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195403 [2018/07/09 02:48]
tyreless
195403 [2018/07/09 04:15]
tyreless
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-===== Sorry, wrong number. ===+=== Sorry, wrong number. ===
  
 Somehow, David Roots' telephone number was incorrectly recorded on a recent walks programme. One member, contacting the number shown and asking for David was greeted: "What? No!!! Not again!"​ Somehow, David Roots' telephone number was incorrectly recorded on a recent walks programme. One member, contacting the number shown and asking for David was greeted: "What? No!!! Not again!"​
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 ---- ----
  
-THE BOYS IN TASMANIA.+===== The Boys In Tasmania===== 
 By Geoff Wagg. By Geoff Wagg.
-PART I - THROUGH THE RESERVE WITH WATER-WINGS AED TOT NOT. This is a simple story, simply told for simple people. + 
-It tells how Frank and David, Ross andGeoff went to Tasmania and what befell them. +=== Part I - Through the Reserve with water-wings and watnot=== 
-We started on Christmas Eve, laden with supplies of Christmas ​(lake, nuts and jelly-beans,​ and one large meat pudding, and energetically farewelled by familes and friends. ​/fter fighting all night for a comfortable ​Position, we finally went to sleep, lulled by the penWqting ​odour of bushwalkers'​ socks. We had our breakfast on the 4519ir1t" and voted it as decidedly Bon oh!; then, eventually reaching Melbourne, of course being Sydneysiders,​ remained unimpressed. + 
-After Christmas dinner (nuts and jelly-beans) in Melbourne we caught our 'plane to Launceston and about half-way across got our firs"; ​taste of true Tassie weather. However, it wasn't quite raining when we arrived in Launceston we trotted off to the traditional camping +This is a simple story, simply told for simple people. 
-ground in Cataract Gorge. We had meat pudding for tea, and want earlto ​bed, considering that we'd done and seen quite enough for one day. + 
-Next morning we all wandered down and patronised their beaut. Olympic Swimming Pool, lathering ourselves energetically,​ then washing ​of the suds with a plunge in the icy water. We breakfasted off the seemingly everlasting meat pudding and proceeded ​an a flood of directions from various people in search of the railway station. It was that morning we saw the posters about the New Zealand train smash, and we scanned the pages anxiously, fearing to see a name we knew. +It tells how Frank and David, Ross and Geoff went to Tasmania and what befell them. 
-Finally we located the locomotive and, as we settled into a aminutive ​antique "​boxie",​ the sky, Which had been a picture of misery, found it could restrain tears no longer and a light mist of rain began to fall. Our journey through to Railton we really enjoyed and mostly we just sat looking at country so typically what we'd hoped to see we could hardly believe it. The mist of rain even improved it, + 
-softening the horizons and bringing out the tones of green and the red soil. At Railton we changed to a rail motor which rattled and jolted on the narrow gauge apparently quite able to make the journey of its own accord, while the driver scarcely deigned to look up from the book in which he was writing. +We started on Christmas Eve, laden with supplies of Christmas ​cake, nuts and jelly-beans,​ and one large meat pudding, and energetically farewelled by familes and friends. ​After fighting all night for a comfortable ​position, we finally went to sleep, lulled by the penetrating ​odour of bushwalkers'​ socks. We had our breakfast on the "​Spirit" and voted it as decidedly Bon oh!; then, eventually reaching Melbourne, of course being Sydneysiders,​ remained unimpressed. 
-Now our way lay mostly through planted forests of pine aad beech, with an occasional level crOssing ​where the driver would rouse himself so far as to sound the horn, then relapse back into his clerical preoccupation. At Sheffield we, perhaps misguidedly,​ parcelled our long trousers and posted them to Queenstown (Frank very reluctantly) after which we went in search of Mr. Winter and his '​bus, ​Which was to take us to W'​aldheim+ 
-Mr. Tinter, however, had decided to delay our departure until the arrival of another crowd of walkers on the later train and, as +After Christmas dinner (nuts and jelly-beans) in Melbourne we caught our 'plane to Launceston and about half-way across got our first taste of true Tassie weather. However, it wasn't quite raining when we arrived in Launceston, so we trotted off to the traditional camping ground in Cataract Gorge. We had meat pudding for tea, and went early to bed, considering that we'd done and seen quite enough for one day. 
-17. + 
-this would reduce our fare, we readily agreed. While we waited he legaled ​us with tales about the twenty walkers he had taken out the evening before, and we beheld visions of ourselves queueing up to climb Darn Bluff. At last the rest arrived ​mad after some further delays we started off for Iraldheim.+Next morning we all wandered down and patronised their beaut. Olympic Swimming Pool, lathering ourselves energetically,​ then washing ​off the suds with a plunge in the icy water. We breakfasted off the seemingly everlasting meat pudding and proceeded ​on a flood of directions from various people in search of the railway station. It was that morning we saw the posters about the New Zealand train smash, and we scanned the pages anxiously, fearing to see a name we knew. 
 + 
 +Finally we located the locomotive and, as we settled into a diminutive ​antique "​boxie",​ the sky, which had been a picture of misery, found it could restrain tears no longer and a light mist of rain began to fall. Our journey through to Railton we really enjoyed and mostly we just sat looking at country so typically what we'd hoped to see we could hardly believe it. The mist of rain even improved it, softening the horizons and bringing out the tones of green and the red soil. At Railton we changed to a rail motor which rattled and jolted on the narrow gauge apparently quite able to make the journey of its own accord, while the driver scarcely deigned to look up from the book in which he was writing. 
 + 
 +Now our way lay mostly through planted forests of pine and beech, with an occasional level crossing ​where the driver would rouse himself so far as to sound the horn, then relapse back into his clerical preoccupation. At Sheffield we, perhaps misguidedly,​ parcelled our long trousers and posted them to Queenstown (Frank very reluctantly) after which we went in search of Mr. Winter and his '​bus, ​which was to take us to Waldheim. 
 + 
 +Mr. Winter, however, had decided to delay our departure until the arrival of another crowd of walkers on the later train and, as this would reduce our fare, we readily agreed. While we waited he regaled ​us with tales about the twenty walkers he had taken out the evening before, and we beheld visions of ourselves queueing up to climb Barn Bluff. At last the rest arrived ​and after some further delays we started off for Waldheim. 
 The country soon became very dreary, being mostly drab stands of timber with occasional saw mills. Also it once more began to rain and the closer we got to the Reserve the heavier it grew. We arrived at Waldheim just on dusk and, as we stepped out an to the saturated ground the sound of running water came loudly to our ears. Drops, trickles, rivulets and streams, all combined in a symphony of wetness. The country soon became very dreary, being mostly drab stands of timber with occasional saw mills. Also it once more began to rain and the closer we got to the Reserve the heavier it grew. We arrived at Waldheim just on dusk and, as we stepped out an to the saturated ground the sound of running water came loudly to our ears. Drops, trickles, rivulets and streams, all combined in a symphony of wetness.
-We collected our food which had beet delivered to the Ranger, and moved into the shelter of the Picnic Hut, along with Mr. Winter'​s twenty-odd other walkers. That night narked ​the end of an era - we finished the meat pudding. + 
-We slept under the table that night and were awakened early next morning by unfortunate walkers whose time was running out and who had to push on whatever the weather. ​It lying under a table while those move eat breakfast one not only has excellent opportunities to study bashwalkers'​ knobbly knees, but also, like Mr. Lazarus, to smnple ​various breakfasts being partaken upstairs. As we lay dozing drifts of conversation came to us containing words like "​raining",​ "​snowing",​ +We collected our food which had been delivered to the Ranger, and moved into the shelter of the Picnic Hut, along with Mr. Winter'​s twenty-odd other walkers. That night marked ​the end of an era - we finished the meat pudding. 
-I?  + 
-,ice on the top track",​ and so we decided that we could afford to spend a day at Waldheim. +We slept under the table that night and were awakened early next morning by unfortunate walkers whose time was running out and who had to push on whatever the weather. ​In lying under a table while those above eat breakfast one not only has excellent opportunities to study bashwalkers'​ knobbly knees, but also, like Mr. Lazarus, to sample ​various breakfasts being partaken upstairs. As we lay dozing drifts of conversation came to us containing words like "​raining",​ "​snowing", ​"ice on the top track",​ and so we decided that we could afford to spend a day at Waldheim. 
-When those moving off had gone we crawled out and stirred up the fire and, after breakfasting,​ decided on a sortie out into the weather We set off along the south track, skirting Dove Lake, and climbing ​Up on to Hanson'​s Peak we stood looking across to where Little Horn Occasionally ​showed through the mist while the mow flakes drifted up to us out of the lake. Although the wind was very powerful, we thoug-r, ​we'd cross the taddle ​and go round the base of Little Horn, then back + 
-' ​via Crater Lake, but as we moved on to the high saddle, we walked into a blast of horizontal sleet that stung our bare legs and sent us scuttling back under the lee side of Hanson'​s. +When those moving off had gone we crawled out and stirred up the fire and, after breakfasting,​ decided on a sortie out into the weatherWe set off along the south track, skirting Dove Lake, and climbing ​up on to Hanson'​s Peak we stood looking across to where Little Horn occasionally ​showed through the mist while the snow flakes drifted up to us out of the lake. Although the wind was very powerful, we thought ​we'd cross the saddle ​and go round the base of Little Horn, then back via Crater Lake, but as we moved on to the high saddle, we walked into a blast of horizontal sleet that stung our bare legs and sent us scuttling back under the lee side of Hanson'​s. 
-As we descended we took quite a buffeting from the rising wind and our groundsheets flapped and snapped round us like sails. At one stage we saw David, quite helpless, being propelled backwards with his gratzsheet ​blown right up round his head, until he hove to in the prickly embrace of a Richea ​budh+ 
-The following night was bitterly cold, and we shivered in our sleeping bags underneath the table. About four next morning we peered through the tiny window and the sight made all worth While. The blizzard was gone, the sky was clear, and the tops were covered with snow. Breakfast was bolted, packs faastily ​made up Lind then aar feet were on the trakl+As we descended we took quite a buffeting from the rising wind and our groundsheets flapped and snapped round us like sails. At one stage we saw David, quite helpless, being propelled backwards with his groundsheet ​blown right up round his head, until he hove to in the prickly embrace of a Richea ​bush. 
-As we climbed towards Cradle, the snow grew thicker until it became a complete carpet of White, while the small lakes were frozen over. The view from Cradle Mountain was beautiful, the aaad effects spectacular and the panorama of snow-dappled peaks would have quickened the beat of any bushwalking heart. By the time we returned + 
-to the track and pushed on toward ​Darn Bluff the mow had become mushy, and the oozy combinations of ice and mud made far from pleasant walking. We pitched camp just after midday in the mouth of Fury Gorge and dined off two rather charred, diminutive dampers. +The following night was bitterly cold, and we shivered in our sleeping bags underneath the table. About four next morning we peered through the tiny window and the sight made all worth while. The blizzard was gone, the sky was clear, and the tops were covered with snow. Breakfast was bolted, packs hastily ​made up and then our feet were on the trail. 
-We climbed Barn Bluff that afternoon and by the time we returned the clouds were building up for a fresh onslaught. Next morning we broke camp quickly with misty rain pursuing us across the Gorge, ​tInd started off with all speed toward Pelion Hut. As the day wore on, the weather improved and our admirable resolution to hurry dissolved with the mist. Soon we were dawdling to the accompaniment of clicking shutters. Button grass and mud, button grass and mud, followed by Frog Hollow, which was exclusively mud. We squelched into Pelion Hut that evening after ten weary hours of mud-wallowing,​ only to find that it was completely packed and nobody was pleased to see us.+ 
 +As we climbed towards Cradle, the snow grew thicker until it became a complete carpet of white, while the small lakes were frozen over. The view from Cradle Mountain was beautiful, the cloud effects spectacular and the panorama of snow-dappled peaks would have quickened the beat of any bushwalking heart. By the time we returned to the track and pushed on toward ​Barn Bluff the mow had become mushy, and the oozy combinations of ice and mud made far from pleasant walking. We pitched camp just after midday in the mouth of Fury Gorge and dined off two rather charred, diminutive dampers. 
 + 
 +We climbed Barn Bluff that afternoon and by the time we returned the clouds were building up for a fresh onslaught. Next morning we broke camp quickly with misty rain pursuing us across the Gorge, ​and started off with all speed toward Pelion Hut. As the day wore on, the weather improved and our admirable resolution to hurry dissolved with the mist. Soon we were dawdling to the accompaniment of clicking shutters. Button grass and mud, button grass and mud, followed by Frog Hollow, which was exclusively mud. We squelched into Pelion Hut that evening after ten weary hours of mud-wallowing,​ only to find that it was completely packed and nobody was pleased to see us. 
 However, once outside again it became apparent that the leeches were delighted to see us and we in turn fulfilled a sadistic delight in plucking them off our socks and dropping them in the fire. Not caring to share our sleeping bags with a myriad leeches, we all moved inside to sleep on the floor. I, however, was fortunate enough to score a third share in a bunk. However, once outside again it became apparent that the leeches were delighted to see us and we in turn fulfilled a sadistic delight in plucking them off our socks and dropping them in the fire. Not caring to share our sleeping bags with a myriad leeches, we all moved inside to sleep on the floor. I, however, was fortunate enough to score a third share in a bunk.
-Next morning the clouds were once more with us, but nevertheless everyone went around hopefully telling everyone that it would soon clear up. Just to prove them wrong, or possibly because we'd done a spot of washing and had it hanging out to dry, the rain set in about 10 o'​clock. That day we had planned to climb Pelion East and Ossa and return to sleep in Pelion Hut. However, the view from Pelion East was so restricted by mist and rain we decided to leave Ossa till next day, hoping for better weather. After eating ​lunoh disconsolately sitting under an overhang on the side of Pelion East, we headed back towards Pelion Hut along what I think must come close to being the sloppiest piece of track we traversed during the thole trip. + 
-Our fourth day began very much like the previous one, with low cloud (or high mist), but this time no one risked a prophecy, ​Co it consequently began to break about midday. We climbed Ossa and, while the photography on the way up was quite good, the tomost ​fifty feet of the mountain seemed to coincide with cloud level and, though it was breaking, getting a photo was very much "catch as catch can". On top we discovered some very respectably-sized snow drifts so as we came down glissading was the order of the day. We would start off vertical but almost invariably cover the last fifty feet on the seats of our shorts. +Next morning the clouds were once more with us, but nevertheless everyone went around hopefully telling everyone that it would soon clear up. Just to prove them wrong, or possibly because we'd done a spot of washing and had it hanging out to dry, the rain set in about 10 o'​clock. That day we had planned to climb Pelion East and Ossa and return to sleep in Pelion Hut. However, the view from Pelion East was so restricted by mist and rain we decided to leave Ossa till next day, hoping for better weather. After eating ​lunch disconsolately sitting under an overhang on the side of Pelion East, we headed back towards Pelion Hut along what I think must come close to being the sloppiest piece of track we traversed during the thole trip. 
-(TO BE CCNTINUED.) + 
-IMINI.6..s abowammumbsiml +Our fourth day began very much like the previous one, with low cloud (or high mist), but this time no one risked a prophecy, ​so it consequently began to break about midday. We climbed Ossa and, while the photography on the way up was quite good, the topmost ​fifty feet of the mountain seemed to coincide with cloud level and, though it was breaking, getting a photo was very much "catch as catch can". On top we discovered some very respectably-sized snow drifts so as we came down glissading was the order of the day. We would start off vertical but almost invariably cover the last fifty feet on the seats of our shorts. 
-Reports have it that one of the highlights of the Boating ​IT,​Teekend ​was the unusual precautions taken to prevent bush fires. Tea was cooked by primus in the boats, while sheltering from a shower under overhanging rock ledges. + 
-ARE 1ULKERS BECOMING SISSIES? Quote from Paddy Pallin'​s advertisoment in the magazine of October, 1937: +(To be continued.) 
-"​Shortly after I started making camp gear I told a friend that I was getting in touch with Sydney Bush Walkers. He said "​S.B.W.?​ They'​re a pretty tough lot - won't buy anything if they can rake it then7,​olvest." + 
-19. +---- 
-FEDERATION NOTES FEBRUARY 1ING+ 
 +Reports have it that one of the highlights of the Boating ​Weekend ​was the unusual precautions taken to prevent bush fires. Tea was cooked by primus in the boats, while sheltering from a shower under overhanging rock ledges. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=== Are walkers becoming sissies=== 
 + 
 +Quote from Paddy Pallin'​s advertisoment in the magazine of October, 1937: 
 + 
 +"​Shortly after I started making camp gear I told a friend that I was getting in touch with Sydney Bush Walkers. He said "​S.B.W.?​ They'​re a pretty tough lot - won't buy anything if they can make it themselves." 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Federation Notes - February Meeting. ===== 
 By Allen A. Strom. By Allen A. Strom.
-FRAZER PiEK: The Wyong Shire Council (as Trustees ​ofFrazer ​Park"​) ​TIY1 take no action to prevent the removal of gravel from the Park. + 
-THE NATIONAL TRUST is concentrating on an effort to ensure retention ​"Of thFHTEFFT-716auties ​of the Hawkesbury River-Eroken ​Bay Area. The Kariong Proposal is receiving first attention. +__Frazer Park__: The Wyong Shire Council (as Trustees ​of "​Frazer ​Park"​) ​will take no action to prevent the removal of gravel from the Park. 
-AUSTRALIAN ENCYCLOPEDIA: The note on "Eushwalking" in this publicarion ​7-7617finETTEed ​by the President and Secretary of Federation. + 
-DEEWHY LAGOON: The National Trust reports that the 'Fauna Protection ​7Enel is supporting efforts to preserve portion of Deewhy Lagoon in its natural condition. +__The National Trust__ ​is concentrating on an effort to ensure retention ​of the natural beauties ​of the Hawkesbury River - Broken ​Bay Area. The Kariong Proposal is receiving first attention. 
-BARREN GROUNDS: The Federation has asked the Fauna Protection Panel + 
-to have 3,456 acres on the Barren Grounds gazetted as a Faunal Reserve+__Australian Encyclopedia__: The note on "Bushwalking" in this publicarion ​is being finalised ​by the President and Secretary of Federation. 
-WARRMUNGLES. The Department of Lands has notified the Federation ​FEFF77,000 acres have been reserved in thD Warrumbungles in preparation for a National Park. The persons nominated by the Federation for inclusion on the Trust (Messrs. Pallin and McInnes) will be given full consideration. + 
-The N.S.W. Federation of Dushwalking Clubs is affiliated with the newly established ​N.S.T. Sports ​Federation ​whose objects are stated as: to encourage general ​pFFETZT7=7Ein ​sports involving physical exertion and to foster sports activities and the interests of those participating in such activities in New South Wales"​. +__Deewhy Lagoon__: The National Trust reports that the Fauna Protection ​Panel is supporting efforts to preserve portion of Deewhy Lagoon in its natural condition. 
-It has been reported that the Victorian Federation of walking ​Clubs is interested in establishing an Australian Federation, + 
-SEARCH AND RESCUE: The S R will meet on the following dates at Paddy Pallin'​s at 5.30 p t. +__Barren Grounds__: The Federation has asked the Fauna Protection Panel to have 3,456 acres on the Barren Grounds gazetted as a Faunal Reserve. 
-March 8th, May 10th, August 9th, November 8th. + 
-The meeting on March 8th is most ,important and Club contact Men are asked to attend with "​up-to-date"​ check lists of S R personnel. The S. & R. section is to contact the Victorian Police and S R to establish liaisson and discuss methods used. +__Warrumbungles__: ​The Department of Lands has notified the Federation ​that 14,000 acres have been reserved in the Warrumbungles in preparation for a National Park. The persons nominated by the Federation for inclusion on the Trust (Messrs. Pallin and McInnes) will be given full consideration. 
-The S R Section is giving consideration to undertaking search and rescue in cases of parties missing in caves. + 
-ANNUAL CAMP will be held on April 3rd/4th at Euroka Clearing. +The N.S.W. Federation of Dushwalking Clubs is affiliated with the newly established ​__N.S.W. Sports ​Federation__ ​whose objects are stated as: "to encourage general ​participation in sports involving physical exertion and to foster sports activities and the interests of those participating in such activities in New South Wales"​. 
-A report was made to Federation on an area of land lying along the coast between Disaster Bay and Cape Howe. Many interesting features concerning its Primitive nature and the presence of certain species of plants and animals. Proposed to investigate the area fully. ​Visits ​to Areas of imnortance would be nude as follows + 
--  FroFosed ​Budderoo National Park: March 19// 20 21st +It has been reported that the Victorian Federation of Walking ​Clubs is interested in establishing an __Australian Federation__. 
-The Kariong Peninsula Proposal: April 9 10 llth. + 
-'Phone Allen A. Strom at WE 2528 for details. +__Search and Rescue__: The S R will meet on the following dates at Paddy Pallin'​s at 5.30 p.m.: March 8th, May 10th, August 9th, November 8th. The meeting on March 8th is most important and Club contact Men are asked to attend with "​up-to-date"​ check lists of S R personnel. The S. & R. section is to contact the Victorian Police and S R to establish liaisson and discuss methods used. 
-'CP 90177,,e. CIP*P1M + 
-MP P1 +The S R Section is giving consideration to undertaking search and rescue in cases of parties missing in caves. 
-&../. + 
-.1M '​177..t24 +__Annual Camp__ ​will be held on April 3rd/4th at Euroka Clearing. 
-V; Liz 041  chia.22,4 + 
-.c +A report was made to Federation on an area of land lying along the coast between Disaster Bay and Cape Howe. Many interesting features concerning its Primitive nature and the presence of certain species of plants and animals. Proposed to investigate the area fully. ​__Visits ​to Areas__ ​of imnortance would be nude as follows: Proposed ​Budderoo National Park: March 19/20/21stThe Kariong Peninsula Proposal: April 9/10/llth. 'Phone Allen A. Strom at WE 2528 for details. 
-MORE LETTERS TO PADDY. + 
-Here's a letter from a New Australian residing at Tarraleah, Tasmania, that Paddy got the other day. Knowing of old the critical way in which Europeans look at rucksacks Paddy takes it as rare compliment. I leave it to Bush +---- 
-+ 
-walkers ​to say whether ​,they like to be referred to as nTramps+===== Paddy Made===== 
-reDear ​Sir! + 
-I've seen a beautiful rucksack carried by a tramp lately. Whenasked himwhere could buy such +=== More letters to Paddy=== 
-one I got your address. The rucksack has a leather-bottom,​ two big outside pockets and strips for blankets too.+ 
 +Here's a letter from a New Australian residing at Tarraleah, Tasmania, that Paddy got the other day. Knowing of old the critical way in which Europeans look at rucksacks Paddy takes it as rare compliment. I leave it to Bushwalkers ​to say whether they like to be referred to as "​Tramps"​
 + 
 +"​Dear ​Sir! 
 + 
 +I've seen a beautiful rucksack carried by a tramp lately. When asked him where could buy such one I got your address. The rucksack has a leather-bottom,​ two big outside pockets and strips for blankets too. 
 I expect your offers, if you've this one or others in stock."​ I expect your offers, if you've this one or others in stock."​
-10.71, 
-0 0  
-.; 
-'​4440'​1 
-tr4. 
-fze miA4. 
-, 1 
-I 1,11 
-/4 iwli 
--41/ 
-PADDY PAWN 
-Lightweight Camp Gear 
-201 CASTLEREAGH St SYDNEY 
-M2678 
-+Pt, r"..1 
  
 +Paddy Pallin. Lightweight Camp Gear.
 +
 +201 Castlereagh St., Sydney. M2678.
 +
 +----
195403.txt · Last modified: 2018/07/09 04:21 by tyreless