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195409 [2018/07/30 03:06]
tyreless
195409 [2018/07/30 03:13]
tyreless
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 __Itinerary__:​ Saturday: Camp within half a mile of Barrington Trig. Visit to The Rim and Rocky Knob if time permits. Sunday: Across Plain, Brumlow Creek, Big Hole, Falls, crashed 'plane site. Monday: Carey'​s Peak, down Corker to Rocky Crossing on Williams River, then to Guest House - here connect with bus outside. Home. __Itinerary__:​ Saturday: Camp within half a mile of Barrington Trig. Visit to The Rim and Rocky Knob if time permits. Sunday: Across Plain, Brumlow Creek, Big Hole, Falls, crashed 'plane site. Monday: Carey'​s Peak, down Corker to Rocky Crossing on Williams River, then to Guest House - here connect with bus outside. Home.
  
-Transport arrangements must be rinalised ​by 15th September!!+Transport arrangements must be finalised ​by 15th September!!
  
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-=== Bushwaler ​tracked by smell. ===+=== Bushwalker ​tracked by smell. ===
  
 Not, not S & R., but at Queen'​s Birthday Weekend Messrs. Leyden, Cosgrove and French were tracked down and located by the keen nose of Major James Sturgiss, a local resident. The irony of it is that they were betrayed by a surfeit of cleanliness,​ the pungent odour being Frank'​s Solvol! Not, not S & R., but at Queen'​s Birthday Weekend Messrs. Leyden, Cosgrove and French were tracked down and located by the keen nose of Major James Sturgiss, a local resident. The irony of it is that they were betrayed by a surfeit of cleanliness,​ the pungent odour being Frank'​s Solvol!
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 Sometimes when you are far from signs, it is most important to keep on that mighty watershed; and it's just at that time when you wrinkle the brow and ponder between Gungarton and the Brassy or in the timber between the Cascades and the Tin Mines. Of course, there are strips of range where you'd merit the proverbial Lead Medal if you made a mistake... Cunningham'​s Gap in Queensland, the Main Range from Kosciusko to Dicky Cooper'​s Bogong or the Crosscut Saw that joins Howitt with Cobbler and the Barry Mtns.... Sometimes when you are far from signs, it is most important to keep on that mighty watershed; and it's just at that time when you wrinkle the brow and ponder between Gungarton and the Brassy or in the timber between the Cascades and the Tin Mines. Of course, there are strips of range where you'd merit the proverbial Lead Medal if you made a mistake... Cunningham'​s Gap in Queensland, the Main Range from Kosciusko to Dicky Cooper'​s Bogong or the Crosscut Saw that joins Howitt with Cobbler and the Barry Mtns....
  
-Ah! Yes! The Crosscut Saw! Now there'​s a piece of mountain that's worth calling both Great and Range; and what's more, it Divides like a Saw! Situated in the Victorian Middle Alps, the Crosscut is the centre of a land of mystery, mighty peaks, romantic snowplains and old warrior snow gums. Nearby are the sources of the King and Howqua (flowing to the west); ​tho Wonnangatta and Macalister (flowing to the east)....+Ah! Yes! The Crosscut Saw! Now there'​s a piece of mountain that's worth calling both Great and Range; and what's more, it Divides like a Saw! Situated in the Victorian Middle Alps, the Crosscut is the centre of a land of mystery, mighty peaks, romantic snowplains and old warrior snow gums. Nearby are the sources of the King and Howqua (flowing to the west); ​the Wonnangatta and Macalister (flowing to the east)....
  
 Some years back we had our first taste of this country when we "​experimented"​ with the Baw Baws (a southern offshoot of the Divide where the Range turns east to back around behind Melbourne) and from these heights made out Mt Wellington on the skyline, Glen Maggie Reservoir and the Lakes on the coastal strip below. Coming home along the Princes Highway through Stratford and Bairnsdale, the jagged blue sky of the west whetted the appetite, and the following year, assisted with information from our good Melbourne friends, we approached Wellington from the south-east and were for some days, goggle-eyed at the beauty and mystery of Lake Tarli Karng, the Wellington, Snowy and Hewitt Plains and of course, the Crosscut Saw, which we traversed in order to go down to Whifield via Cobbler and the Bennie Homestead on the Rose River. Some years back we had our first taste of this country when we "​experimented"​ with the Baw Baws (a southern offshoot of the Divide where the Range turns east to back around behind Melbourne) and from these heights made out Mt Wellington on the skyline, Glen Maggie Reservoir and the Lakes on the coastal strip below. Coming home along the Princes Highway through Stratford and Bairnsdale, the jagged blue sky of the west whetted the appetite, and the following year, assisted with information from our good Melbourne friends, we approached Wellington from the south-east and were for some days, goggle-eyed at the beauty and mystery of Lake Tarli Karng, the Wellington, Snowy and Hewitt Plains and of course, the Crosscut Saw, which we traversed in order to go down to Whifield via Cobbler and the Bennie Homestead on the Rose River.
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 Once again, we had some invaluable details from our Melbourne friends and were able to get food packed in to Howitt Hut by Fred Fry who has a holding on the Howqua where we proposed to make a start on the trek. Once again, we had some invaluable details from our Melbourne friends and were able to get food packed in to Howitt Hut by Fred Fry who has a holding on the Howqua where we proposed to make a start on the trek.
  
-The Coach took us through Mansfield to Merrijig where, camped on the Delatite, we were qdite close to the beginning with Mt Buller and Timbertop rising directly to the north of the campsite. Once on the Howqua, the walking... or should I say the splashing... began. There were twenty four crossings in the first eight miles, at which point, a forestry hut... the Eight Mile... is established. In a day and a half we had progressed to the final flat at the foot of the Howitt Spur after a valley of great beauty and many flats clothed with fine Manna Gums. Ritchie'​s Hut at the 14 mile, is a veritable mansion complete with refrigeration and hot and cold running water. Bindareo Hut another forestry structure, is the last of the huts at about 18 miles from Fry's. Views of the shape of things to come are caught all along the valley floor... Buller, Magdala, Howitt... all above five thousand feet.+The Coach took us through Mansfield to Merrijig where, camped on the Delatite, we were quite close to the beginning with Mt Buller and Timbertop rising directly to the north of the campsite. Once on the Howqua, the walking... or should I say the splashing... began. There were twenty four crossings in the first eight miles, at which point, a forestry hut... the Eight Mile... is established. In a day and a half we had progressed to the final flat at the foot of the Howitt Spur after a valley of great beauty and many flats clothed with fine Manna Gums. Ritchie'​s Hut at the 14 mile, is a veritable mansion complete with refrigeration and hot and cold running water. Bindareo Hut another forestry structure, is the last of the huts at about 18 miles from Fry's. Views of the shape of things to come are caught all along the valley floor... Buller, Magdala, Howitt... all above five thousand feet.
  
 The Howitt Spur is steep but not a killer... perhaps its worse features are the wealth of scrub (largely young ash and Daviesia, products of the fire scourge) and the washed out and overgrown track... all in the earlier stages of the climb. As the elevation figures rise, a wild profusion of peaks begin to sort themselves out... west and north are Buller, Stirling, Thorne, the Stanley Name Range, Cobbler, Koonika, Speculation round to the Crosscut; south and east are Square Gin Bluff, Lovick, Magdala and Big Hill whilst straight ahead is the great massif of Howitt getting more and more vertical. Gradually the track improves, becoming a well-graded zigzag and although the party ahead appear to be crawling along an almost vertical face, we move up easily into the snow gums (carpetted with flowering Snow Daisies). Finally above the treeline, comes the first crest... a pleasant plateau of snow grass; and there across a shallow depression stands the cairn, the Howitt peak. The Howitt Spur is steep but not a killer... perhaps its worse features are the wealth of scrub (largely young ash and Daviesia, products of the fire scourge) and the washed out and overgrown track... all in the earlier stages of the climb. As the elevation figures rise, a wild profusion of peaks begin to sort themselves out... west and north are Buller, Stirling, Thorne, the Stanley Name Range, Cobbler, Koonika, Speculation round to the Crosscut; south and east are Square Gin Bluff, Lovick, Magdala and Big Hill whilst straight ahead is the great massif of Howitt getting more and more vertical. Gradually the track improves, becoming a well-graded zigzag and although the party ahead appear to be crawling along an almost vertical face, we move up easily into the snow gums (carpetted with flowering Snow Daisies). Finally above the treeline, comes the first crest... a pleasant plateau of snow grass; and there across a shallow depression stands the cairn, the Howitt peak.
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 The trail goes northerly round the Terrible Hollow (the head of the Wonnangatta) passed Macalister Springs (where the river of that name finds birth)... a happy campsite ringed by snow gums... on to the Howitt Plain, a wide and long plain around five thousand feet above sea level. Away to the eastern end of this plain is the Howitt Hut, a hut apparently of great age, perhaps built by the Bryces, the pioneers of the Snowy Plains. The trail goes northerly round the Terrible Hollow (the head of the Wonnangatta) passed Macalister Springs (where the river of that name finds birth)... a happy campsite ringed by snow gums... on to the Howitt Plain, a wide and long plain around five thousand feet above sea level. Away to the eastern end of this plain is the Howitt Hut, a hut apparently of great age, perhaps built by the Bryces, the pioneers of the Snowy Plains.
  
-North again, from the Howitt Plain the track goes down some 3,000ft to the Dry River. This was nww country to us and we were amazed by the width of the valley floor which continued to broaden right down to the junction with the Wonnangatta. Here a terrific clearing greets the traveller... the "home paddocks"​ of the Wonnangatta Station. The buildings of the old station still stand... the 16-roomed homestead slowly decaying along with th furnishings,​ all hand made on the spot. This is where the Bryce family took over in the 70's alongside the junction of the Conglomerate and Wonnangatta Rivers... and from the homestead looking south up the valley of the Wonnangatta,​ stands Mt Howitt and the Crosscut Saw, blue with haze in the summer and white-capped in the winter. Once the "​Wonnangatta Run" covered all the grasslands and tops from the Humphrey River across the Snowy Plains to Mt Clear! For six months of the year, the Bryce family was cut off from the world by snow; then when the rivers went down, treks were made to Dargo for supplies. Before Dargo was established,​ the nearest supply town was Harrietville! Somewhere along the line, the pioneer spirit faded out and the Bryces left the district; Wonnangatta passed into new hands who put in a Manager. The old home was on the downward for soon after the Manager and his cook were found murdered with only the silent hills and the ever-watching Howitt to solve the mystery.+North again, from the Howitt Plain the track goes down some 3,000ft to the Dry River. This was new country to us and we were amazed by the width of the valley floor which continued to broaden right down to the junction with the Wonnangatta. Here a terrific clearing greets the traveller... the "home paddocks"​ of the Wonnangatta Station. The buildings of the old station still stand... the 16-roomed homestead slowly decaying along with the furnishings,​ all hand made on the spot. This is where the Bryce family took over in the 70's alongside the junction of the Conglomerate and Wonnangatta Rivers... and from the homestead looking south up the valley of the Wonnangatta,​ stands Mt Howitt and the Crosscut Saw, blue with haze in the summer and white-capped in the winter. Once the "​Wonnangatta Run" covered all the grasslands and tops from the Humphrey River across the Snowy Plains to Mt Clear! For six months of the year, the Bryce family was cut off from the world by snow; then when the rivers went down, treks were made to Dargo for supplies. Before Dargo was established,​ the nearest supply town was Harrietville! Somewhere along the line, the pioneer spirit faded out and the Bryces left the district; Wonnangatta passed into new hands who put in a Manager. The old home was on the downward for soon after the Manager and his cook were found murdered with only the silent hills and the ever-watching Howitt to solve the mystery.
  
 Downstream from the Conglomerate,​ the Wonnangatta slowly bottles up and as the Humphrey comes in from the west (and from under the feet of the Barry Mtns.) the trail climbs up the Wombat Mtn (to some 4,000 feet, unfortunately) and down on to the Wongungarra River. Downstream from the Conglomerate,​ the Wonnangatta slowly bottles up and as the Humphrey comes in from the west (and from under the feet of the Barry Mtns.) the trail climbs up the Wombat Mtn (to some 4,000 feet, unfortunately) and down on to the Wongungarra River.
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 The Wongungarra together with its tributary the Crooked River, have valleys of great historic significance. Many hundreds once peopled such towns as Grant, Talbotville and Howittville... now just names or a clearing overgrown with thistles, so elusive is the yellow metal. The Wongungarra together with its tributary the Crooked River, have valleys of great historic significance. Many hundreds once peopled such towns as Grant, Talbotville and Howittville... now just names or a clearing overgrown with thistles, so elusive is the yellow metal.
  
-Thus the first section of our Skyline Tour finished as we boarded the coach at "Glen View", the homestead on the junction of the Wonnaagatta ​and Wongungarra Rivers, beneath the great towering ridges, the foothills of a hundred snowy peaks.+Thus the first section of our Skyline Tour finished as we boarded the coach at "Glen View", the homestead on the junction of the Wonnagatta ​and Wongungarra Rivers, beneath the great towering ridges, the foothills of a hundred snowy peaks.
  
 Loathe to leave the wide plains of the high altitudes, the Coach made off through Dargo  township and along the rapidly rising range, into the snow gums and out on to the Dargo High Plains and the summer home of the Treasure family. Once these plains were the scene of much activity as the gold miners dug down through the basalt on "deep leads"​... but the returns weren'​t worth the effort and so to soft quietude of the skyline the little plain (some twentyfive square miles) returned. Loathe to leave the wide plains of the high altitudes, the Coach made off through Dargo  township and along the rapidly rising range, into the snow gums and out on to the Dargo High Plains and the summer home of the Treasure family. Once these plains were the scene of much activity as the gold miners dug down through the basalt on "deep leads"​... but the returns weren'​t worth the effort and so to soft quietude of the skyline the little plain (some twentyfive square miles) returned.
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 It's got to be seen to be believed. Wellington, Howitt, Buller, Cobbler, The Twins, a huge granite monadnock that is Buffalo, Feathertop flecked with snow, Fainter, the wide expanse of peaks and flats making up the Bogong High Plains, Mount Bogong (more snow), Kosciusko (the Main Range glistening with snow patches), the Pilot, the Cobberas, the Bowen Mtns and the Nunniong Plains... indeed a complete circle to sea and a magnificent day to enjoy it. It's got to be seen to be believed. Wellington, Howitt, Buller, Cobbler, The Twins, a huge granite monadnock that is Buffalo, Feathertop flecked with snow, Fainter, the wide expanse of peaks and flats making up the Bogong High Plains, Mount Bogong (more snow), Kosciusko (the Main Range glistening with snow patches), the Pilot, the Cobberas, the Bowen Mtns and the Nunniong Plains... indeed a complete circle to sea and a magnificent day to enjoy it.
  
-We got out to Mt Loch aboard the Coach and stood by to commence the third ana last stage of our sojourn on the heights. Bogong High Plains are well known to Sydneysiders though familiarity does not detract from the magnificence of being on them. But the changing scene is here apparent as the Kiewa Scheme with painful slowness takes over Pretty Plain and Rocky Valley. Our route went from Mt Loch to Dibbin'​s Hut to Mt Jim and then Mt Cope. Few visitors realise the value of Mt Cope and pass on leaving its peak unchallenged. Not that it takes great fortitude to climb it; but rather that here one gains a Dress Circle view well worth the effort. The snowpole route was followed past Wallace'​s Hut and Basalt Hill to the major shock of the trip, the tremendous damage and waste brought about by Man in Rocky Valley. Last time that we were here, it was a place of quietly grazing cattle... now the scene of upheaval and squalid waste.+We got out to Mt Loch aboard the Coach and stood by to commence the third and last stage of our sojourn on the heights. Bogong High Plains are well known to Sydneysiders though familiarity does not detract from the magnificence of being on them. But the changing scene is here apparent as the Kiewa Scheme with painful slowness takes over Pretty Plain and Rocky Valley. Our route went from Mt Loch to Dibbin'​s Hut to Mt Jim and then Mt Cope. Few visitors realise the value of Mt Cope and pass on leaving its peak unchallenged. Not that it takes great fortitude to climb it; but rather that here one gains a Dress Circle view well worth the effort. The snowpole route was followed past Wallace'​s Hut and Basalt Hill to the major shock of the trip, the tremendous damage and waste brought about by Man in Rocky Valley. Last time that we were here, it was a place of quietly grazing cattle... now the scene of upheaval and squalid waste.
  
 From Rocky Valley on the land grows bald and mighty. At Mt Nelse one looks out towards Bogong, notes the great depth of the Big River that separates the two masses and scans the huge rifts on Victoria'​s highest peak; then slowly one picks up the gear and moves on to find Roper'​s Hut, thinking (but only in the most secluded inner self) "will we ever make it?" From Rocky Valley on the land grows bald and mighty. At Mt Nelse one looks out towards Bogong, notes the great depth of the Big River that separates the two masses and scans the huge rifts on Victoria'​s highest peak; then slowly one picks up the gear and moves on to find Roper'​s Hut, thinking (but only in the most secluded inner self) "will we ever make it?"
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 Bogong is a little world of its own. The northern and western faces dive down in a terrific plunge, the south is bordered by the deeply entrenched Big River whilst the east tapers away along the Long Spur to Mount Wills. Here are little glades and plains... some treed, some bald. In keeping with the majesty of the mountain, Bogong'​s top is marked by a large cairn giving a front stalls view of the Murray'​s source... Kosciusko and the Main Range and some near at hand peaks of note... Benambra, Gibbo and Wills. Bogong is a little world of its own. The northern and western faces dive down in a terrific plunge, the south is bordered by the deeply entrenched Big River whilst the east tapers away along the Long Spur to Mount Wills. Here are little glades and plains... some treed, some bald. In keeping with the majesty of the mountain, Bogong'​s top is marked by a large cairn giving a front stalls view of the Murray'​s source... Kosciusko and the Main Range and some near at hand peaks of note... Benambra, Gibbo and Wills.
  
-It was Wills that attracted most of our concern at this stage, because alongside that Mountain (and connected to it by a low saddle) ran the Long Spur... an unexperimented line of descent. From the Cleve Cole Hut the start of the Long Spur was readily located by snow poles going up past "Hotel Aptex" and out along the spur itself. Then followed a well-defined track for some miles, the Mitta Mitta Route going down the Mulhaussen Spur to the North. The early stages of the Long Spur are narrow like a backbone; but slowly as the altitude drops and the slopes of Mt. Wills are approached, the Spur widens, snow gums give place to groves of Mountain Ash and we come upon a small log cabin... Hodgkinson'​s Hut. It is from here that difficulties arise since apparently, the track is litte used even though the drop is gradual and the route an excellent one. There are traps for the unwary and very scrubby patches. Parts of the scrub have been cut at some time in the past and the track although undoubtedly present is difficult to locate. But in all this scurrying to find and keep the track a full day passes and the altitude in lost without a sudden descent. Coming off the Long Spur to the east brigs one on to Kangaroo Creek (it rises between Mt Wills and the Long Spur back at the connecting saddle) a tributary of the Big River. Just above the junction a road and water race runs down the Valley of the Big River to the Maude and Yellow Girl Gold Mine at Glen Valley on the Omeo Highway. At this point our Coach was awaiting us bringing the Third Stage of the Skyline Tour to a close and commencing the homeward trip through Tallangatta and the Hume Weir.+It was Wills that attracted most of our concern at this stage, because alongside that Mountain (and connected to it by a low saddle) ran the Long Spur... an unexperimented line of descent. From the Cleve Cole Hut the start of the Long Spur was readily located by snow poles going up past "Hotel Aptex" and out along the spur itself. Then followed a well-defined track for some miles, the Mitta Mitta Route going down the Mulhaussen Spur to the North. The early stages of the Long Spur are narrow like a backbone; but slowly as the altitude drops and the slopes of Mt. Wills are approached, the Spur widens, snow gums give place to groves of Mountain Ash and we come upon a small log cabin... Hodgkinson'​s Hut. It is from here that difficulties arise since apparently, the track is little ​used even though the drop is gradual and the route an excellent one. There are traps for the unwary and very scrubby patches. Parts of the scrub have been cut at some time in the past and the track although undoubtedly present is difficult to locate. But in all this scurrying to find and keep the track a full day passes and the altitude in lost without a sudden descent. Coming off the Long Spur to the east brigs one on to Kangaroo Creek (it rises between Mt Wills and the Long Spur back at the connecting saddle) a tributary of the Big River. Just above the junction a road and water race runs down the Valley of the Big River to the Maude and Yellow Girl Gold Mine at Glen Valley on the Omeo Highway. At this point our Coach was awaiting us bringing the Third Stage of the Skyline Tour to a close and commencing the homeward trip through Tallangatta and the Hume Weir.
  
 And now we have come to the time to reminisce. The difficulties of terrain, of attention to provisions and of personality repercussions,​ have passed; no doubt those factors are extremely important for they all add up to a determination of our sincerity of purpose and bring into relief, the impressions that are made upon our fellows; no doubt too, despite the many difficulties,​ we would welcome another opportunity to be together if it meant the vista of the great plains and snowgams... or the tumultuous call of the birds in the mornings as we awoke alongside the swiftly flowing mountain streams. And now we have come to the time to reminisce. The difficulties of terrain, of attention to provisions and of personality repercussions,​ have passed; no doubt those factors are extremely important for they all add up to a determination of our sincerity of purpose and bring into relief, the impressions that are made upon our fellows; no doubt too, despite the many difficulties,​ we would welcome another opportunity to be together if it meant the vista of the great plains and snowgams... or the tumultuous call of the birds in the mornings as we awoke alongside the swiftly flowing mountain streams.
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 May I ask you to think about a vast Alpine National Park stretching from Mt Erica (The Baw Paws) along the Great Divide through Mts Matlock, Skene, MacDonald, Magdala, Howitt; The Howitt, Snowy and Wellington Plains; The Barry Mtns; The Dargo, Bogong and [illegible]. May I ask you to think about a vast Alpine National Park stretching from Mt Erica (The Baw Paws) along the Great Divide through Mts Matlock, Skene, MacDonald, Magdala, Howitt; The Howitt, Snowy and Wellington Plains; The Barry Mtns; The Dargo, Bogong and [illegible].
  
-Anyhow, we are at Mt St. Bernard, by one [illegible] stores could be taken on and the route that we followed across the High Plains to the Bogong Peak (or similar) followed. Many routes lead off from Bogong and although our Long Spur was a headache, this was largely due to poor tracking. Such a track would not be following the Great Divide which you will notice doubles back from Mt Hotham around Omeo and Benatbra. Hereabouts it is low and developed for agriculture. I would suggest two alternatives... down the Long Spur to Glen Valley, then transport through Omeo to Benambra. From Benambra, the Tin Mines Track leads finally to Kosciusko via The Pilot and the Ramshead Range. The other alternative would be to follow the Long Spur until it connects with Mt Wills, then Mt Wills, Glen Wills, across to Gibbs Creek, over Mt Gibbs and on to the Buenbar Hut track to Tom Groggin and then the Leatherbarrel route to Dead Horse Gap and Kosciusko. (A further suggestion still from Benambra on to the Nunniong Plain, the Cobberas, the Pilot, Kosciusko.)+Anyhow, we are at Mt St. Bernard, by one [illegible] stores could be taken on and the route that we followed across the High Plains to the Bogong Peak (or similar) followed. Many routes lead off from Bogong and although our Long Spur was a headache, this was largely due to poor tracking. Such a track would not be following the Great Divide which you will notice doubles back from Mt Hotham around Omeo and Benambra. Hereabouts it is low and developed for agriculture. I would suggest two alternatives... down the Long Spur to Glen Valley, then transport through Omeo to Benambra. From Benambra, the Tin Mines Track leads finally to Kosciusko via The Pilot and the Ramshead Range. The other alternative would be to follow the Long Spur until it connects with Mt Wills, then Mt Wills, Glen Wills, across to Gibbs Creek, over Mt Gibbs and on to the Buenbar Hut track to Tom Groggin and then the Leatherbarrel route to Dead Horse Gap and Kosciusko. (A further suggestion still from Benambra on to the Nunniong Plain, the Cobberas, the Pilot, Kosciusko.)
  
-trust you have had patience with me during this outline of routes. Pour over your maps and you too, will see a dozen routes for the choosing. Many places are tracked... many tracks shown or pre-existing have gone because of lack of use, or fires or washaways, or simply because it has been ndbody's business to care for them. To my knowledge no Huts for General Public use exist anywhere in the area planned. No wonder one needs to be a virile walker to make the grade! These lands are national property... how often do we hear that they are wasteland because they are seldom visited and only then by the most adventurous!+Trust you have had patience with me during this outline of routes. Pour over your maps and you too, will see a dozen routes for the choosing. Many places are tracked... many tracks shown or pre-existing have gone because of lack of use, or fires or washaways, or simply because it has been nobody's business to care for them. To my knowledge no Huts for General Public use exist anywhere in the area planned. No wonder one needs to be a virile walker to make the grade! These lands are national property... how often do we hear that they are wasteland because they are seldom visited and only then by the most adventurous!
  
 Obviously, the difficulties of use are far too great for most, even though they have a continuous hankering to see and know. Sufficient facilities MUST be provided... at least decent tracking and construction of Huts could be undertaken. No manner of voluntary work could be comparable to the possible effort of an enlightened administration. Obviously, the difficulties of use are far too great for most, even though they have a continuous hankering to see and know. Sufficient facilities MUST be provided... at least decent tracking and construction of Huts could be undertaken. No manner of voluntary work could be comparable to the possible effort of an enlightened administration.
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 === Cameras Are Valuable... === === Cameras Are Valuable... ===
  
-Your Camera, Exposure meter, Tripod, extra Lenses, can be covered in an inexpensive All Risks Policy against fire, burglary, theft, loss by misdaventrue, smashing or leaving in the train!!!+Your Camera, Exposure meter, Tripod, extra Lenses, can be covered in an inexpensive All Risks Policy against fire, burglary, theft, loss by misadventure, smashing or leaving in the train!!!
  
 Ask all about it from Club Member Brian Harvey. '​Phones:​ Business BU5039, BU5660. Private JW1462. Ask all about it from Club Member Brian Harvey. '​Phones:​ Business BU5039, BU5660. Private JW1462.
195409.txt ยท Last modified: 2018/07/30 03:17 by tyreless