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195311 [2016/11/28 23:33]
tyreless
195311 [2016/11/29 01:42]
tyreless
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 A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers, C/- Ingersoll Hall, 256 Crown St., Sydney. A monthly bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers, C/- Ingersoll Hall, 256 Crown St., Sydney.
  
-===No.228. ​October, 1953. Price 6d.===+===No.228. ​November, 1953. Price 6d.===
  
 |**Editor**|Jim Brown, 103 Gipps St, Drummoyne| |**Editor**|Jim Brown, 103 Gipps St, Drummoyne|
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 At the Committee Meeting of October, the names of about 60 unfinancial members were crossed off the books. The number was made up of approximately 40 "​active"​ and 20 non-active members, and reduced the total membership in all categories to 216. Notification is being sent to all concerned. At the Committee Meeting of October, the names of about 60 unfinancial members were crossed off the books. The number was made up of approximately 40 "​active"​ and 20 non-active members, and reduced the total membership in all categories to 216. Notification is being sent to all concerned.
  
-Some of those removed from the books will certainly apply for re-instatement,​ and it is probable that a number previously on the "​active"​ list will ask to be restored as non-active, and that Committe ​will approve most requests of this kind. However, the majority of those crossed off will simply pass out of the records of the Club, and in one year we will show a wastage of more than forty members.+Some of those removed from the books will certainly apply for re-instatement,​ and it is probable that a number previously on the "​active"​ list will ask to be restored as non-active, and that Committee ​will approve most requests of this kind. However, the majority of those crossed off will simply pass out of the records of the Club, and in one year we will show a wastage of more than forty members.
  
 To date the intake of new members this year has been 11, and with only 15 names on the current list of prospective members, it is quite certain that the end of the club year on January 31st will see us with depleted numbers. As a comparison, the following tabulation, taken from annual reports, may be of interest: To date the intake of new members this year has been 11, and with only 15 names on the current list of prospective members, it is quite certain that the end of the club year on January 31st will see us with depleted numbers. As a comparison, the following tabulation, taken from annual reports, may be of interest:
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 Here one might readily digress with an analysis of our income and expenditure,​ pointing to variable items, such as postages, which are largely influenced by membership: while other costs are constant, such as rental of Club room. The fact is that we will not be able to live "in the manner to which we have been accustomed"​ if the present trend continues. Here one might readily digress with an analysis of our income and expenditure,​ pointing to variable items, such as postages, which are largely influenced by membership: while other costs are constant, such as rental of Club room. The fact is that we will not be able to live "in the manner to which we have been accustomed"​ if the present trend continues.
  
-For some years our membersnip ​was reasonably stable. Last year a reduction was evident, and this year a steep decline is indicated. It is probably a direct product of the generally waning interest in which we have remarked previously, the reasons for which seem to be numerous and varied. While we should not be alarmed by the tendency, we should perhaps consider what we want the Club to be in the future. Are we content to see our numbers falling? Do we believe it will presently level out at a satisfactory figure? Or do we feel that some action should be taken to stabilise or increase our membership?+For some years our membership ​was reasonably stable. Last year a reduction was evident, and this year a steep decline is indicated. It is probably a direct product of the generally waning interest in which we have remarked previously, the reasons for which seem to be numerous and varied. While we should not be alarmed by the tendency, we should perhaps consider what we want the Club to be in the future. Are we content to see our numbers falling? Do we believe it will presently level out at a satisfactory figure? Or do we feel that some action should be taken to stabilise or increase our membership?
  
 This has been a vexed problem in the past, when Club opinion has generally been opposed to promiscuous growth, or any form of advertising for new members. Certainly there is a maximum figure at which the jobs of some officers, notably Treasurer and Secretary, would become too onerous altogether. In any case, lowering of our standard of admission would be an undesirable thing. The point calling for consideration is whether we wish to embark on something in the nature of a recruiting drive to maintain our membership. Should we agree to move in that direction we must be careful that our decision is not dictated by the selfish desire to secure more funds for the gratification of existing members. The Club is the thing, and the only motive which should govern our thoughts is the continued welfare of the walking game to which the Club has contributed,​ and can continue to contribute, so much. This has been a vexed problem in the past, when Club opinion has generally been opposed to promiscuous growth, or any form of advertising for new members. Certainly there is a maximum figure at which the jobs of some officers, notably Treasurer and Secretary, would become too onerous altogether. In any case, lowering of our standard of admission would be an undesirable thing. The point calling for consideration is whether we wish to embark on something in the nature of a recruiting drive to maintain our membership. Should we agree to move in that direction we must be careful that our decision is not dictated by the selfish desire to secure more funds for the gratification of existing members. The Club is the thing, and the only motive which should govern our thoughts is the continued welfare of the walking game to which the Club has contributed,​ and can continue to contribute, so much.
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 The Treasurer'​s Report provided evidence of a very satisfactory round-up of late payers. No less than £19.10.0 had been collected in subscriptions. In fact it appears from correspondence that all but one has paid (Far be it from us to point the finger). (Alas - far more than one - Editor.) The Treasurer'​s Report provided evidence of a very satisfactory round-up of late payers. No less than £19.10.0 had been collected in subscriptions. In fact it appears from correspondence that all but one has paid (Far be it from us to point the finger). (Alas - far more than one - Editor.)
  
-The Conservation Secretary'​s Report described a Conference on Bushfire Control, presided over by the Chairman of the Bushfires Committee, Mr. Messer. At the conference Mr. Morris, Bushfire liaison officer of the Sutherland Shire Council had described the Fire Fighting Centre at Sutherland Council Chambers and Brigades at Engadin ​and Heathcote, which include in their areas portion of National Park eastward to Kangaroo Creek, also the brigades at Waterfall Sanitorium, Loftus and Bundeena, and some further away from National Park. He asked what manpower Bushwalkers might provide for bushfire fighting in National Park, using the Park's equipment and with assistance and direction from members of the various Sutherland Shire Bushfire Brigade.+The Conservation Secretary'​s Report described a Conference on Bushfire Control, presided over by the Chairman of the Bushfires Committee, Mr. Messer. At the conference Mr. Morris, Bushfire liaison officer of the Sutherland Shire Council had described the Fire Fighting Centre at Sutherland Council Chambers and Brigades at Engadine ​and Heathcote, which include in their areas portion of National Park eastward to Kangaroo Creek, also the brigades at Waterfall Sanitorium, Loftus and Bundeena, and some further away from National Park. He asked what manpower Bushwalkers might provide for bushfire fighting in National Park, using the Park's equipment and with assistance and direction from members of the various Sutherland Shire Bushfire Brigade.
  
 Tom Moppett explained that Mr. Morris'​s idea was that any bushwalkers in the park during bushfire periods might report fires and perhaps help the brigades. Some discussion ensued, in which Gil Webb suggested that the provision of a good camp site might be an inducement to bushwalkers to stay around ready to help. It was decided to appoint a Committee consisting of Malcolm McGregor, Tom Moppett, Paul Barnes, Allen Strom and Alex Colley to report on the practicability of the suggestion. Tom Moppett explained that Mr. Morris'​s idea was that any bushwalkers in the park during bushfire periods might report fires and perhaps help the brigades. Some discussion ensued, in which Gil Webb suggested that the provision of a good camp site might be an inducement to bushwalkers to stay around ready to help. It was decided to appoint a Committee consisting of Malcolm McGregor, Tom Moppett, Paul Barnes, Allen Strom and Alex Colley to report on the practicability of the suggestion.
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 By Leon Blumer. By Leon Blumer.
  
-As we gradually approached the hut in the late afternoon the Hornli ridge loomed above our heads. We had already viewed the Matterhorn from various sides aad marvelled at its impossible outline, its airy ridges and faces, so it was with a little trepidation that Brian and I tried to visualise the route for the next morning. Such was our respect for the peak that we had left Janet at Zermatt, Janet having been with us previously on the Dent Blanche, a much more difficult peak in all respects.+As we gradually approached the hut in the late afternoon the Hornli ridge loomed above our heads. We had already viewed the Matterhorn from various sides and marvelled at its impossible outline, its airy ridges and faces, so it was with a little trepidation that Brian and I tried to visualise the route for the next morning. Such was our respect for the peak that we had left Janet at Zermatt, Janet having been with us previously on the Dent Blanche, a much more difficult peak in all respects.
  
 The hut, of course, was full to the brim, so we grabbed a blanket each and slept on the table after the usual supper of maggi soup (so thick that a spoon would stand upright). Ropes and rucksack provided the necessary padding, and we actually slept for a few hours. This was our fourth week in the Alps and we cared little when and where we slept. The hut, of course, was full to the brim, so we grabbed a blanket each and slept on the table after the usual supper of maggi soup (so thick that a spoon would stand upright). Ropes and rucksack provided the necessary padding, and we actually slept for a few hours. This was our fourth week in the Alps and we cared little when and where we slept.
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 The third cord, a rope ladder, was rather horrible, iced-up, decayed, and with a few rungs missing. It swings out over the precipice, and creaks and groans when, at half-way, you have to transfer to the inside rungs. I have usually a steady head over sheer space but was acutely conscious of the fact that it would be impossible to hold once the ladder broke. The mist enveloped us more than once and added to the sublimity of the depths. The third cord, a rope ladder, was rather horrible, iced-up, decayed, and with a few rungs missing. It swings out over the precipice, and creaks and groans when, at half-way, you have to transfer to the inside rungs. I have usually a steady head over sheer space but was acutely conscious of the fact that it would be impossible to hold once the ladder broke. The mist enveloped us more than once and added to the sublimity of the depths.
  
-The Italian shoulder was reached and the going, though still exposed, became much easier up and down jagged gendarnes. We were the only two on that side but nanaged ​to find scratch marks and occasional footsteps on the snowy parts of the ridge. Most of the rock strata sloped downwards and outwards and there were some pitches which would equal any severe English rock climb if the ropes were removed. Below one especially difficult pitch which Brian (as last man) had to rope down, we found a plaque commemorating a famous Swiss guide, Otto Tuhrer who was killed last year by the cord breaking. We congratulated ourselves on our slower but surer belay technique.+The Italian shoulder was reached and the going, though still exposed, became much easier up and down jagged gendarnes. We were the only two on that side but managed ​to find scratch marks and occasional footsteps on the snowy parts of the ridge. Most of the rock strata sloped downwards and outwards and there were some pitches which would equal any severe English rock climb if the ropes were removed. Below one especially difficult pitch which Brian (as last man) had to rope down, we found a plaque commemorating a famous Swiss guide, Otto Tuhrer who was killed last year by the cord breaking. We congratulated ourselves on our slower but surer belay technique.
  
 We lost the route after this, and found ourselves on the precipitous Italian face. We tried twice to find the route before realising that scratch marks led above a snow slope, around a corner and across to the main ridge. To have kept down the face on a subsidiary ridge would have been suicidal. Stones rattle down this at all hours. We lost the route after this, and found ourselves on the precipitous Italian face. We tried twice to find the route before realising that scratch marks led above a snow slope, around a corner and across to the main ridge. To have kept down the face on a subsidiary ridge would have been suicidal. Stones rattle down this at all hours.
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 The following day we wandered up to the Furg Joch, ambled across the Theodule glacier with its delightful panoramas, then down a winding track to Zermatt and the flesh pots. The most famous peak of them all had been conquered. We were supremely happy. The following day we wandered up to the Furg Joch, ambled across the Theodule glacier with its delightful panoramas, then down a winding track to Zermatt and the flesh pots. The most famous peak of them all had been conquered. We were supremely happy.
  
-(Abseiling is a method of descendfng ​by virtually sitting in a loop of the rope, which is slung loosely over a projection, the climber allowing the free end to pass through his legs and hands, so controlling his speed of descent.)+(Abseiling is a method of descending ​by virtually sitting in a loop of the rope, which is slung loosely over a projection, the climber allowing the free end to pass through his legs and hands, so controlling his speed of descent.)
  
 ---- ----
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 =====Survival Of The Fittest.===== =====Survival Of The Fittest.=====
  
-Ted Phillips of the River Canoe Club reports an amanzing ​item of news:+Ted Phillips of the River Canoe Club reports an amazing ​item of news:
  
 "If the newspapers had grabbed hold of it, it would doubtless have been super-headlined "Hiker cheats death in miraculous fall of sixty feet over mountain cliff... only injuries slight cuts to leg, knee and forearm!"​ "If the newspapers had grabbed hold of it, it would doubtless have been super-headlined "Hiker cheats death in miraculous fall of sixty feet over mountain cliff... only injuries slight cuts to leg, knee and forearm!"​
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 ---- ----
  
-Frank Rigby squatted on a rock near the top of Devil'​s Hole, and promptly complained that his brains felt cold. After amoment ​of surprised comment on his unconventional design, he was dubbed the "​Renault"​ man.+Frank Rigby squatted on a rock near the top of Devil'​s Hole, and promptly complained that his brains felt cold. After a moment ​of surprised comment on his unconventional design, he was dubbed the "​Renault"​ man.
  
 ---- ----
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 At first the vague description "​hairy"​ seemed to contain a clue, but, on mature consideration and after some tactful enquiry, it appears that our hairiest walkers haven'​t ventured into that country lately. Reluctantly we have abandoned this facile solution, but would abjure any bearded walker to avoid the area lest over-enthusiastic monster hunters are at large. At first the vague description "​hairy"​ seemed to contain a clue, but, on mature consideration and after some tactful enquiry, it appears that our hairiest walkers haven'​t ventured into that country lately. Reluctantly we have abandoned this facile solution, but would abjure any bearded walker to avoid the area lest over-enthusiastic monster hunters are at large.
  
-At the timber cutters'​ camps along the Kings Tableland road one may see vast numbers of bottles with fascinatdng ​labels: at the present time, after a drought winter, there is very little water for breaking down purposes in the Labyrinth, and this promotes the theory that the monster of Erskine Gap was conjured out of a bottle, in much the same way that Aladdin produced the genie from the lamp.+At the timber cutters'​ camps along the Kings Tableland road one may see vast numbers of bottles with fascinating ​labels: at the present time, after a drought winter, there is very little water for breaking down purposes in the Labyrinth, and this promotes the theory that the monster of Erskine Gap was conjured out of a bottle, in much the same way that Aladdin produced the genie from the lamp.
  
 Of course, there is one sure thing. There is a monster which may appear in any forested country. It is all consuming, its breath is smoke, red flame stabs from its nostrils. Usually it is born of a small sliver of wood, tipped with a compound of phosphorus. It is a killer. Of course, there is one sure thing. There is a monster which may appear in any forested country. It is all consuming, its breath is smoke, red flame stabs from its nostrils. Usually it is born of a small sliver of wood, tipped with a compound of phosphorus. It is a killer.
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 __Leaders__:​ Roley Cotter and Peggy Bransdon. __Leaders__:​ Roley Cotter and Peggy Bransdon.
  
-__Tally of Casualties__:​ The Whole of the Younger Set, which proves the o der memberscan ​still take it.+__Tally of Casualties__:​ The Whole of the Younger Set, which proves the other members can still take it.
  
 (a) __External__:​ (a) __External__:​
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   * Claude Haynes: An explosion at Guthega.   * Claude Haynes: An explosion at Guthega.
-  * Roley Cotterand ​Peg Bransdon: Woomera Atom Blast.+  * Roley Cotter and Peg Bransdon: Woomera Atom Blast.
   * Enid Hallstrom: Ten tons T.N.T.   * Enid Hallstrom: Ten tons T.N.T.
   * Clem Hallstrom: (Who was asleep at the time) - Atom bomb fell near his home.   * Clem Hallstrom: (Who was asleep at the time) - Atom bomb fell near his home.
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 The party found the wedge-tail squatting forlornly on rocks along the edge of the Cox, with the talons of one foot caught in a rabbit trap. Evidently it had happened some days previously, for the bird was too weak to fly. This posed a problem: plainly death by starvation was only a matter of time, yet no one was very happy about approaching those razor claws, or the curved beak, or the bent wings. The party found the wedge-tail squatting forlornly on rocks along the edge of the Cox, with the talons of one foot caught in a rabbit trap. Evidently it had happened some days previously, for the bird was too weak to fly. This posed a problem: plainly death by starvation was only a matter of time, yet no one was very happy about approaching those razor claws, or the curved beak, or the bent wings.
  
-However Dr. Frank Barr took photographs (for medicinal reasons only, of course): and Dr. Ridhard ​Hoffman administered the anaesthetic (with a six-foot pole Of driftwood). Thereupon Drs. David Brown and Kenneth Meadows, with nurses Sheila Binns, Beryl Christiansen and Kath Brown hovering in the background, removed the foreign body from the patient.+However Dr. Frank Barr took photographs (for medicinal reasons only, of course): and Dr. Richard ​Hoffman administered the anaesthetic (with a six-foot pole Of driftwood). Thereupon Drs. David Brown and Kenneth Meadows, with nurses Sheila Binns, Beryl Christiansen and Kath Brown hovering in the background, removed the foreign body from the patient.
  
 For a time post-operative complications were feared, and at one stage it was thought that the anaesthetist had been over-enthusiastic. However the patient rallied after a time, and after a convalescent period of about two hours, took off, flying slowly at a low level down the river. For a time post-operative complications were feared, and at one stage it was thought that the anaesthetist had been over-enthusiastic. However the patient rallied after a time, and after a convalescent period of about two hours, took off, flying slowly at a low level down the river.
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 ===Ranger Patrol:=== ===Ranger Patrol:===
  
-Following discussion on the activities of the Patrol, the President ​suqgested ​that bushwalkers could give vital and active assistance by joining the body: Secretary is Ken Roberts, 3 Richmond Avenue, Cremorne.+Following discussion on the activities of the Patrol, the President ​suggested ​that bushwalkers could give vital and active assistance by joining the body: Secretary is Ken Roberts, 3 Richmond Avenue, Cremorne.
  
 ===Proposed Warrumbungles National Park:=== ===Proposed Warrumbungles National Park:===
195311.txt · Last modified: 2016/11/29 01:42 by tyreless