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195208 [2016/06/15 22:45]
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195208 [2016/06/16 01:10]
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 +=====Mark Morton Primitive Area.=====
 +
 +====Case for leaving Primitive Areas as Primitive Areas.====
  
-MARK MORTON PRIMITIVE AREA. 
-Case for leavinEprimitive Areas as Primitive Areas. 
-em... 1,​1,​Mftal.EMMMMWMIMMIMMININes ,. 
 by Marie B. Byles. by Marie B. Byles.
-1. At present only a small decimal percentage of the timber used + 
-in New South Wales comes from forests where the timber is regrown +  - At present only a small decimal percentage of the timber used in New South Wales comes from forests where the timber is regrown as rapidly as it is used. 
-as rapidly as it is used. +  ​- ​Taking the timber from areas set aside as Primitive Areas is, therefore, only postponing a little the day when the timber resources of the State will come to an end. 
-2. Taking the timber from areas set aside as Primitive Areas is, +  ​- ​The policy should be to get an increase in the number of forest areas which are subject to systematic fire control, so that timber naturally regenerates,​ or are subject to a planting programme so the timber which the State will need is reared. 
-therefore, only postponing a little the day when the timber resources of the State will cone to an end. +  ​- ​"Once a trust, always a trust",​ is a basic rule of British law. This area was set aside under a trust to be maintained as a Primitive Area. Private trustees would not be allowed to commit a breach of trust. The same rule applies to public trustees and should not be evaded merely because it is difficult to enforce. 
-3. The policy should be to get an increase in the number of forest +  ​- ​"Wilderness ​is a legitimate land use", has become a slogan in America where the seriousness of exploiting lands regardless of anything except immediate needs,has become apparent. 
-areas which are subject to systematic fire control, so that timber naturally regenerates,​ or are subject to a planting programme so the timber which the State will need is reared. +  ​- ​The seriousness is shown in the destruction of rainfall catchment areas, in the destruction of wild life beneficient to man and the destruction and frequently the extinction altogether of various species of fauna and flora, so that future generations will not know them. 
-4. "Once a trust, always a trust",​ is a basic rule of British law. This area was set aside under a trust to be maintained as a Primitive Area. Private trustees would not be allowed to commit a breach of trust. The same rule applies to public trustees and should not be evaded merely because it is difficult to enforce. +  ​- ​But the greatest need for the retention of some areas as Primitive Areas is the necessity ​to develop public ​opinion ​that respects nature for its own sake. The wide areas of land that had been converted into deserts and the continually decreasing timber resources and food resources of the world, arise from the fact that man has thought he could exploit nature instead of co-operating with nature. The best way of overcoming this disastrous attitude to nature is to set aside certain areas where wild fauna and flora is regarded as sacred. 
-5. "Viilderness ​is a legitimate land use", has become a slogan in America where the seriousness of exploiting lands regardless of anything except immediate needs,has become apparent. +  ​- ​Lamington National Park in Queensland is the finest example in Australia of a Primitive Area. It is comparable to some of the National Parks of America. Mark Morton Primitive Area is the only possibility left of New South Wales having a park land comparable to this. In Lamington National Park even tiger snakes may not be killed. The result must be that unconsciously there is built up that public opinion, so necessary in the world today, that nature is not there merely to be exploited for the benefit of man. Without this public opinion all the education in good husbandry and good forestry will not prevent the continued exhaustion of the world'​s resources. 
-6. The seriousness is shown in the destruction of rainfall catchment areas, in the destruction of wild life beneficient to man and the destruction and frequently the extinction altogether of various species of fauna and flora, so that future generations will not know them. +  ​ 
-71 But the greatest need for the retention of some areas as Primitive Areas is the-neOssity-to develop ​-public ​opinibn ​that respects nature for its own sake. The wide areas of land that had been +(In forwarding the above, Marie Byles has added a comment that there is a fresh bid on the part of timber cutters to gain access to the Mark Morton Reserve. For at least five years the Club has been associated with efforts to preserve the Mark Morton area from woodmillers - and it appears that our vigilance will be needed for years to come. - Editor.) 
-converted into deserts and the-continually.decreasing timber + 
-resources and food resources of the world, arise from the fact that man has thought he could exploit nature instead of co-operating with nature. The best way of overcoming this disastrous attitude to nature is to set aside certain areas Where wild fauna and flora is regarded as sacred. +---- 
-8. Lamington National Park in Queensland is the finest example in Australia of a Primitive Area. It is comparable to some of the + 
-National Parks of America. Mark Morton Primitive Area is the only possibility left of New South Wales having a park land comparable +=====The Photographic Exhibition.===== 
-to this. In Lamington National Park even tiger snakes may not be  killed. The result must be that unconsciously there is built up + 
-that public opinion, so necessary in the world today, that nature is +Perhaps the array of photographs in the Club Room on the night of June 27th was not as large as in some recent years, but the quality of the enlargements was of the high standard which has become the accepted thing. More than twenty exhibitors, including two visitors and one prospective member, had produced ​a sizeable display, and while some of the prints could be remembered from other exhibitions,​ the great bulk of the show was fresh. 
-not there merely to be exploited for the benefit of man. Without + 
-this public opinion all the education in good husbandry and good forestry will not prevent the continued exhaustion of the world'​s resources. +President Malcolm McGregor announced the placings, and observed that for several years past we had introduced a judge from outside the Club. These gentlemen had invariably complained at the difficulty of making a selection, and after a panel of five Club members had reviewed the exhibition on this occassion, he could well sympathise with their complaint. There had been great difficulty in making a choice between the first four, but the final decision had been: 
-(In forwarding the above, Marie Byles has added a comment that there is + 
-13. +  - __Gum Tree__ ​by Arthur Gilroy. A good subject with an interesting foreground ​(you could almost feel the cracked mud beside the small pool crunch under your feet). An area of sky was inclined to be uninteresting. 
-a fresh bid on the part of timber cutters to gain access to the Mark Morton Reserve. For at least five years the Club has been associated with efforts to preserve the Mark Morton area from woodmillers - and it appears that our vigilance will be needed for years to come. - Editor.) +  - __Snow Gum__ by Malcolm McGregor. Good detail, but again a patch of flat sky. The lean of the tree could create a falling impression, redeemed by numerous ​branches. The sort of tree which would make a walker say "​Let'​s have lunch"​. 
-THE PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION+  - __Tom Grogin__ ​by Bruce McInnes. There were many prints technically better than this photograph of the old farm buildings, but the feeling of warmth and friendliness gave the picture real atmosphere. 
-Perhaps the array of photographs in the Club Room on the night of June 27th was not as large as in some recent years, but the quality of the enlargements was of the high standard which has become the +  - __Blue ​Gum Forest__ ​by Arthur Gilroy. The mist-veiled trees, ​with light striking through, created a very definite mood. 
-accepted thing. More than twenty exhibitors, including two visitors and one prospective member, had produoed ​a sizeable display, and while +  - __Nandewar Panorama__ ​by Allan Fox. This item, by a visitor from te Caolloa Club, was described as the best panorama seen for a long time, The foreground was complete and balanced, and gradation of tones good. 
-some of the prints could be remembered from other exhibitions,​ the great bulk of the show was fresh. +  ​ 
-President Malcolm McGregor announced the placings, and observed that for several years past we had introduced a judge from outside the Club. These gentlemen had invariably complained at the difficulty of +Honourable mention was also made of a Cave Scene by Beverley Price, Peggy Bransdon'​s ​light-and-shade study of an old Church wall and door, "​Cloudmaker"​ by Sally Mackay, another Peggy Bransdon print of a snow-field in the Alps in summer. Roley Cotter was represented by an attractive river scene, and Phil Hall by the richly ​atmospheric "cart travelling along a tree-fringed road"​. 
-making a selection, and after a panel of five Club members had reviewed + 
-the exhibition on this cocas ion, he could well sympathise with their complaint. There had been great difficulty in making a choice between the first four, but the final decision had been +Amongst those we liked personally was a study in darknessmud and sombre trees by Malcolm McGregor, some high-class ​"​candids" ​by Peggy Bransdon and Ken Meadows, the palms in Brian Harvey'​s Pacific Island photographs (you could almost hear the wind rustling them!), Betty Hall's Banksia Tree at Era, Malcolm McGregor'​s Black Boy (the grass tree variety) and some studies of aborogines by Ira Butler. Arthur Gilroy'​s ​"Damper Making" ​had an obvious appeal. 
-1. Gum Tree by Arthur Gilroy. A good subject with an interesting +
-foreground you could almost feel the cracked mud beside the small pool crunch under your feet). An area of sky was inclined to be uninteresting. +
-2. Snow_Gum ​by Malcolm McGregor. Good detail, but again a patch +
-of Tat sky. The lean of the tree could create a falling +
-impression, redeemed by numerous ​brqnches. The sort of tree which would make a walker say "​Let'​s have lunch"​. +
-3. Tom Grogin ​by Bruce McInnes. There were many prints technically better than this photograph of the old farm buildings, but the feeling of warmth and friendliness gave the picture +
-real atmosphere. +
-4. Blue Gum Forest ​by Arthur Gilroy. The mist-veiled trees, ​--71Fah ​light striking through, created a very definite mood. +
-5. Nandewar Panorama ​by Allan Fax. This item, by a visitor from +
-ni-UE13777-0771, was described as the best panorama seen for a long time, The foreground was complete and balanced, and gradation of tones good. +
-Honourable mention was also made of a Cave Scene by Beverley Price, Peggy Bransdonfs ​light-and-shade study of an old Church wall and door, "​Cloudmaker"​ by Sally Mackay, another Peggy Bransdon print of a snow- +
-field in the Alps in summer. Roley Cotter was represented by an +
-attractive river scene, and Phil Hall by the richly ​atm Nospheric ​cart travelling along a tree-fringed road"​. +
-14. +
-Amongst those we liked personally was a study in darknessmud and sombre trees by Malcolm McGregor, some high-class ​licandidsli ​by Peggy Bransdon and Ken Meadows, the palms in Brian Harvey'​s Pacific +
-Island photographs (you could almost hear the wind rustling them!), +
-Betty Hall's Banksia Tree at Era, Malcolm McGregor'​s Black Boy (the grass tree variety) and some studies of aborogines by Ira Butler. +
-Arthur Gilroy'​s Damper Making had an obvious appeal.+
 The evening'​s official business closed with applause for the sorely-tried judges and for Roley Cotter, who had organised the display. The exhibitors rushed off to collect their items, and some of the audience to catch up on the features they had missed whilst talking. The evening'​s official business closed with applause for the sorely-tried judges and for Roley Cotter, who had organised the display. The exhibitors rushed off to collect their items, and some of the audience to catch up on the features they had missed whilst talking.
-IN THE STEPS OF THE EXPLORERS+ 
-by Kevin Ardill. ​PART 2.+---- 
 + 
 +=====In The Steps Of The Explorers - Part 2.===== 
 + 
 +by Kevin Ardill. 
 (The story of the re-enactment of the first crossing of the Blue Mountains, related by "​Gregory Blaxland"​.) (The story of the re-enactment of the first crossing of the Blue Mountains, related by "​Gregory Blaxland"​.)
-As we left Springwood next morning the local school teachers made a rsurprise ​attack"​. Dressed as bushrangers,​ they loosed a volley of + 
-shots which scared the daylights out of the horses, and we went through +As we left Springwood next morning the local school teachers made a "​surprise ​attack"​. Dressed as bushrangers,​ they loosed a volley of shots which scared the daylights out of the horses, and we went through to Faulconbridge very smartly. It was amazing the way these small towns organised, how friendly and sincere the welcome, the enthusiasm of the school kiddies. We ate the best of their food, drank all their bottled beer (not the kids') and still they cheered us along the way. 
-to Faulconbridge very smartly. It was amazing the way these small towns organised, how friendly and sincere the welcome, the enthusiasm of the school kiddies. We ate the best of their food, drank all their bottled beer (not the kids') and still they cheered us along the way. + 
-The youngsters at Faulconbridge led us to the Dark, singing their own song of welcome and there we had refreshments. Met Mr. Joe Jackson, +The youngsters at Faulconbridge led us to the park, singing their own song of welcome and there we had refreshments. Met Mr. Joe Jackson, the district member, who showed us over Henry Parkes'​ old home, and then attended a quiet ceremony at his grave. The kids farewelled us with a shower of flowers, but I suspect some would have been just as happy with a handful of bricks instead of rose petals. We were an hour late when we left, and didn't care. We hated to go, but we promised to visit Frank Pickett at his home when passing. I think Eric Dehn made the promise the previous day, but the horses were thirsty and I can't bear to see an animal in distress. It's impossible to speed a horse with his nose in a bucket, so we were forced to sip a little, while we waited. 
-the district member, who showed us over Henry Parkes'​ old home, and + 
-then attended a quiet ceremony at his grave. The kids farewelled us with a shower of flowers, but I suspect some would have'been just as +"Life is mostly froth and bubble"​... Ho, hum!... and the envoy from Woodford is disturbed to find the explorers stationary. The people were gathering at Woodford, and it was miles away. PanicTo horse! ​to horseand away we went. We did the 7 1/2 miles in 1 hour 55 minutes and arrived in Woodford about an hour earlier than the envoy anticipated with the result that the people who had returned to their homes were hurriedly recalled when a watcher saw us arriving. 
-happy with a handful of bricks instead of rose petals. We were an hour late when we left, and didn't care. We hated to go, but we promised to visit Frank Pickett at his home when passing. I think Eric Dehn made + 
-the promise the previous day, but the horses were thirsty and I can't +The historic Academy was our shelter for the night. Originally it was Buss' Inn, an old stage coach stop-over, the landlord having the traditional red waistcoat and ruddy cheeks. Having our share of ruddy cheek also, we made ourselves at home, and loafed for the afternoon. A short ceremony at the Park, where we planted some trees, was the only official duty for the day, but we promised to attend the Welfare Boys' ​Home in the evening for a short visit. At dusk we were "​captured" ​at the Academy by a band of "abos" who looked very much like the local Cubs under the charcoal disguises. One bright lad cracked me on the shin with a nulla nulla and left an impression which lasted several days. 
-bear to see an animal in distress. It's impossible to speed a horse with his nose in a bucket, so we were forced to-sip a little, while we + 
-waited. +We escaped after a feast of witchetty grubs (confections), ​crayfish ​and snake (long sausages). After dinner in the old Inn we visited the Welfare Home where the 30 boys shook hands with seven explorers. Work it out yourself how many hands were shaken, but we had the experience of the view from the lookout with the boys singing to us in the clear moonlit night. Then again to bed. 
-'Life is mostly froth and bubble"​ Ho, hum! .. and the envoy from Woodford is disturbed to find the explorers stationary. The people were gathering at Woodford, and it was miles away. PanicTo horses ​to horseand away we went. We did the 7i miles in 1 hour 55 minutes and arrived in Woodford about an hour earlier than the envoy anticipated with the result that the people who had returned to their homes were hurriedly recalled when a watcher saw us arriving. + 
-The historic Academy was our shelter for the night. Originally it was Buss' Inn, an old stage coach stop-over, the.landlord having the traditional red waistcoat and ruddy cheeks. Having our share of ruddy cheek also, we made ourselves at home, and loafed for the afternoon. A short ceremony at the.Park, where we planted some trees, was +Fine weather favoured us next morning. Chasing four mokes around a dewy paddock restored our appetites and so we did justice to a large breakfast, planted a tree in front of the Academy, and with the well-wishes of a mall group, we set out for Lawson. En route the townspeople ​of Hazelbrook claimed us and during the reception we were introduced ​to the oldest resident, who insisted on kissing the explorers. While appreciating the gesture - and her courage - I do think the Committee might have picked the prettiest girl for the task. 
-+ 
-15. +Morning tea was well up to standard, home cooked food, and we masticated for about an hour in the company of the cheerful ​crowd before leaving for Lawson. Opposite the Kihilla guest house we joined up with the procession and "had our photos took". The amateur photographers along the trip gave us many laughs. Most of them underestimated ​our rate of progress, and trotted backwards along the highway trying to get us in focus. Others stood still and, as the shutter clicked, swung the camera in an arc to include the whole party. The best effort was by the lad who trotted backward with box camera to eye and snapped us smartly - quite unaware that his camera was back to front - honest! 
-the only official duty for the day, but we promised to attend the Welfare BoysHome in the evening for a short visit. At dusk we were '​capturee ​at the Academy by a band of uabos" who looked very much like + 
-the local Cubs under the charcoal disguises. One bright lad cracked me on the shin with a nulla nulla and left an impression which lasted several days. +The procession, plus explorers, arrived about noon and there was a large crowd present. For the first time we met Messrs. Guy Blaxland, Andrew Lawson and William Wentworth, M.H.R., who were representing their respective families. We were to see these gentlemen later on a number of occasions, and it speaks well for their fortitude that they turned up time and time again at receptions to greet seven pretenders, a little dirtier and hairier at each successive meeting. Four of us were staying at the hotel and through a misunderstanding we missed the lunch prepared for us. Everyone was very apologetic, but we were pleased ​to give our digestive systems a rest. 
-We escaped after a feast of witchetty grubs (confections), ​cray.; + 
-fish and snake (long sausages). After dinner in the old Inn we visited +A display by the combined school children entertained us, and after signing about a million ​autographs, returned to our hotel. Intermittent rain appeared likely to spoil the night entertainment,​ but after dinner the sky cleared. A variety programme plus fireworks provided the amusement for a large crowd and we left mid-way through the show to go to a party at Kihilla Guest House. The party was good, but Joe and Eric must have been a little weary because they left at midnight. Unfortunately,​ the hotel people, Mr. and Mrs. Bridges, were at the party and the pub was shut. When we made our way home about 3 a.m. I was the only one who didn'​t ​expect to see Joe and Eric crouched shivering on the doorstep. I crawled into my cot at 4 a.m., with the rain pouring outside. 
-the Welfare Home where the 30 boys shook hands with seven explorers. Work it out yourself how many hands were shaken, but we had the +
-experience of the view from the lookout with the boys singing to us in the clear moonlit night. Then again to bed. +
-Fine weather favoured us next morning. Chasing four makes around a dewy paddock restored our appetites and so we did justice to a large breakfast, planted a tree in front of the Academy, and with the well- wishes of a mall group, we set out for Lawson. En route the towns- +
-people ​of Hazelbrook claimed us and during the reception we were intro- +
-duced to the oldest resident, who insisted on kissing the explorers. While appreciating the gesture - and her courage - I do think the Committee might have picked the prettiest girl for the task. +
-Morning tea was well up to standard, home cooked food, and we +
-masticated for about an hour in the company of the cheerful ​Crowd +
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-OR +
-WRITE +
-SIEDLECKYTS TAXI AND TOURIST SERVICE, +
-116 STATION STREET, BLACKHEATH. +
-'PHONE BTHEATH 81 OR 146. +
-LOOK FOR T03210 OR TV270 +
-OR BOOK AT MARK SALON RADIO SHOP - OPP. STATION. +
-.1 +
-16. +
-before leaving for Lawson. Opposite the Kihilla guest house we joined up with the procession and had our photos took". The amateur photographers along the trip gave us many laughs. Most of them underestim- +
-ated our rate of progress, and trotted backwards along the highway +
-trying to get us in focus. Others stood still and, as the shutter +
-clicked, swung the camera in an arc to include the whole party. The best effort was by the lad who trotted backward with box camera to eye and snapped us smartly - quite unaware that his camera was back to +
- front - honest! +
-The procession, plus explorers, arrived about noon and there was +
-a large crowd present. For the first time we met Messrs. Guy Blaxland, Andrew Lawson and William Wentworth, M.H.R., who were representing +
-their respective families. We were to see these gentlemen later on a +
-number of occasions, and it speaks well for their fortitude that they turned up time and time again at receptions to greet seven pretenders, +
-a little dirtier and hairier at each successive meeting. Four of us +
-were staying at the hotel and through a misunderstanding we missed the lunch prepared for us. Everyone was very apologetic, but we were pleas- +
-ed to give our digestive systems a rest. +
-A display by the combined school children entertained us, and after signing about a nillion ​autographs, returned to our hotel. Intermittent rain appeared likely to spoil the night entertainment,​ but +
-after dinner the sky cleared. A variety programme plus fireworks +
-provided the amusement for a large crowd and we left mid-way through the show to go to a party at Kihilla Guest House. The party was good, +
-but Joe and Eric must have been a little weary because they left at +
-midnight. Unfortunately,​ the hotel people, Mr. and Mrs. Bridges, were at the party and the pub was shut. When we made our way home about +
-A.m. I was the only one who didnft ​expect to see Joe and Eric crouched shivering on the doorstep. I crawled into my cot at 4 a.m., with the rain pouring outside.+
 Sunday was a complete rest. I inspected the water pipe at the rear of the hotel that Joe and Eric had climbed to effect entry to their second floor bedroom the previous night. The rain persisted nearly all day and washed out plans for bowls and golf as guests of the Lawson sporting clubs. Several of the boys braved the elements and played golf. Sunday was a complete rest. I inspected the water pipe at the rear of the hotel that Joe and Eric had climbed to effect entry to their second floor bedroom the previous night. The rain persisted nearly all day and washed out plans for bowls and golf as guests of the Lawson sporting clubs. Several of the boys braved the elements and played golf.
-Our horses were in a large paddock near the hotel, and we had some minor trouble on Monday morning when catching them. One horse jumped the gate, but Joe was quick and next moment had the feed bag cord around its neck. With the moke pawing the air, Joe grimly hanging on and calling for help, there was as nice a spine tingler as you could wish for. Charlie rushed with the halter and all was saved. My opinion of Joe went up 100% and my love of horses diminished by a similar ​=punt as we headed back for breakfast. + 
-Just prior to leaving Lawson, Ray walked a little close to the rear of his horse and the animal promptly ​Iticked ​him. Some first aid on Ray's thigh, which bore the imprint of a hoof, and then Mr. Bridges arrived with a brandy. Ray must have been pretty dazed because he declined it, but the way my nerves were I needed it the most, so it +Our horses were in a large paddock near the hotel, and we had some minor trouble on Monday morning when catching them. One horse jumped the gate, but Joe was quick and next moment had the feed bag cord around its neck. With the moke pawing the air, Joe grimly hanging on and calling for help, there was as nice a spine tingler as you could wish for. Charlie rushed with the halter and all was saved. My opinion of Joe went up 100% and my love of horses diminished by a similar ​amount ​as we headed back for breakfast. 
-wasn't wasted. + 
-17.+Just prior to leaving Lawson, Ray walked a little close to the rear of his horse and the animal promptly ​kicked ​him. Some first aid on Ray's thigh, which bore the imprint of a hoof, and then Mr. Bridges arrived with a brandy. Ray must have been pretty dazed because he declined it, but the way my nerves were I needed it the most, so it wasn't wasted. 
 The rain had stopped, and in no time we were in Bullaburra. We planted trees in front of the Progress Hall and then adjourned inside to a large log fire and mountains of food. The rain had stopped, and in no time we were in Bullaburra. We planted trees in front of the Progress Hall and then adjourned inside to a large log fire and mountains of food.
-Lou Ranson, 2KA announcer ​17gave ​us the airu when we arrived at the station. I suppose the description and interviews took about + 
-20 minutes and were climaxed by the arrival of a hostile abo. A dusky- skinned character named Percy had been done up with white paint into a very life-like native. While we were being interviewed,​ Percy crouched at the rear of the radio s tation. The day was very cold. Perce was clothed only in underpants, gum leaves and white paint, so some one took pity on his shivering form. They gave him a bottle of rum to sip. The sips were either long or frequent, and when his cue came to front the explorers, the bottle was empty.+Lou Ranson, 2KA announcer ​"​gave ​us the air" ​when we arrived at the station. I suppose the description and interviews took about 20 minutes and were climaxed by the arrival of a hostile abo. A dusky-skinned character named Percy had been done up with white paint into a very life-like native. While we were being interviewed,​ Percy crouched at the rear of the radio station. The day was very cold. Perce was clothed only in underpants, gum leaves and white paint, so some one took pity on his shivering form. They gave him a bottle of rum to sip. The sips were either long or frequent, and when his cue came to front the explorers, the bottle was empty. 
 Perce was armed with spear, bbomerang, stuffed snake skin and a recently deceased rabbit. The one-man Corroboree really went to town, finally assaulting Eric with the rabbit and spraying us all with blood. We found afterwards that the chap who gave him the rum had also advised him to clout an explorer with the bunny. The deed well done, Perce collapsed on to the bumper bar of a car. Perce was armed with spear, bbomerang, stuffed snake skin and a recently deceased rabbit. The one-man Corroboree really went to town, finally assaulting Eric with the rabbit and spraying us all with blood. We found afterwards that the chap who gave him the rum had also advised him to clout an explorer with the bunny. The deed well done, Perce collapsed on to the bumper bar of a car.
-The procession into the town was the longest ever. The official part was half a mile long, but following cars and lorries were compelled to fall in and by the time we reached the town, the involuntary part stretched about a mile. We were welcomed by the usual large crowd, whisked around to the bowling club for afternoon tea, and then we camped. We were roughing it at the Grand View Hotel (heating in every room) and the of dinner was held there. It was one of those dinners you dream about on a two weeks trip with dried veg. etc. Choice of turkey, duck or cockerel and more if you wanted it. Short speeches, long toasts, and the evening procession forming outside. We were in our glamour togs and so we hurried to change, but the local policeman thought it would be a good idea to parade in our best. We fell in behind the band, the three explorers abreast, the four servants dttifully a couple of paces behind. + 
-We went up the street, we care back, we bowed to the right and we bowed to the left, and hardly got a clap. The procession then headed for the barbecue paddock behind the publ. The light dawned. "Letts get out of this!" and we flew back to our roams and climbed into our walking rig-outs. There were hundreds on the floodlit paddock, the arrival of the explorers was announced, and we were given a huge reception. Some one enquired if we saw the procession, and suspicion turned into certainty. Apart from one policeman, nobody knew the explorers were in the bally show! +The procession into the town was the longest ever. The official part was half a mile long, but following cars and lorries were compelled to fall in and by the time we reached the town, the involuntary part stretched about a mile. We were welcomed by the usual large crowd, whisked around to the bowling club for afternoon tea, and then we camped. We were roughing it at the Grand View Hotel (heating in every room) and the official ​dinner was held there. It was one of those dinners you dream about on a two weeks trip with dried veg. etc. Choice of turkey, duck or cockerel and more if you wanted it. Short speeches, long toasts, and the evening procession forming outside. We were in our glamour togs and so we hurried to change, but the local policeman thought it would be a good idea to parade in our best. We fell in behind the band, the three explorers abreast, the four servants dttifully a couple of paces behind. 
-(It may have taken the original explorers only 17 days to cross the Blue Mountains. Because of space, ​itts going to take three months to tell the tale of their guccessors. However, we guarantee to f ind the way over the mountains by the September Issue.) + 
-Illmammmalin=e1, +We went up the street, we care back, we bowed to the right and we bowed to the left, and hardly got a clap. The procession then headed for the barbecue paddock behind the publ. The light dawned. "Let'​s ​get out of this!" and we flew back to our rooms and climbed into our walking rig-outs. There were hundreds on the floodlit paddock, the arrival of the explorers was announced, and we were given a huge reception. Some one enquired if we saw the procession, and suspicion turned into certainty. Apart from one policeman, nobody knew the explorers were in the bally show! 
-CONGRATULATIONS TO the two newly engaged couples: + 
---UTHa777EFFEIii ​and Len Fall, Whose engagement was made public on Sunday 20th. Helen Brooks and Bill Horton, both at present abroad.. We understand they are returning to Australia during the next few months. +(It may have taken the original explorers only 17 days to cross the Blue Mountains. Because of space, ​it'​s ​going to take three months to tell the tale of their successors. However, we guarantee to find the way over the mountains by the September Issue.) 
-18.+ 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===Congratulations to:==
 + 
 +The two newly engaged couples: 
 + 
 +Gladys Martin ​and Len Fall, whose engagement was made public on Sunday 20th. 
 + 
 +Helen Brooks and Bill Horton, both at present abroad. We understand they are returning to Australia during the next few months. 
 + 
 +---- 
 "​HIKERS LOST IN BUSH." "​HIKERS LOST IN BUSH."
 CONTINUED FROM JULY ISSUE .... By "​X"​. CONTINUED FROM JULY ISSUE .... By "​X"​.
195208.txt · Last modified: 2016/06/16 03:45 by tyreless