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-|Editorial ​Editorial - A Plan for the High Places| | 1|+|Editorial - A Plan for the High Places| | 1|
 |At the Half-Yearly General Meeting| | 3| |At the Half-Yearly General Meeting| | 3|
 |"Lost "|John BookIuck| 6| |"Lost "|John BookIuck| 6|
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 Sydney walkers are fortunate in having close at hand such excellent country as the Blue Mountains, the Illawarra Ranges, the Southern Highlands and the Broken Bay area. Because of our climate, however, these districts are not entirely suitable for hot weather walking, and naturally enough the urge is to find higher, cooler places for trips during long annual holidays in the summer. For this purpose it would be difficult to better the alpine parts of New South Wales and Victoria, with the agreeable summer climate, attractive scenery and wild flowers, and admirable camping. Sydney walkers are fortunate in having close at hand such excellent country as the Blue Mountains, the Illawarra Ranges, the Southern Highlands and the Broken Bay area. Because of our climate, however, these districts are not entirely suitable for hot weather walking, and naturally enough the urge is to find higher, cooler places for trips during long annual holidays in the summer. For this purpose it would be difficult to better the alpine parts of New South Wales and Victoria, with the agreeable summer climate, attractive scenery and wild flowers, and admirable camping.
  
-In the last part of his "​Report on the National Parks of Victoria",​ published in the September issue, Allen Strom points to the many virtues of a large alpine park. There is no reason why we should not have an Australian version of the Appalachian Trail which runs for some hundreds of miles through the mountains of the eastern States of the U.S.A., with acess points at frequent intervals. To a large degree this already exists. Stock routes and tracks in from the high country behind Canberra across to Kiandra: many walkers have travelled between there and Mt. Kosciusko, and south past Cascade Creek to the Pilot, and over the border to 0meo. Farther south-west, in Victoria, there is fine alpine country embracing the Feathertop-Bogong-Hotham tops, and beyond that the Mt. Howitt - Mt. Speculation terrain.+In the last part of his "​Report on the National Parks of Victoria",​ published in the September issue, Allen Strom points to the many virtues of a large alpine park. There is no reason why we should not have an Australian version of the Appalachian Trail which runs for some hundreds of miles through the mountains of the eastern States of the U.S.A., with access ​points at frequent intervals. To a large degree this already exists. Stock routes and tracks in from the high country behind Canberra across to Kiandra: many walkers have travelled between there and Mt. Kosciusko, and south past Cascade Creek to the Pilot, and over the border to 0meo. Farther south-west, in Victoria, there is fine alpine country embracing the Feathertop-Bogong-Hotham tops, and beyond that the Mt. Howitt - Mt. Speculation terrain.
  
 Certain sections of the alpine highlands and the rivers flowing from them have been spoiled from the walker'​s viewpoint by the operations of the Snowy Mountains project - notably the valley of the Geehi below Kosciusko itself. In Victoria the Kiewa scheme has put access roads on to the Bogong High Plains. Though we may regret the "​loss"​ to us of these lovely places which were relatively undeveloped until recent years, there is still a huge expanse of wonderful alpine country which is almost completely untouched: it is still possible to walk for a week through these ranges without meeting another human being. Certain sections of the alpine highlands and the rivers flowing from them have been spoiled from the walker'​s viewpoint by the operations of the Snowy Mountains project - notably the valley of the Geehi below Kosciusko itself. In Victoria the Kiewa scheme has put access roads on to the Bogong High Plains. Though we may regret the "​loss"​ to us of these lovely places which were relatively undeveloped until recent years, there is still a huge expanse of wonderful alpine country which is almost completely untouched: it is still possible to walk for a week through these ranges without meeting another human being.
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 There seems a notorious reluctance on the part of Governments to commit themselves to plans of this kind: a broad policy covering future development of the Blue Mountains region has been envisaged in the proposed Blue Mountains National Park, but there is no evidence that anything is being done to implement the plan as a whole. The problems of deciding a grand policy covering the Alps region are far more complex, because they require co-operation between two States in the first place. There seems a notorious reluctance on the part of Governments to commit themselves to plans of this kind: a broad policy covering future development of the Blue Mountains region has been envisaged in the proposed Blue Mountains National Park, but there is no evidence that anything is being done to implement the plan as a whole. The problems of deciding a grand policy covering the Alps region are far more complex, because they require co-operation between two States in the first place.
  
-Because the alpine areas are situated at some distanee ​from the cities there is a tendency to overlook them in overall planning for future usage and development,​ but if one bears in mind the importance of the streams which rise there, the need for thoughtful and balanced usage is plain.+Because the alpine areas are situated at some distance ​from the cities there is a tendency to overlook them in overall planning for future usage and development,​ but if one bears in mind the importance of the streams which rise there, the need for thoughtful and balanced usage is plain.
  
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 Another great sport is glissading, both standing and sitting, and both with and without ice axes. One can achieve quite some speed at this, particularly with slightly icy conditions and rubber soled boots! Another great sport is glissading, both standing and sitting, and both with and without ice axes. One can achieve quite some speed at this, particularly with slightly icy conditions and rubber soled boots!
  
-That, so far, has been about the axtent ​of our activities, but many more trips are planned and, boy! are we having a good time. Have also joined the New Zealand Speliological Society so maybe on some of their trips shortly."​+That, so far, has been about the extent ​of our activities, but many more trips are planned and, boy! are we having a good time. Have also joined the New Zealand Speliological Society so maybe on some of their trips shortly."​
  
 ===2. From Victoria.=== ===2. From Victoria.===
  
-We have heard that one of the searchers who actially ​picked up the lost hikers on Mt. Donna Buang near the end of August was one Bill Horton. Now, we know that our Bill Horton was stationed in Melbourne on his return from England last year, and we know he once did some walking with Melbourne Bush Walkers, so it seems a reasonable deduction that our identification is correct. We may have confirmation at a later date.+We have heard that one of the searchers who actually ​picked up the lost hikers on Mt. Donna Buang near the end of August was one Bill Horton. Now, we know that our Bill Horton was stationed in Melbourne on his return from England last year, and we know he once did some walking with Melbourne Bush Walkers, so it seems a reasonable deduction that our identification is correct. We may have confirmation at a later date.
  
 ===3. From New Guinea.=== ===3. From New Guinea.===
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 Marie Byles mailed us the clipping from the Melbourne "​Age"​ (date of 22/8/53) which contained the following: Marie Byles mailed us the clipping from the Melbourne "​Age"​ (date of 22/8/53) which contained the following:
  
-"Two Victorians and a patrol ​offfcer ​have climbed the two main peaks of Mt. Wilheim, the highest mountain in Papua and New Guinea.+"Two Victorians and a patrol ​officer ​have climbed the two main peaks of Mt. Wilheim, the highest mountain in Papua and New Guinea.
  
-Mt. Wilhelm, which rises above the Bismarck ranges about 70 miles south west of Madang, has six peaks. The two main peaks rise to 15,400 feet and 14,900 feet. Tho others average 14,500 feet.+Mt. Wilhelm, which rises above the Bismarck ranges about 70 miles south west of Madang, has six peaks. The two main peaks rise to 15,400 feet and 14,900 feet. The others average 14,500 feet.
  
 The Victorians are Mr. N.M. Semple of the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories,​ and __Mr. L.T. Rayner__, architect, of the Department of Public Vorks, Victoria. Patrol Officer A.M. Keogh accompanied them with police boys and carriers. A short radio message received at District Services Headquarters in Pt. Moresby said the party had successfully climbed the two main peaks after operating from a base camp at 13,570 feet. The Victorians are Mr. N.M. Semple of the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories,​ and __Mr. L.T. Rayner__, architect, of the Department of Public Vorks, Victoria. Patrol Officer A.M. Keogh accompanied them with police boys and carriers. A short radio message received at District Services Headquarters in Pt. Moresby said the party had successfully climbed the two main peaks after operating from a base camp at 13,570 feet.
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 This definitely is not a resume of the signs and symptoms displayed by some young men, mooning around the Clubroom, when they have been "​struck"​ by the desirable characteristics in certain of the young ladies whom Fortune has guided through the portals of "​Ingersoll Hall". Or of others who have been "​struck"​ by food fads (not to be mis-read foot pads) or by the violent walking shirts as keenly sought by the Kodachrome addicts. This definitely is not a resume of the signs and symptoms displayed by some young men, mooning around the Clubroom, when they have been "​struck"​ by the desirable characteristics in certain of the young ladies whom Fortune has guided through the portals of "​Ingersoll Hall". Or of others who have been "​struck"​ by food fads (not to be mis-read foot pads) or by the violent walking shirts as keenly sought by the Kodachrome addicts.
  
-We refer to that phenomenon which we call Lightning, ​ard which the Ancient Greeks concluded to be the fiery darts of the Storm God Zeus hurled from the skies at his enemies.+We refer to that phenomenon which we call Lightning, ​and which the Ancient Greeks concluded to be the fiery darts of the Storm God Zeus hurled from the skies at his enemies.
  
 Lightning is the high-speed flow of electric current between charges which have accumulated in thunderclouds and/or in the earth. This flow occurs between cloud or earth: or between cloud and cloud. The exact process in which a cloud builds up electrical charges to such a magnitude as to produce a lightning stroke is not known, but it does appear that upward currents of hot air carry particles of moisture from the earth'​s surface and it is in the turbulence of the tiny water drops that the charge is generated. The charge is gradually built up within the cloud, and though the cloud remains in electrical balance; i.e. equal parts of positive and negative electricity are present, the __base__ usually becomes predominantly charged, either negatively or positively. Simultaneously due to the latter'​s magnetic field, the earth underneath the cloud likewise is charged with the __opposite__ polarity to that of the base of the cloud. If the base is negative, the earth charge is positive. The converse holds good. And so the charge moves along in the earth, keeping pace with the charge in the sky above. The theory is that the dynamic centre of the earth-charge surges up each successive prominent landscape feature: buildings, steeples, trees, persons, and so on. Before the actual lightning stroke, a "​leader"​ stroke - invisible to the eye - proceeds from the positive charge to the negative charge, or vice versa. It as though someone had attached an invisible wire to a terminal at the base of the cloud with the other end to a terminal on the top of a prominent landscape feature below. As soon as the "​leader"​ makes contact with its opposite number, the flash we call lightning occurs and the main charge follows the path of the "​leader"​ (or the invisible wire). Lightning is the high-speed flow of electric current between charges which have accumulated in thunderclouds and/or in the earth. This flow occurs between cloud or earth: or between cloud and cloud. The exact process in which a cloud builds up electrical charges to such a magnitude as to produce a lightning stroke is not known, but it does appear that upward currents of hot air carry particles of moisture from the earth'​s surface and it is in the turbulence of the tiny water drops that the charge is generated. The charge is gradually built up within the cloud, and though the cloud remains in electrical balance; i.e. equal parts of positive and negative electricity are present, the __base__ usually becomes predominantly charged, either negatively or positively. Simultaneously due to the latter'​s magnetic field, the earth underneath the cloud likewise is charged with the __opposite__ polarity to that of the base of the cloud. If the base is negative, the earth charge is positive. The converse holds good. And so the charge moves along in the earth, keeping pace with the charge in the sky above. The theory is that the dynamic centre of the earth-charge surges up each successive prominent landscape feature: buildings, steeples, trees, persons, and so on. Before the actual lightning stroke, a "​leader"​ stroke - invisible to the eye - proceeds from the positive charge to the negative charge, or vice versa. It as though someone had attached an invisible wire to a terminal at the base of the cloud with the other end to a terminal on the top of a prominent landscape feature below. As soon as the "​leader"​ makes contact with its opposite number, the flash we call lightning occurs and the main charge follows the path of the "​leader"​ (or the invisible wire).
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 A few week-ends ago, while gathering a heap of bracken in my groundsheet to keep the cold out and the ageing bones from too firma terra, I remembered a General Meeting of many years ago when the club was hashing over the old matter of someone destroying native vegetation and who should we write to. One bold member arose and suggested that we ought to put our own house in order first, and cease this nefarious practice of cutting bracken fern for our beds. Well, no one stood up to challenge this particular spasm. As I remember, they battened on to some other provocative remark, and no one told the speaker that bracken was a curse, a blight, an exotic, and only a couple of shades less noxious than blackberry, lantana and the rabbit. A few week-ends ago, while gathering a heap of bracken in my groundsheet to keep the cold out and the ageing bones from too firma terra, I remembered a General Meeting of many years ago when the club was hashing over the old matter of someone destroying native vegetation and who should we write to. One bold member arose and suggested that we ought to put our own house in order first, and cease this nefarious practice of cutting bracken fern for our beds. Well, no one stood up to challenge this particular spasm. As I remember, they battened on to some other provocative remark, and no one told the speaker that bracken was a curse, a blight, an exotic, and only a couple of shades less noxious than blackberry, lantana and the rabbit.
  
-Having recalled this, I also rerlembered ​another discourse on bracken. A well-informed botanist, member of another Club which rather specialises in that sort of knowledge, once commented in my hearing that he agreed bracken was a pest that had swallowed up thousands of acres of good farming land and was one of the farmers'​s bugaboos, BUT, he added, it had served one useful purpose. In many places slopes had been cleared not wisely, but only too thoroughly, and only bracken held the soil together and prevented erosion.+Having recalled this, I also remembered ​another discourse on bracken. A well-informed botanist, member of another Club which rather specialises in that sort of knowledge, once commented in my hearing that he agreed bracken was a pest that had swallowed up thousands of acres of good farming land and was one of the farmers'​s bugaboos, BUT, he added, it had served one useful purpose. In many places slopes had been cleared not wisely, but only too thoroughly, and only bracken held the soil together and prevented erosion.
  
 Well, while we're being sympathetic towards bracken fern, Paddy'​s little handbook on campcraft gives it at least two boosts, one as bedding, and the other (on page 34 of my edition) as a bush food. It reads: Bracken Tips - tips just curled above the ground are edible. Boil (infringement of copyright acknowledged). Our own magazine applauds bracken in the issue of January, 1941. (Quote) "Bites from bull dog ants - to cure instantly, crush the leaf of the common bracken fern and apply the juice to the sting. We remember hearing in New Zealand that the new uncurled fronds, crushed and rubbed on mosquito bites, would take away the sting" (unquote). Well, while we're being sympathetic towards bracken fern, Paddy'​s little handbook on campcraft gives it at least two boosts, one as bedding, and the other (on page 34 of my edition) as a bush food. It reads: Bracken Tips - tips just curled above the ground are edible. Boil (infringement of copyright acknowledged). Our own magazine applauds bracken in the issue of January, 1941. (Quote) "Bites from bull dog ants - to cure instantly, crush the leaf of the common bracken fern and apply the juice to the sting. We remember hearing in New Zealand that the new uncurled fronds, crushed and rubbed on mosquito bites, would take away the sting" (unquote).
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 By Damalja Ingregown. By Damalja Ingregown.
  
-It was held on August 22/23rd on the nameless creek which flows between Roach Trig and Cowan Trig. It was a double-barreled ​affair, with a morning party from Mt. Kuring-gai led by the President, and an afternoon party (more correctly, parties) coming in from Terrey Hills with David Ingram in general control. This report is mostly about the manner of getting to the site, and for the moment we will be concerned with the morning party, numbering ten at Mt. Kuring-gai. The weather, unpleasant the previous night, was improving, and a large afternoon contingent was expected.+It was held on August 22/23rd on the nameless creek which flows between Roach Trig and Cowan Trig. It was a double-barrelled ​affair, with a morning party from Mt. Kuring-gai led by the President, and an afternoon party (more correctly, parties) coming in from Terrey Hills with David Ingram in general control. This report is mostly about the manner of getting to the site, and for the moment we will be concerned with the morning party, numbering ten at Mt. Kuring-gai. The weather, unpleasant the previous night, was improving, and a large afternoon contingent was expected.
  
 So, down to Cowan Creek, and per Woodnutt'​s launch to the far shore, across a small creek and up the slopes. We were passing through superb eriostemon and boronia (two kinds): the climb was made in slow time and once, when we sheltered briefly from a flurry of rain, one member continued up the ridge. We didn't sight him at the top, but the massed dillwynnias,​ the huge grey and pink spider flowers and the creeping hardenbergia claimed our attention, and we gladly assumed he had "gone before"​. So, down to Cowan Creek, and per Woodnutt'​s launch to the far shore, across a small creek and up the slopes. We were passing through superb eriostemon and boronia (two kinds): the climb was made in slow time and once, when we sheltered briefly from a flurry of rain, one member continued up the ridge. We didn't sight him at the top, but the massed dillwynnias,​ the huge grey and pink spider flowers and the creeping hardenbergia claimed our attention, and we gladly assumed he had "gone before"​.
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 Presently came a drawn-out cry from the Roach Trig side, and we came to our feet to welcome David and about nine more of the afternoon party. The leader, with grave mien, advanced on the President to say, with evident understatement,​ "​I'​m sorry, Malcolm, but I've lost about 25 people"​. Presently came a drawn-out cry from the Roach Trig side, and we came to our feet to welcome David and about nine more of the afternoon party. The leader, with grave mien, advanced on the President to say, with evident understatement,​ "​I'​m sorry, Malcolm, but I've lost about 25 people"​.
  
-(Here David Inaram tahes over the tale).+(Here David Ingram takes over the tale).
  
 There were two suitable buses from Chatswood to Terrey Hills available for the second party travelling to the Corroboree, leaving at 12.36 and 1.15 p.m. The first bus landed about 25 at Terrey Hills at about 1.30 p.m. After sundry re-organisation,​ we set off for a brisk mile. It was then time for me to return to Terrey Hills to meet the second bus. With a description of the route to Roach Trig, and an annotated map, the remaining 24 were despatched on their way north-west. There were two suitable buses from Chatswood to Terrey Hills available for the second party travelling to the Corroboree, leaving at 12.36 and 1.15 p.m. The first bus landed about 25 at Terrey Hills at about 1.30 p.m. After sundry re-organisation,​ we set off for a brisk mile. It was then time for me to return to Terrey Hills to meet the second bus. With a description of the route to Roach Trig, and an annotated map, the remaining 24 were despatched on their way north-west.
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 The second bus brought another 8 or 9 enthusiasts and we were soon hot on the trail of the earlier contingent. Even so, we had time to admire the couple of hundred waratah buds growing close to the track. When we reached the foot track leading to Roach Trig it was obvious that no 24 Corroborators had passed that way, as the damp sandy track was undisturbed. However, the other party had maps, compasses and several experienced walkers, so we pressed on to Roach Trig. A short distance west of the Trig we could hear Malcolm and his early morning party, who were soon located at about 3.20 p.m. at an excellent Corroboree Ground. The second bus brought another 8 or 9 enthusiasts and we were soon hot on the trail of the earlier contingent. Even so, we had time to admire the couple of hundred waratah buds growing close to the track. When we reached the foot track leading to Roach Trig it was obvious that no 24 Corroborators had passed that way, as the damp sandy track was undisturbed. However, the other party had maps, compasses and several experienced walkers, so we pressed on to Roach Trig. A short distance west of the Trig we could hear Malcolm and his early morning party, who were soon located at about 3.20 p.m. at an excellent Corroboree Ground.
  
-Chief Corroborator McGregor was dbviously ​disappointed at our small number and the absence of the S.B.W. Singers. His mouth dropped still further when I announced that there were 24 or so would-be revellers who were obviously, by now, not in that part of Kuring-gai Chase where they were expected.+Chief Corroborator McGregor was obviously ​disappointed at our small number and the absence of the S.B.W. Singers. His mouth dropped still further when I announced that there were 24 or so would-be revellers who were obviously, by now, not in that part of Kuring-gai Chase where they were expected.
  
 Immediately a miniature search and rescue was organised by the Chief Corroborator. He made for Cowan Trig while I made for Roach Trig (there is only a mile between the two points). At the Trig I left a note on a sheet of newspaper under a stone in case the missing party should arrive. Then I set out along the track over which we had come out. Soon I could hear faint shouts away to the South, which became fainter as I hurried towards them. At last the sounds seemed a little nearer, and, above the sound of the wind, which was fairly strong, appeared to be coming from a swamp at the head of a creek south of Cowan Trig. Then the voices ceased for a few minutes until I received an answering call to mine quite close at hand. As I stumbled out of the bush, the party came into sight, straggling along the foot track which would eventually lead them to Roach Trig. Immediately a miniature search and rescue was organised by the Chief Corroborator. He made for Cowan Trig while I made for Roach Trig (there is only a mile between the two points). At the Trig I left a note on a sheet of newspaper under a stone in case the missing party should arrive. Then I set out along the track over which we had come out. Soon I could hear faint shouts away to the South, which became fainter as I hurried towards them. At last the sounds seemed a little nearer, and, above the sound of the wind, which was fairly strong, appeared to be coming from a swamp at the head of a creek south of Cowan Trig. Then the voices ceased for a few minutes until I received an answering call to mine quite close at hand. As I stumbled out of the bush, the party came into sight, straggling along the foot track which would eventually lead them to Roach Trig.
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-On the Search weekend in June, the S & R team spent one night in Katoomba Court House, when Neil Schafer played the role of the prisone ​at the bar. Uncharitable souls are now suggesting that this is why he didn't lead his walk in September, having learned that his party would consist of four "​Johns"​ and one "​Bobby"​.+On the Search weekend in June, the S & R team spent one night in Katoomba Court House, when Neil Schafer played the role of the prisoner ​at the bar. Uncharitable souls are now suggesting that this is why he didn't lead his walk in September, having learned that his party would consist of four "​Johns"​ and one "​Bobby"​.
  
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 ===Bushwalker Ball:=== ===Bushwalker Ball:===
  
-It was reported that the Ball held on September 14th was a very successful night socially. ​Abott 175 People attended which might just be sufficient to pay for running costs. The matter of choosing a Monday night for a Ball was discussed and it was decided to ask Mr. John Cotter to endeavour to make a booking for a Friday or Saturday night in 1954. Prddington ​Town Hall would be preferred.+It was reported that the Ball held on September 14th was a very successful night socially. ​About 175 People attended which might just be sufficient to pay for running costs. The matter of choosing a Monday night for a Ball was discussed and it was decided to ask Mr. John Cotter to endeavour to make a booking for a Friday or Saturday night in 1954. Paddington ​Town Hall would be preferred.
  
 ===Walks Report:=== ===Walks Report:===
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 ===Conservation Bureau:=== ===Conservation Bureau:===
  
-Reports were made concerning the Warrumbungle Mountains, the Barren Grounds, Bouddi Natural Park, the Kariong Peninsula Area and Frazer Park. The Secretary said that Messrs. Pallin and McInnes would be recommended to tne Lands Department for inclusion on the Trust of the proposed Warrumbungle National Park. A further note would be sent to the Department concerning the Kariong Peninsula Area.+Reports were made concerning the Warrumbungle Mountains, the Barren Grounds, Bouddi Natural Park, the Kariong Peninsula Area and Frazer Park. The Secretary said that Messrs. Pallin and McInnes would be recommended to the Lands Department for inclusion on the Trust of the proposed Warrumbungle National Park. A further note would be sent to the Department concerning the Kariong Peninsula Area.
  
 Allen Strom was appointed Secretary of the Bureau. Allen Strom was appointed Secretary of the Bureau.
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 ===Additional Instructional Walk:=== ===Additional Instructional Walk:===
    
-Roy Bruggy'​s walk on the weekend of 28/29th November has been gazetted as an addtional ​Instructional Weekend - further particulars later.+Roy Bruggy'​s walk on the weekend of 28/29th November has been gazetted as an additional ​Instructional Weekend - further particulars later.
  
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 Paddy Pallin. Lightweight Camp Gear. Paddy Pallin. Lightweight Camp Gear.
  
-201 Castlereagh St SYDNEY. M2678.+201 Castlereagh St Sydney. M2678.
  
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 Will you allow yet another of the sanctuaries to be destroyed without an effort to show that Progress must not mean interference with natural wilderness everywhere? Will you allow yet another of the sanctuaries to be destroyed without an effort to show that Progress must not mean interference with natural wilderness everywhere?
  
-At the present time, the Morton Primitive Area is controlled by a Trust of public-spirited citizens. This Trust has resisted all efforts to date, to allow the sawmiller access. They rightly contend that some of the valleys of the Kangaroo River System should remain untouched for the enjoyment of people, now and in the future. The taking of timber leads to an undesirable interference with plant and animal habitats with consequent loss. **This ​opiniono ​is held by the Forestry Authority in Queensland and they have left some areas completely untouched except for walking tracks**. Excellent examples of the work of the Queenslanders are to be seen in the Lamington and Cunningham'​s Gap National Parks.+At the present time, the Morton Primitive Area is controlled by a Trust of public-spirited citizens. This Trust has resisted all efforts to date, to allow the sawmiller access. They rightly contend that some of the valleys of the Kangaroo River System should remain untouched for the enjoyment of people, now and in the future. The taking of timber leads to an undesirable interference with plant and animal habitats with consequent loss. **This ​opinion ​is held by the Forestry Authority in Queensland and they have left some areas completely untouched except for walking tracks**. Excellent examples of the work of the Queenslanders are to be seen in the Lamington and Cunningham'​s Gap National Parks.
  
 Now the N.S.W. Forestry Commission says that Morton Primitive Area is at present wasteland... the Trust has no money to develop the area and whole reserve is seldom used. We agree that the Trust has no money... neither has many another Trust that controls a public parkland; this is a criticism of the Government'​s policy towards National Parks generally. That nobody ever visits the area can be answered by Bushwalkers and lovers of the out-of-doors very aptly. The area is very well known to us and its primitive beauty prompts many of us to protest against the timber getter and the destroyer. Give the Trust sufficient money to lay down tracks and advertise, and we will soon have an area as popular as Lamington National Park. Now the N.S.W. Forestry Commission says that Morton Primitive Area is at present wasteland... the Trust has no money to develop the area and whole reserve is seldom used. We agree that the Trust has no money... neither has many another Trust that controls a public parkland; this is a criticism of the Government'​s policy towards National Parks generally. That nobody ever visits the area can be answered by Bushwalkers and lovers of the out-of-doors very aptly. The area is very well known to us and its primitive beauty prompts many of us to protest against the timber getter and the destroyer. Give the Trust sufficient money to lay down tracks and advertise, and we will soon have an area as popular as Lamington National Park.
195310.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/11/24 00:30 by tyreless