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195302 [2016/11/10 04:27]
tyreless
195302 [2016/11/10 04:32] (current)
tyreless
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 After you have elected your officers, treat them with the courtesy and tolerance you would wish in their position. If you believe a mistake has been made, or some matter overlooked, it is kinder to talk about it with the appropriate officer rather than produce it dramatically at a general meeting. You may have your facts wrong. After you have elected your officers, treat them with the courtesy and tolerance you would wish in their position. If you believe a mistake has been made, or some matter overlooked, it is kinder to talk about it with the appropriate officer rather than produce it dramatically at a general meeting. You may have your facts wrong.
  
-Rametber, too, that though the prestige and glamour of office may be terrific (!) the remuneration is imperceptible. The would-be critic should first investigate his own attitude, and ask himself if he is fully supporting the committee, or treating it merely as a body of lackeys appointed to do his bidding.+Remember, too, that though the prestige and glamour of office may be terrific (!) the remuneration is imperceptible. The would-be critic should first investigate his own attitude, and ask himself if he is fully supporting the committee, or treating it merely as a body of lackeys appointed to do his bidding.
  
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 The following day, Saturday, was the start of one of the main objects of the trip, the climbing of Bartle Frere (5,​287-feet),​ the highest mountain in Queensland. Early in the morning we caught a train (at least that's what we were told it was) to Malanda, and a car out past Lamond'​s Hill to a clearing within 2 miles of the foot of the mountain. The road to this spot was in very good condition, having been repaired recently. The following day, Saturday, was the start of one of the main objects of the trip, the climbing of Bartle Frere (5,​287-feet),​ the highest mountain in Queensland. Early in the morning we caught a train (at least that's what we were told it was) to Malanda, and a car out past Lamond'​s Hill to a clearing within 2 miles of the foot of the mountain. The road to this spot was in very good condition, having been repaired recently.
  
-We set up a base camp and spent the afternoon reconnoitring around the various ​tinter ​tracks to see which would be the most advantageous for our purpose. The next day dawned cloudy and ominous (at 5 a.m. we were up), but not having to pack, Ken and I were soon away and after about half an hour on a timber track we cut off this into the "​scrub"​ (local term for jungle). We pushed and scrambled our way for about 200 yards when we came across a very old Army-cut track, which was a little easier and followed the saddle we wanted.+We set up a base camp and spent the afternoon reconnoitring around the various ​timber ​tracks to see which would be the most advantageous for our purpose. The next day dawned cloudy and ominous (at 5 a.m. we were up), but not having to pack, Ken and I were soon away and after about half an hour on a timber track we cut off this into the "​scrub"​ (local term for jungle). We pushed and scrambled our way for about 200 yards when we came across a very old Army-cut track, which was a little easier and followed the saddle we wanted.
  
-About this stage it started to rain and didn't stop until we got back to camp eleven hours later. Not having brought our groundsheets because they would have been torn pushing through the scrub, we just had to put up with getting wet through. The track took us as far as the foot of the main climb, but petered out in a creek which we crossed. We went straight up the other side and followed along the side of the creek for some distance, and passed some very beautiful falls and cascades. The climb itself was eneventful, not even a small snake being seen, but about halfway up we came to a cave formed by a huge pile of boulders roughly the size of those in Bungonia Gorge, but surmounted by an enormous granite "​pebble"​ about 50 or 60-ft. in diameter, one of the biggest single rounded stones I have seen. Several other piles of rocks wee passed farther up, but none as big as this one. Some quite good views could possibly be obtained by scrambling up on to these rocks, and looking out over the tree tops, but it was far too misty when we were there.+About this stage it started to rain and didn't stop until we got back to camp eleven hours later. Not having brought our groundsheets because they would have been torn pushing through the scrub, we just had to put up with getting wet through. The track took us as far as the foot of the main climb, but petered out in a creek which we crossed. We went straight up the other side and followed along the side of the creek for some distance, and passed some very beautiful falls and cascades. The climb itself was uneventful, not even a small snake being seen, but about halfway up we came to a cave formed by a huge pile of boulders roughly the size of those in Bungonia Gorge, but surmounted by an enormous granite "​pebble"​ about 50 or 60-ft. in diameter, one of the biggest single rounded stones I have seen. Several other piles of rocks wee passed farther up, but none as big as this one. Some quite good views could possibly be obtained by scrambling up on to these rocks, and looking out over the tree tops, but it was far too misty when we were there.
  
-We also found in variou ​spots remnants of old army camps, with sticks laid out to make beds, piles of tins,. etc.+We also found in various ​spots remnants of old army camps, with sticks laid out to make beds, piles of tins,. etc.
  
 We stopped at the top for about a quarter of an hour, where we had a long delayed lunch and devoured half a pound of biscuits between us, and at half past two pushed off on the long trek home. To facilitate our return and allow us more time for climbing, we had blazed trees on the way up, and we were very glad to follow these on the return down, but even then progress was comparatively slow because we still had to push our way through the scrub. The mountain an its western face presents a more or less flat face with no very strongly defined ridges, and without the blaze marks we would have been very definitely "​uphill"​ in picking out the narrow saddle at the bottom, which separates the headwaters of the Russell and Mulgrave Rivers by only a few hundred yards. If we had ended in either of these streams, which fall away very suddenly, it would have taken us till next day to get out. We were very glad when we hit camp and a curried meat stew and rice were provided by Alan Wilson. We stopped at the top for about a quarter of an hour, where we had a long delayed lunch and devoured half a pound of biscuits between us, and at half past two pushed off on the long trek home. To facilitate our return and allow us more time for climbing, we had blazed trees on the way up, and we were very glad to follow these on the return down, but even then progress was comparatively slow because we still had to push our way through the scrub. The mountain an its western face presents a more or less flat face with no very strongly defined ridges, and without the blaze marks we would have been very definitely "​uphill"​ in picking out the narrow saddle at the bottom, which separates the headwaters of the Russell and Mulgrave Rivers by only a few hundred yards. If we had ended in either of these streams, which fall away very suddenly, it would have taken us till next day to get out. We were very glad when we hit camp and a curried meat stew and rice were provided by Alan Wilson.
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 Part of that night and the following morning we spent in travelling from Milla Milla to Ravenshoe, with the idea of going out to see the Tully Falls. This, however, would have proved an expensive proposition as there were no hitches and the local taxi driver wanted some fabulous sum for the 12 mile journey, so about midday we turned our backs on the idea reluctantly,​ and started hitching our way down the Palmerston highway to Innisfail. We found hitching up here very similar to Tasmania, the cars are few and far between, but those that do come along are very good and invariably stop to tell you why they can't pick you up. They are mostly local people going but a short way out to farms. Part of that night and the following morning we spent in travelling from Milla Milla to Ravenshoe, with the idea of going out to see the Tully Falls. This, however, would have proved an expensive proposition as there were no hitches and the local taxi driver wanted some fabulous sum for the 12 mile journey, so about midday we turned our backs on the idea reluctantly,​ and started hitching our way down the Palmerston highway to Innisfail. We found hitching up here very similar to Tasmania, the cars are few and far between, but those that do come along are very good and invariably stop to tell you why they can't pick you up. They are mostly local people going but a short way out to farms.
  
-The following day at Innisfail was spent in admiring the city and its environs, which we thought were nicer than Cairns. The city is built along the banks of the Johnson River and parks line both banks. The nights we spent here we stayed at the local Camping and Parking Ground, which is one of the nicest I have seen, being situated on the banks of the river and covered with lush green grass (as are most of Innisfail parks) instead of the usual bare earth, and with smaal trees scattered here and there. It also had a laundry, showers, etc.+The following day at Innisfail was spent in admiring the city and its environs, which we thought were nicer than Cairns. The city is built along the banks of the Johnson River and parks line both banks. The nights we spent here we stayed at the local Camping and Parking Ground, which is one of the nicest I have seen, being situated on the banks of the river and covered with lush green grass (as are most of Innisfail parks) instead of the usual bare earth, and with small trees scattered here and there. It also had a laundry, showers, etc.
  
 Thursday found us invading Paronella Park, about 11 miles south of Innisfail. It is a small park, built entirely by one man, JOse Paronella, a Spaniard, and its building occupied 20 years of hi lifetime. ​ Apart from paths, outhouses and lunch sheds, a Spanish style "​fort"​ occupies the centre, wherein meals are served and dances and the local picture shows are held. There were many varied and interesting things to be seen here and it was a day well spent. Thursday found us invading Paronella Park, about 11 miles south of Innisfail. It is a small park, built entirely by one man, JOse Paronella, a Spaniard, and its building occupied 20 years of hi lifetime. ​ Apart from paths, outhouses and lunch sheds, a Spanish style "​fort"​ occupies the centre, wherein meals are served and dances and the local picture shows are held. There were many varied and interesting things to be seen here and it was a day well spent.
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 ===Monday 29/9/52. After it's all over.=== ===Monday 29/9/52. After it's all over.===
  
-There was no time last night to end the story. We climbed out of Ripple Creek, and found the country exactly as we hoped. Went through another saddle, up another knob - and that was just as it should be. With great relief, we turned along the ridge, bearing 107, and held to it for over an hour - about two miles of raspy going. Near the end of the leg we found a surveyor'​s mark, and, as we slewed into our next bearing, 139, picked up a blazed way and a cut track. It was 4.30 and we were still about 6 miles from Warraganba. At 5.30, quite suddenly, we came on to a rebuilt edition of the old trail, just where it should be a little beyond was a large clearing where logging had been done, and a rutted, tractor-trampled highway led us right through, four miles to Warragamba Dam site. It was 7.5 as we started out across the lofty suspension bridge which, to all intents and purposes, marked journey'​s end. West-east. The twain had met.+There was no time last night to end the story. We climbed out of Ripple Creek, and found the country exactly as we hoped. Went through another saddle, up another knob - and that was just as it should be. With great relief, we turned along the ridge, bearing 107, and held to it for over an hour - about two miles of raspy going. Near the end of the leg we found a surveyor'​s mark, and, as we slewed into our next bearing, 139, picked up a blazed way and a cut track. It was 4.30 and we were still about 6 miles from Warragamba. At 5.30, quite suddenly, we came on to a rebuilt edition of the old trail, just where it should be a little beyond was a large clearing where logging had been done, and a rutted, tractor-trampled highway led us right through, four miles to Warragamba Dam site. It was 7.5 as we started out across the lofty suspension bridge which, to all intents and purposes, marked journey'​s end. West-east. The twain had met.
  
 (NOTE: We were told at the Dam that the road we had followed from King's Tableland for about 4 miles does go all the way through. What course it follows we can't guess. It must negotiate the deep gorges of Pocket Creek, Gogongolly Creek and Ripple Creek at least. When someone drives through it, we shall be glad to learn what happens, but we advise a jeep or land-rover for the trip.) (NOTE: We were told at the Dam that the road we had followed from King's Tableland for about 4 miles does go all the way through. What course it follows we can't guess. It must negotiate the deep gorges of Pocket Creek, Gogongolly Creek and Ripple Creek at least. When someone drives through it, we shall be glad to learn what happens, but we advise a jeep or land-rover for the trip.)
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 Graham ("​Mouldy"​) Harrison has sent us a copy of a pamphlet produced by the Forests Commission of Victoria, and distributed to motorists, campers and the like in that State. Graham ("​Mouldy"​) Harrison has sent us a copy of a pamphlet produced by the Forests Commission of Victoria, and distributed to motorists, campers and the like in that State.
  
-It is rather interesting as an exanple ​of the educative part of Victoria'​s bush-fire precautions,​ and is reproduced below:+It is rather interesting as an example ​of the educative part of Victoria'​s bush-fire precautions,​ and is reproduced below:
  
 ===A Holiday Message.=== ===A Holiday Message.===
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 As you go about the forests, absorbing the freshness and fascinated by the busyness of the birds and animals they shelter, you will come across notices warning of the danger of fire. These are to remind you that __it is in your hands to keep the forests green__ - that a moment'​s absent-mindedness with a match, cigarette, camp-fire or pipe could destroy all the natural beauty which you seek to enjoy. Nothing would ruin your holiday more quickly than the worry, panic and perhaps even tragedy of a forest fire. As you go about the forests, absorbing the freshness and fascinated by the busyness of the birds and animals they shelter, you will come across notices warning of the danger of fire. These are to remind you that __it is in your hands to keep the forests green__ - that a moment'​s absent-mindedness with a match, cigarette, camp-fire or pipe could destroy all the natural beauty which you seek to enjoy. Nothing would ruin your holiday more quickly than the worry, panic and perhaps even tragedy of a forest fire.
  
-Constant care and discretion in the use of fire by each one of ut will make it possible for our forests to remain green and flourishing,​ refuges of quiet and loveliness.+Constant care and discretion in the use of fire by each one of us will make it possible for our forests to remain green and flourishing,​ refuges of quiet and loveliness.
  
 ===Observe the five points of careful camping:​-=== ===Observe the five points of careful camping:​-===
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 How Wal acquired his residence in the heart of Kuring-gai Chase is beyond me. The bloke'​s got a bushwalking club all of his own. All the walking country you could wish for in his own backyard and if weather conditions are bad he can adjourn to the house for a hot meal and change of clothes. A flickering light down among the trees guided our feet and the quietness prevailing indicated that the doings had begun. Were we too late? Lamb No.1 was almost a memory and No.2 was saluting the carver, so joining the queue we got in for our cut. A lovely thick slice of lamb from Sam, a portion of potato from Bill, green peas and mint sauce - I said mint sauce - from some angel and silence reigned supreme, with one satisfied customer lining up for a second helping. Taking a good look at this bird I resolve never to be in a food party with him. A second helping! imposs, imposs, ridic, ridic. How Wal acquired his residence in the heart of Kuring-gai Chase is beyond me. The bloke'​s got a bushwalking club all of his own. All the walking country you could wish for in his own backyard and if weather conditions are bad he can adjourn to the house for a hot meal and change of clothes. A flickering light down among the trees guided our feet and the quietness prevailing indicated that the doings had begun. Were we too late? Lamb No.1 was almost a memory and No.2 was saluting the carver, so joining the queue we got in for our cut. A lovely thick slice of lamb from Sam, a portion of potato from Bill, green peas and mint sauce - I said mint sauce - from some angel and silence reigned supreme, with one satisfied customer lining up for a second helping. Taking a good look at this bird I resolve never to be in a food party with him. A second helping! imposs, imposs, ridic, ridic.
  
-The typical Bill Henley fire both illuminated and warmed the circle of sitters. Gil Webb endeavoured to encourage the songsters but honestly how can one sing through a mass of lamb and green peas. For the same reason I suppose there was a complete lack of skits and sketches. Rene Brown provided a surprise by singing of the pathetic experiences of Polly Perkins, late of Paddington Green. Bravo Rene! I noticed quite a large nupber ​of old members not seen for quite a long time. Ray Bean, very quiet I admit, but looking the same, and I began to think that if all the crowd turned up at the swimming carnival on February 14th at Lake Eckersley what an entertaining and socially successful day we could have. A free plug for the swimming carnival please Mr. Editor, but we didn't really get a chance to chat with many of our errant members and the carnival is the next event and there will be sunlight to illuminate their happy faces (we hope). The Barbecue - several of the younger lads climbing up a sheer rock face at the back of the assemblage ​givas rise to the suspicion that maybe the lambs - oh horror - acting the goat is O.K. with me, but as interior lining! Wal, you wouldn'​t treat an old pal like that. Still, the lads going up the rock face were remarkably sure footed. "The food you eat today walks and talks tomorrow"​. I say bah. What rot.+The typical Bill Henley fire both illuminated and warmed the circle of sitters. Gil Webb endeavoured to encourage the songsters but honestly how can one sing through a mass of lamb and green peas. For the same reason I suppose there was a complete lack of skits and sketches. Rene Brown provided a surprise by singing of the pathetic experiences of Polly Perkins, late of Paddington Green. Bravo Rene! I noticed quite a large number ​of old members not seen for quite a long time. Ray Bean, very quiet I admit, but looking the same, and I began to think that if all the crowd turned up at the swimming carnival on February 14th at Lake Eckersley what an entertaining and socially successful day we could have. A free plug for the swimming carnival please Mr. Editor, but we didn't really get a chance to chat with many of our errant members and the carnival is the next event and there will be sunlight to illuminate their happy faces (we hope). The Barbecue - several of the younger lads climbing up a sheer rock face at the back of the assemblage ​gives rise to the suspicion that maybe the lambs - oh horror - acting the goat is O.K. with me, but as interior lining! Wal, you wouldn'​t treat an old pal like that. Still, the lads going up the rock face were remarkably sure footed. "The food you eat today walks and talks tomorrow"​. I say bah. What rot.
  
 By eleven quite a number were heading homewards and here this very obscure report of the Barbecue must end. Some camped the night, and were to go on a walk next day. Returning to the railway station would be quite a good enough walk and I fancy would be sufficient for most. A word of thanks to Wal Roots, Gil Webb and the other helpers. At least six hours work went into preparing the lambs. A most pleasant evening and here's hoping they feel disposed to repeat the dose next Christmas. By eleven quite a number were heading homewards and here this very obscure report of the Barbecue must end. Some camped the night, and were to go on a walk next day. Returning to the railway station would be quite a good enough walk and I fancy would be sufficient for most. A word of thanks to Wal Roots, Gil Webb and the other helpers. At least six hours work went into preparing the lambs. A most pleasant evening and here's hoping they feel disposed to repeat the dose next Christmas.
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 Friday evening: Bus to Kurrajong and Heights meets 5.40 ex Central. Friday evening: Bus to Kurrajong and Heights meets 5.40 ex Central.
  
-Saturday: Buses to Kurrajong ​ana Heights meet 8.30 a.m., 11.26 a.m., 1.38 p.m. and 2.44 p.m. trains ex Central. Connection with 6.5 p.m. train to Kurrajong only.+Saturday: Buses to Kurrajong ​and Heights meet 8.30 a.m., 11.26 a.m., 1.38 p.m. and 2.44 p.m. trains ex Central. Connection with 6.5 p.m. train to Kurrajong only.
  
 Sunday morning: Bus to Kurrajong Heights meets 9.8 a.m. ex Central. Sunday morning: Bus to Kurrajong Heights meets 9.8 a.m. ex Central.
  
-Sunday return: Buses leave Kurrajong Heights 1.5, 4.45 and 7.15 p.m., pass Kurrajong 1.30, 5.15 dnd 7.40 meeting trains arriving Sydney at 3.47, 7.28 and 9.49 p.m.+Sunday return: Buses leave Kurrajong Heights 1.5, 4.45 and 7.15 p.m., pass Kurrajong 1.30, 5.15 and 7.40 meeting trains arriving Sydney at 3.47, 7.28 and 9.49 p.m.
  
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 We stuffed the remains of our feet into the remains of our boots and plodded off. Church Creek and the track to Yerranderie were located without mishap, and the whole pack of cripples increased speed as their hopes of catching the 'bus increased. We stuffed the remains of our feet into the remains of our boots and plodded off. Church Creek and the track to Yerranderie were located without mishap, and the whole pack of cripples increased speed as their hopes of catching the 'bus increased.
  
-The inhabitants of Yerranderie are used to seeing rare sights, but seldom as rare as this. Not a garment but had been attacked by Rudolph'​s 24-inch trunk borer (see glassary). Not a foot but needed a local anaesthetic. But we will do it again. Who's coming?+The inhabitants of Yerranderie are used to seeing rare sights, but seldom as rare as this. Not a garment but had been attacked by Rudolph'​s 24-inch trunk borer (see glossary). Not a foot but needed a local anaesthetic. But we will do it again. Who's coming?
  
 (List of party to reach Yerranderie on Monday, 29th December, 1952: Betty Swain (S.B.W.), Beverley Price (S.B,W.), Geoff Broadhead (Rucksack Club), Gordon Adam (St. George Bushwalkers),​ Colin Putt (S.B.W.), Peter Stitt (S.B.W.), Brian Anderson (S.B.W.), Ben Bishop (S.B.W.), Ross Laird (S.B.W.).) (List of party to reach Yerranderie on Monday, 29th December, 1952: Betty Swain (S.B.W.), Beverley Price (S.B,W.), Geoff Broadhead (Rucksack Club), Gordon Adam (St. George Bushwalkers),​ Colin Putt (S.B.W.), Peter Stitt (S.B.W.), Brian Anderson (S.B.W.), Ben Bishop (S.B.W.), Ross Laird (S.B.W.).)
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