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195309 [2016/11/22 03:32]
tyreless
195309 [2016/11/22 04:32]
tyreless
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 By Alex Colley. By Alex Colley.
 +
 Should any hikers ever became lost in the Northern Blue Mountains the journalists would at last be right when they described the terrain as "​rugged mountain country, the roughest country in the State - where a single slip would mean a fall of 200 feet" (it's always 200'), and used the rest of their stock of "lost hiker" phrases, which, I suspect, are kept permanently set up in type in a special pigeon hole in newspaper offices. But this unhappy conjunction of fact and description is unlikely ever to occur because hikers seldom, if ever, go there. Nor does anybody else that you'd notice. Though only 2 hours from the G.P.O. by car and a few minutes by air, this area of some 3,000 square miles is one of the least populated parts of the State. Most of it can be covered only on foot, hence its unpopularity. In the centre of it, where rise the Macdonald, the southern tributaries of the Goulburn, the Cudgegong and the northern tributaries of the Colo, a collection of mountains with weird names such as "​Monundilla",​ "​Coriaday",​ "​Coricudgy",​ "​Kekeelbons"​ and "​Bournbourwa"​. To me they are slightly suggestive of bird calls and perhaps are anglicised versions of aboriginal bird names. It was towards these high points that the 1953 S.B.W. Monundilla expedition, comprising Ira Butler, Ray Kirkby, Jim Brown and the writer, headed on June 13th. To forestall controversy let it be recorded, here and now, that the four of us placed our feet on the top of Monundilla simultaneously. Should any hikers ever became lost in the Northern Blue Mountains the journalists would at last be right when they described the terrain as "​rugged mountain country, the roughest country in the State - where a single slip would mean a fall of 200 feet" (it's always 200'), and used the rest of their stock of "lost hiker" phrases, which, I suspect, are kept permanently set up in type in a special pigeon hole in newspaper offices. But this unhappy conjunction of fact and description is unlikely ever to occur because hikers seldom, if ever, go there. Nor does anybody else that you'd notice. Though only 2 hours from the G.P.O. by car and a few minutes by air, this area of some 3,000 square miles is one of the least populated parts of the State. Most of it can be covered only on foot, hence its unpopularity. In the centre of it, where rise the Macdonald, the southern tributaries of the Goulburn, the Cudgegong and the northern tributaries of the Colo, a collection of mountains with weird names such as "​Monundilla",​ "​Coriaday",​ "​Coricudgy",​ "​Kekeelbons"​ and "​Bournbourwa"​. To me they are slightly suggestive of bird calls and perhaps are anglicised versions of aboriginal bird names. It was towards these high points that the 1953 S.B.W. Monundilla expedition, comprising Ira Butler, Ray Kirkby, Jim Brown and the writer, headed on June 13th. To forestall controversy let it be recorded, here and now, that the four of us placed our feet on the top of Monundilla simultaneously.
  
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 This job had none of the glamour and none of the success that the 1952 search had. It was Plain hard work, shoving through scrub, looking in likely places and unlikely ones as well, covering the tracks that the Police and locals had searched the previous days to make sure they had not overlooked anything, and to add to our discomfort it was bitterly cold the whole two days. This job had none of the glamour and none of the success that the 1952 search had. It was Plain hard work, shoving through scrub, looking in likely places and unlikely ones as well, covering the tracks that the Police and locals had searched the previous days to make sure they had not overlooked anything, and to add to our discomfort it was bitterly cold the whole two days.
  
-For the search itself there is little to say: the work was hard and uninteresting,​ and it was to the credit of everyone that they stuck to the job as cheerfully as they did. The main point of interest was the co-operation of the Police. A 'bus was arranged to take us to and from Katoomba, the nights were spent at Wentworth Falls School of Arts and Katoonba ​Court House respectively,​ and Police cars did any moving of personnel we considered necessary.+For the search itself there is little to say: the work was hard and uninteresting,​ and it was to the credit of everyone that they stuck to the job as cheerfully as they did. The main point of interest was the co-operation of the Police. A 'bus was arranged to take us to and from Katoomba, the nights were spent at Wentworth Falls School of Arts and Katoomba ​Court House respectively,​ and Police cars did any moving of personnel we considered necessary.
  
 The bright spot of the weekend was Saturday night. You have to be as tired and cold as we were to appreciate the small comfort the Court House offered. Two large fire places and the necessary fuel were provided and in a flash wet clothes and boots, cooking gear, food and what-not littered the place. To describe the chaos is impossible; but if you imagine a row of boots along the Court bench, a dozen black billies before each fire, and food and clothes strewn about the floor, dock and other available furniture, you can get some idea of the scene that met the gaze of a small-ish gent in civvies when he opened the door to see what was going on. The roar he uttered could be heard miles away. It was "The Beak" himself, and it took our friend the Sergeant some time to pacify his outraged dignity that his Court House should be so used. The bright spot of the weekend was Saturday night. You have to be as tired and cold as we were to appreciate the small comfort the Court House offered. Two large fire places and the necessary fuel were provided and in a flash wet clothes and boots, cooking gear, food and what-not littered the place. To describe the chaos is impossible; but if you imagine a row of boots along the Court bench, a dozen black billies before each fire, and food and clothes strewn about the floor, dock and other available furniture, you can get some idea of the scene that met the gaze of a small-ish gent in civvies when he opened the door to see what was going on. The roar he uttered could be heard miles away. It was "The Beak" himself, and it took our friend the Sergeant some time to pacify his outraged dignity that his Court House should be so used.
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 ---- ----
  
-"TEE BUSHWALKER" ​N0412+====="The Bushwalker" ​No.12.===== 
-Federation is Publishing again this year THE BUSHWALKER" its annual magazine which has not appeared since 1948. + 
-Material requiredStoriet ​describing walks, incidents on walks, canoeing, climbing, skiing, caveing, etc. - and photographs. (Closing date - September 20th). +Federation is Publishing again this year "The Bushwalker"​ - its annual magazine which has not appeared since 1948. 
-Advertisements: Contact Business Manager, Jack Evans, BX1245. + 
-Material to be sent to: Wie Hon. Editor,'''​Tbe Busbmalker" No.12, 72 Hudson Street, Hurstville. (Or tphone ​LU4648. +__Material required__Stories ​describing walks, incidents on walks, canoeing, climbing, skiing, caveing, etc. - and photographs. (Closing date - September 20th). 
-REPO R`t ON "​NATIONAL Pi-RKS OF VICTORIA". + 
-In this month'​s issue we conclude Allen Stramts ​Report on National Parks of Victoria''​, parts of which have been published in +__Advertisements__: Contact Business Manager, Jack Evans, BX1245. 
-the July and August magazines. We would call attention to the thought of a great Alpine Park mentioned in this part. We like it - and will have something to say about it next month'​s editorial column. + 
-I AT MARK SALON RADIO SHOP - OPP. STATION. +Material to be sent to: The Hon. Editor, ​"The Bushwalker" No.12, 72 Hudson Street, Hurstville. (Or '​phone ​LU4648.
-4. + 
-Victorian Nati..0:​ap..3,​ Parks , 9 +---- 
-Cowes and San Remo are the Hhot-spotsu ​of the holiday traffic with the "​blah"​ of roundabouts and nwhczt,have-you"​. + 
-The advertised "​tourist attractions"​ of the Island include the Penguin and Mutton Bird Rookeries, the Koala populations and the Seal Rocks. The Seal Rocks on the far south-western corner of the Island and these were made the subject of one of our visits. Fortunately,​ the Rocks are inaccessible (without a boat) but a fine view of the animals can be had with the use of a telescope or a pair of binoculars. There is, however, an incessent demand by professional fishermen to reduce the numbers of seals on the pretext that they destroy fishing nets and reduce the size of the catches. +=====Report On "​National Parks Of Victoria".===== 
-Not far away is "​Summerland where the Penguin and Mutton Bird Rookeries exist. These to my mind, are in a pathetic condition .. it amazes that the birds dare to return to their nests at night! In one "​sanctuary"​ tents had recently been pitched right over the nesting burrows .. and close by, were at least fifty people firmly encamped for many days. Roads already traverse the area where some of the birds walk in order to reach the burrows + 
-we saw dead penguins killed I presume, by passing traffic. The sanctuaries appear to be miserably small and settlement is proceeding on the surrounding land .. some of this land appears to have been out up for a "​suburbia"​ type building. The tourist traffic is tremendous .. great hordes of people ​arri7ed ​in several buses to see the birds return to their nests at &ask+In this month'​s issue we conclude Allen Strom'​s "Report on National Parks of Victoria", parts of which have been published in the July and August magazines. We would call attention to the thought of a great Alpine Park mentioned in this part. We like it - and will have something to say about it next month'​s editorial column. 
-I would think that the position is so bad as to be hopeless, + 
-but should the authorities wish to save the situation, immediate action to cut off the south-western end of the Island, the gradual elimination of all permanent human habitation in that area, access to the Rookeries to be by foot alone, would seem to be the only successful policy. +Cowes and San Remo are the "hot-spots" ​of the holiday traffic with the "​blah"​ of roundabouts and "what-have-you"​. 
-And what of the Koala? Well, we saw a number, generally in trees that were suffering defoliation .. anyhow, there did not appear to be a great number of food trees .. and the great exposure of the Island would prevent great growths of trees. The extensive development of the land would militate against the whole Island becoming a "​sanctuary"​..perhaps small enclosed areas could do something. Stories of the Koalas having bred themselves out of food looks highly probable... the use of land for the normal pursuits of Man and a sanctuary for animals .. quite hopeless! + 
-couldntt ​help feeling very depressed about the whole matter of the Penguins, Mutton Birds and Koalas as we left Phillip ​Is.. According to the much blazened contention, the hordes of people who saw these animals should by now, have been influenced to proteot ​them and yet I hear no public outcry to correct this misuse of our Native ​Faunal +The advertised "​tourist attractions"​ of the Island include the Penguin and Mutton Bird Rookeries, the Koala populations and the Seal Rocks. The Seal Rocks are on the far south-western corner of the Island and these were made the subject of one of our visits. Fortunately,​ the Rocks are inaccessible (without a boat) but a fine view of the animals can be had with the use of a telescope or a pair of binoculars. There is, however, an incessent demand by professional fishermen to reduce the numbers of seals on the pretext that they destroy fishing nets and reduce the size of the catches. 
-1 ti + 
-Victorian National Parks ,u +Not far away is "​Summerland" ​where the Penguin and Mutton Bird Rookeries exist. These to my mind, are in a pathetic condition... it amazes that the birds dare to return to their nests at night! In one "​sanctuary"​ tents had recently been pitched right over the nesting burrows... and close by, were at least fifty people firmly encamped for many days. Roads already traverse the area where some of the birds walk in order to reach the burrows... we saw dead penguins killed I presume, by passing traffic. The sanctuaries appear to be miserably small and settlement is proceeding on the surrounding land... some of this land appears to have been cut up for a "​suburbia"​ type building. The tourist traffic is tremendous... great hordes of people ​arrived ​in several buses to see the birds return to their nests at dusk. 
-From San Remo we went on through Wonthaggi .. Victoria'​s Black Coal Town .. Inverloch, Koonwarra, Meeniyan, Fish Creek and into the Wilson Promontory National Park. The camp that night was of course, at TidalRiver .. a well-appointed Camping Area with a full-time Ranger. Some of the party under the leadership of Bill Dingeldei, climbed the highest peak in the Park, Mount Latrobe (2366 feet). + 
-The area of the Park is 102,000 acres and is the most southerly point of the mainland of Australia. It is a magnificent ​pen- +I would think that the position is so bad as to be hopeless, but should the authorities wish to save the situation, immediate action to cut off the south-western end of the Island, the gradual elimination of all permanent human habitation in that area, access to the Rookeries to be by foot alone, would seem to be the only successful policy. 
-insula ​of granite with beautiful coastline scenery originally named "​Furneaux Land" by Bass in 1798, but later re-named Wilson 'Promontory after Thomas Wilson, of London, a friend of + 
-Flinders. road is being cut up Mt. Oberon .. some of us followed to the top and obtained a wide panorama of sandy beaches and dented coastline. +And what of the Koala? Well, we saw a number, generally in trees that were suffering defoliation... anyhow, there did not appear to be a great number of food trees... and the great exposure of the Island would prevent great growths of trees. The extensive development of the land would militate against the whole Island becoming a "​sanctuary"​..perhaps small enclosed areas could do something. Stories of the Koalas having bred themselves out of food looks highly probable... the use of land for the normal pursuits of Man and a sanctuary for animals... quite hopeless! 
-But the real story of "The Prom." is a sad one. Some eighty + 
-thousand acres were again burned out early in 1951, this time apparently destroying permanently,​ the forest giants that grew in many places. Only a maze of fallen dead trunks greeted the party that climbed Latrobe .. no regrowth of trees were to be seen. Lilly Pilly Gully famed as the home of the Koala is a +couldn'​t ​help feeling very depressed about the whole matter of the Penguins, Mutton Birds and Koalas as we left Phillip ​Island. According to the much blazened contention, the hordes of people who saw these animals should by now, have been influenced to protect ​them and yet I hear no public outcry to correct this misuse of our Native ​Fauna! 
-grey mass of dead trees. Everywhere I could see the terrible + 
-change since my last visit. It seems obvious that some plant +From San Remo we went on through Wonthaggi... Victoria'​s Black Coal Town... Inverloch, Koonwarra, Meeniyan, Fish Creek and into the Wilson Promontory National Park. The camp that night was of course, at Tidal River... a well-appointed Camping Area with a full-time Ranger. Some of the party under the leadership of Bill Dingeldei, climbed the highest peak in the Park, Mount Latrobe (2366 feet). 
-species have become extinct in some places; striking and undesirable ecological changes have occurred and there is an advancement of exotic and unwanted plants. + 
-The history of "The Prom." has been one of disappearing species and recurrent fires. The toll is now becoming fully apparent. Where do the fires come from? There are many opinions .. but one thing is certain .. the 1951 fire burned for many days before it "got away" when the hot northerlies drove it south, ravaging and consuming to finally burn part of the lighthouse, itself! It is significant also, that His Honour, Judge Stretton (June 24th, 1946) reported as Royal Commissioner on matter concerning forest fires ..."​Grazing has been a regular recurrent +The area of the Park is 102,000 acres and is the most southerly point of the mainland of Australia. It is a magnificent ​peninsula ​of granite with beautiful coastline scenery originally named "​Furneaux Land" by Bass in 1798, but later re-named Wilson'​Promontory after Thomas Wilson, of London, a friend of Flinders. ​road is being cut up Mt. Oberon... some of us followed to the top and obtained a wide panorama of sandy beaches and dented coastline. 
-cause of Porest ​fires. The extent of the relationship + 
-between grazing and forest fires may best be expressed by stat- +But the real story of "The Prom." is a sad one. Some eighty thousand acres were again burned out early in 1951, this time apparently destroying permanently,​ the forest giants that grew in many places. Only a maze of fallen dead trunks greeted the party that climbed Latrobe... no regrowth of trees were to be seen. Lilly Pilly Gully famed as the home of the Koala is a grey mass of dead trees. Everywhere I could see the terrible change since my last visit. It seems obvious that some plant species have become extinct in some places; striking and undesirable ecological changes have occurred and there is an advancement of exotic and unwanted plants. 
-ing that wherever grazing has been practised in mountain forest, + 
-it has been one of the major and most frequentcauses ​of fire." A scientific fire-protection plan for National Parks should be formulated. Grazing of domestic stock is completely prohibited in many National Parks throughout the world, including those in Switzerlandand Tasmania. +The history of "The Prom." has been one of disappearing species and recurrent fires. The toll is now becoming fully apparent. Where do the fires come from? There are many opinions... but one thing is certain... the 1951 fire burned for many days before it "got away" when the hot northerlies drove it south, ravaging and consuming to finally burn part of the lighthouse, itself! It is significant also, that His Honour, Judge Stretton (June 24th, 1946) reported as Royal Commissioner on matter concerning forest fires... "​Grazing has been a regular recurrent cause of forest ​fires. The extent of the relationship between grazing and forest fires may best be expressed by stating ​that wherever grazing has been practised in mountain forest, it has been one of the major and most frequent causes ​of fire." A scientific fire-protection plan for National Parks should be formulated. Grazing of domestic stock is completely prohibited in many National Parks throughout the world, including those in Switzerland and Tasmania. 
-Two small National Parks Tarra Valley (200 ac.) and Bulga + 
-(91 ac.) are located in the etreziecki ​Ranges, a most interesting mountain chain rising to a couple of thousand feet and standing between the Latrobe Valley and the coastline. Extensive +Two small National Parks... Tarra Valley (200 ac.) and Bulga (91 ac.)... are located in the Streziecki ​Ranges, a most interesting mountain chain rising to a couple of thousand feet and standing between the Latrobe Valley and the coastline. Extensive development of the Range has taken place but it is obvious that at one time tremendous forests of Ash and Beach existed here. Our route took us through Welshpool on to the Grand Ridge Road... certainly an adequate name... to the Tarra Valley Road. The park entrance is situated about two miles down this road. There is an attractive parking area and entrance gate and a small but delightfully situated camping area amongst tall gums and tree ferns. 
-16 + 
-Viotor1al-1 No.tit,​nnl +The walks through the park are splendidly arranged to give adequate inspection of the excellent Rain Forest which includes the Victorian Antarctic Beech or Myrtle (Nothofagus Cunninghamiana). This is a smaller leafed variety than the northern species (N.Moorei) but shows the same capacity for long life, some specimens apparently having withstood natural erosion sufficiently to expose the root systems to a depth of about 12 feet. The party was able to stalk and observe a Lyre Bird for a considerable time. 
-development of the Range has tnken place but it is obvious that at one time tremendous forests of Ash and Beach existed here. Our route took us through Welshpool on to the Grand Ridge Road .. certainly an adequate name .. to the Tarra Valley Road. The park entrance is situated about two miles down this road. There is an attractive parking area and entrance gate and a small but delightfully situated camping area amongst tall gums and tree ferns. + 
-The walks through the park are splendidly arranged to give adequate inspection of the excellent Rain Forest which includes the Victorian Antarctic Beech or Myrtle (Nothofagus Cunninghamiana). This is a smaller leafed variety than the northern species (N.Moorei) but shows the same capacity for long life, some specimens apparently having withstood natural erosion sufficiently to expose the root systems to a depth of about 12  feet. The party was able to stalk and observe a Lyre Bird for a considerable time. +A short distance away is Bulga National Park, the smaller area enclosing a valley packed with tree ferns, a suspension bridge ​enabling the visitor to go out over the valley and look down into the tangle of ferny leaves. ​Both Parks embrace ferneries ​of rare and distinctive beauty... some specimens exceeding ​fifty feet in height. 
-A short distance away is Bulga enclosing a valley packed with enabling the visitor to go out to the tangle of ferny leaves. of rare and distinctive beauty ​fifty feet in height. +  
-National Park, the smaller area tree ferns, a suspension bridge over the valley and look down in- +The attractiveness of both Parks, but in particular that of Tarra Valley, tends to cloud one'​s ​realisation that both are ludicrously small. They are but National Monuments and both are extremely vulnerable to the effects of development. If these parks are to retain their primitive beauty, their lyre birds and the other natural charms that justly attract the cultured citizen, an adequate belt of protective bushland must be reserved all around them giving the closed environment discussed at the outset of this Report. There is still to be considered ​if that is possible, the steps that may be taken to enlargen these Parks into the true dimensions of a National Park... perhaps, coalesce them... where the feeling of being "lost" ​in the vastnesses of Nature could be adequately appreciated. 
-Both Parks embrace ferneries ​.. some specimens exceeding + 
-The attractiveness of both Parks, but in particular that of Tarra Valley, tends to cloud ones realisation that both are ludicrously small. They are but National Monuments and both are extremely vulnerable to the effects of development. If +North from the Strezlecki Ranges and into the Valley of the Latrobe at Traralgon... the drop is steep and the ridges are trimmed almost bare. Here too, Nature has answered Man in Her own language, with landslips in exchange for reduction of cover. The coastal slopes of Gippsland must be rich judging by the extensive settlement and in addition, to the Latrobe Valley has come the brown coal mining of Yallourn and Morwell. Much public money has gone into these undertakings to save Victoria from the embarrassment of irregular supplies of black coal from New South Wales. 
-these parks are to retain their primitive beauty, their lyre birds and the other natural charms that justly attract the cultured citizen, an adequate belt of protective bushland must be reserved all around them giving the closed environment discussed at the outset of this Report. There is still to be consid- + 
-ered if that is possible, the steps that may be taken to enlargen these Parks into the true dimensions of a National Park +Mt. Erica and the Baw Baw Plateau ​dominate the northern landscape from here and we know that as our route lies over the Main Divide there is some climbing ahead. The scars of many fires, but in particular those of '39, are to be seen on the side of the Baw Baws... groves of white ghosts, fire-eaten mountain ash. The Tyers, The Thomson, Walhalla (now further along the road to extinction since the tragic floods last year) pass and there is a terrific climb over and down to camp on a swift flowing tributary of the Thomson. Next day we made Matlock (4500 ft) officially recorded as the highest township in Victoria and right on the Divide. ​Once this was a town of 20,000 persons, but the only evidence to-day, of this population is the extensive area of cleared land from where we enjoyed a magnificent ​panorama embracing a vast expanse of Victoria'​s most mountainous areas. 
-perhaps, coalesce them where the feeling of being "lost in + 
-the vastnesses of Nature could be adequately appreciated. +By the way of Woods Point, Jamieson, Mansfield and Whitfield we finally skirted around Mt. Buffalo into the Oven's Valley... possibly the richest valley in Victoria, not to mention the interesting appearance of Hop and Tobacco growing and the mighty gold dredge at Harrietville... reputed to rank amongst the biggest in the world! But to Mt. Buffalo National Park... a great granite ​monadnock.... "a western outpost in the Australian Alps, with its elevation above sea level varying from 4,000 to 5,600 feet"... a reservation of some 43 square miles (about 27,000 acres). This must be Victoria'​s happiest park at these times. Its snow gums and little plains, granite tors and lookouts ​are grand and satisfying. ​No grazing cattle were seen, the scars of past fires are well hidden and the destructive activities of the tourist are largely concentrated around the chalet. Fortunately perhaps, we cannot see the results of past abuses and we revel in the beauty of summer flowers and the splendid views from the Horn, the Monolith and other viewpoints. 
-North from the Strezlecki Ranges and into the Valley of the Latrobe at Traralgon .. the drop is steep and the ridges are trimmed almost bare. Here too, Nature has answered Man in Her + 
-own language, with landslips in exchange for reduction of cover. The coastal slopes of Gippsland must be rich judging by the extensive settlement and in addition, to the Latrobe Valley has come the brown coal mining of Yallourn and Morwell. Much public money has gone into these undertakings to save Victoria from the embarrassment of irregular supplies of black coal from New South Wales. +From Buffalo we looked out towards the Bogong High Plain and the peaks of the immense Alpine Regions of Victoria and New South Wales... and next day we were in the Alpsamongst the mists at Hotham, looking out over the Barry Ranges again, the overlapping of range upon range from Higginbottam... and on to Omeo. 
-17. + 
-Victorian National Parks +It is in the Alps that we should leave our sojourn and dwell upon the splendour of them. Victorian snow country is magnificentThat a wealth of beauty and satisfaction in contemplation the Baw Baws... Mt. Wellington and all the Middle Alps... the Bogong High Plains. This is indeed an Alpine Parkland already made... and why not contiguous with the Kosciusko State Park?... the whole range from Mt. Erica to the northern limit of the Brindabellas planned for the people for all time! Tracked for walkers and trail riders, adequately fitted with contact points, huts and some roads, this would be a feature fitting our nation... a trail through two States and the Commonwealth. 
-Mt. Erica and the Beg Bag Plate z,L dominate the northern landscape from here and we know that as our route lies over the Main Divide there is some climbing ahead. The scars of many fires, but in particular those of '39, are to be seen on the side of the flaw flaws .. groves of white ghosts, fire-eaten mountain ash. The + 
-Tyers, The Thomson, Walhalla (now further along the road to extinction since the tragic floods last year) pass and there is a +Although we did not see all the Victorian National Parks on this trip, the records of The Caloola Club indicate that we have visited about 14 of the 16. The State like most of the Australian States is not well off for National Parks... 0.6% of the total area of Victoria has been set aside compared with Tasmania'​s 3%, New Zealand'​s 4.7% and Great Britain'​s 12.7%. That some Australian States are in an even worse condition than Victoria is shown by the all over figures for Australia... 0.23%. 
-terrific climb over and down to camp on a swift flowing tributary + 
-of the Thomson. Next day we made Matlock (4500 ft) officially +Although the following summary by the Victorian Town and Country Planning Association is intended to drive home the moral to Victorians, it is as well applied to many another State that we know... 
-recorded as the highest township in Victoria and right on the + 
-Divide. ​Ohce this was a town of 20,000 persons, but the only +"One thing stands out clearly, and it is that National Parks in Victoria have occurred without plan, and may be described as a collection of individual park areas unrelated to any master plan for the State. Only in a few instances can it be indicated that a planned approach is being made to the development of a national park. 
-evidence to-day, of this population is the extensive area of cleared land from Where we enjoyed a magnifioent ​panorama embracing a vast expanse of Victoria'​s most mountainous areas. + 
-By the way of Woods Point, Jamieson, Mansfield and Whitfield we finally skirted around Mt. Buffalo into the Oven's Valley .. possibly the richest valley in Victoria, not to mention the interesting appearance of Hop and Tobacco growing and the mighty gold dredge at Harrietville .. reputed to rank amongst the biggest in the world! But to Mt. Buffalo National Park .. a +"​Generally speaking, the reservation of a specific area of Crown Land as a National Park is brought about by the interest and enthusiasm of a small group of the citizens who prevail upon the Government of the day to take the necessary action. This having been achieved, further interest... at least in the majority of national parks... at governmental level by the provision of funds is almost non-existent. Where funds are provided, these are not adequate for the proper development and maintenance of the areas, and are allocated on a spasmodic basis, without regard to any established policy of progressive and regular development and park management. 
-great granite ​monadnocic.... "a western outpost in the Australian Alps, with its elevation above sea level varying from 4,000 to 5,600 feet" .. a reservation of some 43 square miles (about + 
-27,000 acres). This must be Victoria'​s happiest park at these +"Down the years it was not unusual for Governments to carry out the formality of reserving a National Park area and then remaining almost wholly inactive in the proper planning and orderly development of the parks... a policy of "​laissez-faire"​. 
-times. Its snow gums and little plains, granite tors and look- + 
-outs are grand and satisfying. ​NO grazing cattle were seen, the +"The potential wealth hidden in National Parks throughout the world, by way of their health-giving values to the people of the respective countries, and as attractions to  tourists from other lands, is fully realised by the controlling governments. It will be seen that a high standard of park development and management is set in Overseas countries, where a strong financial policy is recognised as an essential factor in National Park planning."​ 
-scars of past fires are well hidden and the destructive activities of the tourist are largely concentrated around the chalet. Fortunately perhaps, we cannot see the results of past abuses and we revel in the beauty of summer flowers and the splendid views from the Horn, the Monolith and other viewpoints. + 
-From Buffalo we looked out towards the Bogong High Plain and the peaks of the immense Alpine Regions of Victoria and New South Wales .. and next day we were in the Alpsamongst the mists at Hotham, looking out over the Barry Ranges again, the overlapping of range upon range from Higginbottam .. and on to Omeo. +As in Victoria, the citizens of New South Wales would welcome a special enquiry into the care, management, development of existing National Parks and the planning of additional ones. 
-It is in the Alps that we should leave our sojourn and dwell upon the splendour of them. Victorian snow country is magnificentThat a wealth of beauty and satisfaction in contemplation the+ 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Federation Notes - August Meeting.=====
  
-flaw flaws 6.. Mt. Wellington and all the Middle Alps .. the Bo- 
-gong High Plains. This is indeed an Alpine Parkland already made .. and why not contiguous with the Kosciusko State Park? .. the whole range from Mt. Erica to the northern limit.of the Brindabellas planned for the people for all time: Tracked for 
-walkers and trail riders, adequately fitted with contact points, huts and some roads, this would be a feature fitting our nation 6. a trail through two States and the Commonwealth. 
-Victorian National Parks ... 
-Although we did not see all the Victorian National Parks on this trip, the records of The Caloola Club indicate that we have visited about 14 of the 16. The State like most of the Australian States is not well off for National Parks .. 0.6V0 of the total 
-area of Victoria has been set aside compared with Tasmaniass 3%, New Zealandss 4.7% and Great Britainss 12.7%. That some Australian States are in an even worse condition than Victoria is shown by the all over figures for Australia .. 0423%. 
-Although the following summary by the Victorian Town and Country Planning Association is intended to drive home the moral to '​Victorians,​ it is as well applied to many another State that we know 
-"One thing stands out clearly, and it is that National Parks in Victoria have occurred without plan, and may be described as a collection of individual park areas unrelated to any master plan for the State. Only in a few in- 
-stances can it be indicated that a planned approach is being made to the development of a national park. 
-"​Generally speaking, the reservation of a specific area of Crown Land as a National Park is brought about by the interest and enthusiasm of a small group of the citizens who prevail upon the Government of the day to take the necessary action. This having been achieved, further interest .. at 
-least in the majority of national parks .. at governmental level by the provision of funds is almost non-existent. Where funds are -provided, these are not adequate for the proper development and maintenance of the areas, and are allocated on a spasmodic basis, without regard to any established policy of progressive and regular development and park management, 
-"Down the years it was not unusual for Governments to carry out the formality of reserving a National Park area and then remaining almost wholly inactive in the proper planning and orderly development of the parks .. a policy of "​laissez-faire"​. 
-"The potential wealth hidden in National Parks throughout the world, by way of their health-giving values to the 
-people of the respective countries, and as attractions to  tourists from other lands, is fully realised by the control- 
-ling governments. It will be seen that a high standard of 
-park development and management is set in Overseas countries, where a strong financial policy is recognised as an essential factor in National Park planning."​ 
-As in Victoria, the citizens of New South Wales would welcome a special enquiry into the care, management, development of exist:Ing National Parks and the planning of additional ones. 
-a 
-PHOTOGRAPHY ! ? 
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-31 Macquarie Place 
-SYDNEY N.S.W. 
-FEDERATION NOTES - AUGUST MEETING. 
 By Allen A. Strom. By Allen A. Strom.
-DEEWHY LAGOON: Improvements planned for the Deewhy Lagoon will del-El-OTT-large portion of it as a Bird Sanctuary. The Federation will support the National Trust in protests to a number of authoritative bodies. 
-BUSHWALKER BALL: Members of affiliated clubs are asked to rally to the support of the Federation for the Ball to be held at Paddington Town Hall on Monday, September 14th. Tickets 17/6d. News to hand would indicate that the Federation stands to lose heavily. Duplicated handbills and posters are available for advertisement. John Cotter wants to know how many are going in order to arrange for decorations and catering. The orchestra End other matters are in hand. 
-THE BUSHWALKER NO.12: Editorial cony, stories, photographs,​ suggestTUFT-717galy required by the Hon. Editor, Ron Wardrop, 77 Hudson Street, Hurstville. 
-'be-6 . 
-, r  
-rrop 
-e40010'​...1. 
-EAT t.3 IN. A NAME? 
-4.1 +. 
-For many years we have been proofing tents with a mixture of waxes recommended by a chemist knowledgeable in such things. Any old wax wonit do to proof a tent of course. The wax must be highly water repellent and not harmful to the fabric of the tent. It must not be so stiff that it makes the tent bulky. It must have a range of plasticity so that it remains pliable in freezing cold and yet not melt to an oil under summer sun. It must be colourless and odourless. Such 
-a paragon of waxes was achieved by judicious blending of several waxes. The proofing service became very popular and on day John suggested that we sell the wax so that Bushwalkers could proof their own tents and jackets. Then arose the question of the name. "Think up a good name I said to John and the next thing I knew the jars of wax were labelled uDrumstick"​. "How come"? said I. 
-Well, said John, eyes atwinkle, "I said to myself, Paddy Wax - Paddy whacle - Paddy whack t the Drumstick!"​ - so Drumstick"​ it is, and if you want to prOof a tent or jacket get a jar of Drumstick"​ - Price V-. 
-  ​ 
-PA Y ALIA 
-Lightweight Camp Gear 
-201CASTLEREACH St SYDNEY 
-M2678 
  
 +===Deewhy Lagoon:===
 +
 +Improvements planned for the Deewhy Lagoon will destroy a large portion of it as a Bird Sanctuary. The Federation will support the National Trust in protests to a number of authoritative bodies.
 +
 +===Bushwalker Ball:===
 +
 +Members of affiliated clubs are asked to rally to the support of the Federation for the Ball to be held at Paddington Town Hall on Monday, September 14th. Tickets 17/6d. News to hand would indicate that the Federation stands to lose heavily. Duplicated handbills and posters are available for advertisement. John Cotter wants to know how many are going in order to arrange for decorations and catering. The orchestra and other matters are in hand.
 +
 +===The Bushwalker, No.12:===
 +
 +Editorial copy, stories, photographs,​ suggestions urgently required by the Hon. Editor, Ron Wardrop, 77 Hudson Street, Hurstville.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====Paddy Made.=====
 +
 +===What'​s In A Name?===
 +
 +For many years we have been proofing tents with a mixture of waxes recommended by a chemist knowledgeable in such things. Any old wax won't do to proof a tent of course. The wax must be highly water repellent and not harmful to the fabric of the tent. It must not be so stiff that it makes the tent bulky. It must have a range of plasticity so that it remains pliable in freezing cold and yet not melt to an oil under summer sun. It must be colourless and odourless. Such a paragon of waxes was achieved by judicious blending of several waxes. The proofing service became very popular and one day John suggested that we sell the wax so that Bushwalkers could proof their own tents and jackets. Then arose the question of the name. "Think up a good name" I said to John and the next thing I knew the jars of wax were labelled "​Drumstick"​. "How come"? said I.
 +
 +Well, said John, eyes atwinkle, "I said to myself, Paddy Wax - Paddy whacks - Paddy whacks the Drumstick!"​ - so "​Drumstick"​ it is, and if you want to proof a tent or jacket get a jar of "​Drumstick"​ - Price 2/-.
 +
 +Paddy Pallin. Lightweight Camp Gear.
 +
 +201 Castlereagh St., Sydney. M2678.
 +
 +----
195309.txt · Last modified: 2016/11/22 04:32 by tyreless