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 An Annual or Half-Yearly General Meeting without constitutional amendments is something like roast lamb without mint sauce. Perhaps he realised the deficiencies,​ for the President was at pains to cite the Constitution on the night of the September General Meeting. His first opportunity came shortly after new member George Grey had been introduced to the gathering, which was later to grow to a peak of about 75, when a motion was sought that the notice of the meeting be taken as read. Bill Cosgrove queried the validity of a Half-Yearly General Meeting on that particular evening - it should be the second Friday in the month. Oh no, said the President, the Constitution said "​during September"​. Perhaps Mr. Cosgrove had an out-dated copy? Well, perhaps he did. Well, perhaps we could provide him with a modern issue. An Annual or Half-Yearly General Meeting without constitutional amendments is something like roast lamb without mint sauce. Perhaps he realised the deficiencies,​ for the President was at pains to cite the Constitution on the night of the September General Meeting. His first opportunity came shortly after new member George Grey had been introduced to the gathering, which was later to grow to a peak of about 75, when a motion was sought that the notice of the meeting be taken as read. Bill Cosgrove queried the validity of a Half-Yearly General Meeting on that particular evening - it should be the second Friday in the month. Oh no, said the President, the Constitution said "​during September"​. Perhaps Mr. Cosgrove had an out-dated copy? Well, perhaps he did. Well, perhaps we could provide him with a modern issue.
  
-Then it was Lavender and Old Accounts as the minutes of a bygone era were read. The constitutional amendments of September 1951, with their "​delete the word... and substitute ​therefor... before the word walker in the penultimate paragraph..."​ raised a well earned chuckle. Miraculously,​ there are always people with long memories prepared to move that the minutes be accepted as a correct record.+Then it was Lavender and Old Accounts as the minutes of a bygone era were read. The constitutional amendments of September 1951, with their "​delete the word... and substitute ​therefore... before the word walker in the penultimate paragraph..."​ raised a well earned chuckle. Miraculously,​ there are always people with long memories prepared to move that the minutes be accepted as a correct record.
  
 Correspondence contained sundry replies to our most recent campaigning on bush fire control, a letter which reported that the Victorian Mountain Tramping Club had devised a special walker'​s boot, priced at 55/- pair, sample to be viewed at Paddy'​s:​ a reply from the Minister for Local Government to our representations on sale of wild flowers (indicating that the matter was reviewed periodically,​ that our representations would be considered at the next review, and that other States had promised co-operation in control of protected species transported ex N.S.W.): also an appeal from the N.S.W. Ranger Patrol for the active support of bushwalkers. In explanation of the last, the President explained that the Patrol was a breakaway group of the Rangers'​ League, and that the Committee, after consideration,​ recommended to individual members that they consider joining its ranks. Correspondence contained sundry replies to our most recent campaigning on bush fire control, a letter which reported that the Victorian Mountain Tramping Club had devised a special walker'​s boot, priced at 55/- pair, sample to be viewed at Paddy'​s:​ a reply from the Minister for Local Government to our representations on sale of wild flowers (indicating that the matter was reviewed periodically,​ that our representations would be considered at the next review, and that other States had promised co-operation in control of protected species transported ex N.S.W.): also an appeal from the N.S.W. Ranger Patrol for the active support of bushwalkers. In explanation of the last, the President explained that the Patrol was a breakaway group of the Rangers'​ League, and that the Committee, after consideration,​ recommended to individual members that they consider joining its ranks.
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 My travels in the British Isles and Scandinavia have been made easier for me by the kind help of Frank Leyden, who allowed me to leave unnecessary equipment, maps and brochures I had collected at his home at Chelmsford. By the time I reached his home I must have increased the 70 lbs. I left Sydney with to 80, which load I reduced to about 60 lbs. for touring through the British Isles and still further to 40 lbs. for the Cook's Tour. This was made possible, I say, by making Frank Leyden'​s home my repository. My travels in the British Isles and Scandinavia have been made easier for me by the kind help of Frank Leyden, who allowed me to leave unnecessary equipment, maps and brochures I had collected at his home at Chelmsford. By the time I reached his home I must have increased the 70 lbs. I left Sydney with to 80, which load I reduced to about 60 lbs. for touring through the British Isles and still further to 40 lbs. for the Cook's Tour. This was made possible, I say, by making Frank Leyden'​s home my repository.
  
-If Charlie Chaplin became famous by stimulating laughter, I consider I should be equally famous. When I arrivsd ​in Perth, W.A., reporters interviewed me, took pictures of me and my pack, and I believe I was featured in the following day's issue of the "​Sunday Times"​. In Venice, after nearly disembowelling a corpulent Italian that got in my way on a ferry going along the Grand Canal, the sight of me and my pack caused the boat to rock from stem to stern with laughter. Again, at Cologne in Germany a woman became hysterical with laughter when I appeared: and I could see her husband through self-consciousness trying to lead her away, but she kept on looking back at me, while she held a handkerchief to her face. At Inverness in Scotland a railway official told me I reminded him of Bill Kerr, and at Grasmere in the English Lakes District the warden of the Youth Hostel greeted me with the remark "I thought it was Bill Kerr coming along"​.+If Charlie Chaplin became famous by stimulating laughter, I consider I should be equally famous. When I arrived ​in Perth, W.A., reporters interviewed me, took pictures of me and my pack, and I believe I was featured in the following day's issue of the "​Sunday Times"​. In Venice, after nearly disembowelling a corpulent Italian that got in my way on a ferry going along the Grand Canal, the sight of me and my pack caused the boat to rock from stem to stern with laughter. Again, at Cologne in Germany a woman became hysterical with laughter when I appeared: and I could see her husband through self-consciousness trying to lead her away, but she kept on looking back at me, while she held a handkerchief to her face. At Inverness in Scotland a railway official told me I reminded him of Bill Kerr, and at Grasmere in the English Lakes District the warden of the Youth Hostel greeted me with the remark "I thought it was Bill Kerr coming along"​.
  
 In the British Isles , as on the Continent, I made the greatest use of Youth Hostels I could, in order to keep down expenses but, whereas on more than one occasion I visited an English hostel to be confronted with the notice "​Hostel Booked out for tonight",​ in Scotland I was never once refused admission to a hostel. When I explained to a warden that I came from Australia, he would forget his previous statement that the hostel was booked out, and would tell me to take bed number so-and-so, enjoining me "to keep quiet about it". In consequence,​ those who had booked beds slept on the floor, whilst I slept in a bed. Such is the traditional hospitality of the Scotch that it is the policy of the Youth Hostel Movement there to make room for an overseas visitor. It is peculiar, too, that this kind of thing happened to me at Glencoe where in 1692 Scotsmen were butchered even in the act of offering hospitality. In the British Isles , as on the Continent, I made the greatest use of Youth Hostels I could, in order to keep down expenses but, whereas on more than one occasion I visited an English hostel to be confronted with the notice "​Hostel Booked out for tonight",​ in Scotland I was never once refused admission to a hostel. When I explained to a warden that I came from Australia, he would forget his previous statement that the hostel was booked out, and would tell me to take bed number so-and-so, enjoining me "to keep quiet about it". In consequence,​ those who had booked beds slept on the floor, whilst I slept in a bed. Such is the traditional hospitality of the Scotch that it is the policy of the Youth Hostel Movement there to make room for an overseas visitor. It is peculiar, too, that this kind of thing happened to me at Glencoe where in 1692 Scotsmen were butchered even in the act of offering hospitality.
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-=====Kurnell Peninsula (Australia'​s Birthplace) To Become ​Industiral ​Area.=====+=====Kurnell Peninsula (Australia'​s Birthplace) To Become ​Industrial ​Area.=====
  
 (Extract from an item by Mr. Hume, Secretary, Parks & Playgrounds Movement, received through our P. & P. Delegate, Mrs. H. Stoddart). (Extract from an item by Mr. Hume, Secretary, Parks & Playgrounds Movement, received through our P. & P. Delegate, Mrs. H. Stoddart).
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 I was a worried little boy on the 5.20 ex town that Friday for I hadn't spotted Neil. Somehow I missed him at Campbelltown,​ too, and it wasn't until we mutually appeared on adjoining carriage platforms as the train crept into Camden that I felt happy. The driver of the Bimlow bus told us that the Sunday afternoon trip from Yerranderie had been wiped about a fortnight before - so it looked like a special hiring or some hitch-hiking. Well, forward! I was a worried little boy on the 5.20 ex town that Friday for I hadn't spotted Neil. Somehow I missed him at Campbelltown,​ too, and it wasn't until we mutually appeared on adjoining carriage platforms as the train crept into Camden that I felt happy. The driver of the Bimlow bus told us that the Sunday afternoon trip from Yerranderie had been wiped about a fortnight before - so it looked like a special hiring or some hitch-hiking. Well, forward!
  
-Frank was waiting for us at the store near Spring Corner, having parked his "​two-stroke"​ there. It had been a grim ride over the corrugated road, with his lights dimming inconveniently on the pass. What the papers that week-end described as htornadic ​squalls"​ lashed at the 'bus as we jaunted down the valley. A big black cloud swelled over the western walls as we de-bussed at Bimlow.+Frank was waiting for us at the store near Spring Corner, having parked his "​two-stroke"​ there. It had been a grim ride over the corrugated road, with his lights dimming inconveniently on the pass. What the papers that week-end described as "​tornadic ​squalls"​ lashed at the 'bus as we jaunted down the valley. A big black cloud swelled over the western walls as we de-bussed at Bimlow.
  
 I'll sing you four ho!... etc...\\ I'll sing you four ho!... etc...\\
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 We enquired about transport at the "​Silver Mines"​. No, there was no respectable way out of town, but yes, there was a truck "going down the valley"​ later, and the driver would probably take us. Presently we interviewed the driver, who "​couldn'​t say when he was going" but was willing to carry us to the bridge at Upper Burragorang. From that point we may score a further lift, could even walk to Spring Corner. Frank would then have his "two stroke"​ and Neil and I (at worst) could join the early 'bus from the Coal Mine. We enquired about transport at the "​Silver Mines"​. No, there was no respectable way out of town, but yes, there was a truck "going down the valley"​ later, and the driver would probably take us. Presently we interviewed the driver, who "​couldn'​t say when he was going" but was willing to carry us to the bridge at Upper Burragorang. From that point we may score a further lift, could even walk to Spring Corner. Frank would then have his "two stroke"​ and Neil and I (at worst) could join the early 'bus from the Coal Mine.
  
-It was going to be cold on the tray of that truck, we considered, so we rugged up in balaclavas, gloves and all. Neil pointed to the virtues of a beard. We squatted in a little hollow where gravel had been scooped out for surfacing the road, a handred ​yards east of the "​Silver Mines"​. It was blowing Heavens hard, with cloud whipping across the greying sky.+It was going to be cold on the tray of that truck, we considered, so we rugged up in balaclavas, gloves and all. Neil pointed to the virtues of a beard. We squatted in a little hollow where gravel had been scooped out for surfacing the road, a hundred ​yards east of the "​Silver Mines"​. It was blowing Heavens hard, with cloud whipping across the greying sky.
  
 At 7 p.m., when we were still by the road, Neil decided that you left Yerranderie only when you were carried out. We had built a twiggy straggling fire, and had a bucket of water standing by for quenching it. We brewed up a mix of three different kinds of soup cubes and waited. The comings and goings of the truck periodically brought us to our feet, water bucket at the "​alert"​. At 7 p.m., when we were still by the road, Neil decided that you left Yerranderie only when you were carried out. We had built a twiggy straggling fire, and had a bucket of water standing by for quenching it. We brewed up a mix of three different kinds of soup cubes and waited. The comings and goings of the truck periodically brought us to our feet, water bucket at the "​alert"​.
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 Eleven for the telephone lines that were down. Eleven for the telephone lines that were down.
  
-Probably there wouldn'​t be 11 lines in the valley, but it fits the jingle, and they were all down. We were incommunicando. We bought lunch items at the Post Office - Store, basked in the wonderful calm sunlight, watched the yellow tide of the river flood by, and joined the afternoon 'bus. Frank left us at Spring Corner at 2.30, and Neil and I eventually arrived Sydney at 6.30.+Probably there wouldn'​t be 11 lines in the valley, but it fits the jingle, and they were all down. We were incommunicado. We bought lunch items at the Post Office - Store, basked in the wonderful calm sunlight, watched the yellow tide of the river flood by, and joined the afternoon 'bus. Frank left us at Spring Corner at 2.30, and Neil and I eventually arrived Sydney at 6.30.
  
-I,ll sing you twelve ho!... etc...\\+I'll sing you twelve ho!... etc...\\
 Twelve for the twelve enquiries. Twelve for the twelve enquiries.
  
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 ====Baby, It's Cold Outside!==== ====Baby, It's Cold Outside!====
  
-Sparta had its Spartans, Bondi has its icebergs, and S.B.W. has - what? On a recent combined walk, with a braw frosty night descending, one Nature Boy demonstrated his toughness and utter disdain for the elements, ​nonchalently ​tossed his sleeping bag into the fire and sleps (?) all same blackpfella on the bare ground. We hope Newcastle Walkers were suitably impressed.+Sparta had its Spartans, Bondi has its icebergs, and S.B.W. has - what? On a recent combined walk, with a braw frosty night descending, one Nature Boy demonstrated his toughness and utter disdain for the elements, ​nonchalantly ​tossed his sleeping bag into the fire and sleps (?) all same blackpfella on the bare ground. We hope Newcastle Walkers were suitably impressed.
  
 Note: This habit could develop into serious Club rivalry and could easily cause Paddy to go out of business as walkers frantically scuttle sleeping bags, tents, groundsheets and other luxuries to be in the fashion. Note: This habit could develop into serious Club rivalry and could easily cause Paddy to go out of business as walkers frantically scuttle sleeping bags, tents, groundsheets and other luxuries to be in the fashion.
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 Practice Weekend is being organised; Section would like to know how many members are likely to attend and what would be a convenient date. The place is to be kept secret until the weekend agreed upon, but it will be within the 8/- fare radius of Sydney. Practice Weekend is being organised; Section would like to know how many members are likely to attend and what would be a convenient date. The place is to be kept secret until the weekend agreed upon, but it will be within the 8/- fare radius of Sydney.
  
-===The ​Federaton ​Ball:===+===The ​Federation ​Ball:===
  
 Was reported to be a social and financial success. A fuller report will be presented to the October Meeting. Mr. J. Fletcher was appointed Acting Convener of the 1953 Ball committee in an attempt to have a hall booked in the near future. Was reported to be a social and financial success. A fuller report will be presented to the October Meeting. Mr. J. Fletcher was appointed Acting Convener of the 1953 Ball committee in an attempt to have a hall booked in the near future.
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 A further meeting of this section had worked out scales, size of sheets, title blocks, etc. Four lectures over two field weekends had been arranged. The order of preparing maps had been made somewhat along the following lines :- A further meeting of this section had worked out scales, size of sheets, title blocks, etc. Four lectures over two field weekends had been arranged. The order of preparing maps had been made somewhat along the following lines :-
  
-Wild Dogs, The Castle and Pigeon ​Haase, Kanangra Tops, Gangerangs, Wolgan-Capertee,​ Kangaroo River, Girraween, Butcher'​s Creek, Barrington North, South of the Shoalhaven.+Wild Dogs, The Castle and Pigeon ​House, Kanangra Tops, Gangerangs, Wolgan-Capertee,​ Kangaroo River, Girraween, Butcher'​s Creek, Barrington North, South of the Shoalhaven.
  
 Ten pounds was granted to the Mapping section for the purchase of materials. Ten pounds was granted to the Mapping section for the purchase of materials.
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 Long may that Youth, and others who come after,\\ Long may that Youth, and others who come after,\\
-Walk the buth tracks, seek out the life that's free,\\+Walk the bush tracks, seek out the life that's free,\\
 Meet perils, scars - and hakeas - with laughter\\ Meet perils, scars - and hakeas - with laughter\\
 (Mingled at times with mild profanity). (Mingled at times with mild profanity).
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 |Len Scot| L |and| |Len Scot| L |and|
  
-This was the origin of the term "​Tigers"​. Most of the nine continued to walk together and many others became "​Tigers"​ by adoption. Amongst those who becarme ​regulars were Bill Hall, Reg Alder, Roley Cotter, Tim Coffey, Jess Martin, Edna Stretton, Bert Whillier and Mary Stoddart (Eastoe). Many others, in fact nearly all the active walkers in the Club, came on "​Tiger"​ trips at one time or another. The truth was that there was only a handful of genuine "​tigers"​ and a number of followers who became known as "​rabbits"​. This term originated during a distance event from Katoomba to Picton in two days. As David Stead and I started our weary feet an the last 15 mile stretch after lunch on the Sunday, some ten minutes ahead of the others (and of David'​s famous schedule), David called back to them "The rabbits check out".+This was the origin of the term "​Tigers"​. Most of the nine continued to walk together and many others became "​Tigers"​ by adoption. Amongst those who became ​regulars were Bill Hall, Reg Alder, Roley Cotter, Tim Coffey, Jess Martin, Edna Stretton, Bert Whillier and Mary Stoddart (Eastoe). Many others, in fact nearly all the active walkers in the Club, came on "​Tiger"​ trips at one time or another. The truth was that there was only a handful of genuine "​tigers"​ and a number of followers who became known as "​rabbits"​. This term originated during a distance event from Katoomba to Picton in two days. As David Stead and I started our weary feet an the last 15 mile stretch after lunch on the Sunday, some ten minutes ahead of the others (and of David'​s famous schedule), David called back to them "The rabbits check out".
  
 The secret of the "​Tiger'​s"​ success as a walking group was not their toughness but the organisation and teamwork that went into every trip. I believe any reasonably fit group of walkers could do the same, or similar trips, if they organised as well. Gordon Smith did most of the planning. He used to make exhaustive enquiries about the country, the tracks, times, transport, etc. so that we would set off with as much knowledge of the route as could be obtained. On the track it was the ringing voice of Jack Debert that got the party under way before the sun was up. It was Gordon'​s quiet good humour and encouragement that kept them going at an even pace during the day. Most of the trips were not covered at a fast pace, but we always started early and kept going steadily. The party seldom camped in the dark except on the first night. In the finding of routes Max was often our guide, but when there was doubt nearly everybody gathered round the map and argued. The results were good. False theories were usually exploded. Even if the arguers couldn'​t see the light, Gordon usually could. After a few minutes of listening quietly he would say "I think we'll try this way". And we would. Except on well-known routes the party kept together. When the going was tough the strong walkers were at the back, ready to help if necessary. Gordon and Jack usually carried at least 50 lbs. and sometimes 70 or more so as to enable the girls to travel light and do trips otherwise beyond them. Others helped where they could. When we came to rock faces Dot would get up, lower a rope, and enable the rest to climb or be pulled up. The secret of the "​Tiger'​s"​ success as a walking group was not their toughness but the organisation and teamwork that went into every trip. I believe any reasonably fit group of walkers could do the same, or similar trips, if they organised as well. Gordon Smith did most of the planning. He used to make exhaustive enquiries about the country, the tracks, times, transport, etc. so that we would set off with as much knowledge of the route as could be obtained. On the track it was the ringing voice of Jack Debert that got the party under way before the sun was up. It was Gordon'​s quiet good humour and encouragement that kept them going at an even pace during the day. Most of the trips were not covered at a fast pace, but we always started early and kept going steadily. The party seldom camped in the dark except on the first night. In the finding of routes Max was often our guide, but when there was doubt nearly everybody gathered round the map and argued. The results were good. False theories were usually exploded. Even if the arguers couldn'​t see the light, Gordon usually could. After a few minutes of listening quietly he would say "I think we'll try this way". And we would. Except on well-known routes the party kept together. When the going was tough the strong walkers were at the back, ready to help if necessary. Gordon and Jack usually carried at least 50 lbs. and sometimes 70 or more so as to enable the girls to travel light and do trips otherwise beyond them. Others helped where they could. When we came to rock faces Dot would get up, lower a rope, and enable the rest to climb or be pulled up.
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 When the bushwalkers of this generation have passed on to Elysium, the ten million or so people who will be living in the population centres surrounding the Greater Blue Mountains will realize that the bushwalkers of the past were constructive in their time and had some vision for the future. They not only made persistent efforts to save their bushland wilderness for its environmental value and biologic content, but also invested it with the aura of romantic interest. It will be recognized, thankfully, we hope, that they played a prominent part in the creation of national parklands of great intrinsic value, in the face of insidious destruction caused by commercial interests of one kind and another. The necessarily slow and cautious progress of Governmental action towards measures of preservation will be acknowledged. The story will go down the years in maps and books, and in official files. There will be a vast regret for action taken too late, for mistakes made, for the fact that the people'​s parliamentary representatives adhered to party lines and rarely acted as individual statesmen. The State budgets of the times, because of the recurrence of national crises, did not include items for the creation and maintenance of action for the preservation of Australian scenery, wild-life, and bushland for outdoor living, particularly in the face of the concerted opposition of bodies interested in primary production. When the bushwalkers of this generation have passed on to Elysium, the ten million or so people who will be living in the population centres surrounding the Greater Blue Mountains will realize that the bushwalkers of the past were constructive in their time and had some vision for the future. They not only made persistent efforts to save their bushland wilderness for its environmental value and biologic content, but also invested it with the aura of romantic interest. It will be recognized, thankfully, we hope, that they played a prominent part in the creation of national parklands of great intrinsic value, in the face of insidious destruction caused by commercial interests of one kind and another. The necessarily slow and cautious progress of Governmental action towards measures of preservation will be acknowledged. The story will go down the years in maps and books, and in official files. There will be a vast regret for action taken too late, for mistakes made, for the fact that the people'​s parliamentary representatives adhered to party lines and rarely acted as individual statesmen. The State budgets of the times, because of the recurrence of national crises, did not include items for the creation and maintenance of action for the preservation of Australian scenery, wild-life, and bushland for outdoor living, particularly in the face of the concerted opposition of bodies interested in primary production.
  
-Many years have passed since bushwalkers opened up this matter, that is, their angle of conservation,​ and too little of the general plan has been accomplished;​ but we have made the machinery by which we work and we intend to keep it working. One never knows! We might be surprised in pleasant fashion: our ideas are constructive,​ our positive use of the outlands remains a consistent fact, we are sane and live actively in health in the best bushland environment we can reach, our recreation is educational,​ our words frame facts that all can understand, we hope the best for the future, and have unlimited faith in those other conservators about us who work to the same end. We keep moving steadily onward; with us the Albanian mountaineers' ​mott is appropriate:​ "​little by little"​. For one fact stands out plainly from our experience: if we were to desist from our efforts there would be an immediate slump in public interest, and the aathorities ​would take a more leisured pace in these matters. Forgotten files would accumulate in the archives, and, Heaven forfend, they micht be consigned to the incinerator. There must be continuity of effort in planning the preservation of the things we want to use and save for the use of others.+Many years have passed since bushwalkers opened up this matter, that is, their angle of conservation,​ and too little of the general plan has been accomplished;​ but we have made the machinery by which we work and we intend to keep it working. One never knows! We might be surprised in pleasant fashion: our ideas are constructive,​ our positive use of the outlands remains a consistent fact, we are sane and live actively in health in the best bushland environment we can reach, our recreation is educational,​ our words frame facts that all can understand, we hope the best for the future, and have unlimited faith in those other conservators about us who work to the same end. We keep moving steadily onward; with us the Albanian mountaineers' ​motto is appropriate:​ "​little by little"​. For one fact stands out plainly from our experience: if we were to desist from our efforts there would be an immediate slump in public interest, and the authorities ​would take a more leisured pace in these matters. Forgotten files would accumulate in the archives, and, Heaven forfend, they might be consigned to the incinerator. There must be continuity of effort in planning the preservation of the things we want to use and save for the use of others.
  
 It may disappoint some of our colleagues of the outdoors to learn that not many names of bushwalkers appear on the features of our bushland environment. Mainly because of origins some early walkers'​ names have been perpetuated;​ most are in relatively minor positions topographically but important to bushwalkers,​ indicating lookouts, passes and such-like. At times the authorities have attached the names of prominent citizens to features, as can be seen on the High Monaro, but personal names are frowned on unless genuinely historic. Therefore in this section we have proceeded with caution. It may disappoint some of our colleagues of the outdoors to learn that not many names of bushwalkers appear on the features of our bushland environment. Mainly because of origins some early walkers'​ names have been perpetuated;​ most are in relatively minor positions topographically but important to bushwalkers,​ indicating lookouts, passes and such-like. At times the authorities have attached the names of prominent citizens to features, as can be seen on the High Monaro, but personal names are frowned on unless genuinely historic. Therefore in this section we have proceeded with caution.
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 In our own social way we have learned about the natural attractions of the great mountainous barrier region, until now we are very certain of its general value as environment. We know its interesting plateaux and peaks, frescoed walls and vast buttresses, master-ranges,​ breaks and gaps; its canyons and deeps, beautiful streams, forests, heaths and fern-gullies. Better than any other section of our people we know the intrinsic value of the wilderness areas, which we very much desire should remain as such, without roads and settlements and free of the blight of commercial undertakings and polluted streams. We want the Greater Blue Mountains National Park established. In our own social way we have learned about the natural attractions of the great mountainous barrier region, until now we are very certain of its general value as environment. We know its interesting plateaux and peaks, frescoed walls and vast buttresses, master-ranges,​ breaks and gaps; its canyons and deeps, beautiful streams, forests, heaths and fern-gullies. Better than any other section of our people we know the intrinsic value of the wilderness areas, which we very much desire should remain as such, without roads and settlements and free of the blight of commercial undertakings and polluted streams. We want the Greater Blue Mountains National Park established.
  
-The standard tourist map - which includes very little of the northern half of the region - shows that much interest has been added to the face of what was really wild country when heavy-pack exploring walkers first engineered their routes across it. To a certain extent it was the haunt of cattle-duffers and moonshiners. Its trails were known only to local bushmen who had reasons for riding into and across it. Within its fastnesses were scrubber cattle and brunbies, at least one stag, and a great quantity of marsupial, reptilian and bird life up to 1916, when skin-getting became a business. Then trappers, shooters, timber-getters,​ some cattlemen, and the great recurrent bushfires from 1928-9 onward, depleted natural values and decimated wild-life.+The standard tourist map - which includes very little of the northern half of the region - shows that much interest has been added to the face of what was really wild country when heavy-pack exploring walkers first engineered their routes across it. To a certain extent it was the haunt of cattle-duffers and moonshiners. Its trails were known only to local bushmen who had reasons for riding into and across it. Within its fastnesses were scrubber cattle and brumbies, at least one stag, and a great quantity of marsupial, reptilian and bird life up to 1916, when skin-getting became a business. Then trappers, shooters, timber-getters,​ some cattlemen, and the great recurrent bushfires from 1928-9 onward, depleted natural values and decimated wild-life.
  
 In this limited article there is little space left for information about particular place-names. As an earnest of what is meant by giving interest to the features of this region, let us consider two of the most prominent peaks of Tallarat Crags: Arabanoo Peak and Cambage Spire. Where Christy'​s Creek joins Kowmung River, in the Southern Blue Mountains, there is a chaotic array of canyons, crags and peaks. The twisting Tiamat Canyon of East Christy'​s Creek junctions with Christy'​s Creek Canyon a few hundred yards from the Kowmung at the upper end of Bulga-Denis Canyon. East Christy'​s Creek rises between several plateaux of Kanangra Tops (3,500 feet) then drops steeply southward. In this limited article there is little space left for information about particular place-names. As an earnest of what is meant by giving interest to the features of this region, let us consider two of the most prominent peaks of Tallarat Crags: Arabanoo Peak and Cambage Spire. Where Christy'​s Creek joins Kowmung River, in the Southern Blue Mountains, there is a chaotic array of canyons, crags and peaks. The twisting Tiamat Canyon of East Christy'​s Creek junctions with Christy'​s Creek Canyon a few hundred yards from the Kowmung at the upper end of Bulga-Denis Canyon. East Christy'​s Creek rises between several plateaux of Kanangra Tops (3,500 feet) then drops steeply southward.
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-RABBITS AMONG THE TIGERS.+=====Rabbit Among The Tigers.===== 
 By Grace Noble. By Grace Noble.
-Eleven an a food-list, I went along muttering to myself, eleven on a food-list -- me Who's always been a blooming individualist with me own foods that I cooks how I likes or don't cook at all: still, I suppose it ma7 lighten the weight - but it's much against my better judgment that I'm in on this at all. "​This"​ being Gordon Smith'​s first "​underwater trip down the Kowmung"​ of Christmas - New Year, 1938-39. To know how I, a rabbit to end all rabbits, happened to be in it, you have to realise that the said Smithy, though a wonderful instigator and organiser of trips, was cursed with something a Tiger should be without - a kind heart. So when someone says to him "​Here''​s poor Grace been languishing in the country with no walking for six months, and she'd love to go on a walk", he cheerfully says "Oh, she can come, we can anays carry her". (He being both capable of and willing to do just that.) 
-Besides Gordon, the original starters. from Ginkin were Jack Debert (whipper-in of the weaklings), Bill Hall (who committed the sacrilege of annointing his Christmas pudding and cream with bran), Roley Cotter (helping maidens in distress 'way back in those dim, dark ages), Reg Alder, Alex Colley, and a non-bushwalker friend of Alex, Edgar Phillips who looked like something out of Scheherezade,​ with his dark hair, soulful eyes and a purple-striped towel he used as a turban, and who beguiled the camp fire with tales from Jurgen. There were also two friends of Alex, whose names I donit remember, but who had radical social views (must have been before he Saw the Light), The Tigresses were represented by Hilma Galliott, Dot English and Mary Stoddart. At the tail-end, of course, come the Rabbits - Clare Kinsella, who has the sort of figure its nice to have along on a walk, even if (or because) you might have to carry it hone - and myself, the Very Inferior Rabbit. Whereas Clare, when confronted with a ten-foot, drop into a bottomless pool, would jump docilely When ordered, the Very Inferior type would stand dithering at the edge until it dropped off from exhaustion. 
-As to this being "a first down the Upper Kowmung"​ trip, I feel 
-it is always dangerous to make such a claim - some obscure geologist or surveyor was probably there long before - but at least I am pretty 
-sure we were the first S.B.W. party to travel the length of the Kowmung from the Hollander-Tuglow junction, actually on or in the river - as 
-distinct from other parties which had followed its course from a route 
-well up on the ridges. 
-We spent the first few days in a deceptively easy and pleasant amble from Ginkin down the rivers till we got to Morong Creek, where we said goodbye to Dot, Alex and his friends, who had only the Christmas part of the holiday and were returning from there. This left the experimental part of the trip - down the Morong Deep and so on to Yerranderie - to be 'done before New Year, When we had to Dick up food, some more members of the trip, and get rid of myself. This may not sound much, but When you consider that we did not yet know whether one could make a pack float in a reasonably water-tight condition for any corinerable distance, or even how far we were likely to have to float 1 
-41. 
-them, it was enough to cause a few misgivings (to the rabbits, at any rate). 
-I might remark here that the original idea, vvhian we had all faithfully followed, was to buy each a small rectangular surf float (about 3' x 21), on which we would tie our packs. As the granite gorge narrowed, we came to the first testing place - sheer walls and a long narrow pool. I am not quite sure of the next bit, but I think the guinea pig's pack (not mine) was first wrapped in a groundsheet,​ then tied with cord to the float and launched, with the pack uppermost. As arzscientific type should have been able to predict, but didn'​t,​ the float floated to the top, leaving the pack underneath, somewhat wetter. The interesting part to us was that even then, pack plus float did not sink more than a few inches in the water - and so the historic discovery was made of simply wrapping in a groundsheet and tying securely like a Christmas pudding. (The rubber floats made wonderful air-cushions for the rest of the trip.) 
-In case there are any folk remaining who have not done it, the Morong Deep" is cut deep into granitic rocks, with theKowmung flowing in a series of long pools of varying depth, and anything up to 300-yards long, with sheer walls, and ending in a mass of granite boulders and a drop, or a series of drops, into the next pool - and so on for miles. I don't recall the total length, but I do know that the hardest day's going was eight miles: and that was from dawn to dark. Needless to say, wear a-id tear on groundsheets and gear is nearly as bad as that on personnel. I remember a time when Reg, somewhere below in the depths of the gorge, spreadeagled against a very knobbly piece of granite, and arrayed in the conventional masculine mode for doing the Kowmung, was carefully lowering Mary's pack by cord to the pool below. Mary calls out: "​Don'​t scratch itlu Retort from the depths, in deeply injured voice: ''​Don'​t scratch what?" 
-The trials of this part of the trip were added to by this elevenon-a-food-list stunt. The theory is that, instead of cooking and washing up f or yourself all the time, 7011 have a turn at doing it for eleven. I think three or four cooks were rostered. for eaOh meal, but only one or two washers-up: just imagine about 20 plates, with accompanying cutlery, and incredible numbers of dirty billies, and you may agree that in practice it's not so hot. To a dispassionate observer, the tribal ceremony involVed. in dishing out was also amazing. Eleven dishes were set cut in a row, and three or four billy-bearers,​ followed by a blow-fly shoo-er, would start along the row, to the accompaniment of a steadily rising buzz from the double orchestra (human and insect). This would reach a deafening crescendo as the quantities were at last exactly apportioned;​ a deathly silence from the human orchestra as it grabbed its food; and then just a steady munch, munch, munch. 
-I might point out that individualism was severely frowned upon. You were given a share of everything eXactly equal to everyone else'​s,​ and you ate it or else. It was at the end of the most gruelling day, with the temperature well over 100, that a more than usually obnoxious-looking mess of dried potato and tinned meat mixed together 
-04. were served out; I took one look at it, and hurriedly sneaked my plate t_ 
-42. 
-over to Reg (who was always hungry), unfortunately was caught in the act, pounced on and ordered to eat. Whereupon I shamed myself forever by weeping quantities of salt tears into the aforesaid mess. This un-nerved the entire party, who all acted very remorseful and bunged me into my sleeping bag and put me away for the night. 
-As the river emerges from the narrower part of the gorge, the level stretches between the pools are more frequent. One advantage in being a rabbit was that (when no-one was sufficiently alert to check up on me) I could meander along in the rear, enjoy the cool strangeness of the gorge itself, with its grey-blue and grey-pink walls and silent pools, and murmur to myself Mary's favourite quotation: 
-"There is sweet music here, which softer falls Than petals from blown roses on the grass; Or night-dews an still waters, between walls Of shadowy granite, in a gleaming pass". 
-Needless to say, sooner or later, the spell would be broken, the whipper-in would remember me, and baying at m7 heels would round me lap at least to the middle of the party. 
-The rest of the trip (as far as I was concerned) was a pleasant stroll down the Kowmung and in to Yerranderie (where some of the party accompanied me in order to get more food), and where the New Year arrivals, David Stead, Dot, Bill Mullins and (I think) Irving Calnan and Bill Whitney joined the party to do the rest of the Kowmung and so to Katomba. My only regret at this stage was abandoning the said Bill M., who was our Hero of the Moment, to the unscrupulous clutches 
-of H. and C., who I feared Took an Interest. 
-Incidentally,​ the return party took with them ice cream. Being now unencumbered by a rabbit they got back before the ice cream melted, 
-with the result that a photo entitled hDot eating ice cream on the Kowmungh which subsequently appeared in the Bushwalker, was greeted with jeers of derision as an obvious fake. 
-Well, looking back on it,11m glad to have done the trip --- once .. 
-los11.1MMIIIIMIII=t 
-- IN THE NAME OF SPORT. 
-During the 50'z of last century.it was estimated that there were 60 million buffalo in Canada and U.S.A. By 1880 they h ad almost 
-been destroyed Today, despite 70 years of careful preservation,​ there are perhaps 309000. 
-"​Sportsmen"​ have contributed largely to the extinction of at least four South African creatures - the Bloubok, the True Quagga, the Cape Lion and Burdheills Zebra. 
-4 
  
 +Eleven an a food-list, I went along muttering to myself, eleven on a food-list -- me who's always been a blooming individualist with me own foods that I cooks how I likes or don't cook at all: still, I suppose it __may__ lighten the weight - but it's much against my better judgement that I'm in on this at all. "​This"​ being Gordon Smith'​s first "​underwater trip down the Kowmung"​ of Christmas - New Year, 1938-39. To know how I, a rabbit to end all rabbits, happened to be in it, you have to realise that the said Smithy, though a wonderful instigator and organiser of trips, was cursed with something a Tiger should be without - a kind heart. So when someone says to him "​Here'​s poor Grace been languishing in the country with no walking for six months, and she'd __love__ to go on a walk", he cheerfully says "Oh, she can come, we can always carry her". (He being both capable of and willing to do just that.)
 +
 +Besides Gordon, the original starters from Ginkin were Jack Debert (whipper-in of the weaklings), Bill Hall (who committed the sacrilege of annointing his Christmas pudding and cream with bran), Roley Cotter (helping maidens in distress 'way back in those dim, dark ages), Reg Alder, Alex Colley, and a non-bushwalker friend of Alex, Edgar Phillips who looked like something out of Scheherezade,​ with his dark hair, soulful eyes and a purple-striped towel he used as a turban, and who beguiled the camp fire with tales from Jurgen. There were also two friends of Alex, whose names I don't remember, but who had radical social views (must have been before he Saw the Light). The Tigresses were represented by Hilma Galliott, Dot English and Mary Stoddart. At the tail-end, of course, come the Rabbits - Clare Kinsella, who has the sort of figure its nice to have along on a walk, even if (or because) you might have to carry it home - and myself, the Very Inferior Rabbit. Whereas Clare, when confronted with a ten-foot drop into a bottomless pool, would jump docilely when ordered, the Very Inferior type would stand dithering at the edge until it dropped off from exhaustion.
 +
 +As to this being "a first down the Upper Kowmung"​ trip, I feel it is always dangerous to make such a claim - some obscure geologist or surveyor was probably there long before - but at least I am pretty sure we were the first S.B.W. party to travel the length of the Kowmung from the Hollander-Tuglow junction, actually on or in the river - as distinct from other parties which had followed its course from a route well up on the ridges.
 +
 +We spent the first few days in a deceptively easy and pleasant amble from Ginkin down the rivers till we got to Morong Creek, where we said goodbye to Dot, Alex and his friends, who had only the Christmas part of the holiday and were returning from there. This left the experimental part of the trip - down the Morong Deep and so on to Yerranderie - to be done before New Year, when we had to pick up food, some more members of the trip, and get rid of myself. This may not sound much, but when you consider that we did not yet know whether one __could__ make a pack float in a reasonably water-tight condition for any considerable distance, or even how far we were likely to have to float them, it was enough to cause a few misgivings (to the rabbits, at any rate).
 +
 +I might remark here that the original idea, which we had all faithfully followed, was to buy each a small rectangular surf float (about 3' x 2'), on which we would tie our packs. As the granite gorge narrowed, we came to the first testing place - sheer walls and a long narrow pool. I am not quite sure of the next bit, but I think the guinea pig's pack (not mine) was first wrapped in a groundsheet,​ then tied with cord to the float and launched, with the pack uppermost. As any scientific type should have been able to predict, but didn'​t,​ the float floated to the top, leaving the pack underneath, somewhat wetter. The interesting part to us was that even then, pack plus float did not sink more than a few inches in the water - and so the historic discovery was made of simply wrapping in a groundsheet and tying securely like a Christmas pudding. (The rubber floats made wonderful air-cushions for the rest of the trip.)
 +
 +In case there are any folk remaining who have __not__ done it, the "​Morong Deep" is cut deep into granitic rocks, with the Kowmung flowing in a series of long pools of varying depth, and anything up to 300-yards long, with sheer walls, and ending in a mass of granite boulders and a drop, or a series of drops, into the next pool - and so on for miles. I don't recall the total length, but I do know that the hardest day's going was eight miles: and that was from dawn to dark. Needless to say, wear and tear on groundsheets and gear is nearly as bad as that on personnel. I remember a time when Reg, somewhere below in the depths of the gorge, spreadeagled against a very knobbly piece of granite, and arrayed in the conventional masculine mode for doing the Kowmung, was carefully lowering Mary's pack by cord to the pool below. Mary calls out: "​Don'​t scratch it!" Retort from the depths, in deeply injured voice: "​Don'​t scratch what?"
 +
 +The trials of this part of the trip were added to by this eleven-on-a-food-list stunt. The theory is that, instead of cooking and washing up for yourself all the time, you have a turn at doing it for eleven. I think three or four cooks were rostered for each meal, but only one or two washers-up: just imagine about 20 plates, with accompanying cutlery, and incredible numbers of dirty billies, and you may agree that in practice it's not so hot. To a dispassionate observer, the tribal ceremony involved in dishing out was also amazing. Eleven dishes were set out in a row, and three or four billy-bearers,​ followed by a blow-fly shoo-er, would start along the row, to the accompaniment of a steadily rising buzz from the double orchestra (human and insect). This would reach a deafening crescendo as the quantities were at last exactly apportioned;​ a deathly silence from the human orchestra as it grabbed its food; and then just a steady munch, munch, munch.
 +
 +I might point out that individualism was severely frowned upon. You were given a share of everything exactly equal to everyone else'​s,​ and you ate it or else. It was at the end of the most gruelling day, with the temperature well over 100 degrees, that a more than usually obnoxious-looking mess of dried potato ​ and tinned meat mixed together were served out; I took one look at it, and hurriedly sneaked my plate over to Reg (who was always hungry), unfortunately was caught in the act, pounced on and ordered to eat. Whereupon I shamed myself forever by weeping quantities of salt tears into the aforesaid mess. This unnerved the entire party, who all acted very remorseful and bunged me into my sleeping bag and put me away for the night.
 +
 +As the river emerges from the narrower part of the gorge, the level stretches between the pools are more frequent. One advantage in being a rabbit was that (when no one was sufficiently alert to check up on me) I could meander along in the rear, enjoy the cool strangeness of the gorge itself, with its grey-blue and grey-pink walls and silent pools, and murmur to myself Mary's favourite quotation:
 +
 +"There is sweet music here, which softer falls\\
 +Than petals from blown roses on the grass;\\
 +Or night-dews on still waters, between walls\\
 +Of shadowy granite, in a gleaming pass".
 +
 +Needless to say, sooner or later, the spell would be broken, the whipper-in would remember me, and baying at my heels would round me up at least to the middle of the party.
 +
 +The rest of the trip (as far as I was concerned) was a pleasant stroll down the Kowmung and in to Yerranderie (where some of the party accompanied me in order to get more food), and where the New Year arrivals, David Stead, Dot, Bill Mullins and (I think) Irving Calnan and Bill Whitney joined the party to do the rest of the Kowmung and so to Katoomba. My only regret at this stage was abandoning the said Bill M., who was our Hero of the Moment, to the unscrupulous clutches of H. and C., who I feared Took an Interest.
 +
 +Incidentally,​ the return party took with them ice cream. Being now unencumbered by a rabbit they got back before the ice cream melted, with the result that a photo entitled "Dot eating ice cream on the Kowmung"​ which subsequently appeared in the Bushwalker, was greeted with jeers of derision as an obvious fake.
 +
 +Well, looking back on it, I'm glad to have done the trip --- once...
 +
 +----
 +
 +====In The Name Of The Sport.====
 +
 +During the 50's of last century it was estimated that there were 60 million buffalo in Canada and U.S.A. By 1880 they had almost been destroyed Today, despite 70 years of careful preservation,​ there are perhaps 30,000.
 +
 +"​Sportsmen"​ have contributed largely to the extinction of at least four South African creatures - the Bloubok, the True Quagga, the Cape Lion and Burchell'​s Zebra.
195210.txt · Last modified: 2016/06/25 07:33 by tyreless