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 |Editorial - A Lesson For Us| | 1| |Editorial - A Lesson For Us| | 1|
-|Deitorial ​- Theory V. Practice| | 2|+|Editorial ​- Theory V. Practice| | 2|
 |At the January General Meeting|Jim Brown| 3| |At the January General Meeting|Jim Brown| 3|
 |Bushwalking The Easy Way, or The Prospectives Delight|A. Wilson| 5| |Bushwalking The Easy Way, or The Prospectives Delight|A. Wilson| 5|
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 Dormie moved that we support the formation of such a Section, (this after a motion-less prefacory discussion). It was argued that it was in line with our principles - also that we could never afford the equipment: that the equipment would be provided for us - but we were not likely to get sufficient volunteers to quench a candle: some said bushfires didn't conveniently burn at week-ends when we might be available, and some replied that if we aided the other fire fighters two days a week well, it was better than nothing. It was suggested we give financial support to existing local bush fire brigades. Federation President and delegate Paul Barnes, arriving during the debate, suggested that we could support the well-intentioned proposal "in principle"​ for the present, and at least allow it to receive detailed consideration. The words "in principle"​ were never officially added to the motion, but we carried it none the less. Dormie moved that we support the formation of such a Section, (this after a motion-less prefacory discussion). It was argued that it was in line with our principles - also that we could never afford the equipment: that the equipment would be provided for us - but we were not likely to get sufficient volunteers to quench a candle: some said bushfires didn't conveniently burn at week-ends when we might be available, and some replied that if we aided the other fire fighters two days a week well, it was better than nothing. It was suggested we give financial support to existing local bush fire brigades. Federation President and delegate Paul Barnes, arriving during the debate, suggested that we could support the well-intentioned proposal "in principle"​ for the present, and at least allow it to receive detailed consideration. The words "in principle"​ were never officially added to the motion, but we carried it none the less.
  
-Coming to the selection of a site for the annual re-union, we found grave doubts on all hands concerning the "​burned out" nature of favaured ​spots. Thus we passed over Euroka Clearing and Long Angle Gully, and finished with four nominations - Morella Karong, Era, Lake Eckersley and Woods Creek. The first three named were down at the water jump - didn't secure the 10 primary votes to go to the poll and the dark horse Woods Creek was chosen. Before the meeting was over a resident of Windsor had been lined up to check an the state of affairs at the reunion site.+Coming to the selection of a site for the annual re-union, we found grave doubts on all hands concerning the "​burned out" nature of favoured ​spots. Thus we passed over Euroka Clearing and Long Angle Gully, and finished with four nominations - Morella Karong, Era, Lake Eckersley and Woods Creek. The first three named were down at the water jump - didn't secure the 10 primary votes to go to the poll and the dark horse Woods Creek was chosen. Before the meeting was over a resident of Windsor had been lined up to check an the state of affairs at the reunion site.
  
 With 50-odd by-laws to be ratified or cast to the lions at the Annual General Meeting, and the need for the President to reach the Annual Re-Union by Saturday night, a motion was submitted that the by-laws would be mailed to each member with the Annual Report. Any member who wasn't happy about a particular by-law would be required to write the Secretary not later than March, 12th, moving amendment or cancellation:​ any by-law not so impugned would be carried without debate at the meeting. Brief discussion carried the motion. With 50-odd by-laws to be ratified or cast to the lions at the Annual General Meeting, and the need for the President to reach the Annual Re-Union by Saturday night, a motion was submitted that the by-laws would be mailed to each member with the Annual Report. Any member who wasn't happy about a particular by-law would be required to write the Secretary not later than March, 12th, moving amendment or cancellation:​ any by-law not so impugned would be carried without debate at the meeting. Brief discussion carried the motion.
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 Fortunately,​ however, I was saved from becoming another "​Diogenes"​ by the fact that, just as I was about to make a rather heated comment on our speed, Keith Renwick took the wheel for his "​trick"​ (I think that is the correct term - is it not Jim?). Knowing that Keith is an even more cautious type than myself, and knowing that he would stop dead if we so much as passed a single pebble which he couldn'​t account for, I joined the other three on the bunks (get that fellow prospectives,​ bunks, things for spinebashing on). UNFORTUNATELY,​ the confidence I had placed in Keith'​s judgment over the years I had known him was rudely shattered soon after we had safely passed beneath the Hawkesbury Rail Bridge. The boat gave a tremendous shudder and on investigation it appeared that Keith had tried to take the road bridge with him. On investigation we were told he had been expecting Peat's Ferry not a bridge that by rights shouldn'​t be there. This I admit customers set us all back on our feet until Ken suddenly pointed out the cause of the trouble. We were only a very short distance from Mud Island Mental Home. (I had wondered why I had suddenly felt an urge to get out and run alongside the launch. Now I knew.) Fortunately,​ however, I was saved from becoming another "​Diogenes"​ by the fact that, just as I was about to make a rather heated comment on our speed, Keith Renwick took the wheel for his "​trick"​ (I think that is the correct term - is it not Jim?). Knowing that Keith is an even more cautious type than myself, and knowing that he would stop dead if we so much as passed a single pebble which he couldn'​t account for, I joined the other three on the bunks (get that fellow prospectives,​ bunks, things for spinebashing on). UNFORTUNATELY,​ the confidence I had placed in Keith'​s judgment over the years I had known him was rudely shattered soon after we had safely passed beneath the Hawkesbury Rail Bridge. The boat gave a tremendous shudder and on investigation it appeared that Keith had tried to take the road bridge with him. On investigation we were told he had been expecting Peat's Ferry not a bridge that by rights shouldn'​t be there. This I admit customers set us all back on our feet until Ken suddenly pointed out the cause of the trouble. We were only a very short distance from Mud Island Mental Home. (I had wondered why I had suddenly felt an urge to get out and run alongside the launch. Now I knew.)
  
-Ken, the only member of the crew who was without nostalgic memories of this happy spot (he was a Gladesville boy himself), steered us safely past and Keith again took over. While everyone else did some solid spinebashing (prospectives!) Keith guided us up the river past Bar Point, Pumpkin Point, Big Jim's Point, and on to Mangrove Creek. Here a very important ​conferelce ​was held. The original plan had been to anchor here for the night but everyone had so far got in so much spinebashing that no one quite felt like sleep (or so I was told for I was quietly snoring on the starboard bunk). However, they finally continued with first of all Ken at the wheel and then Frank and Jim together substituting for yours truly, still snoring soundly, away on the starboard bunk. (Ah! the blissfulness of it, fellow prospectives,​ you've got to try it to believe it.)+Ken, the only member of the crew who was without nostalgic memories of this happy spot (he was a Gladesville boy himself), steered us safely past and Keith again took over. While everyone else did some solid spinebashing (prospectives!) Keith guided us up the river past Bar Point, Pumpkin Point, Big Jim's Point, and on to Mangrove Creek. Here a very important ​conference ​was held. The original plan had been to anchor here for the night but everyone had so far got in so much spinebashing that no one quite felt like sleep (or so I was told for I was quietly snoring on the starboard bunk). However, they finally continued with first of all Ken at the wheel and then Frank and Jim together substituting for yours truly, still snoring soundly, away on the starboard bunk. (Ah! the blissfulness of it, fellow prospectives,​ you've got to try it to believe it.)
  
 This exhausting effort on my part landed us at Wiseman'​s Ferry at 0130 hours at which time I was rudely awakened in order to be informed that we were anchored and it was time to retire (be sure you pick more considerate companions when you go). This exhausting effort on my part landed us at Wiseman'​s Ferry at 0130 hours at which time I was rudely awakened in order to be informed that we were anchored and it was time to retire (be sure you pick more considerate companions when you go).
  
-At 0830 hours I was awoken again but this time I had no objections whatsoever. There straight in front of me lay the most beautiful scene imaginable. By ordinary standards it was not out of the ordinary. But I had just enjoyed the longest sleep I'd had for weeks. There were no worries on my mind. Technical College had closed, the Finals were over, there were two clear days ahead before returning to the salt mines and there before my eyes lay this scene. There was the river stretching into the distance with bright green reeds against the dark green of the ridges and to cap it all a clear blue sky with one or two scattered clouds and just enough breeze to stop it from being too hot. I lay there daydreaming till the others woke up then I put my thoughts into action. Grabbing the camera in one hand and green filter and lens hood in the other I headed for the dinghy closely followed by Keith. By the time our shutter clicking orgy was finished breakfast in some mysterious fashion had made its appearance on the table. At 1104 hours we finally got under way and several minutes later arrived at Upper Wiseman'​s Ferry. Here Jim and Ken went ashore to find out if we could get petrol the following day (Sunday) if we needed it. Of course the fact that the local hostelry was on the opposite side of the road to the service station may have nothing whatsoever to do with the fact that thcy didn't arrive back till 1204 hours but __I ask you__. One hour to walk two hundred yards and back and ask one simple question (Ha!Ha!).+At 0830 hours I was awoken again but this time I had no objections whatsoever. There straight in front of me lay the most beautiful scene imaginable. By ordinary standards it was not out of the ordinary. But I had just enjoyed the longest sleep I'd had for weeks. There were no worries on my mind. Technical College had closed, the Finals were over, there were two clear days ahead before returning to the salt mines and there before my eyes lay this scene. There was the river stretching into the distance with bright green reeds against the dark green of the ridges and to cap it all a clear blue sky with one or two scattered clouds and just enough breeze to stop it from being too hot. I lay there daydreaming till the others woke up then I put my thoughts into action. Grabbing the camera in one hand and green filter and lens hood in the other I headed for the dinghy closely followed by Keith. By the time our shutter clicking orgy was finished breakfast in some mysterious fashion had made its appearance on the table. At 1104 hours we finally got under way and several minutes later arrived at Upper Wiseman'​s Ferry. Here Jim and Ken went ashore to find out if we could get petrol the following day (Sunday) if we needed it. Of course the fact that the local hostelry was on the opposite side of the road to the service station may have nothing whatsoever to do with the fact that they didn't arrive back till 1204 hours but __I ask you__. One hour to walk two hundred yards and back and ask one simple question (Ha!Ha!).
  
 Having hoisted them aboard we moved off and throbbed steadily upstream at a steady seven knots. Quite a lot of driftwood was met with but all was avoided till I discovered that by standing on the seat behind the steering wheel and using your foot you could steer and look at the scenery (with your head through the hatch) at the same time. Unfortunately I paid TOO much attention to the scenery (ESPECIALLY THE CURVES) and managed to run into the biggest lot yet encounter while travelling at full speed (but I still haven'​t managed to work out how Frank (sorry!) got there). Having hoisted them aboard we moved off and throbbed steadily upstream at a steady seven knots. Quite a lot of driftwood was met with but all was avoided till I discovered that by standing on the seat behind the steering wheel and using your foot you could steer and look at the scenery (with your head through the hatch) at the same time. Unfortunately I paid TOO much attention to the scenery (ESPECIALLY THE CURVES) and managed to run into the biggest lot yet encounter while travelling at full speed (but I still haven'​t managed to work out how Frank (sorry!) got there).
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 About two hours after leaving Wiseman'​s we reached the Colo and proceeding up it till out of sight of the main river we moored in a quiet spot for lunch. Here everyone suddenly came to life and cameras appeared from all corners and much evidence of the perfect suitability of this method of travel for spinebashing was collected. About two hours after leaving Wiseman'​s we reached the Colo and proceeding up it till out of sight of the main river we moored in a quiet spot for lunch. Here everyone suddenly came to life and cameras appeared from all corners and much evidence of the perfect suitability of this method of travel for spinebashing was collected.
  
-An hour later we set off again heading upstream at a steady pace until the setback of a very low road bridge was encountered. But this did not stop the terrible quintet for long. Retiring downstream we quickly dismantled the mast with the aid of a screwdriver and returned to the fray. This time we made it with exactly an inch and a half to spare and the dire prophecy of an ominiscent ​local to the effect that we wouldn'​t get one hundred yards before we got stuck ringing in our ears. Captain Hooper merely gave a scornful laugh at this but posted yours truly and Frank Young in the bows with a lead which Jim had thoughtfully brought along with instructions to give a yell if the soundings fell below a fathom. This wasn't long in happening but with the scornful words of the local still in our ears, the local still in sight, and a firm belief that the launch didn't draw more than eighteen inches of water we gave each a meaning look and agreed that we'd get the launch up to the telegraph line crossing the Colo above this bridge or bust. The soundings fell to four feet, then three feet, then two feet and back to three, then back to two and still we kept going. Soon we came to a clear sandy bottom which we could clearly see two or three feet below the keel of the launch without any need for the lead but still we kept the rest in ignorance. Then we saw the telegraph line and let forth a triumphant cheer.+An hour later we set off again heading upstream at a steady pace until the setback of a very low road bridge was encountered. But this did not stop the terrible quintet for long. Retiring downstream we quickly dismantled the mast with the aid of a screwdriver and returned to the fray. This time we made it with exactly an inch and a half to spare and the dire prophecy of an omniscient ​local to the effect that we wouldn'​t get one hundred yards before we got stuck ringing in our ears. Captain Hooper merely gave a scornful laugh at this but posted yours truly and Frank Young in the bows with a lead which Jim had thoughtfully brought along with instructions to give a yell if the soundings fell below a fathom. This wasn't long in happening but with the scornful words of the local still in our ears, the local still in sight, and a firm belief that the launch didn't draw more than eighteen inches of water we gave each a meaning look and agreed that we'd get the launch up to the telegraph line crossing the Colo above this bridge or bust. The soundings fell to four feet, then three feet, then two feet and back to three, then back to two and still we kept going. Soon we came to a clear sandy bottom which we could clearly see two or three feet below the keel of the launch without any need for the lead but still we kept the rest in ignorance. Then we saw the telegraph line and let forth a triumphant cheer.
  
 "Okay, stop her" we shouted "and have a look over the side"! "Okay, stop her" we shouted "and have a look over the side"!
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   - Activities etc. for Sunday - such things as damper competitions and the like.   - Activities etc. for Sunday - such things as damper competitions and the like.
   ​   ​
-One other point, campfire items in the form of songs, sketches and entertainment from membeps ​or groups of members are required so why not get your heads together now, and work out some really good sketches? Gil Webb will be enquiring for such items for inclusion in the campfire programme. Remember it's your Reunion, so let's get together and make it the best ever.+One other point, campfire items in the form of songs, sketches and entertainment from members ​or groups of members are required so why not get your heads together now, and work out some really good sketches? Gil Webb will be enquiring for such items for inclusion in the campfire programme. Remember it's your Reunion, so let's get together and make it the best ever.
  
 ---- ----
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 Maybe you've met him too! The bloke who's GOT to have it rough and tough, who laughs at the simple beauty of a rural setting and whose parochial limits of mind lead him to believe that there'​s no land but the Blue Mountains. You organise yourself flat to get the party through new country, you feel flushed with success; he growls about the waste of time and money... the bloke that looks with eyes that do not see! Maybe you've met him too! The bloke who's GOT to have it rough and tough, who laughs at the simple beauty of a rural setting and whose parochial limits of mind lead him to believe that there'​s no land but the Blue Mountains. You organise yourself flat to get the party through new country, you feel flushed with success; he growls about the waste of time and money... the bloke that looks with eyes that do not see!
  
-Perhaps I've got things wrong; but for what it's worth, I'd like to contend that there'​s more in our ramblings than "​getting on to good walking country"​. Often we are ready to give opinions on technical problems of land usage and to bandy geographical terms because we've "been about"​. If that is so, then let's see that the trips we organise aim at giving a clear concept of the build of our native land aad how Man is using (or mis-using) it.+Perhaps I've got things wrong; but for what it's worth, I'd like to contend that there'​s more in our ramblings than "​getting on to good walking country"​. Often we are ready to give opinions on technical problems of land usage and to bandy geographical terms because we've "been about"​. If that is so, then let's see that the trips we organise aim at giving a clear concept of the build of our native land and how Man is using (or mis-using) it.
  
 It is not enough to look however, since one must see with knowing eyes -- an uncommon attribute of your common and garden variety of tourist who, having heard the jargon "​education by travel",​ continues to perambulate with self-satisfaction but very little benefit. It is not enough to look however, since one must see with knowing eyes -- an uncommon attribute of your common and garden variety of tourist who, having heard the jargon "​education by travel",​ continues to perambulate with self-satisfaction but very little benefit.
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 From Keswick we go by bus to Seetoller from where we start to climb by the road up to the Homster Pass. Almost at the top of the Pass is a state quarry and one can spend an hour or so watching the large slabs of slate being split up into house slates. The splitting is done by hand and the slates are used throughout the British Isles instead of tiles. From Keswick we go by bus to Seetoller from where we start to climb by the road up to the Homster Pass. Almost at the top of the Pass is a state quarry and one can spend an hour or so watching the large slabs of slate being split up into house slates. The splitting is done by hand and the slates are used throughout the British Isles instead of tiles.
  
-From Homster we climb up on to Green Gable, down a saddle and up on to Great Gable (the climber'​s paradise). From the top of Great Gable the view is magnificent looking down Wastwater. On the left hand side of Wastwater are Wasdale Screes and during ​s torms the lightning sometimes strikes the screes ​mhich move down into the Lake causing a tidal wave. Some years ago a car travelling along the road on the opposite side of the lake was wrecked by one of the waves and the occupants killed.+From Homster we climb up on to Green Gable, down a saddle and up on to Great Gable (the climber'​s paradise). From the top of Great Gable the view is magnificent looking down Wastwater. On the left hand side of Wastwater are Wasdale Screes and during ​storms ​the lightning sometimes strikes the screes ​which move down into the Lake causing a tidal wave. Some years ago a car travelling along the road on the opposite side of the lake was wrecked by one of the waves and the occupants killed.
  
 Just under Great Gable is Black Sail Pass and there is a Youth Hostel in this Pass which is most useful, particularly to climbers who wish to spend a few days on Great Gable. Just under Great Gable is Black Sail Pass and there is a Youth Hostel in this Pass which is most useful, particularly to climbers who wish to spend a few days on Great Gable.
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 ---- ----
  
-IM.Irr.1=1=.11111NOCENIZMIIMPIIIIMMILNIIM.. +=====We Came Of Age.===== 
-WE CAME OF AGE.+
 By Brian G. Harvey. By Brian G. Harvey.
-Now that we have enthusiastically embarked upon preparations for the celebration of our Silver Anniversary in October, with Ball and all, the question of whether we should publish a Special Silver Anniversary Magazine in October to mark the occasion is sure to arise before long. The occasion ​slirely ​warrants a special issue where Club history can be recorded and be kept as a souvenir of the happy celebrations we hope will take place. + 
-In October 1948 when we turned twentyone (we all remember the "​Dungowan"​) we dashed off a 34-page Extra Special Number (with specially ​;printed cover), comprising an ordinary monthly issue with its usual features, followed by the Twentyfirst Anniversary Supplement covering the first Minutes, press cuttings of the embryo movement to form the +Now that we have enthusiastically embarked upon preparations for the celebration of our Silver Anniversary in October, with Ball and all, the question of whether we should publish a Special Silver Anniversary Magazine in October to mark the occasion is sure to arise before long. The occasion ​surely ​warrants a special issue where Club history can be recorded and be kept as a souvenir of the happy celebrations we hope will take place. 
-Club, Constitution,​ Blue Gum Reservation,​ and the like. All very interesting to read and look back on. (By the way, we still have a few copies + 
-left, obtainable from the Business Manager for 6d. per copy, for those who were not fortunate enough to be members in 19481!) +In October 1948 when we turned twentyone (we all remember the "​Dungowan"​) we dashed off a 34-page Extra Special Number (with specially printed cover), comprising an ordinary monthly issue with its usual features, followed by the Twentyfirst Anniversary Supplement covering the first Minutes, press cuttings of the embryo movement to form the Club, Constitution,​ Blue Gum Reservation,​ and the like. All very interesting to read and look back on. (By the way, we still have a few copies left, obtainable from the Business Manager for 6d. per copy, for those who were not fortunate enough to be members in 1948!!) 
-So that' ​the magazine should have been available at the usual cost of 6d. per copy, the Club agreed to subsidise the Magazine to the extent of its loss due to the large amount of paper, etc. used, without any + 
-increase in price, and which amounted, I think, to about 3.17.0. With present day costs, a similar reimbursement would be about 8, perhaps ​9+So that the magazine should have been available at the usual cost of 6d. per copy, the Club agreed to subsidise the Magazine to the extent of its loss due to the large amount of paper, etc. used, without any increase in price, and which amounted, I think, to about £3.17.0. With present day costs, a similar reimbursement would be about £8, perhaps ​£9. 
-I have no doubt that, put to a General Meeting, repetition of the special issue would be greatly favoured. However the Editor cannot be expected to write it up himself, so before you vote an such a proposition it would be as well to find out if the matter is assured of definite support in the form of articles suitable to the occasion. If a few would like to club together we can produce photographs of which the magazine will share half cost, which would be about to any groupsufficiently + 
-12. +I have no doubt that, put to a General Meeting, repetition of the special issue would be greatly favoured. However the Editor cannot be expected to write it up himself, so before you vote an such a proposition it would be as well to find out if the matter is assured of definite support in the form of articles suitable to the occasion. If a few would like to club together we can produce photographs of which the magazine will share half cost, which would be about £3 to any group sufficiently interested to put in a few bob each for the benefit of he many. 
-interested to put in a few bob each forthe benefit of he many. Have you any ideas for the February General Meeting? + 
-=11110,​1110.11ZOMM+Have you any ideas for the February General Meeting? 
-TO NA a DAMPER. + 
-By Jim Brown +---- 
-(AnotheR Cook). + 
-For those walkers ​Who propose to make dampers on an extended trip, this recipe is provided +=====To Make Damper.===== 
-INGREDIENTS: 2 lbs. plain flour ) + 
-Baking Powder ​) Or self-raising flour +By Jim Brown (AnotheR Cook). 
-Small quantity of fat Salt + 
-Water +For those walkers ​who propose to make dampers on an extended trip, this recipe is provided: 
-2 loaves stale bread., + 
-UTENSILS: 2 plates +===Ingredients:=== 
-1 billy - 1 billy - One walker One walker + 
-- one large, one small +  * 2 lbs. plain flour 
-2i pint-size +  ​* ​Baking Powder ​(or self-raising flour) 
-4 pint-size +  ​* ​Small quantity of fat 
-with long finger nails) May be the with keen nose +  * Salt 
-same person. +  ​* ​Water 
-NETHOD: Roll up shirt sleeves. +  ​* ​2 loaves stale bread 
-Place about 1 lb. of flour on the smaller plate, and add baking powder (fruit salts or wood ash may be used.in an emergency, but the use of self raising flour should ​obvia to emergencies). Keep about 1 lb. of flour in reserve (the reason will become apparent later). + 
-Add water and knead with the hands, and knead with the handsand knead with the hands. Add more water and knead with the hands, and etc. etc. After a time the dough will begin to flow off the plate. This means that the mixture'is too wet. Hence your reserve flour. Sprinkle liberally on the dough, and knead with the hands, etc. +===Utensils:=== 
-Presently you will notice that the atmosphere is misty with flour dust. This means that the mixture is too dry. By this time the dough has crept up your fingers to the wrist, so you call for more water. Your assistant explains that the water bucket ​ig empty, so you send him post haste for more. Desist while he is absent, or you will dissipate too much precious flour. + 
-On return, add water generously, and knead with the hands, etc. This will male the dough sloppy so that it will creep up to your elbows (hence rolling up the sleeves). The ball of dough will have diminished to the size of-a golf ball. Summon the walker with long finger nails to scrape you dotn - this can be done by a combination of scratching down to palm level, and "nilkingu ​your fingers ​individual_ly ​- provided the digits can be isolated. +  * 2 plates - one large, one small 
-13. +  * 1 billy - 2 1/2 pint-size 
-Transfer the Whole mess to the 2i-pint billy, and add the residue of the flour. Knead with the hands. You will soon find that the dough is unmanageable in the billy, so move it to the larger plate, and continue to knead with the hands. The mixture will soon be too dry, so you must add water sparingly (allow for sweating from forearms) and knead with the hands. The mixture should gradually become damper (go on, laugh, damn you). Have your long-nailed friends scrape you down periodically,​ and continue to knead with the hands. +  * 1 billy - 4 pint-size 
-After an interminable time you will have a dough of the right +  * One walker ​with long finger nails 
-consistency. If you haven'​t,​ you'd better give it a go anyhow. Have a final rub-down, and assemble the mixture into one.fairly comprehensive rounded lump. Since you have used all your flour, grease the bottom of the 4-pint billy slightly (hence the fat). Pick up the blob of damper and place it centrally in the billy. Invert the lid. Wash the surplus mess off yoftr hands and forearms, scrape away the coals from the bottom of the fire, place the billy there and heap embers around and on top of it. +  * One walker ​with keen nose (May be the same person) 
-Bring your keen-nosed walker close to the fire, and move away from the fire or right out of the hut (if in one) yourself. To relax your nerves you may smoke, drink strong tea or coffee, but should not administer alcohol in any form. Keep well away, for the watcher must not be confused with any exotic or unfamiliar smell. All efforts must be bent on sniffing for the first smell of baking. Cooking time will range from ten minutes to an hour and a half. + 
-If, after an hour, no savour of baking is detected, remove the billy from fire and lift lid, pouring in some charcoal in the process. If black, sack the watch-keeper and treat with nasal inhalants and cough mixture: if white, replace in fire (the billy, not the watch-keeper) and repeat the process, until the load has risen well and is nicely browned. +===Method:=== 
-About this time you will discover that you haven'​t added the salt.  + 
-Anyway, it was an interesting experiment and yoU can eat the two loaves of stale bread (hence the bread - it'll be staleby ​this time anyway). +  * Roll up shirt sleeves. 
-During the January made to the regulations year. One member wants as bushfires! +  ​* ​Place about 1 lb. of flour on the smaller plate, and add baking powder (fruit salts or wood ash may be used in an emergency, but the use of self raising flour should ​obviate ​emergencies). Keep about 1 lb. of flour in reserve (the reason will become apparent later). 
-ONE EAR TO THE GROUND".  +  ​* ​Add water and knead with the hands, and knead with the handsand knead with the hands. Add more water and knead with the hands, and etc. etc. After a time the dough will begin to flow off the plate. This means that the mixture is too wet. Hence your reserve flour. Sprinkle liberally on the dough, and knead with the hands, etc. 
-General Meeting quite a governing burning off at to know if this applies +  ​* ​Presently you will notice that the atmosphere is misty with flour dust. This means that the mixture is too dry. By this time the dough has crept up your fingers to the wrist, so you call for more water. Your assistant explains that the water bucket ​is empty, so you send him post haste for more. Desist while he is absent, or you will dissipate too much precious flour. 
-lot of reference was certain times of the +  ​* ​On return, add water generously, and knead with the hands, etc. This will make the dough sloppy so that it will creep up to your elbows (hence rolling up the sleeves). The ball of dough will have diminished to the size of a golf ball. Summon the walker with long finger nails to scrape you down - this can be done by a combination of scratching down to palm level, and "milking" ​your fingers ​individually ​- provided the digits can be isolated. 
-to bushwalkers as well +  ​* ​Transfer the whole mess to the 2 1/2-pint billy, and add the residue of the flour. Knead with the hands. You will soon find that the dough is unmanageable in the billy, so move it to the larger plate, and continue to knead with the hands. The mixture will soon be too dry, so you must add water sparingly (allow for sweating from forearms) and knead with the hands. The mixture should gradually become damper (go on, laugh, damn you). Have your long-nailed friends scrape you down periodically,​ and continue to knead with the hands. 
- 0    0+  ​* ​After an interminable time you will have a dough of the right consistency. If you haven'​t,​ you'd better give it a go anyhow. Have a final rub-down, and assemble the mixture into one fairly comprehensive rounded lump. Since you have used all your flour, grease the bottom of the 4-pint billy slightly (hence the fat). Pick up the blob of damper and place it centrally in the billy. Invert the lid. Wash the surplus mess off your hands and forearms, scrape away the coals from the bottom of the fire, place the billy there and heap embers around and on top of it. 
 +  ​* ​Bring your keen-nosed walker close to the fire, and move away from the fire or right out of the hut (if in one) yourself. To relax your nerves you may smoke, drink strong tea or coffee, but should not administer alcohol in any form. Keep well away, for the watcher must not be confused with any exotic or unfamiliar smell. All efforts must be bent on sniffing for the first smell of baking. Cooking time will range from ten minutes to an hour and a half. 
 +  ​* ​If, after an hour, no savour of baking is detected, remove the billy from fire and lift lid, pouring in some charcoal in the process. If black, sack the watch-keeper and treat with nasal inhalants and cough mixture: if white, replace in fire (the billy, not the watch-keeper) and repeat the process, until the load has risen well and is nicely browned. 
 +  ​* ​About this time you will discover that you haven'​t added the salt.  
 + 
 +Anyway, it was an interesting experiment and you can eat the two loaves of stale bread (hence the bread - it'll be stale by this time anyway). 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +====="One Ear To The Ground."===== 
 + 
 +During the January ​General Meeting quite a lot of reference was made to the regulations ​governing burning off at certain times of the year. One member wants to know if this applies to bushwalkers as well as bushfires! 
 +  
 +.... 
 + 
 Glad to see Eric Pegram has returned to the fold. Perhaps a warning should be issued that those long legs of Eric's are capable of covering country at a surprising rate and hobbles might well be carried by any leader who is fortunate to enjoy the company of the boy wanderer. Glad to see Eric Pegram has returned to the fold. Perhaps a warning should be issued that those long legs of Eric's are capable of covering country at a surprising rate and hobbles might well be carried by any leader who is fortunate to enjoy the company of the boy wanderer.
-14. 
-Bb and"​Billy"​ Bright are spending several months holiday in Australia from New Guinea. Conditions up there seem to suit them- both physically and financially to judge from the car they have been driving around in. 
- Trust S.B.W'​s to enjoy Christmas away from homes One party (no 6 names, but one of the ladies is prominent socially on the Committee) had their grog sent into the Reserve ready for the celebrations. It's not uncommon to get a white Christmas in Tassy but they mode sure they had a wet one. 
-Shirley King left these shores in the "​Strathaird"​ for England'​s green pastures. She intends to follow Frank Leyden'​s example and see 
-as much of Euro e whilst earning Serling. Her present address in 
-England is - C/- Mrs. Wilderspin, hTe-Kianga",​ Ivy Road, Vange, Ess ex, England. 
-Congratulations to - Mary and Roy Braithwaite,​ on the birth of 
-a daughter: Shirley Evans and Kevin Dean, who have announced their 
-engagement. 
  
-INNOCENTS ABROAD. Frank Leyden sends his very kind regards to his +.... 
-S.B.W. friends ​ He and Leon Blumer have been climbing among the highest peaks in the Austrian Tyrol. + 
-SKIING ​ ENTHUSIASTS. Len Scotland is endeavouring to forma skiing +Bob and"​Billy"​ Bright are spending several months holiday in Australia from New Guinea. Conditions up there seem to suit them both physically and financially to judge from the car they have been driving around in. 
-FEFty with the view of booking ​Bettis ​Camp, if possible during the latter half of the month of July. The hut has accommodation for 16. Would interested members see Len in the Clubroom or write him at + 
-28 Figtree Avenue, Randwick, without delay. +.... 
-WE DON'T LIKE TO HARP + 
-wirars.11Mlimmaamuuaammemumr..lam.ara +Trust S.B.W'​s to enjoy Christmas away from home! One party (no names, but one of the ladies is prominent socially on the Committee) had their grog sent into the Reserve ready for the celebrations. It's not uncommon to get a white Christmas in Tassy but they made sure they had a wet one. 
-but there'​s a number of you good folk who have not yet "came good" with 7-our Magazine Annual Subscription for 1952. As mentioned last month, the subscription expired with the January issue. Out of our + 
-goodness of heart we are posting magazines to those who subscribed +.... 
-last year, knowing full well credit is right. But don't try us out + 
-too far, pleaseIn case you've forgotten, the rate for copies posted to your address is 7/6d. per annum. Held in the Clubroom - 5/-. Don't delay. +Shirley King left these shores in the "​Strathaird"​ for England'​s green pastures. She intends to follow Frank Leyden'​s example and see as much of Europe whilst earning Sterling. Her present address in England is - C/- Mrs. Wilderspin, "​Te-Kianga",​ Ivy Road, Vange, Essex, England. 
-Most-trees must be feminine, They do a strip tease in the autumn months, display bare limbs in winter, dress up-enchantingly every spring, and live off the sap all summer. + 
-15. +.... 
-FEDERATION NOTES.+ 
 +Congratulations to - Mary and Roy Braithwaite,​ on the birth of a daughter: Shirley Evans and Kevin Dean, who have announced their engagement. 
 + 
 +.... 
 + 
 +__Innocents abroad.__ ​Frank Leyden sends his very kind regards to his S.B.W. friendsHe and Leon Blumer have been climbing among the highest peaks in the Austrian Tyrol. 
 + 
 +.... 
 + 
 +__Skiing Enthusiasts.__ Len Scotland is endeavouring to form a skiing ​party with the view of booking ​Bett'​s ​Camp, if possible during the latter half of the month of July. The hut has accommodation for 16. Would interested members see Len in the Clubroom or write him at 28 Figtree Avenue, Randwick, without delay. 
 + 
 +.... 
 + 
 +__We Don't Like To Harp__ ​but there'​s a number of you good folk who have not yet "come good" with your Magazine Annual Subscription for 1952. As mentioned last month, the subscription expired with the January issue. Out of our goodness of heart we are posting magazines to those who subscribed last year, knowing full well credit is right. But don't try us out too far, pleaseIn case you've forgotten, the rate for copies posted to your address is 7/6d. per annum. Held in the Clubroom - 5/-. Don't delay. 
 + 
 +.... 
 + 
 +Most trees must be feminine, They do a strip tease in the autumn months, display bare limbs in winter, dress up enchantingly every spring, and live off the sap all summer. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Federation Notes.===== 
 Brian G. Harvey. Brian G. Harvey.
-KOSCIUSKO AREA. Federation has received from the organisers of ranama HutteTroject ​an invitation to become Foundation Subscribers to the proposed scheme to erect a hut on the slopes of Mount North- cote, near Kunama Creek. The hut has normal accommodation for eight, with four emergency beds. Any bushwalker or skier may subscribe, the subscription being 25. Further details may be obtained from Mr. M.W. Anton, 36a Mona Street, Darling Point, ​!phone FM4122. Interested parties should not delay. + 
-?hDERAT1ON REUNION will be held over weekend 29/30th March. Clubs are requested to suggest a suitable site which has not been burnt out by recent bushfires. +===Kosciusko Area.=== 
-PROPOSED BUSHFIRE FIGHTING AND FLOOD RESCUE SECTION. The notice of  ​Ea"ron liTE-Egrii-FriTilssed ​at -sOniere-iaWan=g-Testion ​was made that there should be two distinct divisions and that the work of the Groups would be simply co-operation with established authorities. Federation is approaching (a) Bushfire Advisory Committee and (b) the Police Department, to ascertain whether walkers could practically assist. + 
-NORTON'S BASIN. Solicitors representing the owners of the North and North-Et banks advise camping on these banks is prohibited during dry weather. Permission may be granted by the lawyers at other times. Federation Secretary will supply addressif required. +Federation has received from the organisers of Kunama Hutte Project ​an invitation to become Foundation Subscribers to the proposed scheme to erect a hut on the slopes of Mount Northcote, near Kunama Creek. The hut has normal accommodation for eight, with four emergency beds. Any bushwalker or skier may subscribe, the subscription being £25. Further details may be obtained from Mr. M.W. Anton, 36a Mona Street, Darling Point, ​'phone FM4122. Interested parties should not delay. 
-KURNELL PENINSULA. It is reported that Caltex is seeking to establish an Oil Refinery alongside the Captain Cook Landing Reserve and partly on the area recently won by conservaelbn ​bodies. Strong protests are going forward. + 
-BUSHFIRE SPOTTING IN NATIONAL PARK. No definite arrangements have been finaTii-ed ​with-TraW-iia-nagementlegy may be laid for proper organisation next summer. +===Federation Reunion.=== 
-NARROW NECK LANDS. It is reported surveyors will soon'be active in 1717-6-67Eation Trthe requested reserves in Narrow Neck-Ruined Castle Areas. + 
-DEFINITION OF PRIMITIVE AREA. A definition has been suggested by the Austra Ian MUFTum ​and forwarded to the Wild Life Preservation Society for consideration. Federation Conservation Bureau will also review. +Will be held over weekend 29/30th March. Clubs are requested to suggest a suitable site which has not been burnt out by recent bushfires. 
-AMENDMENT TO CONSTITUTION. Notice of Motion has been submitted so that a qu-OFTE nay be constituted by nine qualified delegates representing five affiliated clubs. + 
-CRUISING CANOE CLUB has been admitted as an affiliated member. +===Proposed Bushfire Fighting and Flood Rescue Section.=== 
-PRICES AT PADDY_PALLINIS. + 
-Prices Present Posers for Paddy. In conmon ​with most people Paddy is constantly faced with the problem of costs. Rising costs must be passed an eventually but Paddy delays the process as long as possible, and makes every endeavour to stem the rising ​cos'Gs. Like Canute, however, he cannot cause the tide to stop flowing. Fortunately,​ the small staff which has been kept during the reconstruction period are a good team and the man-hours production is high. Another fortunate circumstance is that owing to the fire and the consequent low-rate of usage of japara, Paddy still has stocks of cloth which were bought at considerably less than present day pricesThe benefit of this is passed ​an of course.+The notice of  ​motion was again discussed ​at some length and suggestion ​was made that there should be two distinct divisions and that the work of the Groups would be simply co-operation with established authorities. Federation is approaching (a) Bushfire Advisory Committee and (b) the Police Department, to ascertain whether walkers could practically assist. 
 + 
 +===Norton's Basin.=== 
 + 
 +Solicitors representing the owners of the North and North-East banks advise camping on these banks is prohibited during dry weather. Permission may be granted by the lawyers at other times. Federation Secretary will supply address if required. 
 + 
 +===Kurnell Peninsula.=== 
 + 
 +It is reported that Caltex is seeking to establish an Oil Refinery alongside the Captain Cook Landing Reserve and partly on the area recently won by conservation ​bodies. Strong protests are going forward. 
 + 
 +===Bushfire Spotting In National Park.=== 
 + 
 +No definite arrangements have been finalised ​with Park ManagementWay may be laid for proper organisation next summer. 
 + 
 +===Narrow Neck Lands.=== 
 + 
 +It is reported surveyors will soon be active in investigation of the requested reserves in Narrow Neck - Ruined Castle Areas. 
 + 
 +===Definition of a Primitive Area.=== 
 + 
 +A definition has been suggested by the Australian Museum ​and forwarded to the Wild Life Preservation Society for consideration. Federation Conservation Bureau will also review. 
 + 
 +===Amendment of Constitution.=== 
 + 
 +Notice of Motion has been submitted so that a quorum may be constituted by nine qualified delegates representing five affiliated clubs. 
 + 
 +===Cruising Canoe Club.=== 
 + 
 +Has been admitted as an affiliated member. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Prices ​At Paddy Pallin'​s.===== 
 + 
 +__Prices ​Present Posers for Paddy.__ In common ​with most people Paddy is constantly faced with the problem of costs. Rising costs must be passed an eventually but Paddy delays the process as long as possible, and makes every endeavour to stem the rising ​costs. Like Canute, however, he cannot cause the tide to stop flowing. Fortunately,​ the small staff which has been kept during the reconstruction period are a good team and the man-hours production is high. Another fortunate circumstance is that owing to the fire and the consequent low-rate of usage of japara, Paddy still has stocks of cloth which were bought at considerably less than present day pricesThe benefit of this is passed ​on of course. 
 Walkers can rest assured that they can always get from Paddy Pallin the best quality gear at prices which compare more than favourably with any such gear in Australia. Walkers can rest assured that they can always get from Paddy Pallin the best quality gear at prices which compare more than favourably with any such gear in Australia.
-Note  for Skiers. Paddy has skis, stocks and other accessories bought at last yearrs price and on Which last year's Sales Tax was paid. Prudent skiers are advised to make a deposit now to secure goods for the coming Season at last year's prices. 
-16. 
-?PHONE: M2678. 
-PADDY PALLIN, 
-CAMP GEAR FOR WALKERS, 
-201 Castlereagh Street, 
-(Between Park and Bathurst Streets) 
-SYDNEY. 
  
 +__Note for Skiers.__ Paddy has skis, stocks and other accessories bought at last year's price and on which last year's Sales Tax was paid. Prudent skiers are advised to make a deposit now to secure goods for the coming Season at last year's prices.
 +
 +Paddy Pallin, Camp Gear For Walkers.
 +
 +'​Phone:​ M2678. 201 Castlereagh Street, (Between Park and Bathurst Streets) Sydney.
195202.1464664884.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/05/31 03:21 by tyreless