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195207 [2016/06/10 02:56]
tyreless
195207 [2016/06/10 05:41]
tyreless
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 (Data from the Annual Report of the N.S.W. Bushfires Committee for the period ending 30/4/52 - reported by Alex Colley.) (Data from the Annual Report of the N.S.W. Bushfires Committee for the period ending 30/4/52 - reported by Alex Colley.)
  
-|Carelessness:​-|Cigarettes,​ Matches|173|+|Carelessness:​-|Cigarettes,​ Matches| ​ 173|
 | |Burning Off|  563| | |Burning Off|  563|
 | |Camp Fires| ​ 207| | |Camp Fires| ​ 207|
Line 250: Line 250:
 ---- ----
  
-"​HIKERS LOST IN THE BUSH".+=====Hikers Lost In The Bush.===== 
 By "​X"​. By "​X"​.
-For me it all began with a !phone call from S R contact nan, Jim Hooper. Could I possibly get away that night to search for a party of scho81 ​boys three days overdue on a seven days trip down the Cox?" "Yes, providing the Master was agreeable."​ + 
-He was (without pay, of course), so after purchasing the requisite hard tack, and cancelling all engagements for the next few days, I made my way to Strathfield Station, from where we were to be driven in Police cars to Katoomba. Jim Hooper and I showed our usual modesty by turning up after the press photographers had pressed the button that put the rest of the S R party on the front page of Wednesday'​s "​Herald"​. +For me it all began with a 'phone call from S R contact nan, Jim Hooper. Could I possibly get away that night to search for a party of school ​boys three days overdue on a seven days trip down the Cox?" "Yes, providing the Master was agreeable."​ 
-Wentworth Falls in about two hours, there to have our first taste of the Great Press Quiz, and to give Jim a chance to get his face in the late edition. So far our experience of the Press had not been unpleasant, for it wci;​ss ​not until KatoombaPolice ​Station that we met I'​llumboogier ​and the Red Nosed Reindeer"​. These two characters were the star turn of the P ress delegation, Rumboogie chewing his pencil, and the Red Nosed Reindeer playing with his camery, ​(what a waste of a good camera) between swigs from a bottle of O.P. Beenleigh"​. Swaying + 
-gently to the murmur of the Police Sergeant'​s voice Rumboogie ​endeavour- +He was (without pay, of course), so after purchasing the requisite hard tack, and cancelling all engagements for the next few days, I made my way to Strathfield Station, from where we were to be driven in Police cars to Katoomba. Jim Hooper and I showed our usual modesty by turning up after the press photographers had pressed the button that put the rest of the S R party on the front page of Wednesday'​s "​Herald"​. 
-ed to make notes of our plans. His note book was soon filled with the cryptic symbols of true journalism. Each page went something like tbis: "Bu ....... ........ + 
-A cup of tea and we were into'​cursleeping ​bags about 2 a.m. The Station Sergeant had produced ​blanket n from the cells as underbody, there was plenty of coal for the fire in the Court House, so we must have been the first bushwalkers to be really comfortable before the Judge'​s dais. +Wentworth Falls in about two hours, there to have our first taste of the Great Press Quiz, and to give Jim a chance to get his face in the late edition. So far our experience of the Press had not been unpleasant, for it was not until Katoomba Police ​Station that we met "​Rumboogie" ​and the "Red Nosed Reindeer"​. These two characters were the star turn of the Press delegation, Rumboogie chewing his pencil, and the Red Nosed Reindeer playing with his camera ​(what a waste of a good camera) between swigs from a bottle of O.P. "Beenleigh"​. Swaying gently to the murmur of the Police Sergeant'​s voice Rumboogie ​endeavoured ​to make notes of our plans. His note book was soon filled with the cryptic symbols of true journalism. Each page went something like this: "​Bu............... 
-Before we settled down, though, Rumboogie came in and spoke kindly to us. It appeared that the Press Moguls in Sydney, comfortable in their well padded chairs, between puffs from their Corona Coronas and sips of Scotch, had andered ​a photographer,​ the Red Nosed Reindeer, to go out with one of our parties. Despite Tom Wardhaugh'​s blank refusal, Rumboogie insisted that the photographer must go. No he had no equipment or food, but with an Army greatcoat and a bottle of rum what more could he want? Anyway, if we wouldn'​t co-operate with the Press in the enlightenment of the loublic, he would write us up am a "rack of so- and-so no-hopers"​ who didn't know what we were doing. + 
-Eventually he left with the promise that his photographer would be waiting to follow us in the morning. Gone, but not forgotten, for just as we dozed off, tteRed ​Nosed Reindeer"​ woke us up with two flashlight ​shot+A cup of tea and we were into our sleeping ​bags about 2 a.m. The Station Sergeant had produced ​blankets ​from the cells as underbody, there was plenty of coal for the fire in the Court House, so we must have been the first bushwalkers to be really comfortable before the Judge'​s dais. 
-True to his promisel ​at 4.15 when' ​we boiled the billy before starting off without:breakfast, there was aurhadowwaitLrig ​for us, fully equirped ​with an unopened bottle of rum. The boot of their car must have been fullr, ​than S ammy Lee's cellar (Mr. Davey, please ​notes+ 
-17. +Before we settled down, though, Rumboogie came in and spoke kindly to us. It appeared that the Press Moguls in Sydney, comfortable in their well padded chairs, between puffs from their Corona Coronas and sips of Scotch, had ordered ​a photographer,​ the Red Nosed Reindeer, to go out with one of our parties. Despite Tom Wardhaugh'​s blank refusal, Rumboogie insisted that the photographer must go. Nohe had no equipment or food, but with an Army greatcoat and a bottle of rum what more could he want? Anyway, if we wouldn'​t co-operate with the Press in the enlightenment of the public, he would write us up as a "pack of so-and-so no-hopers"​ who didn't know what we were doing. 
-It was planned to send out three parties: Ton Wardhaugh, Norman Allen and Russel ​Xippax ​going out along Narrow Neck and down Black Dog: Jim*Hooper, Frank Young and Keith Armstrong going down Kedumba: Eric Dehn, John Thornthwaite and Mr.XT' ​travelling over King's Tableland. The Sergeant drove us to our respective starting points. + 
-Tom Wardhaughls ​party was first out Eollowed ​by four Press cars. +Eventually he left with the promise that his photographer would be waiting to follow us in the morning. Gone, but not forgotten, for just as we dozed off, the "​Red ​Nosed Reindeer"​ woke us up with two flashlight ​shots. 
-thick fog covered everything except the Red Nosed Reindeer'​s"​ facial adornment, ​apd the enthusiasm of one local photographer,​ whose plaintive cries of Fair go, fellers!"​ were rapidly left behind in the eerie half-light of dawning. While Tom was delaying the Press on Narrow Neck, the other two parties were setting out from Ihientworth ​Falls. + 
-Some two hours after starting along the Tableland we had breakfast, filling the billy from the non-perennial stream flowing along the middle of the road. Breakfast over, we plodded on, mist from Kedumba Valley swirling about us, and preventing the searching plane from seeing anything below. +True to his promise, ​at 4.15 a.m., when we boiled the billy before starting off without breakfast, there was our shadowwaiting ​for us, fully equipped ​with an unopened bottle of rum. The boot of their car must have been fuller ​than Sammy Lee's cellar (Mr. Davey, please ​note!
-As all who read the news reports know, the searchers, all expert bushmen with extensive knowledge of this wild and ragged country, had to fight their way through the almost impenetrable jungle that covers the area. Well, we battled on, only stopping to accept a lift from a Water Board Land Rover. The driver was going on for another five + 
-miles and we were chatting so pleasantly that it was a shock when we realised we had travelled several miles past our turn-off. To make it worse, we later discovered that cur turn-off was only a few hundred yards from the point where we had got our lift. Don't blame us altogether - the Tableland now has a network of timber roads connected with the '​Iarragamba ​Dam project. +It was planned to send out three parties: Ton Wardhaugh, Norman Allen and Russel ​Kippax ​going out along Narrow Neck and down Black Dog: Jim Hooper, Frank Young and Keith Armstrong going down Kedumba: Eric Dehn, John Thornthwaite and Mr. "​X" ​travelling over King's Tableland. The Sergeant drove us to our respective starting points. 
-The Press was certainly right about the inhospitable ​na. ture of the country, because at one timber-getter 's hut we were called in and they could offer us only a cup of tea. Realising it was our duty as bushwalkers to be friendly with the locals, we accepted, and after several cups of tea and hearing of our progress on a radio news bulletin, we battled on. + 
-When we turned off on to the right track we were joined by two Police constables on a motor cycle and sidecar, and they provided a great exhibition of riding, as the bike wove in and out of the bush. This trick-riding topped off the morning, and the five of us had a +Tom Wardhaugh'​s ​party was first out followed ​by four Press cars. thick fog covered everything except the "Red Nosed Reindeer'​s"​ facial adornment, ​and the enthusiasm of one local photographer,​ whose plaintive cries of "Fair go, fellers!"​ were rapidly left behind in the eerie half-light of dawning. While Tom was delaying the Press on Narrow Neck, the other two parties were setting out from Wentworth ​Falls. 
-late dry lunch several hundred yards before The Jumpback. + 
-The cyclists could go no further, so Eric, John and myselfsaid goodbye to the Police and carried on. By this time tae fog had lifted, and we had a delightful view of the Cam Valley and Mount Solitary wreathed in cloud before we scrambled, ​3 lipped ​and cursed our way down to McMahon'​s farm, there to be greeted by the (in)famous Norman Allen. +Some two hours after starting along the Tableland we had breakfast, filling the billy from the non-perennial stream flowing along the middle of the road. Breakfast over, we plodded on, mist from Kedumba Valley swirling about us, and preventing the searching ​R.A.A.F. ​plane from seeing anything below. 
-Yes, he (they) ​liad found the lost party, hungry but well, just on the other side of the Policeman Range. Tom and Russel had stayed with the boys to feedthem and get them over the range to Moody'​s, ​While he had come on to McMahon'​s to pickus up,, hoping we would be + 
-l8. +As all who read the news reports know, the searchers, all expert bushmen with extensive knowledge of this wild and ragged country, had to fight their way through the almost impenetrable jungle that covers the area. Well, we battled on, only stopping to accept a lift from a Water Board Land Rover. The driver was going on for another five miles and we were chatting so pleasantly that it was a shock when we realised we had travelled several miles past our turn-off. To make it worse, we later discovered that our turn-off was only a few hundred yards from the point where we had got our lift. Don't blame us altogether - the Tableland now has a network of timber roads connected with the Warragamba ​Dam project. 
-able to go back that night with him. With darkness approaching,​ however, we decided to stay at McWahon's that night, going up to the boys in the morning and bringing them out to meet the Police rescue party.+ 
 +The Press was certainly right about the inhospitable ​nature ​of the country, because at one timber-getter'​s hut we were called in and they could offer us only a cup of tea. Realising it was our duty as bushwalkers to be friendly with the locals, we accepted, and after several cups of tea and hearing of our progress on a radio news bulletin, we battled on. 
 + 
 +When we turned off on to the right track we were joined by two Police constables on a motor cycle and sidecar, and they provided a great exhibition of riding, as the bike wove in and out of the bush. This trick-riding topped off the morning, and the five of us had a late dry lunch several hundred yards before The Jumpback. 
 + 
 +The cyclists could go no further, so Eric, John and myself said goodbye to the Police and carried on. By this time the fog had lifted, and we had a delightful view of the Cox Valley and Mount Solitary wreathed in cloud before we scrambled, ​slipped ​and cursed our way down to McMahon'​s farm, there to be greeted by the (in)famous Norman Allen. 
 + 
 +Yes, he (they) ​had found the lost party, hungry but well, just on the other side of the Policeman Range. Tom and Russel had stayed with the boys to feed them and get them over the range to Moody'​s, ​while he had come on to McMahon'​s to pick us up, hoping we would be able to go back that night with him. With darkness approaching,​ however, we decided to stay at McMahon's that night, going up to the boys in the morning and bringing them out to meet the Police rescue party. 
 We cooked our tea on Mrs. McMahon'​s fuel stove and slept on one of their nice soft beds. Such were our hardships. We cooked our tea on Mrs. McMahon'​s fuel stove and slept on one of their nice soft beds. Such were our hardships.
-Norm was in his element ​newspo!lers clamouring for hi the boat party had no broken suffering any dire mishaps.'​ Moody'​s (about 6 miles away, the school boys. Norm assur telepathy.The 'phone ran hot with all the Sydney ​story, and greatly ​disappoirked ​because legs, had not been living on wallabies. ​or All the papers wanted to ring through to long deserted and roofless) to speak to ed them they could - provided they used + 
-One evening paper wanted to send in jeeps to bring the boys out that night before the Police got there, so ensuring a scoop for the afternoon edition. Despite Mr. McMahon'​s insistence that it couldn'​t be done, 12,e was dragged out of bed at five o'​clock next morning to the '​phone. This is the ....... (a city newspaper) here.somewhere in Burragorang,​ and lost. How do we get to your place?''​ +Norm was in his element. The 'phone ran hot with all the Sydney ​newspapers clamouring for his story, and greatly ​disappointed ​because ​the lost party had no broken ​legs, had not been living on wallabies ​or suffering any dire mishaps. All the papers wanted to ring through to Moody'​s (about 6 miles away, long deserted and roofless) to speak to the school boys. Norm assured ​them they could - provided they used telepathy. 
-Early in the day the first of the Press arrived, a reporter and a photographer,​ then another reporter, then Rumboogie, with his trousers rolled up, wet to the waist, his shoes slung around his neck, and being led by a photographer from a rival paper. When we saw him approaching,​ we hurriedly left on our way to the boys, but I had to slip back for a photograph of his countenance. He must have had some hangover the day before: + 
-Did we rescue the boys? Why was Runboogie ​wet to the waist? shall have to tell you all this in another charter. +One evening paper wanted to send in jeeps to bring the boys out that night before the Police got there, so ensuring a scoop for the afternoon edition. Despite Mr. McMahon'​s insistence that it couldn'​t be done, he was dragged out of bed at five o'​clock next morning to the '​phone. ​"This is the ....... (a city newspaper) here. We'​re ​somewhere in Burragorang,​ and lost. How do we get to your place?
-(Mr. X closes this episode ​an this note. note that Mr. X does not Xplain why Xperienced Xponents of the Xercise of walking were Xpended on an Xtended ​Xpedit ion on King's Tableland. The Xoteric may Xclaim at such an Xtraordinary Xhibition, but no doubt the Xigiencies which Xisted made such Xploration Xplicable. We Xpect Mr. X Xecuted his Xcoriating Xploit in Xemplary manner as fitting an X-alks Secretary, X-Membership Secretary and X-Editor). + 
-.......1171IMe +Early in the day the first of the Press arrived, a reporter and a photographer,​ then another reporter, then Rumboogie, with his trousers rolled up, wet to the waist, his shoes slung around his neck, and being led by a photographer from a rival paper. When we saw him approaching,​ we hurriedly left on our way to the boys, but I had to slip back for a photograph of his countenance. He must have had some hangover the day before
--L-it least the gentleman who considers bushwalkers should carry Verey light pistols had the right idea in one respect - he spelt it Very (Special Paddymade lightweight, ​L.o doubt. + 
-Remark from Jess Martin on Roaring ​hind Mountain, vicinity ​Oolong ​Caves, on Queen'​s Birthday weekend: scraped so many plates this weekend, the lyre birds have taken up the sound?+Did we rescue the boys? Why was Rumboogie ​wet to the waist? ​shall have to tell you all this in another charter. 
- 0 0 + 
-CONGRATULATIONS TO: 15-CFR-M-Yui-Te-TE-7+(Mr. X closes this episode ​on this note. We note that Mr. X does not Xplain why Xperienced Xponents of the Xercise of walking were Xpended on an Xtended ​Xpedition ​on King's Tableland. The Xoteric may Xclaim at such an Xtraordinary Xhibition, but no doubt the Xigiencies which Xisted made such Xploration Xplicable. We Xpect Mr. X Xecuted his Xcoriating Xploit in Xemplary manner as fitting an X-Walks Secretary, X-Membership Secretary and X-Editor). 
-Shirley Evans and June 13th. + 
-Luke Priddle, on Norma Rowan. +---- 
-Betty and Phil Hall, whose daughter Susan was Kevin Dean who embarked on the marital career, his engagement to Marie Barden, sister of + 
-19.+At least the gentleman who considers bushwalkers should carry Verey light pistols had the right idea in one respect - he spelt it Very (Special Paddymade lightweight, ​no doubt). 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Remark from Jess Martin on Roaring ​Wind Mountain, vicinity ​Colong ​Caves, on Queen'​s Birthday weekend: ​"​I'​ve ​scraped so many plates this weekend, the lyre birds have taken up the sound"
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===Congratulations To:=== 
 + 
 +Betty and Phil Hall, whose daughter Susan was born on June 9th. 
 + 
 +Shirley Evans and Kevin Dean who embarked on the marital career, ​June 13th. 
 + 
 +Luke Priddle, on his engagement to Marie Barden, sister of Norma Rowan. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME. THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME.
 As a result of decisions taken at the June Committee Meeting, members will find that the new Walks Programme (July to October) will be the last of the present series. As a result of decisions taken at the June Committee Meeting, members will find that the new Walks Programme (July to October) will be the last of the present series.
Line 295: Line 322:
 It is intended to revert to the drill of producing the Walks Programmes on the Club duplicator, but in very different style from the duplicator programmes of 1943-49. It is proposed to produce the new style programme by the photographic-stencil process, in the same way as maps published in the magazine. It is also proposed to use a thin card, similar to that used in present walks programmes - NOT paper. Estimated cost will be about 6 per issue or 18 for each year's programmes. It is intended to revert to the drill of producing the Walks Programmes on the Club duplicator, but in very different style from the duplicator programmes of 1943-49. It is proposed to produce the new style programme by the photographic-stencil process, in the same way as maps published in the magazine. It is also proposed to use a thin card, similar to that used in present walks programmes - NOT paper. Estimated cost will be about 6 per issue or 18 for each year's programmes.
 A further advantage will be the additional time available for preparation. Because it take  five weeks to obtain the finished work from the printers, the Walks '​ecretary must now have his draft progra== ready for Committee review two months before it begins to operate. It is considered that two or three weeks will be sufficient to produce the programme under the new arrangement. A further advantage will be the additional time available for preparation. Because it take  five weeks to obtain the finished work from the printers, the Walks '​ecretary must now have his draft progra== ready for Committee review two months before it begins to operate. It is considered that two or three weeks will be sufficient to produce the programme under the new arrangement.
-IF YOU ARE GOING PLACES +
-CONTACT, +
-SCENIC MOTOR TOURS +
-KAT (MBA  +
-DAILY TOURS BY PARLOR COACH TO TEE WORLD FAMOUS JENOLAN CAVES AND ALL BLUE MOUNTAIN SIGHTS. +
-TRANSPORT BY COACHES FOR PARTIES OF BUSH +
-+
-WALKERS TO KANANGRA WALLS, GINKIN OR OTHER SUITABLE POINTS BY ARRANGEMENT. +
-FOR ALL INF CHI AT ION +
-WRITE TO P.O. BOX 6G0 KATOOMBA. TELEPHONE 60, KATOOMBA. +
-20.+
 One other important decision touching on the balks Programme has been reached. Attention has been drawn to the fact that, under the present routine, names of officers elected at the March meeting do not app ear on a programme until mid-June. With the accelerated production plan it should be possible (provided the retiring vialks Secretary has prepared most of the next programme) to have a new issue ready by mid- April to cover the period May to August. So the new issues will be One other important decision touching on the balks Programme has been reached. Attention has been drawn to the fact that, under the present routine, names of officers elected at the March meeting do not app ear on a programme until mid-June. With the accelerated production plan it should be possible (provided the retiring vialks Secretary has prepared most of the next programme) to have a new issue ready by mid- April to cover the period May to August. So the new issues will be
 "​January to April "​January to April
195207.txt · Last modified: 2016/06/14 03:01 by tyreless