lovely night, everyone happy and bright, ​Dot Butler looking astoundingly athletic and the whole bunch in to gear along the Western Road. Well, we were last after half a mile, and we let '​em ​go. Jim and I had decided to walk at our own steady pace, and walk long hours, if necessary, to cover the milage. We were both badly out of condition, I had done a couple of day walks since last winter and Jim was nearly in the same condition, but was fortunate enough to have had a trip in Victoria earlier in the year. 
-16. + 
-badge when the clock struck twelve and the gym boots leapt into thin air. We pitched the tent and rolled ​intoour ​bags. Had a most restfu ​night disturbed only by hunger pains, thirst, anxiety and finally got out of the tent to tell some lost motorist where he wasn'​t. ​-CoUld ​have told him where to go to but couldn'​t see how big he was, and so back to bed. +Never having fallen before in the Devil'Hole, I rectified that omission, but was dopey enough to get up again. The picking up process, plus cursing time, allowed the torches ahead to disappear, and we were alone. Now I'll tell you about the private trip Jim Brown and I did from Katoomba to Picton. 
-We rose at 5 a.zr L'A. were away 10 minutes later. Found the + 
-track in nO t1ie .im':​1,​=1 ​down to the Cox. Breakfast at the first +The sloppy tracks in Megalong damped both our feet and enthusiasm for the Cox on the morrowHowever, the road was firm and dry, the moon shone brightly, we shared an orange under a gum and registered the first complaint from the lower limbs as the road consistently ​climbed ​towards Black Jerry'​s. As ten years had elapsed since Jim came up that way, and I had never been there before, the gentle reader may not be surprised to learn that we went adrift. We walked about 2 miles trying to find the start of the track, survived a number of determined attacks by a sheep or ram who wanted to butt in, and then resorted to tracking the gym boots worn by members of the leading ​bunch. Jim had just about qualified for his Tenderfoot'​s badge when the clock struck twelve and the gym boots leapt into thin air. We pitched the tent and rolled ​into our bags. Had a most restful ​night disturbed only by hunger pains, thirst, anxiety and finally got out of the tent to tell some lost motorist where he wasn'​t. ​Could have told him where to go to but couldn'​t see how big he was, and so back to bed. 
-side creek, ​doq.n;l: e.jr on oats and sardines on toast. At Breakfast Creek we saw the well-known figure of Peter Stitt. He and three + 
-others had (,71-.-ed -.11. the 6.03 p.m. the previous night and had +We rose at 5 a.mand were away 10 minutes later. Found the track in no time and ambled ​down to the Cox. Breakfast at the first side creek, ​doing nicely ​on oats and sardines on toast. At Breakfast Creek we saw the well-known figure of Peter Stitt. He and three others had ex-ed Sydney on the 6.03 p.m. the previous night and had walked via Carlons. After about two and a half words of conversation he bounded off after his retreating comrades and we were delightfully private once again. The Cox was crossed at Harry'​s River, and there and then we decided that after every gravelly crossing we would stop and clean gravel out of our shoes and socks. This resolution paid dividends by eliminating one source of blisters and providing welcome brief rests. On the subject of rests - we stopped for five minutes every hour. Forty-five minutes were allowed for lunch at Kanangra Creek - ham sandwiches and dates. When deciding on food the the trip I mentioned ​to the girls at work that I was taking a pound of dates. Later one girl asked how they ? would find us if we got lost, and Kath piped up, "​They'​ll ​follow the date stones!" ​And here we were with seedless ​dates! 
-walked via CarlcnE, Aftr about two and a half words of conversation he bounded off after his retreating comrades and we were delightfully private once again. The Cox was crossed at Harry'​s River, and there and then we decided that after every gravelly crossing we would stop and clean gravel out of our shoes and socks. This resolution paid dividends by eliminating one source of blisters and providing welcome brief rests. On the subject of rests - we stopped for five minutes every hour. Forty-five minutes were allowed for lunch at Kanangra Creek - ham sandwiches and dates. When deciding on food the the trip I mentio7ed ​to the girls at work that I was taking a pound of dates. Later one-girt asked how they ? would find us if we got lost, and Kath piped up, liThey=11 ​follow the date stoneW ​And here we were with seedless ​datesi + 
-At 12.45 p.m we left Kahangra ​Crk. and swinging round a bend of the river we met John White, Bev Price and Eric Adcock. John had had a fall, and a bad knee was causing trouble. Bob Abernethy, returning to John's aid, informed us that the main party had left the Kowmung about half an hour earlier. The afternoon passed quite uneventfully2 ​but through bad judgement on my part we were on the rough side of the Cox for the last mile above Kedumba Creek. At 6.15 p.m. we downed packs at Harry'​s Humpy and decided to dine. A good large steak (fresh) each, with plenty of rice, and apricots plus ricemugs of coffee, a short rest, and at 7.45 p.m. we picked up our lightened packs once more. For the time being we left the Cox and fbllowed ​the roads towards ​MoYftlions. Conversation on other walks in the area, the usual rests and gulf,​Ds ​of water in creeks and puddles (until I +At 12.45 p.m we left Kanangra ​Crk. and swinging round a bend of the river we met John White, Bev Price and Eric Adcock. John had had a fall, and a bad knee was causing trouble. Bob Abernethy, returning to John's aid, informed us that the main party had left the Kowmung about half an hour earlier. The afternoon passed quite uneventfully ​but through bad judgement on my part we were on the rough side of the Cox for the last mile above Kedumba Creek. At 6.15 p.m. we downed packs at Harry'​s Humpy and decided to dine. A good large steak (fresh) each, with plenty of rice, and apricots plus ricemugs of coffee, a short rest, and at 7.45 p.m. we picked up our lightened packs once more. For the time being we left the Cox and followed ​the roads towards ​McMahons. Conversation on other walks in the area, the usual rests and gulps of water in creeks and puddles (until I struck a stagnant pool), soon put the miles behind us, and about 10 p.m. we returned to the river. We passed one fire before descending to the river level, and about a mile further on saw several sleeping bodies under a tree. Half a mile further on there were another two weary walkers under another tree - us. 
-struck a stagnant pool), soon put the miles behind us, and about 10 p.m. we returned to the river. We passed one fire before descending to the river level, and about a mile further on saw several sleeping bodies under a tree. Half a mile further on there were another two weary walkers under another tree- us. + 
-Even my stiffening thighs didn't keep me awake, and at 4.45 a.m. +Even my stiffening thighs didn't keep me awake, and at 4.45 a.m. we were optimistic enough to crawl from our bags and tape our soles and heels with 3" elastoplast. John de Bovay of the Hobart Walking Club put me on to this lurk years ago. Roadbashing,​ after the feet have been soaking for a considerable period, can be torment, and the tape idea is wonderful. Rolled oats and bacon and eggs occupied our attention, and at 6 a.m. we were footing it once more. After a few yards I noticed Jim was limping and he made the surprising ​admission ​that his ankle was most painful and he couldn'​t walk any faster. At this pace we were soon overtaken by Geof Wagg and Neil Monteith. At the last wet crossing of the Cox below McMahons the duo surged ahead and Jim suggested I should follow them while he limped in to Bimlow. So I took off, and although the others had only 5 minutes start, I'm darned if I caught a sight of them. The short rests were forgotten and I was within a mile of Bimlow before I sighted five figures ahead. 
-we were optimistic enough to crawl from OUT bags and tape our soles and heels with 3" elastoplast. John de Bovay of the Hobart Walking Club put me on to this lurk years ago. Roadbashing,​ after the feet have been soaking for a considerable period, can be torment, and the tape idea'is wonderful. Rolled oats and bacon and eggs occupied our attention, and at 6 a.m. we were footing it once more. After a few yards I noticed Jim was limping and he made the surprising ​admitsion ​that his ankle was most painful and he couldn'​t walk any faster.' ​At this pace we were soon overtaken by Geof Wagg and Neil Monteith. At + 
-17. +Exactly three hours after leaving Jim I squatted beside Heather Joyce, ​Geof Wagg, Dave Brown, Neil Monteith and, surprisingly - Arne Johnsson. Arne had lost a boot in some rapids, and a sock padded ​with grass and strapped with a thin leather was being used as a substitute. Geof plastered his blisters, a map was the subject of some peering ​and debate, and with Heather leading the way we grunted and groaned out of Binlow. With Neil a conscientious objector the pilgrims were now five. I was sure some of the tough boys were ahead, but Arne was insistent that we were the first through Bimlow. Now I was paying the penalty for my three hour non-stop morning dash, The short stop in Binlow made my legs feel like tomato stakes, and when Len and  Gladys Fall stopped in their motor chariot I stopped also. They were down for a day's drive to see the battered Bushies, and did I fit the bill! However, on hearing of Jim's ankle the Falls floated on, and off I shuffled again. The sun was warm, and a nice patch of grass invited me to rest. The pack was like a feather pillow, and only the thought of the miles ahead shifted me. I leapt to my feet and sped on refreshed ​.... You're a liar, Ardill - you rolled onto your stomach and levered yourself stiff-legged to your feet because you couldn'​t get up any other way. Sure, I'll come clean. One word describes my condition, and you wouldn'​t print it, Madam Editor. The steps had lengthened to about nine inches when Mr. Ingram braked to a stop and offered a bag of glucose sweets "to keep you going."​ My eagle eye saw an empty back seat, and I startled David by putting my pack in the boot and my tail on the empty seat. Back to Bimlow for me and my old mate James. We swung round a bend half a mile further on and Holy Smoke the ghost walks; Mrs. Brown'​s little boy Jim in person plus pack. And then the ghost spoke; the ankle had improved, the spirit was still unconquered,​ and Picton here comes James! ​Poor David, he doesn'​t know whether he's coming or going. One moment he has a cot-case and another one in sight, and then a few minutes ​later the back seat is empty once more and the private walk is on again. 
-the last wet crossing of the Cox below McMahons the duo surged ahead and Jim suggested I should follow them hile he limped in to Bimlow. So I took off, and although the others had only 5 minutes start, I'm darned if I caught a sight of them. The short rests were forgotten + 
-and I wqs within a mile of Bimlow before I sighted five figures ahead. +We reached the Nattai and lunched at the first pool. Saw the leading four on the track above and let them go. Popped in for a swim with Jim looking on. He admitted afterwards the thought entered his mind that he might have to rescue me, but he hadn't decided just how. Even a cramp wouldn'​t have made my legs any stiffer, and I emerged under my own steam. Lunch and a short rest improved us both and we maintained a steady 3 miles per hour to the Nattai crossing. A couple of hundred yards downstream the leading quartet were sighted ​and with a coo and a wave we headed up the hill. Stopping at the pools near the summit for a date or two we were passed ​again, and did not see our fellow travellers again. 
-Exactly three hours after leaving Jim I squatted beside Heather + 
-Joyce, ​Goof Wagg, Dave Brown, Neil Monteith and, surprisingly - Arne Johnsson. Arne had lost a boot in some rapids, and a sock padded ​witL grass and strapped with a thin leather was being used as a substitute ​Goof plastered his blisters, a map was the subject of some peering ​cand debate, and with Heather leading the way we grunted and groaned out +When we hit the road there were two cars waiting - David and Jack Gentle. How mad can this bushwalking get you? - we decided to walk the honour old boy - oh really! ​So David and Jack scooted off, and down the road stepped we with a fresh brew of tea and cakes inside us supplied by the lady passengers Isabel Wilkie and Pat Gentle. May Allah shower blessings on them - we did. The road bash is not described ​but the plaster stuck to us. Some blokes have no sense of humour; David must have thought we meant it when we said we would walk into Picton. He's sure to come back to see how we're going - good old David. Good old nothing- and at 7 p.m. we saw the lights of Picton - arriving outside the Royal George to hear the glad news that the beer had just gone off. Good old David - he had waited for us, and then in the manner of the Samaritan drove us both home. 
-of Binlow. With Neil a conscientious objector the pilgrims were now + 
-five. I was sure some of the tough boys were ahead, but Arne was insistent that we were the first through Bimlow. Now I was paying the penalty for my three hour non-stop morning"dash, The short stop in Binlow made my legs feel like tomato stakes, and when Len and  Gladys Fall stopped in their motor chariot I stopped also. They were down for a day's drive to see the battered Bushies, and did I fit the bil1Z However, on hearing of Jim's ankle the Falls floated on, and off I shuffled again. The sun was warm, and a nice patOh of grass invited me to rest. The pack was like a feather pillow, and only thr thought of the miles ahead shifted me. I leapt to my feet and sped oi) +Strangely enough I was almost normal next morning, and James ditto. I reckon the walk took three years off my life and about the same number of layers of skin off my big toes. Walking at Easter? Not me! I'​m ​staying home to polish my car, 'cause its going to get plenty of use from now on. 
-refreshed You're a llstr, Ardill - you rolled onto your stomach and levered yourself.stiff-legged to your feet because you couldn'​t get up any other way. Sure,​I'​ll come clean. One word describes my condition, and you wouldn'​t print it, Madam Editor. The steps had lengthened to about nine inches when Mr. Ingram braked to a stop and offered a bag of glucose sweets "to keep you going."​ My eagle eye saw an empty back seat, and I startled David by putting my pack in the boot and my tail on the empty seat. Back to Bimlow for inc and my old mate James. We swung round a bend half a mile further on and Holy Smoke the ghost walks; Mrs. Brown'​s little boy Jim in'person plus pack. And then the ghot spoke; the ankle had improved, the spirit was still unconquered,​ and Picton here comes Jamesi ​Poor David, he'doesn'​t know whether he's coming or going. One moment he has a cot-ease and another one in sight, and then a few minutes ​latei the back seat is empty once more and the private walk is on again. + 
-0 +=====New Zealand Letter===== 
-  We reached the Nattai and lunched at the first pool. Saw the leading four on the track above and let them go. Popped in for a swim with Jim looking on. He admitted afterwards the thought entered his mind that he might have to rescue me, but he hadn't decided just + 
-how. Even a cramp wouldn'​t have made my legs any stiffer, and I emerged under my own steam. Lunch and a short rest improved us both +From Keith Renwick 
-and we maintained a steady 3 miles per hour to the Nattai crossing. + 
-A couple of hundred yards downstream the leading quartet were sightec-., ​and with a coo and a wave we headed up the hill. Stopping at the pools near the summit for a date or two we were paseed ​again, and die. +Dear S.B.W's, 
-not see our fellow travellers again. + 
-When we hit the road there were two cars waiting - David and Jack Gentle. How mad can this bushwalking get you? - we decided to walk  the honour old boy - oh reallyi ​So David and Jack scooted off, and down the road stepped we with a fresh brew of tea +Well, the tour is over and at last I am on the way home. By the time you get this I will be home, but it finishes up what I have been up to since the last letter. 
-18. +
-and cakes inside us supplied by the lady passengers Isabel Wilkie and Pat Gentle. May Allah shower blessings on them - we did. The roar bash is not described but the plaster stuck to us. Some blokes have no sense of humour; David must have thought we meant it when we said we would walk into Picton. He's sure to coMe back to see how we're going - good old David. Good old nothing' ​- and at 7 p.m. we saw the lights of Picton - arriving outside the Royal George to hear the glad news that the beer had just gone off. Good old David - he had waited for us, and then in the manner of the Samaritan drove us both home. +
-Strangely enough I was almost normal next morning, and James ditto. I reckon the walk took three years off my life and about the same number.of layers of skin off my big tOes. Walking at Easter? Not me! It; staying home to polish my car, 'cause its going to get plenty of use from now on. +
-NEW ZEALAND LETTER ​From Keith Renwick +
-Dear S.B.W1s+
-Well, the tour is over and at'last I am on the way home. By the time you get this I will be home, but it finishes up what I have been up to since the last letter.+
 On Christmas day we left Christchurch with the Christchurch Tramping Club bound for Lewis Pass, then via Cannibal Gorge and Ada Pass to Ada Valley. From here some of the party climbed Gloriana; then we went down Ada Valley to Lake Guyon and over Maling Pass to Lake Tennyson. Unfortunately I had been suffering for the past three days from sunstroke and food poisoning, so had to pull out here via Clarence Valley and Jack's Pass to Hanmer and back to Christchurch. The Club was going through to Lake Roto Iti. On Christmas day we left Christchurch with the Christchurch Tramping Club bound for Lewis Pass, then via Cannibal Gorge and Ada Pass to Ada Valley. From here some of the party climbed Gloriana; then we went down Ada Valley to Lake Guyon and over Maling Pass to Lake Tennyson. Unfortunately I had been suffering for the past three days from sunstroke and food poisoning, so had to pull out here via Clarence Valley and Jack's Pass to Hanmer and back to Christchurch. The Club was going through to Lake Roto Iti.
-A few days rest in Christchurch and I caught the train to Grey- mouth with Keith Fitzgerald, a Christchurch Chap, and'up to Fox River Caves south of Westport. These we went through again, together with some new ones, and met up with Barry Hartley who came down from the Club trip after it had come out at Lake Rote Iti. The three of us 
-then went down to the Pox Glacier where we were immediately asked to c' join in on the search for the chaps overdue on Sefton. This occupied us for the next few days, during which we had a wonderful morning up on the Dougla Nevd, reaching a high col just under the final slope to the summit, but being on the search we couldn'​t go off and finish the climb of course. This trip was very good experience into Search & Rescue methods in NeZ., whiah are very well organised. 
-We turned then over the Copeland Pass and out to the Hermitage. A few days rest here and a short trip up the Tasman Glacier. It was just at this time that the unfortunate accident occurred with John Younger'​and party. After it was decided that nothing further could be done, Barry and I went on down the inland road to Queenstown for 
-a few days. A few more side trips, such as Skippers and Pigeon Islana on Lake Wanaka, and we went out through Alexandria and Roxborough to 
-19. Dunedin. I then took a buS trip right round the East Coast through 
-Chaselands to Invercargill. Then another bus out to the Waiau Caves where I spent the night and the next day exploring. Back by bus through Riverton to Invercargill,​ and train to Dirredin. 
-Turning northwards once more we returned to Christchurch via 
-the coast road, calling at Palmerston Caves and Morakie Boulders. We 
-worked then for three weeks at Christchurch. Then the ferry boat 
-1\loari"​ took us to Wellington where we stayed a couple of days, then north to Taupo and out to Napier. We just saw the last few ganetts 
-at the Ganett sanctuary on Cape Kidnappers. We also had 13 inches of rain in 24 hours. 
  
-4  ​From Napier we turned south to Palmerston North and out to New Pl7mouth ​for a week. A bus trip round the Mountain and short trips from New Plymouth were all I could get in because of the weather ​whiclk ​since we had started'on the West Coast after the Club trip in the beginning of January, had been continuously cloudy and wet. We have broken the drought in every place we visited right through. +A few days rest in Christchurch and I caught the train to Greymouth with Keith Fitzgerald, a Christchurch chap, and up to Fox River Caves south of Westport. These we went through again, together with some new ones, and met up with Barry Hartley who came down from the Club trip after it had come out at Lake Rote Iti. The three of us then went down to the Fox Glacier where we were immediately asked to join in on the search for the chaps overdue on Sefton. This occupied us for the next few days, during which we had a wonderful morning up on the Douglas Neve, reaching a high col just under the final slope to the summit, but being on the search we couldn'​t go off and finish the climb of course. This trip was very good experience into Search & Rescue methods in N.Z., which are very well organised. 
-I then came back to Auckland to meet Yvonne and Shirley who arrived on March 20th. Later that week we went to Waitomo Caves and Ruapehu. We went up to look at the Whakapapa Glacier which is terribly broken up. From National Park we went to Taupo and Wairaki for a day, then up to Rotorua for another day. Once the girls arrivec, ​the weather changed and we had beautiful fine days right WO to the time I left. + 
-Prot Rotorua we went to Waikarimoanal ​a day there, then on to Gisborne. After a good look round we went through to Opetiki where I left-the girls as they were going down near New Plymouth for Easter. I continued right along the north coast through Tauranga and Paeroa to Auckland. +We turned then over the Copeland Pass and out to the Hermitage. A few days rest here and a short trip up the Tasman Glacier. It was just at this time that the unfortunate accident occurred with John Younger and party. After it was decided that nothing further could be done, Barry and I went on down the inland road to Queenstown for a few days. A few more side trips, such as Skippers and Pigeon Island on Lake Wanaka, and we went out through Alexandria and Roxborough to Dunedin. I then took a bus trip right round the East Coast through Chaselands to Invercargill. Then another bus out to the Waiau Caves where I spent the night and the next day exploring. Back by bus through Riverton to Invercargill,​ and train to Dunedin. 
-To conclude, over Easter I did a round trip of the North Auckland Peninsular,, including a visit to several more caves+ 
-And that is about the extent of my wanderings in N.Z. Although it amounts to some 16,000 miles there is still an awful lot I would like to see and shall have to return some time to finish off, +Turning northwards once more we returned to Christchurch via the coast road, calling at Palmerston Caves and Morakie Boulders. We worked then for three weeks at Christchurch. Then the ferry boat "​Moari"​ took us to Wellington where we stayed a couple of days, then north to Taupo and out to Napier. We just saw the last few ganetts at the Ganett sanctuary on Cape Kidnappers. We also had 13 inches of rain in 24 hours. 
-GOSSIP + 
-Gladys Fall entertained about 20 ladies, mostly S.B.W. members at her home on Sat 19th March. The occasion was Joc Newlandb ​approaching marriage, which took place the following week. As Jce herself said, the surprise party l'really knocked her." Imagine Jo at a loss for words. +From Napier we turned south to Palmerston North and out to New Plymouth ​for a week. A bus trip round the Mountain and short trips from New Plymouth were all I could get in because of the weather ​which since we had started on the West Coast after the Club trip in the beginning of January, had been continuously cloudy and wet. We have broken the drought in every place we visited right through. 
-Frank Ashdown made history recently when he got a hitch in a ROLLS ROYCE1 ​- and it didntt ​cost anything.+ 
 +I then came back to Auckland to meet Yvonne and Shirley who arrived on March 20th. Later that week we went to Waitomo Caves and Ruapehu. We went up to look at the Whakapapa Glacier which is terribly broken up. From National Park we went to Taupo and Wairaki for a day, then up to Rotorua for another day. Once the girls arrived ​the weather changed and we had beautiful fine days right up to the time I left. 
 + 
 +From Rotorua we went to Waikarimoana, ​a day there, then on to Gisborne. After a good look round we went through to Opetiki where I left the girls as they were going down near New Plymouth for Easter. I continued right along the north coast through Tauranga and Paeroa to Auckland. 
 + 
 +To conclude, over Easter I did a round trip of the North Auckland Peninsular, including a visit to several more cavesAnd that is about the extent of my wanderings in N.Z. Although it amounts to some 16,000 miles there is still an awful lot I would like to see and shall have to return some time to finish off
 + 
 +=====Gossip===== 
 + 
 +Gladys Fall entertained about 20 ladies, mostly S.B.W. members at her home on Sat 19th March. The occasion was Joc Newlands ​approaching marriage, which took place the following week. As Joc herself said, the surprise party "really knocked her." Imagine Jo at a loss for words. 
 + 
 +Frank Ashdown made history recently when he got a hitch in a ROLLS ROYCE! ​- and it didn'​t ​cost anything. 
 + 
 +=====Paddy Made===== 
 May already and with winter just around the corner some of us are thinking of snow, good slopes and good ski-ing. May already and with winter just around the corner some of us are thinking of snow, good slopes and good ski-ing.
-For those of you with such thoughts who intend to go to the snow this year Paddy has the best range of gear yet, and the quality and prices are keen (but they wonft cut too big holes in your pocket). ​YouT11 ​be surioris ed at some of the law prices.+ 
 +For those of you with such thoughts who intend to go to the snow this year Paddy has the best range of gear yet, and the quality and prices are keen (but they won'​t ​cut too big holes in your pocket). ​You'​ll ​be surprised ​at some of the low prices. 
 A few examples:- A few examples:-
-Climbing Skins 3. 5. 0 pair. 
-Ski Trousers 6. to 7.16. 0 pair. 
-Italian Ski Boots from 8. 3. 6 pair. 
-Skis from 10.10. 0 pair. 
-Goggles from . 8. 6 pair. 
-Bindings Z3315. 0 set 
-and dozens Of other necessities for your ski ing holiday. 
-Imported gear is already arriving and it wil pay you to be early. 
-Ski Heil you ski bunnys. 
-D LL1N 
-Lightweight Camp Gear 
-201 CASTLE REACH St SYDNEY 
  
 +Climbing Skins £3.5.0 pair.
 +
 +Ski Trousers £6. to £7.16.0 pair.
 +
 +Italian Ski Boots from £8.3.6 pair.
 +
 +Skis from £10.10.0 pair.
 +
 +Goggles from 8.6 pair.
 +
 +Bindings £3.15.0 set
 +
 +and dozens of other necessities for your skiing holiday.
 +
 +Imported gear is already arriving and it will pay you to be early.
 +
 +Ski Heil you ski bunnys.
195505.txt · Last modified: 2016/01/28 05:50 by tyreless