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195107 [2012/05/28 04:31]
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195107 [2018/06/25 02:46]
tyreless
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-THE SIM. BY BusHimInR+====== The Sydney Bushwalker====== 
-A monthly ​bulletin ​of mattersof interest to the. 'S ydney Bush Walkers, C/- Inersoll ​Hall, 256 Crown St., Sydney. + 
-aa. w..mr/ r..m rwm raw; +A monthly ​Bulletin ​of matters of interest to the Sydney ​Bush Walkers, C/- Ingersoll ​Hall, 256 Crown St., Sydney. 
-No.200 ​JULY, 1951 Price 6d. + 
-md.--a w,Md am. .r km .1tmW +---- 
-EditorBill Gillam, Berowra ReportersJim Brown, Kath McKay + 
-Creek Road, Berowra. ​Sales and Subs.: Shirley Evans Production and Business Manager: ​Typed by Jean Harvey. ​Brian Harvey (JW1462).. +=== No. 200. July, 1951Price 6d. === 
-CONTENTS, + 
-Page Editorial - "​Conservation and the Jubilee +|**Editor**|Bill Gillam, Berowra ​Creek Road, Berowra.| 
-Tree Planting"​ 1 +|**Production and Business Manager**|Brian Harvey (JW1462).| 
-At the June General ​Meting ​+|**Reporters**|Jim Brown, Kath McKay.| 
-Social Notes for July* +|**Sales and Subs**|Shirley Evans.| 
-Beyond the Main Divide, by "TheGent in the Tent 6 +|**Typed by**|Jean Harvey.| 
-Why Don't We Do It More Often? 8 + 
-Open Letter to the Club - Duped by the Duplicator 9 +===== In This Issue: ===== 
-The National Trust, by Brian G. Harvey 10 +  
-Map showing Chief Reserves in N.S.IN+| | |Page
-by The Wild Life Preservation Society of Australia +|Editorial - "​Conservation and the Jubilee Tree Planting"​| | 1| 
-Federation Notes 12 +|At the June General ​Meeting| | 2| 
-Paddy News (..dvertisement) ​13 +|Social Notes for July| | 5| 
-EDITORIAL. +|Beyond the Main Divide|"The Gent in the Tent"​| ​6| 
-Conservation and the Jubilee Tree Planting ​mAiw  ma mPlaMa...aw mqmorr:1 +|Why Don't We Do It More Often?| | 8| 
-One of the brightest stars of the galaxy of the Jubilee cups, competitions and drives is the Tree Planting ​schame ​launched by the Governor General several weeks ago. Conservationists and tree lovers generally will welcome the scheme not because it is all that should be desired, but because any scheme, no matter how small its chances of success, will present some of the ideas af conservation to general notice. +|Open Letter to the Club - Duped by the Duplicator| | 9| 
-If townsfolk can summon up sufficient energy to create tree-lined avenues in their own suburbs it is reasonable to expect that some of them will become increasingly sympathetic to the effart2 ​of Federation and other bodies to preserve our diminishing forests and primitive areas. +|The National Trust|Brian G. Harvey|10| 
-2. +|Map showing Chief Reserves in N.S.W.|The Wild Life Preservation Society of Australia|11| 
-On a more practical plane, however, it is doubtful whether the Government Departments in whose hands rests the fate of these areas will undergo any groat change of heart. True, Mark Morton is safe for two years at least; others, well   ​Kuringai Chase is still ransacked every year for its flowers, the National Park is administered indifferently and staffed inadequately,​ our city and suburban parks are constantly being filched for railways, halls and parking stations, the P.Y.G's Department adopts a petulant attitude when there is opposition to their tree destruction schemes, and puts the complaints down to, in their view, the sinister publicity of the Jubilee scheme, which wants the streets adorned with things other than bare poles and wire festoonsThe preservation of our present park space would be a far greater gesture of the Jubilee spirit than the granting, gratis, of thousands of seedlings which have less than an equal chance of survival. +|Federation Notes| |12| 
-The capital difficulty of getting the trees to grow till they arc large enough to withstand the ravages of rabbits, live stock and general neglect is the greatest stumbling block to the scheme. From our own experience at Era we know that the chances of a seedling surviving for a fewryears ​is very low, and we fenced in the plantation. Imagine ​than how difficult it would be to cover all those ridges of dead ringbarked timber where there is no possibility of '​ohe ​seedlings receiving any protection from netting or wire. Even suburban avenues are a constant battle before an decent show can be expected. Granted immunity from telegraph wires it takes years of diligent attention by local councils before such things as Grafton'​s Jacaranda festival, or the pleasant shade of Albury'​s Camphor Laurels rewards the farsighted. + 
-Work for more National-Parks and primitive areas must fr,o on. The planting of new trees may eventually re,timber parts of our countryside,​ but would it not be better to proclaim more national parks: it would be easier.+===== Advertisements:​ ===== 
 + 
 +| |Page| 
 +|Paddy News|13| 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Editorial - Conservation and the Jubilee Tree Planting. ​===== 
 + 
 +One of the brightest stars of the galaxy of the Jubilee cups, competitions and drives is the Tree Planting ​scheme ​launched by the Governor General several weeks ago. Conservationists and tree lovers generally will welcome the scheme not because it is all that should be desired, but because any scheme, no matter how small its chances of success, will present some of the ideas af conservation to general notice. 
 + 
 +If townsfolk can summon up sufficient energy to create tree-lined avenues in their own suburbs it is reasonable to expect that some of them will become increasingly sympathetic to the efforts ​of Federation and other bodies to preserve our diminishing forests and primitive areas. 
 + 
 +On a more practical plane, however, it is doubtful whether the Government Departments in whose hands rests the fate of these areas will undergo any great change of heart. True, Mark Morton is safe for two years at least; others, well... Kuringai Chase is still ransacked every year for its flowers, the National Park is administered indifferently and staffed inadequately,​ our city and suburban parks are constantly being filched for railways, halls and parking stations, the P.M.G's Department adopts a petulant attitude when there is opposition to their tree destruction schemes, and puts the complaints down to, in their view, the sinister publicity of the Jubilee scheme, which wants the streets adorned with things other than bare poles and wire festoonsThe preservation of our present park space would be a far greater gesture of the Jubilee spirit than the granting, gratis, of thousands of seedlings which have less than an equal chance of survival. 
 + 
 +The capital difficulty of getting the trees to grow till they are large enough to withstand the ravages of rabbits, live stock and general neglect is the greatest stumbling block to the scheme. From our own experience at Era we know that the chances of a seedling surviving for a few years is very low, and we fenced in the plantation. Imagine ​then how difficult it would be to cover all those ridges of dead ringbarked timber where there is no possibility of the seedlings receiving any protection from netting or wire. Even suburban avenues are a constant battle before an decent show can be expected. Granted immunity from telegraph wires it takes years of diligent attention by local councils before such things as Grafton'​s Jacaranda festival, or the pleasant shade of Albury'​s Camphor Laurels rewards the farsighted. 
 + 
 +Work for more National Parks and primitive areas must go on. The planting of new trees may eventually re-timber parts of our countryside,​ but would it not be better to proclaim more national parks: it would be easier. 
 (Views expressed in articles and editorials appearing in this magazine do not necessarily represent club opinions or policy on any matters discussed - Ed.) (Views expressed in articles and editorials appearing in this magazine do not necessarily represent club opinions or policy on any matters discussed - Ed.)
-AT _THE JUNE GENEFAL MEETING+ 
-The June meeting promised (Dr threatened, depending on your taste in meetinc,$) at one stare to be one of the most abbreviated in Club history. ​Commancing ​at 8.2.5 p m., with the President in the +---- 
-chair, and about 60 members present, there was a time When it bade fair to be wound up by 8.35. + 
-In keeping with the truncated fashion of the early stages, two of the three new members were not present to be welcomed, and John Thornthwaite alone heard the applause for his admission. We rattled through minutes and correspondence,​ the President announcing that the Hon. Solicitor had received a firm offer of 2440 as compensation for portion 7, Era, from the Lands Department, and had accepted in accordance with the Club's earlier decision on this valuation. We may soon expect to hear a jingle in the Club's piggy bank. +===== At The June General Meeting===== 
-3. + 
-Reports were received in almost disinterested silence until the views of the Alpine Hut Sub-Committee were sought - then the meeting ​cam to life. Bill Cosgrove, convenor, reported that there was one hurdle in that the abbreviated committee was evenly divided on the practicability of the plan. Cost appeared to be a nearly prohibitive factor but, with the destruction of Hotel Kosciusko, it was possible that the State Park Trust may relax its building regulations to perrait smething ​nearer the Club's pocket. We could, of course, build elsewhere, but to be of real value to walkers, the hut should be in the Summit area. +The June meeting promised (or threatened, depending on your taste in meetings) at one stage to be one of the most abbreviated in Club history. ​Commencing ​at 8.15 p.m., with the President in the chair, and about 60 members present, there was a time When it bade fair to be wound up by 8.35. 
-Allan Hardie joined the debate smartly, the words of two motions almost stumbling over one another. We sorted out the first as a suggestion that we invoke Federation support in building a combined bush walkers' ​hat near the tops. The motion was not favoured, Bill Cosgrove contending that the bigger the hut the bigger the cost (let's build a hotell ​cried the interjector). Jenny Madden wondered what finance could be expected and Len Scotland how many volunteer workers. Gil Webb, as the big bad Treasurer, said the Club had only 3() or 40 to outlay on any project, and members would have to-find'the rest of the cost - several thousands. Kath Brown saw no good in bringing in Federation ​find other Clubs, ​thidh would only Mean campetition ​between the biggest contributor (ourselves) and mall shareholders for occupation of the hut. Motion One was lost. + 
-Next was the old chestnut to invest ​25 or more in shares in the Lake AlbinoHut (the same one which has haunted recent meetings) if shares became available. Graham Harrison raised a doubt whether our miserably small share or two would give us unlimited summer tenancy, and urged that this be checked first: Len'Scotland replied that one share would entitle one person to winter accommodation,​ but during +In keeping with the truncated fashion of the early stages, two of the three new members were not present to be welcomed, and John Thornthwaite alone heard the applause for his admission. We rattled through minutes and correspondence,​ the President announcing that the Hon. Solicitor had received a firm offer of £440 as compensation for portion 7, Era, from the Lands Department, and had accepted in accordance with the Club's earlier decision on this valuation. We may soon expect to hear a jingle in the Club's piggy bank. 
-the off-season the skieTs ​would have no interest inthe use of the hut. He promised to enquire into the likelihood of summer occupation. + 
-Gil Webb played the heavy Treasurer again and told us the Club's coffers were low, half of us were unfLnancial ​and prone to be crossed off as such presently, and he could not stomach the thought of sinking ​25 or more in a hut to which we may or may not have access. Suppose some damage were caused to the hut during the summer, we may be blamed and possibly have to foot a repair bill, and perhaps find ourselves limited to the same privileges as any other shareholder. Alex Colley questioned whether the motion was in order - if so, he opposed it anyhow, because only a few members of the Club would be capable of reaching the hut in the snow season. Kath Brown concurred with the Treasurer, remarking that a small portion of the hut would be left open for shelter against bad weather in any case.+Reports were received in almost disinterested silence until the views of the Alpine Hut Sub-Committee were sought - then the meeting ​came to life. Bill Cosgrove, convenor, reported that there was one hurdle in that the abbreviated committee was evenly divided on the practicability of the plan. Cost appeared to be a nearly prohibitive factor but, with the destruction of Hotel Kosciusko, it was possible that the State Park Trust may relax its building regulations to permit something ​nearer the Club's pocket. We could, of course, build elsewhere, but to be of real value to walkers, the hut should be in the Summit area. 
 + 
 +Allan Hardie joined the debate smartly, the words of two motions almost stumbling over one another. We sorted out the first as a suggestion that we invoke Federation support in building a combined bush walkers' ​hut near the tops. The motion was not favoured, Bill Cosgrove contending that the bigger the hut the bigger the cost (let's build a hotel! ​cried the interjector). Jenny Madden wondered what finance could be expected and Len Scotland how many volunteer workers. Gil Webb, as the big bad Treasurer, said the Club had only £30 or £40 to outlay on any project, and members would have to find the rest of the cost - several thousands. Kath Brown saw no good in bringing in Federation ​and other Clubs, ​which would only mean competition ​between the biggest contributor (ourselves) and small shareholders for occupation of the hut. Motion One was lost. 
 + 
 +Next was the old chestnut to invest ​£25 or more in shares in the Lake Albino Hut (the same one which has haunted recent meetings) if shares became available. Graham Harrison raised a doubt whether our miserably small share or two would give us unlimited summer tenancy, and urged that this be checked first: Len Scotland replied that one share would entitle one person to winter accommodation,​ but during the off-season the skiers ​would have no interest in the use of the hut. He promised to enquire into the likelihood of summer occupation. 
 + 
 +Gil Webb played the heavy Treasurer again and told us the Club's coffers were low, half of us were unfinancial ​and prone to be crossed off as such presently, and he could not stomach the thought of sinking ​£25 or more in a hut to which we may or may not have access. Suppose some damage were caused to the hut during the summer, we may be blamed and possibly have to foot a repair bill, and perhaps find ourselves limited to the same privileges as any other shareholder. Alex Colley questioned whether the motion was in order - if so, he opposed it anyhow, because only a few members of the Club would be capable of reaching the hut in the snow season. Kath Brown concurred with the Treasurer, remarking that a small portion of the hut would be left open for shelter against bad weather in any case. 
 Frank Duncan thought we could perhaps reach agreement with the Lake Albina Hut organisers to control sub-letting of the hut during summer months without buying shares. The proceeds of the summer rentals could be passed on to the owners of the hut. Perhaps the idea merited more consideration than it received, for we shot on to Kevin Ardill'​s comment that we should be in Youth Hostels, looking for summer hutments, and Colin Ferguson'​s reminder that Albina was above the timber line. After all this Motion Two was lost also. Frank Duncan thought we could perhaps reach agreement with the Lake Albina Hut organisers to control sub-letting of the hut during summer months without buying shares. The proceeds of the summer rentals could be passed on to the owners of the hut. Perhaps the idea merited more consideration than it received, for we shot on to Kevin Ardill'​s comment that we should be in Youth Hostels, looking for summer hutments, and Colin Ferguson'​s reminder that Albina was above the timber line. After all this Motion Two was lost also.
- 
-Assent was given to one motion in connection with the Snow Hut, however. Jenny Madden moved successfully that the notice of the Half- Yearly Meeting should ask interested members to signify and indicate what financial support they would be prepared to offer. In the meantime it was agreed that the Alpine Hut aub-Committee should remain in existence and hold a watching brief. 
-"​Money,​ money, money" was the motif of the General Business. Gil Webb felt that our almost prodigal spending of 93 on a new duplicator, however necessary it was, should be considered more soberly than at the previous meeting. S o much work had been put 
-in by old members ten or fifteen years ago to accumulate reserve funds it seemed wrong we should dispense it without making some bid to cover current outlay. He outlined a scheme f or organising Theatre Parties where large blocks of tickets (face - value, say 12/6d. ) could be bought for about 7/6d. and retailed for about 10/-, and finally moved that we endeavour to contribute 50 towards the cost of the new machine by similar means. Len Scotland suggested we should have done a little gentle "​scalping"​ on tickets for the Rugby Tests. Kevin Ardill asked if any difficulty was expected in redeening the bonds covering the reserve fund and, if not, Why the agitation over spending money we had available. Gil reiterated that it seamed wrong to purchase equipment from the profits of the work of others. 
-Dormie, with great tenacity of purpose, said it would be good to get the money because we could then buy two shares in the Albina Hut. However, he was about to refer to Mr. Jeremiah Webb, crying shortage of funds one moment and then enthusing over a project to obtain 50 the next. He really didn't believe the theatre party scheme would work, for pa st Social Secretaries had tried it and been left holding the 'bag. 
-Kath Brown supported the Treasurer and said the old members had put much time and trouble into accumulating the money as a fund for equipping and furnishing a Club roan. Perhaps we should not need it for obtaining and furnishing a room, butit may be needed for other items of gear and it seemed unwise to expend all on one machine. 
-Roy Bruggy warted to increase the price of the Magazine hut met decided opposition from tne Editor, who pointed out that last year's magazine profit had been measured in shillings, increase in price may reduce the number of subscribers,​ while many Club circulars were produced on the same plant. He favoured a levy of say 2/.., per head 
-as being more equitable. The Treasurer couldn'​t see himself collecting a levy in addition to the annual subscription,​ and at this stage his motion was put and carried, and we looked for a "​finance sub-committee"​. Treasurer Webb was a natural, and he want ed assistants who worked in large firms, surrounded by potential theatre parties, and suggested 
-Ken Meadows and Bob Bull: they went into conference, reached an impasse, tossed a shilling and said "​sorry"​. Generous to a fault the Club gave the Treasurer power to co-opt his sub-committee,​ but happier times were at hand for him. 
-5. 
-Money, Money, said the Social Secretary, proposing that a hat be taken around at the dance on June 22nd for contributions to the duplicator fund. Protracted debate followed whether it should be "​silver coin", "​minimum fare l/-", or no ceiling"​ (also no basement and no compulsion). Eventually the motion, with "​voluntary"​ added 
-. before "​contributions",​ ana without reference to any amount, was carried - Jess Martin having told the meeting she was ashamed of us, quibbling over shillings and spending pounds on ourselves. 
-Bill Cosgrove spoke of the filching of city and suburban parks, suggesting that individual members should write to members of Parliament and that the support of Federation should be enlisted to save the limited park space from the encroachmentof miscellaneous buildings. We agreed to write Federation, and also assented to a motion asking our Parks and Playgrounds Delegate to address the next general meeting on or best means of conservation of urban parka. 
-Alex Colley referred to the "​quasi-official"​ (Dormie'​s phrase) Kin7,1s Birthday walk and suggested we invite Do rmie to tell the meeting what had occurred. Having restrained Allan frem starting until the meeting approved, we heard from him and also Jim Hooper that the walk fro an K ananEra had appa rently failed because most of those intending to go had cried off owing to bad weather , which left the leader with insufficient people to pay for the motor transport 
-to the Walls. Dornie said that Club trips were never abandoned owing to bad weather ( what, never?) but it was generally agreed to be somewhat poor to walk out where costly transport had been organised, and Committee was charged to enquire into the case. 
-At this late hour the financial sub-committee suddenly cane into being when Ken Meadows and Bob Bull indicated that they had reversed the decision of the toss, provided another sub-committee member could 
-be found. Jean Schoen was nominated and accepted, and with the convenor absolved from the grim necessity of op-opting his entire team, we called it a night at the advanced hour of 0.55 p m. 
  
-SOCIAL NOTES FOR TULf+Assent was given to one motion in connection with the Snow Hut, however. Jenny Madden moved successfully that the notice of the Half-Yearly Meeting should ask interested members to signify and indicate what financial support they would be prepared to offer. In the meantime it was agreed that the Alpine Hut Sub-Committee should remain in existence and hold a watching brief. 
-The new social programme will get may to a wonderful start on 20th ui with a film night by Vvalber ​Gruse. Mr. Gruse has sumo wonderful material, including Burragorang,​ skiing and canoeing. Mr. Gruse appeared on a previous programme and we liked him so much that we signed him up there and then for the entertainment that you will see on Friday 20th. + 
-Another old friend, Harry Whitehoftse, will favour us with an illustrated lecture ​curalbingo, Kiandra, Kosciusko and Corryone. Those who heard Harr y's previous lecture are sure to flock to the Club on Friday 27th. +"​Money,​ money, money" was the motif of the General Business. Gil Webb felt that our almost prodigal spending of £93 on a new duplicator, however necessary it was, should be considered more soberly than at the previous meeting. So much work had been put in by old members ten or fifteen years ago to accumulate reserve funds it seemed wrong we should dispense it without making some bid to cover current outlay. He outlined a scheme for organising Theatre Parties where large blocks of tickets (face value, say 12/6d. ) could be bought for about 7/6d. and retailed for about 10/-, and finally moved that we endeavour to contribute £50 towards the cost of the new machine by similar means. Len Scotland suggested we should have done a little gentle "​scalping"​ on tickets for the Rugby Tests. Kevin Ardill asked if any difficulty was expected in redeeming the bonds covering the reserve fund and, if not, why the agitation over spending money we had available. Gil reiterated that it seamed wrong to purchase equipment from the profits of the work of others. 
-Put this one in your diary: - CHRISTMAS PARTY1953_ - Wednesday, 12th December, p m.- 1 m. "The Coronet"​ (sane place as last year). Tickets will be slightly dearer so start saving right + 
-away. - Ed. Stretton, Social Secretary. +Dormie, with great tenacity of purpose, said it would be good to get the money because we could then buy two shares in the Albina Hut. However, he was about to refer to Mr. Jeremiah Webb, crying shortage of funds one moment and then enthusing over a project to obtain £50 the next. He really didn't believe the theatre party scheme would work, for past Social Secretaries had tried it and been left holding the bag. 
-6.+ 
 +Kath Brown supported the Treasurer and said the old members had put much time and trouble into accumulating the money as a fund for equipping and furnishing a Club room. Perhaps we should not need it for obtaining and furnishing a room, but it may be needed for other items of gear and it seemed unwise to expend all on one machine. 
 + 
 +Roy Bruggy warted to increase the price of the Magazine but met decided opposition from the Editor, who pointed out that last year's magazine profit had been measured in shillings, increase in price may reduce the number of subscribers,​ while many Club circulars were produced on the same plant. He favoured a levy of say 2/- per head as being more equitable. The Treasurer couldn'​t see himself collecting a levy in addition to the annual subscription,​ and at this stage his motion was put and carried, and we looked for a "​finance sub-committee"​. Treasurer Webb was a natural, and he wanted assistants who worked in large firms, surrounded by potential theatre parties, and suggested Ken Meadows and Bob Bull: they went into conference, reached an impasse, tossed a shilling and said "​sorry"​. Generous to a fault the Club gave the Treasurer power to co-opt his sub-committee,​ but happier times were at hand for him. 
 + 
 +Money, Money, said the Social Secretary, proposing that a hat be taken around at the dance on June 22nd for contributions to the duplicator fund. Protracted debate followed whether it should be "​silver coin", "​minimum fare l/-", or "no ceiling"​ (also no basement and no compulsion). Eventually the motion, with "​voluntary"​ added before "​contributions",​ and without reference to any amount, was carried - Jess Martin having told the meeting she was ashamed of us, quibbling over shillings and spending pounds on ourselves. 
 + 
 +Bill Cosgrove spoke of the filching of city and suburban parks, suggesting that individual members should write to members of Parliament and that the support of Federation should be enlisted to save the limited park space from the encroachment of miscellaneous buildings. We agreed to write Federation, and also assented to a motion asking our Parks and Playgrounds Delegate to address the next general meeting on or best means of conservation of urban parks. 
 + 
 +Alex Colley referred to the "​quasi-official"​ (Dormie'​s phrase) King's Birthday walk and suggested we invite Dormie to tell the meeting what had occurred. Having restrained Allan from starting until the meeting approved, we heard from him and also Jim Hooper that the walk from Kanangra had apparently failed because most of those intending to go had cried off owing to bad weather, which left the leader with insufficient people to pay for the motor transport to the Walls. Dormie said that Club trips were never abandoned owing to bad weather (what, never?) but it was generally agreed to be somewhat poor to walk out where costly transport had been organised, and Committee was charged to enquire into the case. 
 + 
 +At this late hour the financial sub-committee suddenly came into being when Ken Meadows and Bob Bull indicated that they had reversed the decision of the toss, provided another sub-committee member could be found. Jean Schoen was nominated and accepted, and with the convenor absolved from the grim necessity of co-opting his entire team, we called it a night at the advanced hour of 9.55 p.m. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +===== Social Notes For July. ===== 
 + 
 +The new social programme will get away to a wonderful start on 20th July with a film night by Walter ​Gruse. Mr. Gruse has sume wonderful material, including Burragorang,​ skiing and canoeing. Mr. Gruse appeared on a previous programme and we liked him so much that we signed him up there and then for the entertainment that you will see on Friday 20th. 
 + 
 +Another old friend, Harry Whitehouse, will favour us with an illustrated lecture ​"​Talbingo, Kiandra, Kosciusko and Corryong"​. Those who heard Harry's previous lecture are sure to flock to the Club on Friday 27th. 
 + 
 +Put this one in your diary: - Christmas Party1953 - Wednesday, 12th December, ​p.m. - 1 a.m. "The Coronet"​ (same place as last year). Tickets will be slightly dearer so start saving right away. 
 + 
 +- Ed. Stretton, Social Secretary. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 BEYOND THE MAIN DIVIDE. BEYOND THE MAIN DIVIDE.
 The Gent in the Tent". The Gent in the Tent".
195107.txt · Last modified: 2018/06/27 02:51 by tyreless