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195107 [2018/06/25 02:46]
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195107 [2018/06/26 02:56]
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 +===== Beyond The Main Divide. =====
 +
 +"The Gent in the Tent".
 +
 +Last year a party of walkers, lured on by one fine day between two cyclones, went to the Barren Grounds for the King's Birthday weekend. During the second day out the weather became so bad that they returned from Berry by 2.20 p.m. train. So as not to be caught in similar circumstances this year much discussion and consideration was given to suitable localities, and the outcome was a plan to walk from Tarana to Blackheath via Fish River and the old Bathurst Stock Route, a distance of about 45 miles. By going beyond the Main Dividing Range we hoped to get away from the influence of any bad coastal weather.
 +
 +How fortunate was the decision! On the Thursday and Friday prior to the holiday week-end the weather along the coast was windy and very wet. As we all had reservations on the 7.25 p.m. Coonamble Mail for Friday 8th June, we were not dismayed at the announcement that no extra trains would be run for the holiday weekend. The overcrowding on this train can only be described as disgraceful for a so-called civilised community. We finally reached Tarana at 1.40 a.m. on Saturday morning (1 hour late) and the only way to get our bulky packs out of the "​cattle truck" (not in one's wildest dreams could the conveyance be described as a railway carriage) was through the window. When the flurry and struggle to descend from "the vehicle"​ had subsided, we noticed that the clouds were breaking and numerous stars could be seen. The Station Master said that Friday had been very wet, so, with his permission we camped in one of the waiting rooms in case cur proposed campsite on the Fish River was flooded.
 +
 +Saturday dawned full but fine. We were up and away by 7 a.m. and had breakfast about 2 1/2 miles out where a small creek crossed the road. The country is fairly open grazing land to the Fish River Bridge with some fantastic granite formations on what the locals call the Crown Range to the East. As the Fish River was running fast and high we kept to the North Eastern bank to avoid fording further upstream. There is a good campsite right at the bridge. As we now had to traverse a few private properties permission was sought from the owners. They seemed very wary about granting permission to proceed until assured that we had no firearms. Apparently holiday week-end rabbiters have done a lot of damage in the past.
 +
 +We followed the Fish River up for about 5 miles through mostly easy going. The river was a fine sight as it rushed down to join the Macquarie. There were many English Willows along the banks and one particularly fine stand of Lombardy Poplars. Rabbits were about in hundreds and their numerous burrows required careful stepping in the long grass. At a spot called Phil's Falls by the Military Map we came upon a wide ford where the old road from Bathurst via O'​Connell and Fish River Hill crossed the river. Fortunately we were on the Eastern bank and didn't have to battle with the torrent. In the next 3 miles the track rises about 1,000 feet through mostly cleared country. The old road is apparently still gazetted as a main road, although suitable for equestrians and pedestrians only, and trees have grown up on either side and down the middle in parts, making a delightful avenue. Local tradition says that it was a Cobb & Co's coach route to Bathurst. This I doubt because Cobb & Co. didn't flourish until the 1850'​s,​ although the route may have been used by earlier coaches, and it certainly seems to have been used as a stock route. Bindi Hill was a prominent feature to the South as we climbed.
 +
 +On top the going was easy. Several trees, torn down by the previous day's gale were strewn across the track, which soon became a country road. We passed several reasonable camp sites to reach Antonio Creek, which was the worst of the lot as far as wood supply went. However, permission to camp was readily given by the owner and we settled down to do battle with rain soaked firewood. Apart from misty mountain rain the evening was uneventful.
 +
 +Next morning was foggy with promise of a fine day. Away about 9 a.m. a short sharp climb out of Antonio Creek brought us to the top of the Dividing Range, at about 3,600 feet above sea level. Here we passed through a gate, where a timber getter assured us we were on the main road, which was really a delightful forest track skirting cleared paddocks occasionally. Down a pleasant ridge to Mary Anne's Creek, then up and over to Jock's Creek, which is a lovely camp spot. Up again on to a ridge where a sudden twist in the track brought the Blue Mountains, all the well known country around the Gangerangs and Kanimbla Valley into view. It was fine and clear, so we spent five minutes deciding which mountains were which. The ridge turned North and slowly dropped to Lowther Creek just under Mt. Blaxland. A double hairpin bend on the way down must have been a headache for any coach driver coming down when the road was in use. Lunch on Lowther Creek was doubly pleasant - keen appetites and another excellent camp site.
 +
 +It was only 1 1/2 miles to the Cox River where the Lithgow - Jenolan Road crosses by a large wooden bridge. From this spot to our overnight camp site we were plagued by rabbit murderers, who seemed to waste their ammunition on most objects except rabbits. A pity they hadn't gone into the country we had just traversed where rabbits abounded, but then they would have had to walk a few miles from their motor conveyances.
 +
 +The Cox was running strongly. It is just as lovely up here as in it's lower reaches, but without towering mountains to climb to get out. Seeing so much water so far up we gave thought to our friends who had planned to cross the stream much lower down on trips to and from the Kanangra area. We followed the river, then cut across a grassy hill to the Jenolan Caves Road Bridge at the Lett River Junction. Then ensued a lively 15 minutes finding a way across the Lett in order to reach the Northern bank of the Cox. We were able to cross safely knee deep and then made fast time along the Cox to a comfortable camp not far from Deep Ravine Creek. As we had recovered by now from the lack of sleep on Friday night, the camp fire was a great success with a definitely intimate conversation.
 +
 +At 8.30 a.m. next morninr we climbed an easy ridge behind the camp spot to enjoy some lovely views across Kanimbla Valley before making for "Moyne Falls",​ the oldest standing house West of the Blue Mountains (erected 1819). Here a young bullodk caused a mild flutter by looking very ferocious, but he wilted before our combined approach. On to Barber'​s Creek for lunch. The road between Little Hartley and Wilson'​s Glen has been put into excellent order, apparently for timber hauling - the concrete box culverts are most impressive. All went well until the swamp below Centennial Glen where, in trying to avoid getting bogged, we mislaid the track. Ernie French followed what he described as animal pads and gave us an anxious moment until he was safely restored to our midst. Centennial Glen was at its best after so much recent rain. We arrived in Blackheath just in time to see the 4.24 p.m. train, which the Railway Department had assured us would not run, go out. However, a spruce up, a beer and some hot food, fortified the party for the assault on the 6.9 p.m. which ran as tabled, even if 15 minutes late.
 +
 +The country around the Main Divide is well worth a look at especially when the coastal weather is bad. It can be approached from Lithgow (bus to South Bowenfels) or Rydal, although the train service to this station is poor. Go and see for yourself!
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== Why Don't We Do It More Often? =====
 +
 + The Social Evening on 25th May was something we have not had in the Club for some time.
 + 
 +The evening started with games and was interspersed with musical items, which were enjoyed both by those who appreciate music and those who like 'a bit-o'​-fun'​.
 +
 +Molly Gallard, ably accompanied by David Ingram, opened the programme with several items on the violin. Eric Rowen, accompanied by Norma, gave us several songs and finally David obliged with a pianoforte solo.
 +
 +There must be more such talent in the Club and it would be nice if we could have another such evening on a bigger and better scale.
 +
 +----
 +
 +Kids up at the Blue Mountains have been caught up in the wave of exploratory re-enactments. They'​re now playing a game of Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth. It's a simple and wholesome game. All you do is hoist an imaginary but immensely heavy pack on your back, totter wearily from one tree to another, sit down and sigh, talk about the perils of the journey, hoist up the imaginary pack again and move an to the next tree.
 +
 +----
 +
 +===== Open Letter To The Club - Duped By The Duplicator. =====
 +
 +After a pre-publication peep at Jim Brown'​s notes "At the June General Meeting"​ I was sorry I had been absent from that notable gathering in order that some simple light might have been shed on the subject of the newly acquired duplicator. Apparently there was never a greater amount said by people who were more ill-informed and should really have known better than to make the statements attributed to them by the Honorary Secretary'​s recordings (and so mislead the meeting).
 +
 +It is indeed very amusing to read of the "​prodigal spending"​ of £93 on the new duplicator from a reserve fund which was created for the very purpose of purchasing equipment! Our last duplicator was second-hand when bought by the Club, and when traded in was aged about 25 years - and then it wouldn'​t lie down. This new machine, not having been manhandled by a previous owner, should have at least the longevity of its predecessor. By "​shedding the load" over 25 years the new machine costs less than £4 per year!
 +
 +And now to confound the babbling economic wizards. The last Annual Report and Balance Sheet was wholly produced by the Club - typed, duplicated, collated and stapled. It was a 13-page affair, of which 350 copies were struck. To have 350 of each of 13 pages, and not even collated and stapled, run off by a commercial duplicating firm costs £13. 6. 9d. This Report cost the Club the mere sum of £3. 8. 0, thus effecting a saving of £9.18. 9d!! Multiply this by the estimated life of the machine at 25 years and we have saved £248. 8. 9d., i e. £155. 8. 9d. more than the machine cost. I can save you another £4 or so on each Walks Programme if run off on stiff board as in other years - £12 per year X 25 years - another £300. You have had song sheets for re-unions, club forms, "Hints to Prospectives"​ and now the proposed 25-sheet song book - all at little cost. The club magazine has been produced at no cost to the Club, in fact it had accumulated assets of £27. 6. 2d. at the last official balance.
 +
 +Therefore, had we not been the proud possessors of a duplicator, the cost of the Annual Report and other items would have been hidden under the sub-heading of "​Printing"​ in the Income and Expenditure Account from year to year and the Annual General Meeting would have bemoaned the rising costs of running the Club and no doubt increased the annual subscription to offset the money we now are actually saving. Have you been duped?? Definitely.
 +
 +It is laughable to consider the debate on raising a "new duplicator fund" when the need to purchase a new one won't arise for a couple of decades. The Honorary Treasurer would do well to refund the "​voluntary contributions"​ made at the dance last Friday week, or forever hang his head in shame. Anyway, the principal of calling upon the regular group which frequents the Club room to donate money for the benefit of the Club in general is entirely wrong.
 +
 +I might say as a member of 15 years stanling (or walking) that I have no knowledge of any special effort ever having been made during that period to raise funds for the purchase of equipment - we were merely fortunate in the days before rising costs hit us to have a surplus of income over expenditure and that some far sighted member had the wisdom to have a reserve earmarked for that specific purpose.
 +
 +As a final shot, it won't be long before the Club will be asked to consider the purchase of a typewriter for the cutting of stencils for the magazine and general club stationery. But that's another treat in store. In the meantime, think up all the arguments you can against it.
  
-BEYOND THE MAIN DIVIDE. 
-The Gent in the Tent". 
-Last year a party of walkers, lured on by one fine day between 
-two cyclones, went to the Barren Grounds for the King's Birthday weekend. During the second day out the weather became so bad that they returned from Berry by 2.20 p m. train. So as not to be caught in similar circumstances this year much discussion and consideration was given to suitable localities, and the outcome was a plan to walk from Tarana to Blackheath via Fish River and the old Bathurst Stock Route, a distance of about 45 miles. By going beyond the Main Dividing Range we hoped to get aw ay from the influence of any bad coastal weather. 
-How fortunate was the decision! On the Thursday and Friday prior to the holiday wedt-end the weather along the coast was windy and very wet. As we all had reservations on the 7.25 p m. Coonamble Mail for Friday 8th June, we were not dismayed at the announcement that no extra trains would be run for the holiday weekend. The overcrowding on this train can only be described as disgraceful for a so-called civilised community. We finally reached Tarana at 1.40 a n, on Saturday morning (1 hour late) and the only way to get our bulky packs out of the cattle truck" (not in one's wildest dreams =Lad the conveyance be described as a railway carriage) was through the window. When the flurry and struggle to descend from lithe vehicle"​ had subsided, we noticed that the clouds were breaking and numerous stars could be seen. The Station Master said that Friday had been very wet, so, with his permission we camped in one of the waiting rooms in case cur proposed campsite on, the Fish River was flooded. 
-Saturday downed full but fine. We were up and away by 7 a m. and had breakfast about 2i miles cut where a small creek crossed the road. The country is fairly open grazing land to the Fish River Bridge with some fantastic granite formations on what the locals call the Crown Range to the East. As the Fish River was running fast and high we kept- to the North Eastern bank to avoid fording further upstream. There is a good campsite right at the bridge. As we now had to traverse a few private properties permission was sought from the owners. They seemed 
-very wary about granting permission to proceed until assured that we had no firearms. Apparently holiday week-end rabbiters have done a lot of damage in the past. 
-We followed the Fish River up for about 5 miles through mostly easy going. The river was a fine si,ht as it rushed down to join the 
-Macquarie. There were many English Willows along the banks and one 
-particularly fine stand of Lombardy Poplars. Rabbits were about in hundreds and their numerous burrows required careful stepping in the long grass. At a spqgft called Phil's Falls by the Military Map we came upon a wide ford where the old road from Bathurst via O'​Connell and Fish River Hill crossed the river. Fortunately we were on the Eastern bank and didn't have to battle with the torrent. In the next 3 miles the 
-track rises about 1,000 feet through mostly cleared country. The old road is apparently still gazetted as a main road, although suitable for 
-7. 
-equestrians and pedestrians only, and trees have grown up on either side and down the middle in parts, making a delightful avenue. Local traditicn says that it was a Cobb & Co's coach route to Bathurst. This I doubt because Cobb & Co. didn't flourish until the 18501s, although the route may have been used by earlier coaches, and it certainly seems to have been used as a stock route. Bindi Hill was a prominent feature to the South as we climbed. 
-On top the going was easy., Several trees, torn down by the previous day's gale were strewn across the track, Which soon became a country road. We passed several reasonable camp sites to reach Antonio Creek, which was the worst of the lot as far as wood supply went. However, permission to camp was readily given by the owner and we settled down to do battle with rain soaked firewood. Apart from misty mountain rain the evening was uneventful. 
-Next morning was foggy with promise of a fine day. Away about 
-a m, a short sharp climb out of Antonio Creek brought us to the top of the Dividing Range, at about 3,600 feet above sea level. Here we passed through a gate, where a timber getter assured us we were on the main road, which was really a delightful forest track skirting cleared paddocks occasionally. Down a pleasant ridge to Mary Anne's Creek, then up and over to Jock's Creek, which is a lovely camp spot. Up again on to a ridge where a sudden twist in the track brought the Blue Mountains, all the well known country around the Gangerangs and Kanimbla Valley into view. It was fine and clear, so we spent five minute- deciding which mountains were which. The ridge turned North and slowly dropped to Lowther Creek just under Mt. Blaxland. A double hairpin bend an the way down must have been a headache for any coach driver coming down when the road was In use. Lunch on Lowther Creek was doubly pleasant - keen appetites and another excellent camp site 
-It was only l miles to the Cox River where the Lithgow - Jenolan Road crosses by a large wooden bridge. From this spot to our overnight camp site we were plagued by rabbit murderers, who seemed to waste their ammunition on most objects except rabbits. A pity they hadn't gone into the country we had just traversed where rabbits abounded, but then they would have had to walk a few miles from their motor conveyances. 
-The Cox was running strongly. It is just as lovely up here as in it's lower reaches, but without towering mountains to climb to get out. Seeing so much water so far up we gave thought to our friends who had planned to cross the stream much lower down on trips to and from the Kananrr,ra area. We followed the river, then cut across a grassy hill to the Jenolan Caves Road Bridge at the Lett River Junction. Then ensued a lively 15 minutes finding a way across the Lett in order to reach 
-the Northern bank of the Cox. We were able to cross safely knee deep and then made fast time along the Cox to a comfortable camp not far from Deep Ravine Creek. As we had recovered by now from the lack of sleep on Friday night, the camp fire was a great success with a definitely intimate conversation. 
-P.30 a m, next morninr we climbed an easy ridge behind the camp spot to enjoy some lovely views across Kanimbla Valley before making for "Moyne Falls",​ the oldest standing house West of the Blue Mountains (erected 1819). Here a young bullodk caused a mild flutter by looking very ferocious, but he wilted before our combined approach. On to Barber'​s Creek for lunch. The road between Little Hartley and Wilson'​s Glen has been put into excellent order, apparently for timber hauling - the concrete box culverts are most impressive. All went well until the swamp below Centennial Glen where, in trying to avoid getting bogged, we mislaid the track. Ernie French followed what he described as animal pads and gave us an anxious moment until he was safely restored to our midst. Centennial Glen was at its best after so much recent rain. We arrived in Blackheath just in time to see the 4.24 p m. train, which the Railway Department had awsured us would not run, co out. However, a spruce up, a be and some hot food, fortified the party for the assault on the 6.9 p m. which ran as tabled, even if 15 minutes late. 
-The country around the Main Divide is wellworth a look at especially when the coastal weatheris bad. It can be approached from Lithgow (bus to South Bowenfels) or Rydal, although the train service to this station is poor. Go and See for yourself! 
-mpimmimmmim .....wahl011.0.1.111.mwmid bamimt. 
-wxy DON'T WE DO IT MORE OFTEN? 
-- The Social Evening, on 5th Yay was something we have not had in the Club for some time. 
-The evening started with games and was interspersed with musical items, Which were enjoyed both by those Who appreciate music and those who like 'a 
-Molly Gallard, ably accompanied by David Ingram, opened the programme with several items on the violin, Eric Rowen, accompanied by Norma, gave us several songs and finally David obliged with a pianoforte solo. 
-There must be more such talent in the Club and it would be nice if we _could have another such evening on a bigger, and better scale. 
-.10 11.11. 1.1=mmINNIIIIEMMOIIIM. salaam. 
-Kids ap at the Blue Mountains have been caught up in the wave of exploratory re-enactments. They'​re now playing a game of Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth. It's a simple and Wholesome game. All you do is hoist an imaginary but immensely 'heavy pack on your back, totter wearily from one tree to mother, sit down and sigh, talk about the perils of the journey, hoist up the imaginary pack again and move an to the next tree. 
-9. 
-OPEN LETTER TO THE CLUB 
-wwww1.1m.I.Mm..NY 
-DUPED BY THE DUPLICATOR. 
-After a pre-publication peep at Jim Brown'​s notes "At the June General Meeting"​ I was sorry 1 had been absent from that notable gathering in order that some simple light might have been shed on the subject of the newly acquired duplicator. Apparently there was never a greater amount said by people who were more ill-informed and should really have known better than to make the statements attributed to them by the ionorary S ecretnry'​s recordings (and so mislead the meeting). 
-It is indeed very amusing to read of the "​prodigal spending"​ of 93 on the new duplicator from a res erve fund which was created for the very pUrpose of purchasing equipmenti Our last duplicator was second-hand when bought by the Club, and When traded in was aged about 25 years - and then it wouldn'​t lie down. This new machine, not having been manhandled by a previous owner, should have at least the longevity of its predecessor. By "​shedding the load" over 25 years the new machine costs less than 4 per year 
- And now to confound the babbling economic wizards. The last Annual Report and Balance Sheet was WHOLLY P RODUCED BY THE CLUB - typed, duplicated, collated and stapled. It was a 13-page affair, of which 350 copies were struck. To have 350 of each of 13 pages, and not even collated and stapled, run aff by a commercial duplicating firm costs 13. 6. 9d. This Report cost the Club the mere SUM of 3. 8. 0, thus effecting a saving of 9.18. 9d1! Multiply this by the estimated life of the machine at 25 years and we have saved 248. 8. 9d., i e. 155. 8. 9d. MORE THAN THE MACHINE COST. I can save you another 4 or so on eadhL Walks Programme if run off on stiff board as in other years - 12 per year X 25 years - another 300. You have had song sheets 
-for re-unions, club forms, ,another 
- to Prospectives"​ and now the proposed 
-25-sheet song book - all at little cost. The club magazine has been imoduced at no cost to the Club, in fact it had accumulated assets of 27. 6. 2d. at the last official balance. 
-Therefore, had we not been the proud possessors of a duplicator, the cost of the Annual Report and other items would have been hidden under the sub-heading of "​Printing"​ in the Income and Expenditure Account from year to year and the Annual General Meeting would have bemoaned the rising costs of running the Club and no doubt increased the annual subscription to offset the money we now are actually SAVING. Have you been duped?? Definitely. 
-It is laughable to oonsider the debate on raising a "new duplicator fund" when the need to purchase a new one won't arise for a couple of decades. The Honorary Treasurer wculd do well to refund the '​voluntary contributions"​ made at the dance last'​Friday week, or forever hang his head in shame. Anyway, the principal of calling upon the regular group which frequents the Club room to donate money for the benefit of the Club in general is entirely wrong. 
-10. 
-I miht say as a member of 15 years stanlinfr (or walking) that I have no knowledrr,e of any special effort ever having been made during that period to raise funds for the purchase of equipment - we were merely fortunate in the days before rising costs hit us to have a surplus of inOome over expenditure and that some far sighted member had the wisdom to have a reserve earmarked for that specific purpose. 
-As a final shot, it won't be long before the Club will be asked to consider the purchase of a typewriter for the cutting of stencils for the magazine and general club stationery. But that's anothar, treat in store. In the meantime, think up all the arguments you can against it. 
 - The Official Duplicator Operator. - The Official Duplicator Operator.
-TEE NATIONAL TRUST.+ 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== The National Trust===== 
 Brian G. Harvey. Brian G. Harvey.
-The June monthly meeting of the Council of the Federation of BushwalkinF, ​Clubs was_privileged ​to be addressed by Mr. King, + 
-the President of The National Trust, and, incidentally,​ the President of the Rangers League. There can be no doubt as to Mr. King's intense enthusiasm, both for the preservation of historical buildings and the conservation of the wild bush flora and fauna - projects which demonstrate,his wide diversity of interests. +The June monthly meeting of the Council of the Federation of Bushwalking ​Clubs was privileged ​to be addressed by Mr. King, the President of The National Trust, and, incidentally,​ the President of the Rangers League. There can be no doubt as to Mr. King's intense enthusiasm, both for the preservation of historical buildings and the conservation of the wild bush flora and fauna - projects which demonstrate his wide diversity of interests. 
-He told us The National Trust (N.S.W.) had been modelled on the parent body in England, which has done so much in the Old Country in not only preserving historical buildings but in the conservation of areas of scenic beauty, e g. the famous Lakes District. The English body has, however, the great advantage of the authority of a special Act of Parliament in its favour ​Which gives it a power in the land with a rigtt to control and police places under its jurisdiction. Being now fairly long-standing,​ its work is well known and many bequests have added to its acquisitions and swelled the success of its untiring work in securing buildings or areas it considers fit for preserving for jposterity.' + 
-The N.S.W. Trust has now been incorporated,​ which gives it the right to poSsess ​freehold as a body and frees its members from personal legal obligation.+He told us The National Trust (N.S.W.) had been modelled on the parent body in England, which has done so much in the Old Country in not only preserving historical buildings but in the conservation of areas of scenic beauty, e.g. the famous Lakes District. The English body has, however, the great advantage of the authority of a special Act of Parliament in its favour ​which gives it a power in the land with a right to control and police places under its jurisdiction. Being now fairly long-standing,​ its work is well known and many bequests have added to its acquisitions and swelled the success of its untiring work in securing buildings or areas it considers fit for preserving for posterity. 
 + 
 +The N.S.W. Trust has now been incorporated,​ which gives it the right to possess ​freehold as a body and frees its members from personal legal obligation. 
 Mr. King intimated the Trust has two main objects, viz., Mr. King intimated the Trust has two main objects, viz.,
-(I) The preservation of historical buildings or places, and (2) The preservation of natural beauty, 
-but at the present time only the former is receiving attention as the field in this category isof great magnitude and presents a task which cannot be given all the attention it merits, much less can bushland areas at present be discussed. It must be appreciated that many of the 
-lick more tlicin 4Z of 11.S.Wis in reserves 
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-lianaAwals a Warr umbuniles Mac1ea7 Valk 11astinisValley J. Sadoione lett @Rd. Blue M"- 1iiri, Murrey 4.4w. les. Eij Merilit dee, Wits Viciorian Airitiel,​(Boion to taw Biati ) ft Tenterfield. 
-ararck J.cpport afiPrecialedi 
  
-11. +  - The preservation of historical buildings or places, and 
-historical edifices around Sydney are in danger of demolition and urgent ​Steps have to be taken to save them. Once they are gone the position is irretrievable. +  - The preservation of natural beauty, 
-During a visit to England he found that tradition had a big bearing on the success of the Trust there, but this attribute was sadly lacking in Australia, not through any fault of ours, but due to the youth of Australia as a nation, and it was up to us to cultivate a backrTound. It was, for instance, tradition not to interf ore with the"​King'​s Swans" on the Thames. How easy it could be for the average man-in-the-street + 
-to adopt the s are traditional view on the protection of our wild flowers and animals. When the famous No.10 Downing Street was in danger of collapsing there was no question of demolition - the walls were merely buttressed and the building should last some hundreds of years more. +but at the present time only the former is receiving attention as the field in this category is of great magnitude and presents a task which cannot be given all the attention it merits, much less can bushland areas at present be discussed. It must be appreciated that many of the historical edifices around Sydney are in danger of demolition and urgent ​steps have to be taken to save them. Once they are gone the position is irretrievable. 
-It is not the policy of the Trust to interfere with the aims or projects of its affiliated bodies or direct them along a certain line + 
-of uniform action, but the Trut will certainly call upon the affiliated bodies if their influence, strength and enthusiasm will assist the Trust in achieving an object. Similarly the Trust will lend its support +During a visit to England he found that tradition had a big bearing on the success of the Trust there, but this attribute was sadly lacking in Australia, not through any fault of ours, but due to the youth of Australia as a nation, and it was up to us to cultivate a background. It was, for instance, tradition not to interfere ​with the "​King'​s Swans" on the Thames. How easy it could be for the average man-in-the-street to adopt the same traditional view on the protection of our wild flowers and animals. When the famous No. 10 Downing Street was in danger of collapsing there was no question of demolition - the walls were merely buttressed and the building should last some hundreds of years more. 
-wherever possible to help the Federation if and when the occasion arises. + 
- 55 +It is not the policy of the Trust to interfere with the aims or projects of its affiliated bodies or direct them along a certain line of uniform action, but the Trut will certainly call upon the affiliated bodies if their influence, strength and enthusiasm will assist the Trust in achieving an object. Similarly the Trust will lend its support wherever possible to help the Federation if and when the occasion arises. 
-It therefore behoves bushwalkers to take an active interest in the + 
-work of the National Trust, as they can't expect to receive support and +It therefore behoves bushwalkers to take an active interest in the work of the National Trust, as they can't expect to receive support and give nothing in return. Unless members are prepared to became members of the Trust and expound their conservation knowledge and experience accumulated over the years, and perhaps become the authorities under the second category of aims and objects, the Trust cannot become the many sided body the counterpart today holds in England. They are at present battling for the preservation of the old Mint Building and St. James' Church as examples of our early architecture. The S.B.W. as a Club can't do anything, but as an organisatbn of 275 members, each and every one can do something - help swell the most powerful weapon today - public opinion. 
-give nothing in return. Unless members are prepared to became members of the Trust and expound their conservation knowledge and experience accumulated over the years, and perhaps become the authorities under the second category of aims and objects, the Trust cannot become the many sided body the counterpart today holds in England. They are at present battling for the preservation of the old Mint Building and St. James' Church as examples of our early architecture. The S.B.W. + 
-as a Club can't do anything, but as an organisatbn of 275 members, each and every one can do something - help swell the most powerful weapon today - public opinion. +---- 
-'And I have no desire to walk, for I am acquainted with almost all the rustic sights and sounds of this neighborhood,​ at least over the weekend. The sights of our beechwoods afford at this season are + 
-the thousands upon thousands of pallid but assertive industrialists which toUring ​car and motor coach deposit in every mossy dingle. There they lie, prostrate grubs in unsightly ​Cocoons ​of greasy paper, mineral water bottles and empty sardine tins. The rustic sounds contend with their gramophones and wireless portables. The rills may laugh, thrush or linnet sing, the sweet wine may"​gently kiss the trees",​ but the voice of the Amorous American negro will drown them all. But what our visitors like best is to read the newspaper to jazzy accompaniment. In this fashion concentration upon harmony is diversified by an intelligent interest in politics, while the brain fag induced by the study of our social and democratic conditions is alleviated by the strains of music.+"And I have no desire to walk, for I am acquainted with almost all the rustic sights and sounds of this neighborhood,​ at least over the weekend. The sights of our beechwoods afford at this season are the thousands upon thousands of pallid but assertive industrialists which touring ​car and motor coach deposit in every mossy dingle. There they lie, prostrate grubs in unsightly ​cocoons ​of greasy paper, mineral water bottles and empty sardine tins. The rustic sounds contend with their gramophones and wireless portables. The rills may laugh, thrush or linnet sing, the "sweet wind" ​may "​gently kiss the trees",​ but the voice of the Amorous American negro will drown them all. But what our visitors like best is to read the newspaper to jazzy accompaniment. In this fashion concentration upon harmony is diversified by an intelligent interest in politics, while the brain fag induced by the study of our social and democratic conditions is alleviated by the strains of music.
 - Kenneth Hare. - Kenneth Hare.
-12.+ 
 +---- 
 FEDERATION NOTES. FEDERATION NOTES.
 Brian G. Harvey. Brian G. Harvey.
195107.txt · Last modified: 2018/06/27 02:51 by tyreless