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195105 [2012/05/28 04:31]
127.0.0.1 external edit
195105 [2016/04/17 11:22] (current)
kennettj
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 CONTENTS ​ CONTENTS ​
  Page  Page
 +
 Editorial - "​Matters of Interest"​ 1 Editorial - "​Matters of Interest"​ 1
 At the April General Meeting 3 At the April General Meeting 3
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 The Field Unit of the Rangers League 17 The Field Unit of the Rangers League 17
 "​Forgive Us If We Appear to Boast" - Faddycs Ad. 19 "​Forgive Us If We Appear to Boast" - Faddycs Ad. 19
- ​* ​  0+ 
 EDITORIAL EDITORIAL
 "​Matters of Interest"​. "​Matters of Interest"​.
-Every journal of any repute must have a policy, those that last longest usually have a slogan. The founders of our magazine chosein the hthirties",ha bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalkers"​. Their aim, they said in the first issue, "was neither ambitious nor comprehensive,​ the main endeavour being to place before members accounts of trips which otherwise would not be readily accessible to them"​. + 
-This then was the original aim of the magazine, an aim formulated when the club was still in its infancy; now, when the -club has reached its majority, ​atremendous ​amount of knowledge has been accumulated,​ in rather a leisurely, haphazard fashion, giving an intimate and vivid history of he bushwalking movement in N.S.W. To browse through a+Every journal of any repute must have a policy, those that last longest usually have a slogan. The founders of our magazine chose in the thirties",ha bulletin of matters of interest to the Sydney Bushwalkers"​. Their aim, they said in the first issue, "was neither ambitious nor comprehensive,​ the main endeavour being to place before members accounts of trips which otherwise would not be readily accessible to them". 
 + 
 +This then was the original aim of the magazine, an aim formulated when the club was still in its infancy; now, when the -club has reached its majority, ​a tremendous ​amount of knowledge has been accumulated,​ in rather a leisurely, haphazard fashion, giving an intimate and vivid history of he bushwalking movement in N.S.W. To browse through a
 collection of old issues is like reading a pile of undiscovered,​ or collection of old issues is like reading a pile of undiscovered,​ or
 long-forgotten,​ letters, depending on the vintage of your membership. long-forgotten,​ letters, depending on the vintage of your membership.
-2. + 
-An absorbing biography, almost a collective autobiography has been written as the magazine has mirrored the changing moods and personalities of the club. For the moods and personalities of the club are constantly changing and it has become the tradition of the magazine to reflect these changes as faithfully as possible. The moods of +An absorbing biography, almost a collective autobiography has been written as the magazine has mirrored the changing moods and personalities of the club. For the moods and personalities of the club are constantly changing and it has become the tradition of the magazine to reflect these changes as faithfully as possible. The moods of the club find expression in the reports of the general meeting and in reports of trips, while the changing personalities of the club are set down, often with the utmost candour, in the "personal"​ articles. Month by month the club has changed, although the change is too imperceptible to be noticed say, over a year, or even two or three. To go back twelve or thirteen years is startling, to go back twenty years is a revelation. 
-the club find expression in the reports of the general meeting and in reports of trips, while the changing personalities of the club are set down, often with the utmost candour, in the ''​personal"​ articles. Month by month the club has changed, although the change is too imperceptible to be noticed say, over a year, or even two or three. To go back twelve or thirteen years is startling, to go back twenty years is a revelation. + 
-Some say the change has an economic background. When the club was first formed the country was in the grip of a depression, a few enthusiastic people were brought together by a letter to a newspaper, formed a club and then spread the idea that bushwalking was a cheap and healthy recreation. And so the early issues were definitely ​11spreading ​the faith",​ perhaps unconsciously,​ and still in the nature of guide books. One member even took the "​opportunity to condemn the selection of the upper reaches of the Grose River for a pleasure trip".. The pssing ​of a few years saw some of the financial worries lifted, and members learned to laugh at each other, and wonder what +Some say the change has an economic background. When the club was first formed the country was in the grip of a depression, a few enthusiastic people were brought together by a letter to a newspaper, formed a club and then spread the idea that bushwalking was a cheap and healthy recreation. And so the early issues were definitely ​"​spreading ​the faith",​ perhaps unconsciously,​ and still in the nature of guide books. One member even took the "​opportunity to condemn the selection of the upper reaches of the Grose River for a pleasure trip". The passing ​of a few years saw some of the financial worries lifted, and members learned to laugh at each other, and wonder what a varied lot had been attracted. They were quite a vocal lot luckily, and have set down for possible posterity some very exuberant sallies such as - Off on a trip with the bangers
-a varied lot had been attracted. They were quite a vocal lot luckily, and have set ,down for possible posterity some very exuberant sallies such as - Off on a trip with the bangers+
 With the wife of Our-ang-outang Roots"​. With the wife of Our-ang-outang Roots"​.
 +
 Just as a merrier note crept into the Club with the brightening years the trips reported covered adventures further afield; adventures they were indeed, when most of the more rugged country in which we Just as a merrier note crept into the Club with the brightening years the trips reported covered adventures further afield; adventures they were indeed, when most of the more rugged country in which we
 now walk with familiarity was completely new, and relatively unexplored. From detailed trips in the Blue Mountains members graduated to Kosciusko, to Tasmania, to New Zealand, even to Western China, setting down for others to read the best places to go, what and who to see to get the most out of their trips. now walk with familiarity was completely new, and relatively unexplored. From detailed trips in the Blue Mountains members graduated to Kosciusko, to Tasmania, to New Zealand, even to Western China, setting down for others to read the best places to go, what and who to see to get the most out of their trips.
-In the conservation field the growing awareness of our bushland heritage was revealed. For the last few years more and more conservation has appeared. Your present Editor has neither the experience nor the talent to report this subject adequately, and is + 
-therefore relying on ardent conservationists.+In the conservation field the growing awareness of our bushland heritage was revealed. For the last few years more and more conservation has appeared. Your present Editor has neither the experience nor the talent to report this subject adequately, and is therefore relying on ardent conservationists. 
 In a very general way this is to be our policy, if we can be said to have a policy: to produce a magazine that in future years can be shown as an indication of what the club was doing, thinking, and saying, in 1951. In a very general way this is to be our policy, if we can be said to have a policy: to produce a magazine that in future years can be shown as an indication of what the club was doing, thinking, and saying, in 1951.
-3. AT THE APRIL GENERAL MEETING. + 
-It was Friday 13th: two or three "​B"​ grade wars were in +AT THE APRIL GENERAL MEETING. 
-progress on the planet Earth: President Truman had just precip2ated ​a first-class squabble by sacking MacArthur: a Federal + 
-election campaign was boiling up in Australia: Sydney had its worst day of blackouts ever. Astrologists would probably tell us that the turbulent planet Mars was in the ascendant. At all events the April General Meeting, with the President in the chair and some 60 members present, was probably the most dour debate since the famous +It was Friday 13th: two or three "​B"​ grade wars were in progress on the planet Earth: President Truman had just precipitated ​a first-class squabble by sacking MacArthur: a Federal 
-Annual General (Deferred Re-Union) Meeting of 1949. +election campaign was boiling up in Australia: Sydney had its worst day of blackouts ever. Astrologists would probably tell us that the turbulent planet Mars was in the ascendant. At all events the April General Meeting, with the President in the chair and some 60 members present, was probably the most dour debate since the famous Annual General (Deferred Re-Union) Meeting of 1949. 
-We welcomed two new members Geoff Boucher and Geoff Gumm to + 
-the arena, and dealt with minutesand ​correspondence in short order. The Victorian Mountain Tramping Club had donated to us a set of thelr blue-print maps of the Howqua-Mt.Howitt-Mt.Wellington area -+We welcomed two new members Geoff Boucher and Geoff Gumm to the arena, and dealt with minutes and correspondence in short order. The Victorian Mountain Tramping Club had donated to us a set of their blue-print maps of the Howqua-Mt.Howitt-Mt.Wellington area -
 a most welcome gift. Blue Mountains Council advised that repair a most welcome gift. Blue Mountains Council advised that repair
 work had been carried out on the Govett'​s Leap Track. A letter from the Local Government Department to the Wild Life Preservation Society (copy to us for information from the latter body) denied that there work had been carried out on the Govett'​s Leap Track. A letter from the Local Government Department to the Wild Life Preservation Society (copy to us for information from the latter body) denied that there
 was any risk of infection in the Hacking River by reason of the sanitary depot at Helensburgh. was any risk of infection in the Hacking River by reason of the sanitary depot at Helensburgh.
 George Spicer enquired why we had written the Sydney University George Spicer enquired why we had written the Sydney University
-Bush Walkers declining to advocate our members joining in their annual marathon and the President explained Federation'​s objections on the score of accident hazard and possible adverse publicity. Federation Report pointed to a vacancy in the Information Bureau and called for delegates to the Re-union Committee and helpers and entertainers for the Camp Fire. +Bush Walkers declining to advocate our members joining in their annual marathon and the President explained Federation'​s objections on the score of accident hazard and possible adverse publicity. ​ 
-It was annOunced that the Non-Active ​subocription ​had been fixed at 5/- per annum as before, also that Peggy Bransdon and Holey Cotter had agreed to organise the Photographic Exhibition to be held on 29th June. Roley stated that prints of any size and on any type of paper would be accepted, but asked exhibitors to produce them at an early hour on the night. After brief discussion it was decided to invite members of affiliated clubs through the Federation to submit entries in the Exhibition. + 
-For a meeting which was to become quite garrulous, the call for Room Stewards met with a deathly hush, and after uneasy discussion +Federation Report pointed to a vacancy in the Information Bureau and called for delegates to the Re-union Committee and helpers and entertainers for the Camp Fire. 
-on the functions of these gentry, the meeting drew a breath of relief when the whole distasteful affair was shelved sine die. The Committee Members deputed to lock up after dances and film nights will hereafter have to be endowed with power of levitation, or else battle for half an hour to replace the furniture no doubt. + 
-We came to Mr. Frost'​s pre-publicised motion to appoint a subcommittee to look into the possibility of establishing a club hut in +It was annOunced that the Non-Active ​subscription ​had been fixed at 5/- per annum as before, also that Peggy Bransdon and Roley Cotter had agreed to organise the Photographic Exhibition to be held on 29th June. Roley stated that prints of any size and on any type of paper would be accepted, but asked exhibitors to produce them at an early hour on the night. After brief discussion it was decided to invite members of affiliated clubs through the Federation to submit entries in the Exhibition. 
-4. + 
-the Alps. Alex Colley seconded, and elected to speak later. Allan Hardie thought consideration should be given the walking fraternity in selecting the site and suggested extending the scope of the enquiry to consider that aspect. Ken Meadows pointed out that the terms of the motion "​Perisher Gap or other suitable areas" embraced it already.+For a meeting which was to become quite garrulous, the call for Room Stewards met with a deathly hush, and after uneasy discussion on the functions of these gentry, the meeting drew a breath of relief when the whole distasteful affair was shelved sine die. The Committee Members deputed to lock up after dances and film nights will hereafter have to be endowed with power of levitation, or else battle for half an hour to replace the furniture no doubt. 
 + 
 +We came to Mr. Frost'​s pre-publicised motion to appoint a subcommittee to look into the possibility of establishing a club hut in the Alps. Alex Colley seconded, and elected to speak later. Allan Hardie thought consideration should be given the walking fraternity in selecting the site and suggested extending the scope of the enquiry to consider that aspect. Ken Meadows pointed out that the terms of the motion "​Perisher Gap or other suitable areas" embraced it already. 
 Len Scotland voiced the opinion that a decision could be made then and there. He thought the whole scheme too ambitious, and called attention to an earlier project to buy shares in the Lake Albina hut on behalf of the Club. George Spicer deprecated such pessimism and thought that the best in the club would come out when an appeal was made: we would be unified in the purpose. Gil Webb (speaking as Treasurer) said we were apparently thoroughly unified already judging from his perpetual appeal for funds. Len Scotland voiced the opinion that a decision could be made then and there. He thought the whole scheme too ambitious, and called attention to an earlier project to buy shares in the Lake Albina hut on behalf of the Club. George Spicer deprecated such pessimism and thought that the best in the club would come out when an appeal was made: we would be unified in the purpose. Gil Webb (speaking as Treasurer) said we were apparently thoroughly unified already judging from his perpetual appeal for funds.
 +
 Alex Colley felt there was much merit in the idea. It cost anything from Z15'to 35 for accommodation in the snow country during the season, and the most enjoyable snow holidays were to be had with bushwalking company. We had in the Club craftsmen and experts in almost all the classifications needed for the construction work itself, and surely we could expect as much aid from the Kosciusko Park Trust as the other clubs who were building there. Anyway, that was the purpose of establishing a sub-committee,​ to review the whole project. Alex Colley felt there was much merit in the idea. It cost anything from Z15'to 35 for accommodation in the snow country during the season, and the most enjoyable snow holidays were to be had with bushwalking company. We had in the Club craftsmen and experts in almost all the classifications needed for the construction work itself, and surely we could expect as much aid from the Kosciusko Park Trust as the other clubs who were building there. Anyway, that was the purpose of establishing a sub-committee,​ to review the whole project.
-Bill Cosgrove joined Len Scotland in drawing a less cheerful ​pioture. He warned that the cost would probably run into 2,000 to 4,0001 and stated that he had heard another Club building in the Kosciusko area had sunk a considerable amount into erecting a+ 
 +Bill Cosgrove joined Len Scotland in drawing a less cheerful ​picture. He warned that the cost would probably run into 2,000 to 4,0001 and stated that he had heard another Club building in the Kosciusko area had sunk a considerable amount into erecting a
 temporary structure which must be replaced by a more elaborate job temporary structure which must be replaced by a more elaborate job
 to meet Park Trust requirements. He supported the Lake Albina contribution. Mention of a temporary hut inspired a few vague suggestions that such a building may be another hSpit Bridget'​ job - temporary for 20 years or so - and it was resolved to create the the sub-committee. Don Frostwas appointed convenor, with Len Scotland, Bill Cosgrove, Alex Colley and Arthur Gilroy as members. to meet Park Trust requirements. He supported the Lake Albina contribution. Mention of a temporary hut inspired a few vague suggestions that such a building may be another hSpit Bridget'​ job - temporary for 20 years or so - and it was resolved to create the the sub-committee. Don Frostwas appointed convenor, with Len Scotland, Bill Cosgrove, Alex Colley and Arthur Gilroy as members.
-Came General Business and Allan Hardiels ​motion that the words "The Leader is responsible for the safety of the party and, if he + 
- ​thinks necessary, may refuse any persons request to attend the walk4 +Came General Business and Allan Hardie'​s ​motion that the words "The Leader is responsible for the safety of the party and, if he 
-should be deleted from future walks programmes. He considered the words offensive, likely to cause ill-feeling,​ and tended to make official walks into private ​trf ps. He contended that any member should be permitted to attend any official walk; that if a leader warned a member that the trip was difficult and the member still joined the party, then the leader had discharged his responsibility,​ and it was up to the member to stay with the party or find his own way out. The recent inclusion of the words in question in walks programmes tended to filch membersrights. He himself had been declined by leaders of two trips recently; the leader of one trip + ​thinks necessary, may refuse any persons request to attend the walk 
-5. was a comparatively new member and in his opinion an alarmist. +should be deleted from future walks programmes. He considered the words offensive, likely to cause ill-feeling,​ and tended to make official walks into private ​trips. He contended that any member should be permitted to attend any official walk; that if a leader warned a member that the trip was difficult and the member still joined the party, then the leader had discharged his responsibility,​ and it was up to the member to stay with the party or find his own way out. The recent inclusion of the words in question in walks programmes tended to filch members rights. He himself had been declined by leaders of two trips recently; the leader of one trip was a comparatively new member and in his opinion an alarmist. 
-Dorothy Lawry intervened to ask if a leader had not always been entitled to decline, and the President explained that the sentence under discUssion ​had been added to the Walks Programmes about 12 months ago, but it had long been an understood thing that a leader could refuse a members request to join his trip. + 
-Jim Hooper, one of the leaders concerned in refusing Allan Hardie, rose and explained that his official Easter trip had been, in fact, a very rugged one. He had noted on a previous walk that Mr. Hardie had lagged well behind the party and was in apparent difficulty at a hazardous spot, and had to be assisted with his rucksack, He read from an article which he intended to submit to +Dorothy Lawry intervened to ask if a leader had not always been entitled to decline, and the President explained that the sentence under discussion ​had been added to the Walks Programmes about 12 months ago, but it had long been an understood thing that a leader could refuse a members request to join his trip. 
-the Magazine Editor on the subject of leaders and members on official walks. +Jim Hooper, one of the leaders concerned in refusing Allan Hardie, rose and explained that his official Easter trip had been, in fact, a very rugged one. He had noted on a previous walk that Mr. Hardie had lagged well behind the party and was in apparent difficulty at a hazardous spot, and had to be assisted with his rucksack, He read from an article which he intended to submit to the Magazine Editor on the subject of leaders and members on official walks. 
-The lengthy debate which followed (lasting over an hour) included comment by Shirley Evans, who had also been refused, that such a severe trip was surely a bad choice for an official Easter trip George ​Sp icer, who had done the Gloucester Tops walks, and+ 
 +The lengthy debate which followed (lasting over an hour) included comment by Shirley Evans, who had also been refused, that such a severe trip was surely a bad choice for an official Easter trip George ​Spicer, who had done the Gloucester Tops walks, and
 agreed it was very rough - the party had been astray for 27 hours - agreed it was very rough - the party had been astray for 27 hours -
 (uproar) but Jim Hooper found his way (continued uproar) found (uproar) but Jim Hooper found his way (continued uproar) found
 his (still continued)..,​ found his To. found his way out admirably in the end. his (still continued)..,​ found his To. found his way out admirably in the end.
-Kath Brown agreed that such a severe trip was unfortunate for Easter, but pointed out that it was a case of that walk or none at all, and indicated that Walks Secretaries often found it difficult to find any leader willing to conduct an official trip on holiday + 
-week-ends. Claude Haynes considered it was a bad thing that leaders could discriminate so widely - as he understood it, the Easter trip had been an entirely male party, all women had been excluded - and that surely approached a breach of the Constitution which decreed the sexes equal.+Kath Brown agreed that such a severe trip was unfortunate for Easter, but pointed out that it was a case of that walk or none at all, and indicated that Walks Secretaries often found it difficult to find any leader willing to conduct an official trip on holiday week-ends. Claude Haynes considered it was a bad thing that leaders could discriminate so widely - as he understood it, the Easter trip had been an entirely male party, all women had been excluded - and that surely approached a breach of the Constitution which decreed the sexes equal. 
 Alex Colley said he had led many official trips for the Club - including many rough trips. He had declined a number of people, and there had been no hard feelings. The leader was unquestionably responsible,​ and should be empowered to decline those he thought incapable of carrying out the trip satisfactorily. Dorothy Lawry agreed with this view, adding that she could call to mind instances where weak walkers had ruined a trip. Bill Henley contributed the thought that very rugged trips should be kept as private pioneering trips. Alex Colley said he had led many official trips for the Club - including many rough trips. He had declined a number of people, and there had been no hard feelings. The leader was unquestionably responsible,​ and should be empowered to decline those he thought incapable of carrying out the trip satisfactorily. Dorothy Lawry agreed with this view, adding that she could call to mind instances where weak walkers had ruined a trip. Bill Henley contributed the thought that very rugged trips should be kept as private pioneering trips.
-Don Frost said that, when Walks Secretary, he had been largely responsible for having the words inserted on the programme, and he believed them necessary. John Cotter returned to the thought that such tough walking was not desirable as the Easter official trip, though he agreed with the tenor of the sentence published in the + 
-6. +Don Frost said that, when Walks Secretary, he had been largely responsible for having the words inserted on the programme, and he believed them necessary. John Cotter returned to the thought that such tough walking was not desirable as the Easter official trip, though he agreed with the tenor of the sentence published in the programme. The President pointed out there was no reason why there should not be several Easter trips, of varying severity, provided leaders were forthcoming. 
-programme. The President pointed out there was no reason why there should not be several Easter trips, of varying severity, provided leaders were forthcoming. + 
-Max Gentle remarked that if he were ever declined he thought he would just drop out, taking it in good part, and ascribing it to his advancing years, while Bill Cosgrove asked if it were not an unwritten law that official walks should be reconnoitred first (cries of "Jim Hooper went over it at Christmas time"​). Roy Bruggy commented if it were a pre-requisite that the leader should have been over the route, it would be even more difficult to get walks for the programme. Ken Meadows suggested, if the motion were adopted, that the Membership Secretary should be instructed in the calibre of members to be admitted - very rugged, or very frail. ​Roluy Cotter rejoined that the standard was to be that of the pattern test walks. We were simply wasting time, he added. +Max Gentle remarked that if he were ever declined he thought he would just drop out, taking it in good part, and ascribing it to his advancing years, while Bill Cosgrove asked if it were not an unwritten law that official walks should be reconnoitred first (cries of "Jim Hooper went over it at Christmas time"​). Roy Bruggy commented if it were a pre-requisite that the leader should have been over the route, it would be even more difficult to get walks for the programme. Ken Meadows suggested, if the motion were adopted, that the Membership Secretary should be instructed in the calibre of members to be admitted - very rugged, or very frail. ​Roley Cotter rejoined that the standard was to be that of the pattern test walks. We were simply wasting time, he added. 
-7 + 
-Members continued to hop up and down, calling for point of order"​. The writer, the other leader to decline Allan Hardie (for +Members continued to hop up and down, calling for point of order"​. The writer, the other leader to decline Allan Hardie (for a walk across the Blue Labyrinth) said that, printed or not, the leader had a moral responsibility for his party. Take away the 
-a walk across the Blue Labyrinth) said that, printed or not, the leader had a moral responsibility for his party. Take away the +clause which protected the leader and he must either ​bear all the burden, or the Club must protect him by reducing the standard of
-clause which protected the leader and he must eit'​ler ​bear all the burden, or the Club must protect him by reducing the -standard of+
 official walks to an absurd level. His reason in this particular case was that the country was tangled, and he could not risk taking official walks to an absurd level. His reason in this particular case was that the country was tangled, and he could not risk taking
 anyone who may lag. anyone who may lag.
-Phil Hall supported this view, saying that probably 30 per cent + 
-of official trips would have to be deemed too severe, and the +Phil Hall supported this view, saying that probably 30 per cent of official trips would have to be deemed too severe, and the standard of the programme would have to be lowered to that of the 
-standard of the programme would have to be lowered to that of the +frailest members. Jack Wren pointed to a risk in the clause, in that it could be used to debar members from attending a trip purely because of personal bias. Allan Hardie made a lengthy reply, but the motion was lost. 
-frailest members. Jack Wren pointed to a risk in the clause, in that it could be used to debar members from attending a trip'purely because of personal bias. Allan Hardie made a lengthy reply, but the motion was lost.+
 Claude Haynes continued to be worried by the apparent discrimination against the female of the species, and moved that the Club publish in the magazine all its by-laws; it was pointed out by several speakers that this would be a prodigous job, and the Claude Haynes continued to be worried by the apparent discrimination against the female of the species, and moved that the Club publish in the magazine all its by-laws; it was pointed out by several speakers that this would be a prodigous job, and the
 motion was lost. Alex Colley succeeded, however, with a motion that the Pattern Test Walks should be made known. motion was lost. Alex Colley succeeded, however, with a motion that the Pattern Test Walks should be made known.
 With all this ado, it was 10.20 p m. before we adjourned. With all this ado, it was 10.20 p m. before we adjourned.
-ilmaindgr,+ 
 Whether it is an indication of how seriously members are taking Whether it is an indication of how seriously members are taking
-the Fancy Dress Dance, we can't say. It has come to our ears, and eyes, that the ghost of Gregory Blaxland still lives. In the club a few weeks ago was a rugged pioneering type, which, when the whiskers were parted, turned out to be none other than Kevin Ardql. The report of the expedition will appear concurrently in thehGazettenand ​the Bushwalker. +the Fancy Dress Dance, we can't say. It has come to our ears, and eyes, that the ghost of Gregory Blaxland still lives. In the club a few weeks ago was a rugged pioneering type, which, when the whiskers were parted, turned out to be none other than Kevin Ardql. The report of the expedition will appear concurrently in the Gazette and the Bushwalker. 
-7.+
 SOCIAL NOTES FO R MAY. SOCIAL NOTES FO R MAY.
 There are two most important social events during the month of May :- There are two most important social events during the month of May :-
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 junction to Penrith section), and Cruising Canoe Club's junction to Penrith section), and Cruising Canoe Club's
 Map No. 3 (Tuggerah Lakes and-Creeks, including Wyong River). Map No. 3 (Tuggerah Lakes and-Creeks, including Wyong River).
 +
 SNOWY GRAND GORGE TO KOSCIUSKO, SNOWY GRAND GORGE TO KOSCIUSKO,
 7576-777Ed JaH7-11%,​-17777177 7576-777Ed JaH7-11%,​-17777177
Line 136: Line 149:
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 Was almost cool down in the valley. That day we covered some seven miles to a Was almost cool down in the valley. That day we covered some seven miles to a
Line 245: Line 225:
 The mist was still above us when we started our climb up Merritt'​s next day. Though it blotted out the view we were grateful The mist was still above us when we started our climb up Merritt'​s next day. Though it blotted out the view we were grateful
 for the coolness and the soft beauty of the Alpine scenery, particularly as we reached the tops and came to magnificent clumps of Snow Daisies and other delicate alpine flowers. That night we camped below Charlotte'​s Pass, on the Snowy side. We had planned to do the tourist track round the tops the next day, and decided to do the walk, mist or no mist, just in case it cleared on the way. But luck was with us again. As we breakfasted the mist lifted, the sun shone through, and as we started our tour with just a day pack between us the clouds receded giving clear vision to the horizon in every direction. So ended a perfect trip. for the coolness and the soft beauty of the Alpine scenery, particularly as we reached the tops and came to magnificent clumps of Snow Daisies and other delicate alpine flowers. That night we camped below Charlotte'​s Pass, on the Snowy side. We had planned to do the tourist track round the tops the next day, and decided to do the walk, mist or no mist, just in case it cleared on the way. But luck was with us again. As we breakfasted the mist lifted, the sun shone through, and as we started our tour with just a day pack between us the clouds receded giving clear vision to the horizon in every direction. So ended a perfect trip.
-14.+
 PATTERN WALKS. PATTERN WALKS.
-(Adopted at the Half-yearly General Meeting,​14/​9/​45).+ 
 +(Adopted at the Half-yearly General Meeting, 14/9/45).
   ​   ​
-2-DAY WALKS.+2-DAY WALKS\\
 Katoomba - Six Foot Track - Gibraltar Creek - Cox's River - Tin Pot Hill - Carlon'​s Katoomba. Katoomba - Six Foot Track - Gibraltar Creek - Cox's River - Tin Pot Hill - Carlon'​s Katoomba.
- li-DAY WALKS. + 
-1. Bundeena - Marley - Wattamolla Garie - Burning Palms - Bola Heights - Wilsonrs ​Creek - Helensburgh.+1-DAY WALKS. 
 +1. Bundeena - Marley - Wattamolla Garie - Burning Palms - Bola Heights - Wilsons ​Creek - Helensburgh.
 2. Blackheath - Govett'​s Leap - Blue Gum Forest - Grose River - Mt.Victoria. 2. Blackheath - Govett'​s Leap - Blue Gum Forest - Grose River - Mt.Victoria.
-3. Campbelitown - Minerva Pool - OrHare/s Creek - Pheasant'​s Creek - Wedderburn Bridge - Campbelltown.+3. Campbelitown - Minerva Pool - OHare's Creek - Pheasant'​s Creek - Wedderburn Bridge - Campbelltown. 
 DAY WALKS. DAY WALKS.
-1. Mt.Kuring gai.- Crosslands ​Berom,​a ​Creek - Fish Ponds - Hornsby.+1. Mt.Kuring gai.- Crosslands ​- Berowra ​Creek - Fish Ponds - Hornsby.
 2. Waterfall - Mt.Westmacott Myuna Creek - Heathcote Creek - Scouters Mountain - Woronora River - Sabugal Crossing - Engadine. 2. Waterfall - Mt.Westmacott Myuna Creek - Heathcote Creek - Scouters Mountain - Woronora River - Sabugal Crossing - Engadine.
 3. Waterfall - The Mill - Island Track - Palona Brook - Garie Trig. - Era - Lilyvale. 3. Waterfall - The Mill - Island Track - Palona Brook - Garie Trig. - Era - Lilyvale.
 4. Gordon - Rocky Creek - Middle Harbour Creek - Cowan Creek - track to Sphinx - Cockle Creek, Wahroonga.. 4. Gordon - Rocky Creek - Middle Harbour Creek - Cowan Creek - track to Sphinx - Cockle Creek, Wahroonga..
-ilor....eamiMINAM:​+ 
 ALTERATION TO WALKS PROGRAMME. ALTERATION TO WALKS PROGRAMME.
 Federation Re-union-(shown on programme for May 12/13) is now scheduled for May 19/20. Location - EUROKA. Federation Re-union-(shown on programme for May 12/13) is now scheduled for May 19/20. Location - EUROKA.
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 Kath Brown Jim Brown Kath Brown Jim Brown
 Dennis Gittoes and Val Downin have announced their engagement. We wish them both the traditional good camping'​. Dennis Gittoes and Val Downin have announced their engagement. We wish them both the traditional good camping'​.
-16.+ 
 FEDERATION REPORT FEDERATION REPORT
 Blue Gum Forest: Letter from Trust thanking Bushwalkers generally Blue Gum Forest: Letter from Trust thanking Bushwalkers generally
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 :​Vhffl.OPiiTh nnYlnrJ9 :​Vhffl.OPiiTh nnYlnrJ9
 17. 17.
 +
 TEE FIELD UNIT OF THE RANGERS LEAGUE. TEE FIELD UNIT OF THE RANGERS LEAGUE.
 Founded over 20 years ago, the Rangers League has for its aims and objects the protection and preservation of our bushlands, together with the Native Flora and Fauna which they contain, also the prevention of bush fires which every year devastate some portion of our glorious bushland. Founded over 20 years ago, the Rangers League has for its aims and objects the protection and preservation of our bushlands, together with the Native Flora and Fauna which they contain, also the prevention of bush fires which every year devastate some portion of our glorious bushland.
195105.txt · Last modified: 2016/04/17 11:22 by kennettj