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195305 [2016/11/16 05:32]
tyreless
195305 [2016/11/16 05:37] (current)
tyreless
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 That old bugbear of Walks Secretaries,​ the day walk, is still giving trouble and, of the 18 Sundays on the programme, only 10 have been filled. However, two of the remaining weekends are occupied by the Instructional Walk and Corroboree, when it is customary to leave the Sunday open. It is not difficult to find a reason for the missing day walks. A large number of the most active walkers hold day trips in something like contempt, preferring to miss a programme than to appear leading a day walk. Others, while glad to avail themselves of these "trips without notice"​ will not involve themselves from three to six months in advance, leaving it to a valiant few who sometimes saddle themselves with two day trips on the one programme. That old bugbear of Walks Secretaries,​ the day walk, is still giving trouble and, of the 18 Sundays on the programme, only 10 have been filled. However, two of the remaining weekends are occupied by the Instructional Walk and Corroboree, when it is customary to leave the Sunday open. It is not difficult to find a reason for the missing day walks. A large number of the most active walkers hold day trips in something like contempt, preferring to miss a programme than to appear leading a day walk. Others, while glad to avail themselves of these "trips without notice"​ will not involve themselves from three to six months in advance, leaving it to a valiant few who sometimes saddle themselves with two day trips on the one programme.
  
-Of course, the proof of the pudding... after all, if the exciting day walks on the programme fail to take place, then it becomes a facade, suggesting that we are far more active than we really are. This programme deserves the fullest support, which means support from the members for those leaders who have devised fascinating and attractive trips, ​ard support from the leaders themselves, who should not try to cancel their trips simply because something more appealing presents itself. It is a significant point that the thoroughly dependable leader almost invariably finds himself with a party.+Of course, the proof of the pudding... after all, if the exciting day walks on the programme fail to take place, then it becomes a facade, suggesting that we are far more active than we really are. This programme deserves the fullest support, which means support from the members for those leaders who have devised fascinating and attractive trips, ​and support from the leaders themselves, who should not try to cancel their trips simply because something more appealing presents itself. It is a significant point that the thoroughly dependable leader almost invariably finds himself with a party.
  
 Naturally, with such a walkers'​ programme, there are some trips of quite rugged character, in the vicinity of 40 miles and correctly classed as rough, to be carried out in the course of a normal weekend. Leaders of these trips should resist the temptation to build up a large party by accepting very inexperienced walkers and members who are plainly out of condition for a rough trip. Several of the trips listed could easily burn off a beginner. Further, if the leader of one of these tigerish walks finds the Editor angling for a place in the party, he will probably be doing both himself and the writer a kindness by declining gently but firmly. Naturally, with such a walkers'​ programme, there are some trips of quite rugged character, in the vicinity of 40 miles and correctly classed as rough, to be carried out in the course of a normal weekend. Leaders of these trips should resist the temptation to build up a large party by accepting very inexperienced walkers and members who are plainly out of condition for a rough trip. Several of the trips listed could easily burn off a beginner. Further, if the leader of one of these tigerish walks finds the Editor angling for a place in the party, he will probably be doing both himself and the writer a kindness by declining gently but firmly.
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 April'​s general meeting was a reposeful one, with about fifty members present, including the two welcomed, Enid Hallstrom and Ted Weavers. April'​s general meeting was a reposeful one, with about fifty members present, including the two welcomed, Enid Hallstrom and Ted Weavers.
  
-After years of jealously storing up the minutes of the Annual General Meeting until they had properly matured, it seemed almost brash and indecent to find those of March 13th being confirmed by the vote of people who really could remember what had occurred. And then on to correspondence,​ which contained (inter alia, of course) Elsie Bruggy'​s resignation as comittee ​member to take on the portfolio of Assistant Secretary, and also Elsa McGregor'​s resignation from Membership Secretary - the two vacancies to be filled at the May meeting.+After years of jealously storing up the minutes of the Annual General Meeting until they had properly matured, it seemed almost brash and indecent to find those of March 13th being confirmed by the vote of people who really could remember what had occurred. And then on to correspondence,​ which contained (inter alia, of course) Elsie Bruggy'​s resignation as committee ​member to take on the portfolio of Assistant Secretary, and also Elsa McGregor'​s resignation from Membership Secretary - the two vacancies to be filled at the May meeting.
  
 There was, too, a letter from a lady who harboured dark doubts of our sincerity on conservation matters, particularly on Era. Her motives and her arguments were themselves far from lucid, but she urged us to allow our big bushwalking heart "That pulsing organ to swell to the size of a split pea". What we were to do after this access of generosity was not clear. A suitable, if almost too rational, reply had gone forward from our Conservation Secretary. There was, too, a letter from a lady who harboured dark doubts of our sincerity on conservation matters, particularly on Era. Her motives and her arguments were themselves far from lucid, but she urged us to allow our big bushwalking heart "That pulsing organ to swell to the size of a split pea". What we were to do after this access of generosity was not clear. A suitable, if almost too rational, reply had gone forward from our Conservation Secretary.
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 General Business was called and Dormie produced a large volume, the Annual of the Mountain Club of South Africa, a body he had visited on his recent tour. The journal had been sent as a complimentary to the Club, and he suggested we respond with twelve months'​ issues of our magazine - duly carried. General Business was called and Dormie produced a large volume, the Annual of the Mountain Club of South Africa, a body he had visited on his recent tour. The journal had been sent as a complimentary to the Club, and he suggested we respond with twelve months'​ issues of our magazine - duly carried.
  
-Sheila Binns reminded us of subscriptions due - David Brown (a resident of Katoomba when not in the bush elsewhere) passed on the tidings that hot showers were now obtainable at the Reserve at Katoomba at the nominal fee of ld. per person per dip - Frank Barr was presented with the lug bashing outfit which had been waiting for him since the Reunion, and it was called a night at the highly respectable hour of 8.47.+Sheila Binns reminded us of subscriptions due - David Brown (a resident of Katoomba when not in the bush elsewhere) passed on the tidings that hot showers were now obtainable at the Reserve at Katoomba at the nominal fee of 1d. per person per dip - Frank Barr was presented with the lug bashing outfit which had been waiting for him since the Reunion, and it was called a night at the highly respectable hour of 8.47.
  
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 On reading your editorial (April'​s,​ of course) I am encouraged. You have spurred me so print this - if you dare. On reading your editorial (April'​s,​ of course) I am encouraged. You have spurred me so print this - if you dare.
  
-If all members of the Club are not fariliar ​with the fact that Neil Schafer and myself (see who the article is by) did 120 miles by foot in the Kosciusko area then they should, or else the wrath of the bearded walker shall be brought down on them as truly as the devil punishes his sinners.+If all members of the Club are not familiar ​with the fact that Neil Schafer and myself (see who the article is by) did 120 miles by foot in the Kosciusko area then they should, or else the wrath of the bearded walker shall be brought down on them as truly as the devil punishes his sinners.
  
 By now you are probably asking, what about your story? By now you are probably asking, what about your story?
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 The track held good for quite a way, following the land marks as described, and then we lost it. No doubt the fast growing jungle had grown over it. We had been told to bear well to the left to a patch of lantana or we would find ourselves at a cliff face. We wandered back and forth but no sign of a track or a blaze mark did we see. Finally our wanderings brought us out at the top of the cliff face. Well, at least we had some idea of where we were, so we climbed back up and found the lantana patch and found ourselves in amongst the old familiar lawyer vine again. After sidling around the ridge for a while, Bill found a way down and also something that could have been a track. This brought us to some huge caves. We were on the right track at last but it was 6.30 and we still had a long way to go. These caves were about a quarter of a mile long, and at the end - O, joy! - the border fence. As the ground was well cleared either side of the fence it didn't take us long to reach the border gates and there, like the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, was a bus. The track held good for quite a way, following the land marks as described, and then we lost it. No doubt the fast growing jungle had grown over it. We had been told to bear well to the left to a patch of lantana or we would find ourselves at a cliff face. We wandered back and forth but no sign of a track or a blaze mark did we see. Finally our wanderings brought us out at the top of the cliff face. Well, at least we had some idea of where we were, so we climbed back up and found the lantana patch and found ourselves in amongst the old familiar lawyer vine again. After sidling around the ridge for a while, Bill found a way down and also something that could have been a track. This brought us to some huge caves. We were on the right track at last but it was 6.30 and we still had a long way to go. These caves were about a quarter of a mile long, and at the end - O, joy! - the border fence. As the ground was well cleared either side of the fence it didn't take us long to reach the border gates and there, like the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, was a bus.
  
-The bus driver lived in a small house just inside Queensland and he told us that the bus went to Murwillunbah ​every day, leaving the gates at 8.00 in the morning. That meant we could catch the Saturday morning bus which left us all the next day to ourselves and we would be able to visit the Natural Arch, which was only a couple of miles down the road. After enquiring for a good camp spot, we left in high spirits.+The bus driver lived in a small house just inside Queensland and he told us that the bus went to Murwillumbah ​every day, leaving the gates at 8.00 in the morning. That meant we could catch the Saturday morning bus which left us all the next day to ourselves and we would be able to visit the Natural Arch, which was only a couple of miles down the road. After enquiring for a good camp spot, we left in high spirits.
  
 We camped on soft green grass near a good open stream in the Numinbah Valley. The weather had improved considerably,​ in fact it was quite fine. The next morning we set off for the Natural Arch, which is in a small reserve and seemingly quite a popular picnicking spot. The Natural Arch was fascinating. A stream flows at quite a high level and at one time no doubt it tumbled over the rocks to the gully below, where it continued on its way, but in the course of time the water has worn a hole in the rock surface which allows it to fall through into a big cave below. It is possible to see this formation from inside the cave and also to look through the hole from above into the cave. Well constructed concrete paths lead to the view points. The place is really well worth visiting. We camped on soft green grass near a good open stream in the Numinbah Valley. The weather had improved considerably,​ in fact it was quite fine. The next morning we set off for the Natural Arch, which is in a small reserve and seemingly quite a popular picnicking spot. The Natural Arch was fascinating. A stream flows at quite a high level and at one time no doubt it tumbled over the rocks to the gully below, where it continued on its way, but in the course of time the water has worn a hole in the rock surface which allows it to fall through into a big cave below. It is possible to see this formation from inside the cave and also to look through the hole from above into the cave. Well constructed concrete paths lead to the view points. The place is really well worth visiting.
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 ====Train Trouble.==== ====Train Trouble.====
  
-Jenny and Stan Madden looked like stealing a march on Bill Rodgers'​ Easter party by joining the 5.47 train west - but it baulked at Pehrith ​and was side-tracked to allow the train carrying the official party to storm through. Nothing daunted, Jenny and Stan walked out to Black Jerry'​s.+Jenny and Stan Madden looked like stealing a march on Bill Rodgers'​ Easter party by joining the 5.47 train west - but it baulked at Penrith ​and was side-tracked to allow the train carrying the official party to storm through. Nothing daunted, Jenny and Stan walked out to Black Jerry'​s.
  
 Similarly, the Shoalhaven party had train trouble, using a total of eight trains and two cars to get to and from Tallong. The official party on the 5.10 was delayed by a bad case of "hot box" and a weary engine, and were finally trans-trained at Moss Vale to a following service. Frank Rigby came in solitary splendour on the 9.18 ex Central which finally steamed out at 11.10 p.m. On the return trip, the three somnambulists of the party "came home with the milk in the morning"​ - on the 1.17 a.m. from Tallong on Tuesday - very satisfactory for the one who expressed a wish to catch an early train. Similarly, the Shoalhaven party had train trouble, using a total of eight trains and two cars to get to and from Tallong. The official party on the 5.10 was delayed by a bad case of "hot box" and a weary engine, and were finally trans-trained at Moss Vale to a following service. Frank Rigby came in solitary splendour on the 9.18 ex Central which finally steamed out at 11.10 p.m. On the return trip, the three somnambulists of the party "came home with the milk in the morning"​ - on the 1.17 a.m. from Tallong on Tuesday - very satisfactory for the one who expressed a wish to catch an early train.
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 Budderoo! Have you ever poured over the Kiama Ordinance Sheet and wondered what lay beyond and about that name? Budderoo! Have you ever poured over the Kiama Ordinance Sheet and wondered what lay beyond and about that name?
  
-I always had a sneaking suspicion that there was something of great interest to tempt the settler out that way... a long way out... out on a limb, as it were! I've wondered too... where did that name come from? Perhaps it sounds aboriginal, or an anglicised version of an aboriginal name for there are similar sounding words in many Australian place names. But the locals pronounce it as a sort of "​Buggeroo"​ or Buggeroh"​ and I strongly suspect that its isolation gave the place its name. Politeness has probably calmed it down to Budderoo... a find sounding name anyway, despite its doubtful ancestry.+I always had a sneaking suspicion that there was something of great interest to tempt the settler out that way... a long way out... out on a limb, as it were! I've wondered too... where did that name come from? Perhaps it sounds aboriginal, or an anglicised version of an aboriginal name for there are similar sounding words in many Australian place names. But the locals pronounce it as a sort of "​Buggeroo"​ or "Buggeroh"​ and I strongly suspect that its isolation gave the place its name. Politeness has probably calmed it down to Budderoo... a find sounding name anyway, despite its doubtful ancestry.
  
-We started off from just below Knight'​s Hill, perched high (abaut 2,000 feet as a matter of fact) above Macquarie Rivulet, near Tongarra. The view looking north over the coastal plain around Dapto and Albion Park, over Lake Illawarra and straight at Mounts Kembla and Kiera, was first inspected in order to give an orientation to the Budderoo visit.+We started off from just below Knight'​s Hill, perched high (about 2,000 feet as a matter of fact) above Macquarie Rivulet, near Tongarra. The view looking north over the coastal plain around Dapto and Albion Park, over Lake Illawarra and straight at Mounts Kembla and Kiera, was first inspected in order to give an orientation to the Budderoo visit.
  
-To Carrington Falls first of all, the mecca of many a bushwalk, giving its usual fine show, perhaps enhanced by the recent fresh rain in the Kangaroo. Nearby the swamps are aflame with the little Christmas Bell (Elandfordia nobilis) spangled with the White of the Sundow (Drosera binata) in flower. From Carrington to Gerringong Falls (on the Gerringong Creek) is by strange and devious timber-getters'​ tracks... a maze to trap young players. Finally we made the swamps nearby the falls. These are the large hanging swamps or swampy plains for whibh the headwaters of the Kangaroo are famous; and very important too, for in these peaty masses is retained the waters of the rainy times, to be slowly released as the conditions dry out, thus ensuring a continuous flow in the valleys of the Kangaroo River and its tributaries. One realises then, how vital it is to protect those peats from the ravages of bushfires... the fires that burn slowly and often unobserved, until the whole peaty mass is consumed.+To Carrington Falls first of all, the mecca of many a bushwalk, giving its usual fine show, perhaps enhanced by the recent fresh rain in the Kangaroo. Nearby the swamps are aflame with the little Christmas Bell (Elandfordia nobilis) spangled with the White of the Sundow (Drosera binata) in flower. From Carrington to Gerringong Falls (on the Gerringong Creek) is by strange and devious timber-getters'​ tracks... a maze to trap young players. Finally we made the swamps nearby the falls. These are the large hanging swamps or swampy plains for which the headwaters of the Kangaroo are famous; and very important too, for in these peaty masses is retained the waters of the rainy times, to be slowly released as the conditions dry out, thus ensuring a continuous flow in the valleys of the Kangaroo River and its tributaries. One realises then, how vital it is to protect those peats from the ravages of bushfires... the fires that burn slowly and often unobserved, until the whole peaty mass is consumed.
  
 These swampy plains bring happy recollections of their close cousins the snowy plains... the low, bent and white-barked Scribbly Gums assisting the delusion. Wide, gently falling greeneries, studded with the red and yellow of Bells when we saw them, many of the specimens beginning to seed... a good sign; apparently this is too far out for the picker, both amateur and professional. These swampy plains bring happy recollections of their close cousins the snowy plains... the low, bent and white-barked Scribbly Gums assisting the delusion. Wide, gently falling greeneries, studded with the red and yellow of Bells when we saw them, many of the specimens beginning to seed... a good sign; apparently this is too far out for the picker, both amateur and professional.
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 The feeling of frustration somewhat dampened the appreciation of the splendid views around and down the Kangaroo Valley. The Head looks directly towards the township and as we camped at the Head, we saw the "​lights go on again all over the town". Cambewarra, Mt. Brown, Red Rocks, Mt. Scansi, Tallowa Head, Grassy Mountain, Carrialloo and Barrengarry... all accounted for in a wide panorama, together with a general backdrop of the skyline range south of the Shoalhaven. The feeling of frustration somewhat dampened the appreciation of the splendid views around and down the Kangaroo Valley. The Head looks directly towards the township and as we camped at the Head, we saw the "​lights go on again all over the town". Cambewarra, Mt. Brown, Red Rocks, Mt. Scansi, Tallowa Head, Grassy Mountain, Carrialloo and Barrengarry... all accounted for in a wide panorama, together with a general backdrop of the skyline range south of the Shoalhaven.
  
-On the third day a quick retreat was called in order to make the rendezvous with our transport. Back over the Budderoo capping, skirting Bulloh Hill we came upon the better section of the Budderoo Track, no doubt improved some little time ago by the timber merchants. The plan was to locate Ulrich'​s Pass which would lead us down onto the Brogher'​s Creek near Wattamolla and close by the "​pick-up point"​. Back along the road, not far north of Bulloh Hill we crossedanother ​volcanic capping, this one not cleared and still with many fine eucalypts. It was about this point that we left the road to follow the ridge striking south and before long we cane to the Ulrich'​s Pass Track which led on to the slopes of Brogher'​s Creek and the termination of the trip. This Track would appear to be only made track off the plateau on the eastern face. Inspection of the walls from the valley of the Brogher'​s suggests many possibilities,​ but these would need careful investigation. In addition, the explorer would find large areas of Rain Forest to combat.+On the third day a quick retreat was called in order to make the rendezvous with our transport. Back over the Budderoo capping, skirting Bulloh Hill we came upon the better section of the Budderoo Track, no doubt improved some little time ago by the timber merchants. The plan was to locate Ulrich'​s Pass which would lead us down onto the Brogher'​s Creek near Wattamolla and close by the "​pick-up point"​. Back along the road, not far north of Bulloh Hill we crossed another ​volcanic capping, this one not cleared and still with many fine eucalypts. It was about this point that we left the road to follow the ridge striking south and before long we cane to the Ulrich'​s Pass Track which led on to the slopes of Brogher'​s Creek and the termination of the trip. This Track would appear to be only made track off the plateau on the eastern face. Inspection of the walls from the valley of the Brogher'​s suggests many possibilities,​ but these would need careful investigation. In addition, the explorer would find large areas of Rain Forest to combat.
  
 The loneliness of the plateau, the freedom of the wide swampy plains, the changing environment brought about by the volcanic cappings and the fine views made the Budderoo Trip very worthwhile. One felt again the value of isolation and the desire to keep the land for the refreshment of the soul. Here too is the extremely important job that this land must help to do: maintenance of the waters in the Kangaroo and its tributaries. The loneliness of the plateau, the freedom of the wide swampy plains, the changing environment brought about by the volcanic cappings and the fine views made the Budderoo Trip very worthwhile. One felt again the value of isolation and the desire to keep the land for the refreshment of the soul. Here too is the extremely important job that this land must help to do: maintenance of the waters in the Kangaroo and its tributaries.
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-Speaking of errors ​aad omissions: We have had date trouble ourselves. What's in a date? A seed - yes, we know but we had our Search and Rescue looking for the airplane-part on the weekend of Mardh 28/29, which should have read 21/22, and is now corrected for the record.+Speaking of errors ​and omissions: We have had date trouble ourselves. What's in a date? A seed - yes, we know but we had our Search and Rescue looking for the airplane-part on the weekend of March 28/29, which should have read 21/22, and is now corrected for the record.
  
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 11. NO, we don't exactly sleep under the stars. We carry light weight tents, weighing only two or three pounds. COMMANDOS TO DELETE ENTIRRTY. 11. NO, we don't exactly sleep under the stars. We carry light weight tents, weighing only two or three pounds. COMMANDOS TO DELETE ENTIRRTY.
  
-12. There will/will not/may be men/milen in the party (delete phrases and sex not appropriate).+12. There will/will not/may be men/women in the party (delete phrases and sex not appropriate).
  
 13. FOR MEN ONLY. The women normally carry all their own gear. 13. FOR MEN ONLY. The women normally carry all their own gear.
195305.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/11/16 05:37 by tyreless