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195210 [2016/06/24 03:25]
tyreless
195210 [2016/06/25 07:00]
tyreless
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 +=====Bushwalker Achievements In Conservation.=====
  
-BUSHWALKER ACHIEVEMENTS IN CONSERVATION. 
 By Ken Matthews By Ken Matthews
-Every bushwalking club knows that Sydney is, of all the Australian capitals, the one most favoured by nature in the provision of abundant areas particularly suited for bushwalking. ​' ith the Blue Mountains, Burragorang Valley, Hawkesbury River system, and the beaches and highlands of the near South Coast, the success of the bushwalking movement is assured for several generations to come, and with foresight should continue while civilisation itself lasts.+ 
 +Every bushwalking club knows that Sydney is, of all the Australian capitals, the one most favoured by nature in the provision of abundant areas particularly suited for bushwalking. ​With the Blue Mountains, Burragorang Valley, Hawkesbury River system, and the beaches and highlands of the near South Coast, the success of the bushwalking movement is assured for several generations to come, and with foresight should continue while civilisation itself lasts. 
 An important factor to be considered is the expanding population of the metropolitan area. As the population increases bushwalking is likely to become increasingly popular so that more and more people will spend their leisure hours in the bush areas. But the demand for new roads, power-lines,​ town areas, developmental works and landing areas will also increase. These may threaten the retention of the bushwalking areas if foresight be not shown. An important factor to be considered is the expanding population of the metropolitan area. As the population increases bushwalking is likely to become increasingly popular so that more and more people will spend their leisure hours in the bush areas. But the demand for new roads, power-lines,​ town areas, developmental works and landing areas will also increase. These may threaten the retention of the bushwalking areas if foresight be not shown.
-It is not only for the bushwalking community that steps should be taken to see that the scenic ​aad wild-life areas around Sydney and else, where in the State are preserved. As everyone ​knowsertain ​species of fauna, and of flora, are disappearing and it is well in the interest of nature-lovers generally that steps should be taken to halt despoliation. In the interests of science and knowledge, as well as in :​ecreational ​activity and national fitness, the preservation of the bushlands as primitive areas is of prime importance. It is not necessary to be a practising bushwalking to appreciate the bushlands and What they contain. But it is essential, most essential indeed, if the bush regions are to be enjoyed in their wildest and primitive state, to approach them on foot ard not by means of motor cars, or, in anticipation of things to come, by helicopter or saucer. + 
-There can be no bringing of the bushlands to the people. The +It is not only for the bushwalking community that steps should be taken to see that the scenic ​and wild-life areas around Sydney and elsewhere ​in the State are preserved. As everyone ​knows, certain ​species of fauna, and of flora, are disappearing and it is well in the interest of nature-lovers generally that steps should be taken to halt despoliation. In the interests of science and knowledge, as well as in recreational ​activity and national fitness, the preservation of the bushlands as primitive areas is of prime importance. It is not necessary to be a practising bushwalking to appreciate the bushlands and what they contain. But it is essential, most essential indeed, if the bush regions are to be enjoyed in their wildest and primitive state, to approach them on foot and not by means of motor cars, or, in anticipation of things to come, by helicopter or saucer. 
-people, if they want it, must go to the bushland. Attempts to bring + 
-37. +There can be no bringing of the bushlands to the people. The people, if they want it, must go to the bushland. Attempts to bring the bush to the people by opening up roadways beyond a given point only succeed in pushing the bush farther away or destroying it altogether. Supposing in a moment of mad enthusiasm, under a caption ​of "Bring the Bushlands to the People",​ roadways with their incidentals of bridges, culverts, quarried areas, parking spaces, shelter-sheds,​ telephone lines, and the inevitable hotels and kiosks for motorists, and landing fields for helicopterists,​ were to be provided at every lookout, scenic spot, in every valley, stream, glade and glen - would not the very reason for building them have then been destroyed? Would not the "next step" ​then be to begin removing the roadways, sheds etc. in the hope that the bushlands, and the animals, birds and trees would come back to the people? As foolish as it may seem, this, at any rate in general principle, is the situation that has faced several ​countries ​outside ​Australia ​- hence the reservation of large tracts in America, Africa and Europe as great national parks. It can happen in Australia too, and will happen if foresight be not shown. After all, until 1788, the whole of Australia was a primitive area. 
-the bush to the people by opening up roadways beyond a given point only succeed in pushing the bush farther away or destroying it alto- + 
-ether. Supposing in a moment of mad enthusiasm, under a capLio'​l ​of +The bushwalking community has not been unmindful of the position, and it is to the credit of the Bushwalking Clubs and their Federation that something, small though it may be relative to what remains to be done, has been achieved in the way of conservation of areas. A brief account of those achievements is here attempted. While, in a bushwalking journal, emphasis is placed on the energies of the Bushwalking Movement, grateful ​acknowledgement ​is made of the assistance given by bodies such as the Wild Life Preservation Society, Parks and Playground Movement, Rangers' ​League, Boy Scouts Association,​ Australian Forest League and several Government officials as well as private citizens. 
-Bring the Bushlands to the People",​ roadways with their incidentals of bridges, culverts, quarried areas, parking spaces, shelter-sheds,​ telephone lines, and the inevitable hotels and kiosks for motoriits, and landing fields for helicopterists,​ were to be provided at every + 
-lookout, scenic spot, in every valley, stream, glade and glen - would not the very reason for building them have then been destroyed? Would not the 'next step' ​then be to begin removing the roadways, sheds etc0 in the hope that the bushlands, and the animals, birds and trees would come back to the people? As foolish as it may seem, this, at any rate in general principle, is the situation that has faced several ​tountries ​outside ​kastralia ​- hence the reservation of large tracts in Ameri4a, Africa and Europe as great national parks. It can happen in Australia too, and will happen if foresight be not shown. After all, until 1788, the Whole of Australia was a primitive area. +One of the first attempts at conservation - and a highly ​successful ​one - was the Blue Gum Forest, Grose Valley. Apart from a few members of the Mountain Trails Club and Sydney ​Bush Walkers not many people knew of this delightful spot. The first walker known to have visited the forest was a Frenchman, Du Faur, who did the trip in 1876. The late Judge Docker frequented the area gaining access from Perry'​s Lookdown long before the S.B.W. was formed. It was he who constructed a steel ladder down the cliff face. Surrounded as it is by cliffs 2,000 feet high, with no road leading into it, the Blue Gum Forest at the junction of the Grose River and Govett'​s ​Leap Creek, should remain a primitive area for all time. 
-The bushwalking community has not been unmindful of the position, and it is to the credit of the Bushwalking Clubs and their Federation that something, small though it may be relative to what remains to be done, has been achieved in the way of conservation of areas. A brief account of those achievements is here attempted. While, in a bushwalking journal, emphasis is placed on the energies of the Bushwalking Movement, grateful ​acknowledgment ​is made of the assistance given by bodies such as the Wild Life Preservation Society, Parks and Playground Movement, RangersLeague, Boy Scouts Association,​ Australian Forest League and several Government officials as well as private citizens. + 
-One of the first attempts at conservation - and a highly ​success'​ ful one - was the Blue Gum Forest, Grose Valley. Apart from a few members of the Mountain Trails Club and Sydney ​Dash Walkers not many people knew of this delightful spot. The first walker known to have visited the forest was a Frenchman, Du Faur, Who did the trip in 1876. The late Judge Docker frequented the area gaining access from Perry'​s Lookdown long before the S.B.W. was formed. It was he who constructed a steel ladder down the cliff face. Surrounded as it is by cliffs 2,000 feet high, with no road leading into it, the Blue Gum Forest at the junction of the Grose River and Govettls ​Leap Creek, should remain a primitive area for all time. +The Lands Department, quite unaware of anything worthy of protection, had given a grazing lease over the area to a farmer living on the surrounding plateau. It just happened that on one occasion when some members of the S.B.W. and M.T.C. were encamped there, the echo of an axe resounded through the stately blue gums. Upon investigation ​the lessee was seen ringbarking the trees, a legal right he had towards every one of the few thousand blue gums there. He was unresponsive to the pleas made to him: he had a grazing lease and wanted to use the area for his cattle. But he was found to be responsive to bargaining and himself offered to sell his lease over the 40 acres for £130 payable within three months. So, the S.B.W. and M.T.C. set about raising money, and with the help of other agencies and private citizens, succeeded in purchasing the lease. Thus the Blue Gum Forest was handed back to the Crown to be dedicated as a camping reserve for all time. The Government appointed four members of the S.B.W. as trustees. Since then the Blackheath Council has added strips of land to the area. It must not pass unnoticed, however, that a strip of adjacent ​land is still he in private ownership, though it is unlikely that the owner will use in a way that would thwart the purposes of the camping reserve. 
-The Lands Department, quite unaware of anything worthy of protection, had given a grazing lease over the area to a farmer living on the surrounding plateau. It just happened that on one occasion when some members of the S.B.W. and M.T.C. were encamped there, the + 
-echo of an axe resounded through the stately blue gums. Upon investiga, tion the lessee was seen ringbarking the trees, a legal right he had towards every one of the few thousand blue gums there. He was unresponsive to the pleas made to him: he had a grazing lease and wanted to use the area for his cattle. But he was found to be responsive to bargaining and himself offered to sell his lease over the 40 acres for 130 payable within three months. So, the S.B.W. and M.T.C. set about raising money, and with the help of other agencies and private citizens, succeeded in purchasing the lease. Thus the Blue Gum Forest was handed back to the Crown to be dedicated as a camping reserve for all time. The Government appointed four members of +In its early days, the S.B.W. ​took out a special lease of 100 acres on Myuna Creek, a tributary of Heathcote ​Creek. The purpose of the lease of the area, Morella Karong as it is known, was for a camping reserve and sanctuary. Conditions of the lease were that no fences were to be erected and no permanent habitation was to be allowed. The area has a waterfall and substantial pool. However, ​on the establishment of the Heathcote Primitive Area, the S.B.W. relinquished the lease in favour of negotiating for the conservation of the Garawarra Park
-3S. + 
-the S.B.W. as trustees. Since then the Blackheath Council has added strips of land to the area. It must not-lass unnoticed, however, that +A similar lease for a camping reserve and sanctuary of 85 acres was taken out by the M.T.C. ​on Heathcote Creek. The area is known as the Miarra Sanctuary. The lease is still held but the area is now surrounded by the Heathcote Primitive Area. 
-a strip of adjacent ​lard is still he in private ownership, though it + 
-it unlikely that the owner will use in a way that would thwart the purposes of the camping reserve. +The Heathcote Primitive Area, a strip of country eight miles long by about half a mile wide, of about 1,640 acres, along Heathcote Creek, and accessible from Waterfall ​township, is the result of the efforts of the bushwalking clubs. It was established for public recreation and preservation of flora and fauna. It is under the control of trustees, seven appointed by the bushwalking clubs and one by the Sutherland ​Shire Council. 
-In its early days, the S.B.W. ​t' ​out a special lease of 100 acres on Myuna Creek, a tributary of eatncote ​Creek. The purpose of the lease of the area, Morella Karong as it is known, was for a camping reserve and sanctuary. Conditions of the lease were that no fences were to be erected and no permanent habitation was to be allowed. The area has a waterfall and substantial pool. However, ​an the establishment of the Heathcote Primitive Area, the S.B.W. relinquished the lease in favour of negotiating for the conservation of the Garawarra Park, + 
-A similar lease for a camping reserve and sanctuary of 85 acres was taken out by the M.T.C. ​an Heathcote Creek. The area is known as the Miarra Sanctuary. The lease is still held but the area is now surrounded by the Heathcote Primitive Area. +The first monument to the Federation of Bushwalking Clubs by way of conservation is Bouddi Natural Park. The Park comprises an area of about 2,000 acres, six or seven miles wide, varying ​from a quarter to a mile wide, situated behind Maitland Bay and ocean beach not far north of the point at which the Hawkesbury ​River enters the Pacific. In the early 1930'​s ​Miss Marie Byles began campaigning ​for the conservation of the area, and after interesting the District ​Surveyor, other Governmental officials and the S.B.W., the project ​was taken up in earnest by the Federation. As a result it was reserved ​about 1936. It is under the control of a trust comprising ​three S.B.W. ​members and three nominees of the local shire. The area abounds in wild flowers. ​Several ​working bees of bushwalkers have built tracks and shelters. 
-The Heathcote Primitive Area, a strip of country eight miles long by about half a mile wide, of about 1,640 acres, along Heathcote Creek, and accessible from Thterfall ​township, is the result of the efforts of the bushwalking clubs. It was established for public recreation and preservation of flora and fauna. It is under the control of trustees, seven appointed by the bushwalking clubs and one by the Sutherland ​Shiro Council. + 
-The first monument to the Federation of Bushwalking Clubs by way of conservation is Bouddi Natural Park. The Park comprises an area of about 2,000 acres, six or seven miles widai- '​Varying ​from a quarter to +The second monument to the Federation and to the bushwalking movement and individual clubs generally, is the Garawarra Park. "​Garawarra" ​is compounded of "Garie" ​and "​Illawarra"​. The area of the Park which has been reserved is less than half the area that the bushwalking movement would like to see reserved. The larger area includes an expanse of about 5,000 acres from the southern boundary of National ​Park to Bald Hill and Otford, and from the railway line to the coast. This area of highland and beach is the chief one-day recreation centre for walkers. The first attempt to have the area reserved seems to have been made by the M.T.C. in 1925, but the official answer was that it was not warranted since the National Park was adjacent. With the formation of the S.B.W. in 1927 the number of bushwalkers interested in the area grew considerably. The area being so accessible and therefore popular, it was natural that the newer bushwalking clubs should be interested in it. Upon its formation in 1932 the Federation immediately campaigned and in short time no less than 5,000 signatures were obtained to a petition for conservation. The result was that in August 1934 all the available Crown Lands in the area, about 1,300 acres, were officially dedicated as a reserve. Small additions now make it 1,465 acres. The reservation includes Burning Palms beach, Bulgo Trigonometrical station and adjacent plateaux. Attempts by the adjoining National Park Trust to absorb Gara Park have been successfully thwarted. Gara Park has, since 1935, been under the control of seven trustees including minority representation from the bushwalking movement. 
-a mile wide, situated behind Maitland ​,Bay and ocean beach not far north of the point at which the Hawkesbury ​ver enters the Pacific. In the early 19307s ​Miss Marie Byles began fi apaigning ​for the conservation of the area, and after interesting the Nstrict ​Surveyor, other Governmental officials and the S.B.W., the ,p oject was taken up in earnest by the Federation. As a result it was r erved about 1936. It is under + 
-he control of a trust comp:​Asing ​three SOBOW, ​members and three nominees of the local shire. The area abounds in wild flowers. ​Sever& ​working bees of bushwalkers have lilt tracks and shelters. +To provide a camping area and to preserve the water supply, the S.B.W. bought 40 acres at North Era in 1947. This area was thrown open to the public as a free site for non-permanent ​camps, and remained so until the whole of the Era lands, the bridge between the National Park and Garawarra Park, were resumed by the Government in 1950. The activities of bushwalkers played no small part in gaining this precious resumption. 
-The second monument to the Federation and to the bushwalking movement and individual clubs ganer411y, is the Garawarra Park. ''​Garawarrah ​is compounded of "Garieh ​and "​Illawarra"​. The area of the Park which has been reserved is less than half the area that the bushwalking movement would like to see reserved. The larger area includes an expanse of about 5,000 acres from the southern boundary of Nationa3 ​Park to Bald Hill and Otford, and from the railway line to the coast. This area of highland and beach is the chief one-day recreation centre for walkers. The first attempt to have the area reserved seems to have been made by the M.T.C. in 1925, but the official answer was that it was not warranted since the National Park was adjacent. With the formation of the S.B.W. in 1927 the number of bushwalkers interested in the area grew cons iderably. The area being so accessible and therefore popular, it was natural that the newer bushwalking clubs should be interested in it. Upon its formation in + 
-39. +These, then, are the achievements of the bushwalking movement in conservation. There are others on a less grand scale but space will not permit of their mention. A brief reference, however, should be made of the National Perks and Primitive Areas Council founded by Myles J. Dunphy. Its objects are to locate ​and plan areas for national parks and primitive reserves. One well-worked out and co-ordinated plan is for a Greater Blue Mountains National Park to take in an area from a little north of the Colo River down to near Mittagong, westward ​to beyond ​Jenolan Caves and near Lithgow, eastward to the first ridge of the Blue Mountains including Kurrajong Heights, Glenbrook, Hill Top. The plan is an ideal for the future. It allows for the growth of the existing townships ​and new ones, industrialisation,​ tourist resorts, while at the same time ensuring conservation of primitive areas of flora and fauna. In short, it represents a plan of co-ordination,​ national in character, as opposed to piecemeal haphazard projects of which Australia has unhappily ample experience. 
-1932 the Federation immediately campaigned and in short time no less than 5,000 signatures were obtained to a petition for conservation. The result was that in August 1934 all the available Crown Lands in the area, about 1,300 acres, were officially dedicated as a reserve. Small additions now make it 1465 acres. The reservation includes Burning Palms beach, Bulgo Trigonometrical station and adjacent plateaux. Attempts by the adjoining National Park Trust to absorb Gara Park have been successfully thwarted. Gara Park has, since 1935, been under the control of seven trustees including minority representation from the bushwalking movement. + 
-To provide a camping area and to preserve the water supply, the S.B.W. bought 40 acres at North Era in 1947. This area was thrown open to the public as a free site for non-permanent ​carps, and remained so until the whole of the Era lands, the bridge between the National Park and Garawarra Park, were resumed by the Government in 1950. The activities of bushwalkers played no small part in gaining this precious resumption. +---- 
-These, then, are the achievements of the bushwalking movement in conservation. There are others on a less grand scale but space will not permit of their mention. A brief reference, however, should be made of the National Perks and Primitive Areas Council founded by + 
-Myles J. Dunphy. Its objects are to locate ​aid plan areas for national parks and primitive reserves. One well-worked out and co-ordinated plan is for a Greater Blue Mountains National Park to take in an area from a little north of the Colo River down to near Mittagong, westward ​tobe5rond ​Jenolan Caves and near Lithgow, eastward to the first ridge of the Blue Mountains including Kurrajong Heights, Glenbrook, Hill Top. The plan is an ideal for the future. It allows for the growth of the existing townships ​aad new ones, industrialisation,​ tourist resorts, while at the same time ensuring conservation of primitive areas of flora and fauna. In short, it represents a plan of co-ordination,​ national in character, as opposed to piecemeal haphazard projects of which Australia has unhappily ample experience. +=====List Of Presidents.===== 
-1110/M + 
-LIST OF PRESIDENTS+(Chairmen ​were elected at each of the early meetings.) 
-771FiREFE ​were elected at each of the early meetings.) + 
-DEBERT, Jack 10/2/28 - 13/ 9/29 +|Debert, Jack|10/2/28 - 13/9/29| 
-DUNCAN, Frank 13/9/29 - 13/ 3/31 +|Duncan, Frank|13/9/29 - 13/3/31| 
-CHARDON, Harold 13/3/31 - 8/ 4/32 +|Chardon, Harold|13/3/31 - 8/4/32| 
-RITSON, Clifford 8/4/32 9/ 3/34 +|Ritson, Clifford|8/4/32 9/3/34| 
-HERBERT, Thomas 9/3/34 - 13/ 3/36 +|Herbert, Thomas|9/3/34 - 13/3/36| 
-ROOTS, Walter 13/​3/​36 ​=, 10/ 7/36 +|Roots, Walter|13/​3/​36 ​10/7/36| 
-BERRY, Maurice 10/7/36 - 10/ 3/39 +|Berry, Maurice|10/7/36 - 10/3/39| 
-CROKERRichaid ​10/3/39 - 14/ 3/41 +|CrokerRichard|10/3/39 - 14/3/41| 
-COLLEY, Alex 14/3/41 - 13/ 3/42 +|Colley, Alex|14/3/41 - 13/3/42| 
-LAWRY, Dorothy 13/3/42 - 10/ 3/44 +|Lawry, Dorothy|13/3/42 - 10/3/44| 
-S TEAD, David 10/3/44 - 9/3/45 +|Stead, David|10/3/44 - 9/3/45| 
-GARRAD, Edna 9/3/45 - 8/ 3/46 +|GarradD, Edna|9/3/45 - 8/3/46| 
-ROSE, Jack 8/​3/​46 ​=. 14/ 3/47 +|Rose, Jack|8/​3/​46 ​14/3/47| 
-MOPPETT, Thomas 14/3/47 - 14/ 3/52 McGREGOR, Malcolm 14/3/52 - +|Moppett, Thomas|14/3/47 - 14/3/52
-40.+|McGregor, Malcolm|14/​3/​52 ​- | 
 + 
 +---
 RABBITS AMONG THE TIGERS. RABBITS AMONG THE TIGERS.
 By Grace Noble. By Grace Noble.
195210.txt · Last modified: 2016/06/25 07:33 by tyreless