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195412 [2018/08/10 03:12]
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195412 [2018/08/13 03:27]
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 +===== Federation Notes For November. =====
  
- 
-FEDERATION NOTES FOR NOVEMBER. 
 - Allen A. Strom, - Allen A. Strom,
-After appropriate investigation and upon the recornmendation ​of the President, it was agreed to admit THE BONDI WANDERER'​S ​to membership of the Federation. + 
-A screed has been prepared outlining the working procedure of the SEARCH AND RESCUE SECTION. This will be sent out to the Police, Air Force, ​Armythe Po ice Intelligence Rescue Squad. It was also agreed to forward copies to the Clubs. +After appropriate investigation and upon the recommendation ​of the President, it was agreed to admit __The bondi Wanderers__ ​to membership of the Federation. 
-BUSHFIRE FIGHTING ​ IN THE-ROYAL NATIONAL ​ PARK: The list of volunteers now has sixty odd names. These will be handed over to the Sutherland Shire Bushf ire Fighting Brigade Authorities. Further volunteers are still welcome. Ring Paul Barnes, ​U131351+ 
-RACING TRACK ON NARROW NECK: Following presentation of a cutting from +A screed has been prepared outlining the working procedure of the __Search and Rescue Section__. This will be sent out to the Police, Air Force, ​Army and the Police ​Intelligence Rescue Squad. It was also agreed to forward copies to the Clubs. 
-977-77777-777375-77071non ​this topic, it was agreed to protest + 
-to the City of Blue Mountains Council. Affiliated Clubs and interested individuals were asked to add their protest in order to impress the Council. +=== Bushfire Fighting in the Royal National Park=== 
-REPRINT OF SULMAN'S  ​"WILDFLOWERS OF N.S.W."​.: It was agreed that we shoUrEFFITngus =Robert-Sri-'so. maim this reprint. + 
-CCNVENER FOR THE  SOCIAL COMMITTEE is still urgently required. Please see if you can 77-7777ETZer+The list of volunteers now has sixty odd names. These will be handed over to the Sutherland Shire Bushfire ​Fighting Brigade Authorities. Further volunteers are still welcome. Ring Paul Barnes, ​UB1351
-COURIDJAH RAILWAY STATION: It was agreed that we should ask the 575EFEEent ​of =77= replace the Water Tank at Couridjah Station, + 
-NATIONAL PARKS IN U.S.A.: A recent letter received has shown that 17577TonafFFFEE=EFFica ​may be disturbed without Congressional approval. Since 1916 no appeal to Congress has been successful. Copies of legislation from U.S.A. and New Zealand are being collected in preparation for a draft of an Act to be presented to the New South Wales Parliament. Such an Act would cover the establishment of a +=== Racing track on Narrow Neck=== 
-National ​Parks Authority, the provision of funds and security of land tenure. + 
-BOUDDI NATURAL PARK: It is now reported that Scott'​s Portion (of about 200 acresT-177s ​been added to the Park. This covers a number of creeks draining into Maitland Bay and also covers the main range between Maitland Bay and Little Creek. The Gosford Shire has in a letter to the Department of Lands supported the Trust'​s plan for the resumption of the greater portion of two other blocks on the Scenic Highway behind Maitland Bay. +Following presentation of a cutting from "The Sydney Morning Herald"​ on this topic, it was agreed to protestto ​the City of Blue Mountains Council. Affiliated Clubs and interested individuals were asked to add their protest in order to impress the Council. 
-SCIENTIFIC STAFF  FOR THE FAUNA PROTECTION PANEL: The Fauna Protectior Pane has asked fore E1-557=577-7 ​ETTIogist ​to assist with investigation of Faunal matters. + 
-COLOUR TRANSPARENCIES ABOUT CONSERVATIONAL MATTERS: A Series of Cola, Transparencies have beenU7nt ​up by the 77Tretary ​of the Conservatiolal Bureau showing areas of interest in our Conservation Projects. Persons who would care to arrange showings of these in order to interest as many People ​as Possible ​in our proposals for reservations should contact A. Strom at '​qVB2528+=== Reprnt of Sulman'"Wildflowers of N.S.W.": ​=== 
-8.14.41.m...1wwwwws..m. + 
-THE RIDGEWALKERS+It was agreed that we should ask Angus and Robertson's to make this reprint. 
-Geof Wagg. + 
-Now to me a ridge is a fine and wonderful thing. To the owner of an experienced gaze a ridge appears as ahigh road to anywhere he wants to go; the heights or the depths. When I was a prospective I never failed to admire the leader who could stand in the middle of a noncommittal patch of scrub and announce with encourEgirg ​certainty "The saddle'​s over there",​ and so it nearly always was. +=== Convenor for the Social Committee: === 
-Yet I think the place where I really ​cane to appreciate ridges was in Tasmania. They donft have them there you see, and so the unfortunate Tasmanian walkers must perforce wallow through seas of button grass to their beloved mountains instead of marching dry shod along some convenient ridge.+ 
 +Is still urgently required. Please see if you can get a volunteer
 + 
 +=== Couridjah Railway Station=== 
 + 
 +It was agreed that we should ask the Department ​of Railways to replace the Water Tank at Couridjah Station. 
 + 
 +=== National Parks in U.S.A.: ​=== 
 + 
 +A recent letter received has shown that no National Park in America ​may be disturbed without Congressional approval. Since 1916 no appeal to Congress has been successful. Copies of legislation from U.S.A. and New Zealand are being collected in preparation for a draft of an Act to be presented to the New South Wales Parliament. Such an Act would cover the establishment of a __National ​Parks Authority__, the provision of funds and security of land tenure. 
 + 
 +=== Bouddi Natural Park=== 
 + 
 +It is now reported that Scott'​s Portion (of about 200 acres) has been added to the Park. This covers a number of creeks draining into Maitland Bay and also covers the main range between Maitland Bay and Little Creek. The Gosford Shire has in a letter to the Department of Lands supported the Trust'​s plan for the resumption of the greater portion of two other blocks on the Scenic Highway behind Maitland Bay. 
 + 
 +=== Scientific staff for the Fauna Protection Board=== 
 + 
 +The Fauna Protectior Pane has asked for the appointment of Biologist ​to assist with investigation of Faunal matters. 
 + 
 +=== Colour Transparencies about conservational matters=== 
 + 
 +A Series of Colour ​Transparencies have been built up by the Secretary ​of the Conservatiolal Bureau showing areas of interest in our Conservation Projects. Persons who would care to arrange showings of these in order to interest as many people ​as possible ​in our proposals for reservations should contact A. Strom at WB2528
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== The Ridgewalkers===== 
 + 
 +Geof Wagg. 
 + 
 +Now to me a ridge is a fine and wonderful thing. To the owner of an experienced gaze a ridge appears as a high road to anywhere he wants to go; the heights or the depths. When I was a prospective I never failed to admire the leader who could stand in the middle of a noncommittal patch of scrub and announce with encouraging ​certainty "The saddle'​s over there",​ and so it nearly always was. 
 + 
 +Yet I think the place where I really ​came to appreciate ridges was in Tasmania. They don'​t ​have them there you see, and so the unfortunate Tasmanian walkers must perforce wallow through seas of button grass to their beloved mountains instead of marching dry shod along some convenient ridge. 
 And so it was that as the four of us returned from Tasmania still glowing with the enjoyment of our carefree days, yet remembering our yearning for a dry ridge, we sort of promised ourselves that this Winter we'd go out past Jenolan on the Kanangra road to hunt the ridges where they lurk among the sally bush and chase them out along their long, strong, bastions until they dropped exhausted to the Cox. And so it was that as the four of us returned from Tasmania still glowing with the enjoyment of our carefree days, yet remembering our yearning for a dry ridge, we sort of promised ourselves that this Winter we'd go out past Jenolan on the Kanangra road to hunt the ridges where they lurk among the sally bush and chase them out along their long, strong, bastions until they dropped exhausted to the Cox.
-Our first real ridge trip was on the third weekend in July when Dot, Grace, Don Newis, Neil Monteith, Snow and myself burnt midnight oil out along the Kanangra Road beneath a sky of frosty stars to snuggle finally into the shelter of the verandah on the new hut at Cunningham'​s Clearing. This cosy spot we knew of old. Our objective was Guouogang thence Queahgong, Jenolan and the long ridge that drops at Breakfast Creek. I hod been that way before with Ross, so that was probably why the rest of the party waited for me that morning. This is a lamentable fact but I might as well admit now that despite early rising and good intentions I was always last ready in the mornings. Dot seems to be able to do anything she's going to do in + 
-12. +Our first real ridge trip was on the third weekend in July when Dot, Grace, Don Newis, Neil Monteith, Snow and myself burnt midnight oil out along the Kanangra Road beneath a sky of frosty stars to snuggle finally into the shelter of the verandah on the new hut at Cunningham'​s Clearing. This cosy spot we knew of old. Our objective was Guouogang thence Queahgong, Jenolan and the long ridge that drops at Breakfast Creek. I had been that way before with Ross, so that was probably why the rest of the party waited for me that morning. This is a lamentable fact but I might as well admit now that despite early rising and good intentions I was always last ready in the mornings. Dot seems to be able to do anything she's going to do in five minutes. Grace, Don and Snow all manage to be prompt: Neil, in spite of the amazing variety and quantity of his food, is on time, but I, alas no. And when at last I am packed ​up and ready to leave, someone points out the billy and the tin of milk and the dishcloth which I have inadvertantly left out. However, even after waiting for me, the party managed to be away slightly after seven, ​while the troup of Rovers camped just down the paddock still snored in their tents. The morning was delectably clear and as the crisp, frosted grass crunched under our feet we felt it was a fine thing to be abroad and wakeful while others slept. 
-five minutes. Grace, Don and Snow all manage to be prompt: Neil, in spite of the amazing variety and quantity of his food, is on time, but I, alas no. And when at last I am packed ​Up and ready to leave, someone points out the billy and the tin of milk and the dishcloth which I have inadvertantly left out. However, even after waiting for me, the party managed to be away slightly after seven, ​While the troup of Rovers camped just down the paddock still snored in their tents. The morning was delectably clear and as the crisp, frosted grass crunched under our feet we felt it was a fine thing to be abroad and wakeful while others slept. + 
-Now the main land nark between Cunningham'​s ​aid Guouogang is a large clearing, and as already mentioned, I'd been there before, but in spite-of this I led the party on a circumnavigation of the said clearing, or the west and south sides, and would have continued to do the same to the east and probably north sides if I hadn't been fortunate enough to catch a glimpse of the object of our search between the trees. Being quite exhausted with shock at having finally located the clearing I resigned the leadership to Dot and Snow who made a much better job of it. We left the clearing with Whalan'​s Creek on the north side; we skirted gullies, crossed ridges and climbed up for a view. "Ah! There'​s Guouogang! ​-- or is it over there?"​ "Let 's hope not". "No, this is it I'm sure". "Then that must be the ridge we want". "Oh, well, we'll try it anyway."​ We followed our ridge until it seemed in danger of being swallowed up in small scrub and futile gullies, so Dot climbed a tree and told us Guouogang straight ahead"​. Away we went and sure enough there was the long hot ridge of sally bush crawling to the summit on the east side. +Now the main land mark between Cunningham'​s ​and Guouogang is a large clearing, and as already mentioned, I'd been there before, but in spite of this I led the party on a circumnavigation of the said clearing, or the west and south sides, and would have continued to do the same to the east and probably north sides if I hadn't been fortunate enough to catch a glimpse of the object of our search between the trees. Being quite exhausted with shock at having finally located the clearing I resigned the leadership to Dot and Snow who made a much better job of it. We left the clearing with Whalan'​s Creek on the north side; we skirted gullies, crossed ridges and climbed up for a view. "Ah! There'​s Guouogang! - or is it over there?"​ "​Let'​s hope not". "No, this is it I'm sure". "Then that must be the ridge we want". "Oh, well, we'll try it anyway."​ We followed our ridge until it seemed in danger of being swallowed up in small scrub and futile gullies, so Dot climbed a tree and told us "Guouogang straight ahead"​. Away we went and sure enough there was the long hot ridge of sally bush crawling to the summit on the east side. 
-The sun was now shining with full geniality and the water was dripping from the bucket I'd been carrying since we left Whalan'​s Creek, down my legs and filling up my boots. ​hIlve had this water carrying!"​ I said at last. "​Better put it in something that doesn'​t leak, someone suggested. "You can put it in me if you like", said Snow, who was beginning to feel thirsty. + 
-We toiled ​Up the ridge cursing the sally scrub that whips and drags and scratches and gets thicker every year. As we turned an elbow near the top we came to the place where you can see above the scrub and across the south side of Guouogang to the steep rock walls of sheer Paralizer that climb out of Kanangra River. These were particularly interesting to us because the next week about this time we hoped to be somewhere above them. +The sun was now shining with full geniality and the water was dripping from the bucket I'd been carrying since we left Whalan'​s Creek, down my legs and filling up my boots. ​"​I'​ve ​had this water carrying!"​ I said at last. "​Better put it in something that doesn'​t leak", someone suggested. "You can put it in me if you like", said Snow, who was beginning to feel thirsty. 
-We pushed on towards the top and by dint of much searching found the trig nestling amid the sally. It's very important to find the trig, of course, because it's only by climbing this that you get any sort of a view. As it was just on lunch time we had lunch here and + 
-I, with great pleasure, boiled the water I'd been carrying so long and made some tea. We took an 'hour over this and then we were away down over the low saddle and up to Queahgong. As we sat here taking in the view along came the Rovers who we'd felt sure must have got in front of us while we were beating around the clearing. Theywent off down Queahgong Buttress saying they intended to camp at Mobb's Swamp but we were pretty certain that they wouldn'​t ​malB it as some of them were trailing badly. +We toiled ​up the ridge cursing the sally scrub that whips and drags and scratches and gets thicker every year. As we turned an elbow near the top we came to the place where you can see above the scrub and across the south side of Guouogang to the steep rock walls of sheer Paralizer that climb out of Kanangra River. These were particularly interesting to us because the next week about this time we hoped to be somewhere above them. 
-13. + 
-It was a glorious afternoon for the ridges. The sun glowed ​warmil ​and a cool breeze dried our sweat while we stood astride the narrow line of eroding rock with the purple, blue of bottomless ​IVIumbedah ​on our left hand and on our right the long arm of Gaouogang Buttress thrown out to grasp Kanangaroo. +We pushed on towards the top and by dint of much searching found the trig nestling amid the sally. It's very important to find the trig, of course, because it's only by climbing this that you get any sort of a view. As it was just on lunch time we had lunch here and I, with great pleasure, boiled the water I'd been carrying so long and made some tea. We took an hour over this and then we were away down over the low saddle and up to Queahgong. As we sat here taking in the view along came the Rovers who we'd felt sure must have got in front of us while we were beating around the clearing. They went off down Queahgong Buttress saying they intended to camp at Mobb's Swamp but we were pretty certain that they wouldn'​t ​make it as some of them were trailing badly. 
-We dropped down again then UD and up to Jenolan where I told everybody about how this couldn'​t be Jenolan because I could remember Jenolan being a lot further than this and then, suddenly there we were, looking down the last mile or so of ridge, where Scrubber'​s Hump lays down beside the Cox at Breakfast Creek.+ 
 +It was a glorious afternoon for the ridges. The sun glowed ​warmth ​and a cool breeze dried our sweat while we stood astride the narrow line of eroding rock with the purple, blue of bottomless ​Mumbedah ​on our left hand and on our right the long arm of Gaouogang Buttress thrown out to grasp Kanangaroo. 
 + 
 +We dropped down again then up and up to Jenolan where I told everybody about how this couldn'​t be Jenolan because I could remember Jenolan being a lot further than this and then, suddenly there we were, looking down the last mile or so of ridge, where Scrubber'​s Hump lays down beside the Cox at Breakfast Creek. 
 Darkness drew on as we dropped down, down to the Cox (how could it be so far) until in the very last of the light we made Breakfast Creek and well earned rest. Darkness drew on as we dropped down, down to the Cox (how could it be so far) until in the very last of the light we made Breakfast Creek and well earned rest.
-ft  ​The following weekend found us encamped once more by the Hanangra ​road, this time at Yorong ​Creek. In spite of a wetting we got on the previous Saturday night we were still braving the elements in light weight fashion without a tent. The whole, cold party being the ever faithful Snow and Neil, infamous Jim Holloway and I, snuggled between ground sheets on the frosty ground. + 
-The morning dawned fine and frosty so we were up with the light to start a conflagration and warm the atmosphere a little. Shortly after seven we were crunching along the frozen surface of Kanansra ​road to the place about a mile back from the camp where it crossed our ridge, or what goes for a ridge around this area. We chose our starting point with great care and this paid off because we managed to find the ridge first go, although of course we weren'​t sure of this for a long time. After chasing it far a mile or so it petered out into a swamp (or possibly took an inconspicuous turn that we failed to notice) so we did five minutes map reading and head s3ratch ing until someone pointed out a sharp conical-peak that cet1d be seen about half a mile off through the trees. "Ah, undoubtedly Thurat +The following weekend found us encamped once more by the Kanangra ​road, this time at Morong ​Creek. In spite of a wetting we got on the previous Saturday night we were still braving the elements in light weight fashion without a tent. The whole, cold party being the ever faithful Snow and Neil, infamous Jim Holloway and I, snuggled between ground sheets on the frosty ground. 
-Trig; our troubles are over". Eager to get our first good look at + 
-the back part of the Paralizer Ridge we tore throlla ​the tender young sally scrub to the top of this and were just shaking hands all round +The morning dawned fine and frosty so we were up with the light to start a conflagration and warm the atmosphere a little. Shortly after seven we were crunching along the frozen surface of Kanangra ​road to the place about a mile back from the camp where it crossed our ridge, or what goes for a ridge around this area. We chose our starting point with great care and this paid off because we managed to find the ridge first go, although of course we weren'​t sure of this for a long time. After chasing it far a mile or so it petered out into a swamp (or possibly took an inconspicuous turn that we failed to notice) so we did five minutes map reading and head scratching ​until someone pointed out a sharp conical peak that cou1d be seen about half a mile off through the trees. "Ah, undoubtedly Thurat Trig; our troubles are over". Eager to get our first good look at the back part of the Paralizer Ridge we tore through ​the tender young sally scrub to the top of this and were just shaking hands all round when Neil who had been muttering incantations over his map and compass for some minutes broke the sad news. Thurat Trig was over the way across the thousand foot deep cleft of Thurat creek. We were feeling so fit that morning it seemed nothing could stop us so over the side we went among the scrub and loose boulders, glissading on bare rock creek beds. 
-when Neil who had been muttering incantations over his map and compass for some minutes broke the sad news. Thurat Trig was over the way across the thousand foot deep cleft of Thurat creek. We were feeling so fit that morning it seemed nothing could stop us so + 
-over the side we went among the scrub and loose boulders, glissading on bare rock creek beds. +We caught our breath at the bottom then started up the other side, very steep at first but leaning back more towards the top. Although it was accidental this route was more direct than our intended one via Thurat Trig and put us well on the Paralizer ridge by 10 o'​clock. This main ridge has been burnt out recently and is pretty ​clear so we could really tear along. Also it is comparatively flat being only a succession of low rocky humps which make it difficult to judge just when you're on top of your mountain. This was most upsetting because we had planned to have lunch on top. Eventually however we topped a hump bearing a modest cairn of stones where we found an old milk tin containing priceless documents on anything from toilet paper to receipts. Ours was written on a bank withdrawal form. 
-We caught our breath at the bottom then started up the other side, very steep at first but leaning back more towards the top. Although it was accidental this route was more direct than our intended one via Thurat Trig and put us well on the Paralizer ridge by 10 o'​clock. This main ridge has been burnt out recently and is Pretty ​clear so we could really tear along. Also it is comparatively flat being only a succession of low rockyhumps which ma1e. it difficult to judge just when you're ontop of your mountain. This was most upsetting because we had planned to have lunch on top. Eventually however we topped a hump bearing a modest cairn of stones where we found an old milk tin containing priceless documents on + 
-14. +As it was only 11.30 we decided ​to go downstairs for lunch. So down we went, down that best of ridges, Paralizer East Buttress, all the way getting ​glorious views of Guouogang, Kanangra River and the Dogs. Rough and broken as this ridge is it's very steepness makes it a rapid one to travel as anything slower than a vigorous stumble is impossible. Soon we came to the place where you can hear the calling water below you on either hand and here we dropped off the ridge to our left and down the open ridge side we ran with the river junction clear in view. We ran with our packs bumping on our backs and the sweat running off our noses. Suddenly there we were on the green flats, with swift clear river and the glorious feeling of icy water closing over our perspiring bodies. We'd had a busy morning. 
-anything from toilet paper to receipts. Ours was written on a bank withdrawal form. + 
-As it was only 11.30 we decided ​tO go downstairs for lunch. So down we went, down that best of ridges, Paralizer East Buttress, all the way (Petting ​glorious views of Guouogang, Kanangra River and the Dogs. Rough and broken as this ridge is it's very steepness makes it a rapid one to travel as anything slower than a vigorous stumble is impossible. Soon we cane to the place where you can hear the calling water below you an either hand and here we dropped off the ridge to our left and down the open ridge side we ran with the river junction clear in view. We ran with our packs bumping on our backs and the sweat running off our noses. Suddenly there we were an the green flats, with swift clear river and the glorious feeling of icy water closing over our perspiring bodies. We'd had a busy morning. +Lunch took us an hour and ten minutes that day (because of the swim) but we managed to get down the Kanangra to Kanangaroo by 3 o'​clock. We thought of camping here but decided we might as well push on to Mobb's Swamp with Holloway protesting that he'd only agree if someone came out with him the next morning to see the sunrise from Splendour Rock. We didn't walk to the end of Yellow Dog ridge but crossed right at the junction and climbed straight up the side, which was probably quicker but, as we found, required much more effort. Yellow Dog wore us down with hump after hump and our feet plodded slower and slower. Then as the red sunset stained the West, Dingo reared before us. Snow was still sound in wind and limb and Holloway, though trailing the field, was going well enough, but Neil mad I didn't think we'd make it. Of course we did struggle to the top, all four of us, and along the plateau and at six o'​clock as the last streak of red disappeared below the purple hills we literally dropped into Mobb'​s ​Swamp, eleven hours after leaving Morong Creek. 
-Lunch took us an hour and ten minutes that day (because of the swim) but we managed to get dawn the Kanangra to Kanangaroo by 3 o'​clock. We thought of camping here but decided we might as well Push on to Mobb's Swamp with Holloway protesting that he'd only agree if someone came out with him the next morning to see the sunrise from Splendour Rock. We didn't walk to the end of Yellow Dog ridge but crossed right at the junction and climbed straight up the side, which was probably quicker but, as we found, required much more effort. Yellow Dog wore us down with hump after hump and our feet plodded slower and slower. Then as the red sunset stained the West, Dingo reared before us. Snow was still sound in wind and limb and Holloway, though trailing the field, was going well enough, but Neil mad I didn't think we'd make it. Of course we did struggle to the top, all four of us, and along the plateau and at six o'​clock as the last streak of red disappeared below the purple hills we literally dropped into Mobbls ​Swamp, eleven hours after leaving Morong Creek. + 
-The last big ridge we walked together was Kanangra to Cloudmaker and Tiwilla then Kowmung, the Cox, Cedar Creek, etc. We were going up White Dog; but an the Friday night train we net the Pegram party off to Mt. Cookem, and got talking to Arne who was with tha Admiral when he did the same trip. Moved by some foolhardy bravado we said +The last big ridge we walked together was Kanangra to Cloudmaker and Tiwilla then Kowmung, the Cox, Cedar Creek, etc. We were going up White Dog; but on the Friday night train we met the Pegram party off to Mt. Cookem, and got talking to Arne who was with the Admiral when he did the same trip. Moved by some foolhardy bravado we said "​We'​ll ​see you at the Cox on Saturday night",​ and Arne's gentle scepticism was just enough to spur us on. 
-see you at the Cox on Saturday night",​ and Arne's gentle scepticism was just enough to snur us on. + 
-In the cave at Kanangra that night it was the same trusty crew that chased Guouogang except that Dot was missing. Early in the September morning we were astir and were easily away by seven, myself of course being last. The Walls and Thurat Spires looked splendid in that early light and for Grace, Don and Neil it was a first view. Down Gentle'​s Pass and under Craft'​s Walls we made our way with Donald nursing an ankle injured on the ski tow at Kosci. In Gabes +In the cave at Kanangra that night it was the same trusty crew that chased Guouogang except that Dot was missing. Early in the September morning we were astir and were easily away by seven, myself of course being last. The Walls and Thurat Spires looked splendid in that early light and for Grace, Don and Neil it was a first view. Down Gentle'​s Pass and under Craft'​s Walls we made our way with Donald nursing an ankle injured on the ski tow at Kosci. In Gabes Gap we nestled ​and tied up the weak ankle, then over High and High and Mighty where Snow and I studied the map. "​Ah",​ we said nodding sagely "we sidle round Stormbreaker"​. So we immediately sidled round Mighty instead and struggled, cursing, back on to the track only to find the sidle still to be done. We paid our respects to the four and then topped Cloudmaker at 10.30. 
-Gap we nestled ​ard tied up the weak ankle, then over High and High and Mighty where Snow and I studied the map. "​Ah",​ we said nodding sagely "we sidle round Stormbreaker"​. So we immediately sidled round Mighty instead and struggled, cursing, back on to the track only to find the sidle still to be done. We paid our respects to the four and then topped Cloudmaker at 10.30. + 
-15. +"Most encouraging", ​said, "it looks like lunch on the Kowmung"; but I don't think anyone believed me. We pushed down to Tiwilla and slogged out along its flat buttress. At one spot Snow peered over down into Tiwilla Creek. ​"Hundred Man cave down there",​ he said, "water and everything. Beaut spot for lunch.
-"Most encouraging", ​said, "it looks like lunch on the Kowmung; but I don't think anyone believed me. We pushed down to Tiwilla and slogged out along its flat buttress. At one snot Snow peered over down into Tiwilla Creek. ​f'Hundred Man cave down there",​ he said, "water and everything. Beaut spot for lunch. + 
-"Lunch on the Kowmung"​ we said sternly and Snow reluctantly came away. At the end of the Buttress we lost a bit of time finding the way down to the ridge but find it we did and then after a false start we even found the right ridge, but it was getting later all the time - 12.30, 1.00 1.30, 2.0. Three o'​clock it was When we sighted the Kowmung; was ever water so cool or grass so green. We were just enjoying lunch when on glancing behind we saw an enormousblack stor cloud eyeing over the shoulder of Cloudmaker. Rapidly we grabbed +"Lunch on the Kowmung"​ we said sternly and Snow reluctantly came away. At the end of the Buttress we lost a bit of time finding the way down to the ridge but find it we did and then after a false start we even found the right ridge, but it was getting later all the time - 12.30, 1.00 1.30, 2.0. Three o'​clock it was when we sighted the Kowmung; was ever water so cool or grass so green. We were just enjoying lunch when on glancing behind we saw an enormous black storm cloud eyeing over the shoulder of Cloudmaker. Rapidly we grabbed lunch and dived with it under the groundsheets as the first barrage of raindrops peltered down on us. It only lasted about ten minutes and soon we could hear it rumbling and grumbling up the river giving Hell to the boys on the Cox. 
-+ 
-lunch and dived with it under the groundsheets as the first barrage of raindrops peltered down on us. It only lasted about ten minutes and soon we could hear it rumbling and grumbling up the river giving Hell to the boys on the Cox. +It seemed ridiculous to be setting off at 4.50 to walk six miles or so to the Cox, especially when there were delightful ​camp sights on every hand, but this we did and as soon as we'd got the rigor mortis beaten, made good time too. When we came to the canyon section at the mouth Neil thoughtfully filled his pockets with dried apricots ​so that they could be soaking and ready for tea. Darkness loomed over us as we entered the canyon and at every campsight the brakes were automatically applied because we'd think "This might be our last chance of a comfortable night"​. However, ​Grace prodded us along now, and when a girl wants to go on it's dreadfully hard for boys to give in. Then quite suddenly the canyon dissolved into open banks with casuarinas and fires winking in the dark. 
-It seemed ridiculous to be setting off at 4.50 to walk six miles or so to the Cox, especially when there were delightful ​carp sights on every hand, but this we did and as soon as we'd got the rigor mortis beaten, made good time too. When we came to the canyon section at the mouth Neil thoughtfully filled his pockets with dried aprioots ​so that they could be soaking and ready for tea. Darkness loomed over us as we entered the canyon and at every campsight the brakes were automatically applied because we'd think "This might be our last chance of a comfortable night"​. However,Grqce prodded us along now, and when a girl wants to go on it's dreadfully hard for boys to give in. Then quite suddenly the canyon dissolved into open banks with casuarinas and fires winking in the dark. + 
-We heard Pegram'​s contented "Oont! Oont!" as he crouched ​aver his steak and Arne's soft "Ilh, so you have made it. Well done!" and we felt we were home.+We heard Pegram'​s contented "Oont! Oont!" as he crouched ​over his steak and Arne's soft "Ah, so you have made it. Well done!" and we felt we were home. 
 + 
 +---- 
 DROWNING DOWN THE KOWMUNG DROWNING DOWN THE KOWMUNG
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195412.txt · Last modified: 2018/08/14 03:17 by tyreless