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195008 [2017/08/21 02:48]
tyreless
195008 [2017/08/23 01:06]
tyreless
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 Arthur Gilroy pointed out that Kevin could speak in support, and Kevin seized the opportunity to observe that he considered we should also know __why__ such walks were not led. As both mover and seconder concurred on this point it was added to the motion. Arthur Gilroy pointed out that Kevin could speak in support, and Kevin seized the opportunity to observe that he considered we should also know __why__ such walks were not led. As both mover and seconder concurred on this point it was added to the motion.
  
-Dornie ​spoke of Era again. He pointed out that there had been alterations in the Cabinet, and that the post of Minister for Lands had changed hands. He thought it was an opportune time to place our case regarding Era, its amalgamation with Garawarra and the preservation of Garawarra as an independent Trust, before the new Minioter. He pointed out that there was evidence that shack building was still going on at Era on the resumed lands, and that some one might even commence building on Portion 7, and moved that we communicate this to the Minister, with a request that a policy for the government of Era be framed at an early date. This motion, after being amended to include reference to shack building, was carried.+Dormie ​spoke of Era again. He pointed out that there had been alterations in the Cabinet, and that the post of Minister for Lands had changed hands. He thought it was an opportune time to place our case regarding Era, its amalgamation with Garawarra and the preservation of Garawarra as an independent Trust, before the new Minister. He pointed out that there was evidence that shack building was still going on at Era on the resumed lands, and that some one might even commence building on Portion 7, and moved that we communicate this to the Minister, with a request that a policy for the government of Era be framed at an early date. This motion, after being amended to include reference to shack building, was carried.
  
 In a surprisingly genial atmosphere Bobs Chapman and Bull were elected Room Stewards for the next two months, and "there being no further business"​ the meeting closed at 8.55 p.m. In a surprisingly genial atmosphere Bobs Chapman and Bull were elected Room Stewards for the next two months, and "there being no further business"​ the meeting closed at 8.55 p.m.
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 By Ray Kirkby. By Ray Kirkby.
  
-receht ​writer in his "Guide to Tasmania"​ emphasised that you should not walk there before the end of November or after late March. That is very true indeed but much pleasure comes from doing what one should not. However, the dictum started me thinking of a few jaunts I have made in the forbidden months. Even as I commenced to write, I remembered that a friend and I once set out to get to Wellington Falls from Hobart one Sunday after a heavy fall of snow. All went merry, comparatively speaking, until we began to ascend the North West Bay River, rock hopping on the snow-covered stones. It was not long before my companion landed waist-deep in the frozen water and I was sufficiently sympathetic to agree that we had better retreat. That night war was declared which determines the month as September. I am prepared, in this instance, to admit that we left a warm bed, that we would go back to one and that we had a few rums on the return trip in front of the fire at the Fern Tree Hotel.+recent ​writer in his "Guide to Tasmania"​ emphasised that you should not walk there before the end of November or after late March. That is very true indeed but much pleasure comes from doing what one should not. However, the dictum started me thinking of a few jaunts I have made in the forbidden months. Even as I commenced to write, I remembered that a friend and I once set out to get to Wellington Falls from Hobart one Sunday after a heavy fall of snow. All went merry, comparatively speaking, until we began to ascend the North West Bay River, rock hopping on the snow-covered stones. It was not long before my companion landed waist-deep in the frozen water and I was sufficiently sympathetic to agree that we had better retreat. That night war was declared which determines the month as September. I am prepared, in this instance, to admit that we left a warm bed, that we would go back to one and that we had a few rums on the return trip in front of the fire at the Fern Tree Hotel.
  
 There was one day which needs no diary to recall to my mind. We were ski-ing at Lake Fenton and late Saturday afternoon I had the misfortune to break a ski and there were no spares. Nothing daunted, I announced that on the morrow I would walk to Lake Belcher. I have three vivid memories of scenes and events of the day - three only. There was one day which needs no diary to recall to my mind. We were ski-ing at Lake Fenton and late Saturday afternoon I had the misfortune to break a ski and there were no spares. Nothing daunted, I announced that on the morrow I would walk to Lake Belcher. I have three vivid memories of scenes and events of the day - three only.
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 Sydney'​s __average__ annual rainfall for many years was 46 inches. Last year it was almost 60 inches. This year, up to the date of writing (July 21st) 63 inches have fallen, with almost half the year still to go. Your guess is to good as mine for 1951... Sydney'​s __average__ annual rainfall for many years was 46 inches. Last year it was almost 60 inches. This year, up to the date of writing (July 21st) 63 inches have fallen, with almost half the year still to go. Your guess is to good as mine for 1951...
  
-So, **wake up to yourselves!** What was good enough for our fathers is NOT good enough for us (quotation from somebody). We are still expected to use the same rucksacks, sleep in the same kind of sleeping bags on similar groundsheets,​ shelter in identical tents - use all the same type of equipment as the distinguished founders of our Club. That may have been all right for 46-inch-ayear walkers. It is NOT, I say again NOT, good enough for us. Walkers! Rise in your legions and force vested interests to give us a fair go! Demand better conditions for Walkers!+So, **wake up to yourselves!** What was good enough for our fathers is NOT good enough for us (quotation from somebody). We are still expected to use the same rucksacks, sleep in the same kind of sleeping bags on similar groundsheets,​ shelter in identical tents - use all the same type of equipment as the distinguished founders of our Club. That may have been all right for 46-inch-a-year ​walkers. It is NOT, I say again NOT, good enough for us. Walkers! Rise in your legions and force vested interests to give us a fair go! Demand better conditions for Walkers!
  
 Take the old, passe, outmoded groundsheet. You are supposed to sleep on it - with or without an underbody of bracken laboriously hewed with a puny knife, or strips of bark painstakingly and individually collected in the forest. "What comfort does it give you? None! What protection from the flooding ground did it afford at your last Reunion? Negligible! It is high time we replaced groundsheets with a collapsible rubber dinghy of the type used by airmen during the last war. This would be at once a soft couch for weary limbs and would, under prevailing weather conditions, swiftly become water-borne,​ adding the soothing motion of the tide to your care-unravelling sleep. And you, my walker friend, would sleep warm and dry. Take the old, passe, outmoded groundsheet. You are supposed to sleep on it - with or without an underbody of bracken laboriously hewed with a puny knife, or strips of bark painstakingly and individually collected in the forest. "What comfort does it give you? None! What protection from the flooding ground did it afford at your last Reunion? Negligible! It is high time we replaced groundsheets with a collapsible rubber dinghy of the type used by airmen during the last war. This would be at once a soft couch for weary limbs and would, under prevailing weather conditions, swiftly become water-borne,​ adding the soothing motion of the tide to your care-unravelling sleep. And you, my walker friend, would sleep warm and dry.
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 In the case of (1) an anchor will be necessary if you wish to remain with the party in accordance with the Code of Ethics. Era and similar recognised camping spots should be furnished with buoys. In the case of (1) an anchor will be necessary if you wish to remain with the party in accordance with the Code of Ethics. Era and similar recognised camping spots should be furnished with buoys.
  
-Of course, some sort of groundsheet will still be necessary for those occasions when it is fine enough to travel per foot, and since all walking equipment should be dual-purpose,​ this should be adaptable as a sail for your rubber dinghy. Well, a sail demands a mast, you say. Of course! But you have your telescopic, aluminium-alloy tent poles, and your special jury-rig adjustment for your dinghy. Also, you have special lightweight Paddymade blades which may be attachcd ​to your tent pole-mast for use as paddles when the wind is not in your favour. The same blades may also be used as entrenching tools if it ever becomes fine enough to camp on firm ground.+Of course, some sort of groundsheet will still be necessary for those occasions when it is fine enough to travel per foot, and since all walking equipment should be dual-purpose,​ this should be adaptable as a sail for your rubber dinghy. Well, a sail demands a mast, you say. Of course! But you have your telescopic, aluminium-alloy tent poles, and your special jury-rig adjustment for your dinghy. Also, you have special lightweight Paddymade blades which may be attached ​to your tent pole-mast for use as paddles when the wind is not in your favour. The same blades may also be used as entrenching tools if it ever becomes fine enough to camp on firm ground.
  
 The era of the hobnail is past, of course. With delicate rubber boats they will be outlawed, but there seems to be a future for the "​flipper"​ contrivance as used by Frog Men in the last war. The era of the hobnail is past, of course. With delicate rubber boats they will be outlawed, but there seems to be a future for the "​flipper"​ contrivance as used by Frog Men in the last war.
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 ---- ----
  
-SIGNS .AND PORTENTS+=====Signs And Portents.===== 
-By ilMeerschaumn. There was a large whitewash mark right round the Hall. + 
-Mhat was it? ihhat did it mean? Was it Art? If so, why just the one band? +By "​Meerschaum"​. 
-It certainly wasn't part of the new interior decorating, too rigid and inflexible. The modern fancy is for elastic vertical stripes, not large continuous swathes. If it was only up and down a bit with a few red ochred handprints and a few feathers it might be a decor motif for tCorroboroe. But, Ballet in the suburbs? Unheard of! + 
-The photographers didn't approve of it eitherIt was too startling and didn'​t ​shadein ​correctly. No tonal gradation. How would one bring out the detail in the shadows with that highlight blazing right across them. Then, if one actually wanted the highlight, of course the shadows must go, for such a band couldn'​t be held back while the shadows came up. Someone suggested a fortieth at a fiftieth but this was met with little comment, and what comment there was, was purely derisory. The 0.P. (oldest photographer) remembered viewing (I think viewing was the correct term) a negative which a friend of his once had. On further reflection he remembered it had something to do with the shutter.+There was a large whitewash mark right round the Hall
 + 
 +What was it? What did it mean? Was it Art? If so, why just the one band? 
 + 
 +It certainly wasn't part of the new interior decorating, too rigid and inflexible. The modern fancy is for elastic vertical stripes, not large continuous swathes. If it was only up and down a bit with a few red ochred handprints and a few feathers it might be a decor motif for "​Corroboree"​. But, Ballet in the suburbs? Unheard of! 
 + 
 +The photographers didn't approve of it eitherIt was too startling and didn'​t ​shade in correctly. No tonal gradation. How would one bring out the detail in the shadows with that highlight blazing right across them. Then, if one actually wanted the highlight, of course the shadows must go, for such a band couldn'​t be held back while the shadows came up. Someone suggested a fortieth at a fiftieth but this was met with little comment, and what comment there was, was purely derisory. The O.P. (oldest photographer) remembered viewing (I think viewing was the correct term) a negative which a friend of his once had. On further reflection he remembered it had something to do with the shutter. 
 A member, possibly with contacts in the County Council, suggested it might be blackout preparation. He pointed out that if you came in at the door, which most of us do, the white line led to all the important places, committee room, library cupboard and so on back to the door. Perhaps the Rationalists were rationalising at last. A member, possibly with contacts in the County Council, suggested it might be blackout preparation. He pointed out that if you came in at the door, which most of us do, the white line led to all the important places, committee room, library cupboard and so on back to the door. Perhaps the Rationalists were rationalising at last.
-More ominous was the interpretation from the Map and Mind Reader. He had noted while on the Wollondilly similar marks and research had shown the valley was to be flooded to that depthThe Rationalists might have calculated that if it rained again .. well, who knows, perhaps the line might notbe high enough. + 
-11. +More ominous was the interpretation from the Map and Mind Reader. He had noted while on the Wollondilly similar marks and research had shown the valley was to be flooded to that depthThe Rationalists might have calculated that if it rained again... well, who knows, perhaps the line might not be high enough. 
-A stray do g wandered in, saw the line was too high, and wandered out again. + 
-General opinion was that the situation ​hd alarming possibilities. Some were for referring it to the Committee, others for putting it in the hands of the Honorary Solicitor. Expert opinion was definitely necessary; perhaps a nerking ​bee could right matters before they went further - look what happened with that log at Bluegum.  +A stray dog wandered in, saw the line was too high, and wandered out again. 
-At that moment the only person benefiting was the Honorary Treasurer. He had managed to collect a few threeponces ​from strange types who would thrust that coin into his hand at the door and whisper ​'There's the white line, mate? They tell me there'​s a bottle of beer at the end of it'. Ono such charabter ​had a much garbled account of how a Main Roads Board line-painter (mechanical) had gone berserk and rushed round tlic walls till he fell out Lin open window.+ 
 +General opinion was that the situation ​had alarming possibilities. Some were for referring it to the Committee, others for putting it in the hands of the Honorary Solicitor. Expert opinion was definitely necessary; perhaps a working ​bee could right matters before they went further - look what happened with that log at Bluegum. ​ 
 + 
 +At that moment the only person benefiting was the Honorary Treasurer. He had managed to collect a few threepences ​from strange types who would thrust that coin into his hand at the door and whisper ​"Where's the white line, mate? They tell me there'​s a bottle of beer at the end of it". Ono such character ​had a much garbled account of how a Main Roads Board line-painter (mechanical) had gone berserk and rushed round the walls till he fell out an open window. 
 And to think I'm the only one who knows the true story. For I put it up the day Roley was overdue on a walk. But I'm not telling anyone, I'm still enjoying the joke and am thinking of writing a play about it for the next reunion. And to think I'm the only one who knows the true story. For I put it up the day Roley was overdue on a walk. But I'm not telling anyone, I'm still enjoying the joke and am thinking of writing a play about it for the next reunion.
-1}.111..1 + 
-TJNEXPLORED TERRITORY+---- 
-If there'​s one thing that makes a Bushwalker prick up his ears its mention of new country. Scratches and bruises are manfully suffered and even exhibited with pride in some cases (and places). A scratchy bit of ridge assumes such glamor ​that at the fifth or sixth telling it is portrayed as a cross between the Garden of Eden, and Wynyard in the rush period. + 
-Well, here's news of a bit of unexplored territory, practically at OUP front door, you might say. If you don't say it, we will, and if you are a member of the Lower Income Group you will enthuse over this new country. The best of good company always to hand, bush flowers that can be admired all the year round and dry conditions guaranteed. +=====Unexplored Territory.===== 
-The entertainment is so good that we can't keep it to ourselves any longer, so if you're interested in fields afresh come and join us sonic Friday evening. Tariff is moderate and we even proffer directions how to find this place. When you enter the clubroom turn right and follow your nose. If yoa lose the way just ask anyone for the whereabouts ​bf the S.B.W. Library. They most likely won't be able to tell you, but that indomitable bushwalking spirit of yours should overcome this difficulty.+ 
 +If there'​s one thing that makes a Bushwalker prick up his ears it'​s ​mention of new country. Scratches and bruises are manfully suffered and even exhibited with pride in some cases (and places). A scratchy bit of ridge assumes such glamour ​that at the fifth or sixth telling it is portrayed as a cross between the Garden of Eden, and Wynyard in the rush period. 
 + 
 +Well, here's news of a bit of unexplored territory, practically at our front door, you might say. If you don't say it, we will, and if you are a member of the Lower Income Group you will enthuse over this new country. The best of good company always to hand, bush flowers that can be admired all the year round and dry conditions guaranteed. 
 + 
 +The entertainment is so good that we can't keep it to ourselves any longer, so if you're interested in fields afresh come and join us some Friday evening. Tariff is moderate and we even proffer directions how to find this place. When you enter the clubroom turn right and follow your nose. If you lose the way just ask anyone for the whereabouts ​of the S.B.W. Library. They most likely won't be able to tell you, but that indomitable bushwalking spirit of yours should overcome this difficulty. 
 There is an attractive collection of books for your choice and as well as the adventure of exploring this new country you will have the pleasure of restoring animation to the co-librarians - Vera Matasin and Margaret Stoddart. There is an attractive collection of books for your choice and as well as the adventure of exploring this new country you will have the pleasure of restoring animation to the co-librarians - Vera Matasin and Margaret Stoddart.
-12. + 
-KAMERA KAPERS+---- 
-amaibAl + 
-By Brian G. ILLrvey+=====Kamera Kapers.===== 
-Now that the Photographic Section is hidden in mists of the rather hazy past end none of our many well-informed photographic genii, deeply versed in the mechanics and chemistry of photography,​ appear inclined to share their knowledge with their follow members, + 
-I thought a few short notes on my own more recent experiences might +By Brian G. Harvey. 
-be of value to '​nose ​struggling for good pictures. + 
-Equtpped ​with a nZeise ​fitted with a 4.5 I'Tessar"​ lens, I +Now that the Photographic Section is hidden in mists of the rather hazy past and none of our many well-informed photographic genii, deeply versed in the mechanics and chemistry of photography,​ appear inclined to share their knowledge with their follow members, I thought a few short notes on my own more recent experiences might be of value to those struggling for good pictures. 
-was struck by my failure to obtain sharp negatives of such easy subjectn ​as the suburban cottage presents, especially when a tripod + 
-is used, and every precaution taken to ensure correct focussing. +Equipped ​with a "​Zeiss" ​fitted with a 4.5 "Tessar"​ lens, I was struck by my failure to obtain sharp negatives of such easy subjects ​as the suburban cottage presents, especially when a tripod is used, and every precaution taken to ensure correct focussing. 
-The inside lens, fixed in place by screws, seemed intact, and no maladjustnent ​was apparent in the spool err angement+ 
-On examination by a commercial camera repairer, my attention was drawn to the large amount of Tiplay" which was demonstrated in the folding mechanism of sliding rods. The camera was purchased in 1937 02 1938, and it was surprising to snddenly ​realise how +The inside lens, fixed in place by screws, seemed intact, and no maladjustment ​was apparent in the spool arrangement. 
-much wear could have taken place since them. + 
-The whole front was tightened up, the lens checked for focus in relation to the scale, giving ​on "as new" job, bar a few missing +On examination by a commercial camera repairer, my attention was drawn to the large amount of "play" which was demonstrated in the folding mechanism of sliding rods. The camera was purchased in 1937 or 1938, and it was surprising to suddenly ​realise how much wear could have taken place since them. 
-areas of lacquer from the casing. + 
-To those enthusiasts who find similar ​''​soft" images when they +The whole front was tightened up, the lens checked for focus in relation to the scale, giving ​an "as new" job, bar a few missing areas of lacquer from the casing. 
-expected a masterpiece,​ perhaps these few notes may be of some help in assisting them to display something out of the box in our next exhibition. + 
-ERA WORKING BEE.+To those enthusiasts who find similar ​"soft" images when they expected a masterpiece,​ perhaps these few notes may be of some help in assisting them to display something out of the box in our next exhibition. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Era Working Bee.===== 
 By Jack Wren. By Jack Wren.
-On the 7th July, 1950 36 more trees were planted at Era. + 
-For a club of our size the turn up of works wa really ​remarkablel +On the 7th July, 1950 36 more trees were planted at Era. For a club of our size the turn up of works was really ​remarkable! ​On the Saturday they turned up hour after hour, until I counted the grand total of nine. Most, though not quite all, the party worked hard and long. 
-On the Saturday they turned up hour after hour, until I counted + 
-the grand total of nine. Most, though not quite all, the party worked hard and long. +Twelve trees were planted in individual guards around the campsite, and the other twenty-four within the enclosure. The trees were
-Twelve trees were planted in individual guards around the campsite, and the otter twenty-four within the enclosure. The + 
-trees were +  ​* ​12 F. Carnea (White Mahogany) 
-12 F. Carnea (White Mahogany) +  ​* ​12 F. Botryoides (Bangalay) 
-12 F. Botryoides (Bangalay) +  ​* ​12 F. Pallidifolia (Boomera Gum). 
-12 F. Pallidifolia (Boomera Gum). + 
-13. +---- 
-FASHION NOTES+ 
-Christian Dior and other famous French Fashion Houses are modelling their latest styles on the fashions of the 1920tshut the really well-dressed Bushwalker goes hack to tae 1360r5+=====Fashion Notes.===== 
-The elegant creation shown in the accomp anying sketcth ​was modelled by Mary T.cGrerwr ​in the Burra6orng ​Valley recently and waa made up in a delicate shade of Khaki in the finest quality drill. + 
-A_SIGN OF THE TIMES surreptitious ​Eottres ​of kerosene which appear on nearly all recent official walks to ensure a respectable cooking fire. +Christian Dior and other famous French Fashion Houses are modelling their latest styles on the fashions of the 1920'sbut the really well-dressed Bushwalker goes back to the 1860's. 
- 0 OOOOOO + 
-Letter ​to the Editor. +The elegant creation shown in the accompanying sketch ​was modelled by Mary McGregor ​in the Burragorang ​Valley recently and was made up in a delicate shade of Khaki in the finest quality drill. 
-Reply to "ONE CAPTAIN TO A SHIPONE LEADER TO A WALK". "Dear Sir, + 
-I will '​3egi11 ​my reply by asking what the Captain, who is also the leader of a walk, must do when the ship (taxi) is sinking in a sea of mud. Does he desert the ship, oras an alternative,​ appoint a deputy leader for the walk while the ship is salvaged? I chose the first course. I happened to know the Forest foreman and was therefore in a much better position to get help than an unknown taxi driver.+---- 
 + 
 +__A Sign of the times__ - surreptitious ​bottles ​of kerosene which appear on nearly all recent official walks to ensure a respectable cooking fire. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Letter ​To The Editor.===== 
 + 
 +Reply to "One captain to a shipone leader to a walk". 
 + 
 +"Dear Sir, 
 + 
 +I will begin my reply by asking what the Captain, who is also the leader of a walk, must do when the ship (taxi) is sinking in a sea of mud. Does he desert the ship, oras an alternative,​ appoint a deputy leader for the walk while the ship is salvaged? I chose the first course. I happened to know the Forest foreman and was therefore in a much better position to get help than an unknown taxi driver. 
 But to proceed, I appointed a deputy leader to lead the party on while I went for assistance. I admit a slight liability for not notifying a few of the party but I was anxious to get help and I naturally thought that the word would be quickly passed around. But to proceed, I appointed a deputy leader to lead the party on while I went for assistance. I admit a slight liability for not notifying a few of the party but I was anxious to get help and I naturally thought that the word would be quickly passed around.
-i-then went to get the forestry truck. When I returned I found that the reet of the party had packed and half had already left with the deputy leader, but half a dozen remained behind to watch the "​fun"​ of the taxi being hauled out of the bog. I am not able to see how half the party could be left entirely ignorant of the deputy ​leaderfs ​departure. After the taxi had been rescued, I + 
-14. +"​I ​then went to get the forestry truck. When I returned I found that the rest of the party had packed and half had already left with the deputy leader, but half a dozen remained behind to watch the "​fun"​ of the taxi being hauled out of the bog. I am not able to see how half the party could be left entirely ignorant of the deputy ​leader'​s ​departure. After the taxi had been rescued, I returned ​to the camp site to begin my packing. The rest of the party who had packed while I was getting help were ready to leave. I instructed them to follow a 'phone line that runs down to Newnes via the Old Coach. Road. On this road there are a number of deceiving turnoffs and this is the only sure thing to follow unless you know the road well. 
-Nreturned ​to the camp site to begin my packing. The rest of the party who had packed while I was getting help wore ready to leave. I instructed them to follow a 'phone line that runs down to Newnes via the Old Coach. Road. On this road there are a number of deceiving turnoffs and this is the only sure thing to follow unless you know the road well. + 
-This party of six then left. Three only did not rejoin the main party. This means that three followed my instructions,​ three did not. When I had finished my packing I also left. I rejoined the rest at lunch time to find that two members and one prospective were missing. I almost immediately knew what had happened to +"This party of six then left. Three only did not rejoin the main party. This means that three followed my instructions,​ three did not. When I had finished my packing I also left. I rejoined the rest at lunch time to find that two members and one prospective were missing. I almost immediately knew what had happened to them, they had neglected to watch the 'phone line and had continued on down the old railway line towards Newnes. 
-them, they had neglected to watch the '?hone line and had continued on down the old railway line towards Newnes. + 
-"The rest of the party including myself proceeded with the +"The rest of the party including myself proceeded with the walk as stated on the programme. I later discovered from the three who had "deviated"​ that on Saturday night they knew that they were not much more than an hour's easy walk from the rest of the party who were at Newnes. They did not try to rejoin ​us
-walk as stated on the programme. I later discovered from the three who had deviated"​ that on Saturday night they knew that they were not much more than an hour's easy walk from the rest of the party who were at Newnes. They did not try to rejoin ​US+ 
-To quote from the subject article "I frankly confess to a disinclination to regain a party in which lack of cohesion appeared to boa marked characteristic"​. I think that the +"To quote from the subject article "I frankly confess to a disinclination to regain a party in which lack of cohesion appeared to be a marked characteristic"​. I think that the "​deviationists" ​were the ones who had gone astray, not the main party. I also think that this is an attitude that should not be tolerated in the club. If the leader must separate from the rest of the party through circumstances beyond his control, it would make everything much easier for him and the rest of his party if all the members of that party followed his instructions. 
-deviationists6 ​were the ones who had gone astray, not the main party. I also think that this is an attitude that should not be tolerated in the club. If the leader must separate from the rest of the party through circumstances beyond his control, it would make everything much easier for him and the rest of his party if all the members of that party followed his instructions. + 
-- The Leader, +- The Leader, Official Trip, King's Birthday ​Weekend."​ 
-Official Trip, + 
-King's Birthday ​We +---- 
-PLAN FOR YiTURE PROTECTION+ 
-In his lecture to the Club on last Friday, Allen Strom stressed from the beginning that he was going to take us far beyond the bounds of conservation as it is usually understood by bushwalkers. "The preservation of wild country",​ he said, "is but part of the problem, and 7Thi1st ​we might be happ y to have a Blue Mountains National Park, or a Kosciusko State Park, we will still be far from retaining the Australia we know. Every plant and animal habitat - mountain plain or jungle forest - has its contribution to make in relative natural inhabitants,​ and it is a very limited outlook that is satisfied with large tracts of mountainous walking country that satisfy our desire for physical exertion''​+=====Plan For nature Protection.===== 
-15. + 
-The greatest menace to any policy of nature protection was the incr'​ea sing world population; the rate of increase being 50,000 persons a day. This resulted in a grecYter d. Yand on tho renewable and non-renewable nature resources of thu world, particularly in the few remaining unexploited territories. Evidences of a drive beyond capacity could be seen in the conditions that gave rise to the appalling ​Wastage ​of the Tennessee Valley, the loss in production in Argentina,the reduced fertility and productivity of our own soils, and tte use of our timber resources at a rate that is at least three times greater than our ability to replace them. Increasing population meant further inroads into virgin country as the old lands became unable to support their own popultion. More homes were roquired. This meant more timber, bigger cities, improved transport, and loss of isolation. Closer settlement brought an urgent clash with OUP wild life in the back-country. There was a constant war between domestic and native animals in their demand for sustenance.., Bigger cities were trampling out the wild things from around them, the fate of our National Park and the Kuring-gai Chase were examples that improved transport left no land as a safe wildlife sanctuary. The existence of Australia7s ​native plants and +In his lecture to the Club on last Friday, Allen Strom stressed from the beginning that he was going to take us far beyond the bounds of conservation as it is usually understood by bushwalkers. "The preservation of wild country",​ he said, "is but part of the problem, and whi1st ​we might be happy to have a Blue Mountains National Park, or a Kosciusko State Park, we will still be far from retaining the Australia we know. Every plant and animal habitat - mountain plain or jungle forest - has its contribution to make in relative natural inhabitants,​ and it is a very limited outlook that is satisfied with large tracts of mountainous walking country that satisfy our desire for physical exertion"
-animals hung delicately on a balance that had been built up over + 
-thousands of years of isolation. ​Ths balance ​Was upset by the advance of the white man, by the animals he introduced (such as rabbits, foxes, dogs and cats), and by the careless use of fire. +The greatest menace to any policy of nature protection was the increasing ​world population; the rate of increase being 50,000 persons a day. This resulted in a greater demand ​on the renewable and non-renewable nature resources of the world, particularly in the few remaining unexploited territories. Evidences of a drive beyond capacity could be seen in the conditions that gave rise to the appalling ​wastage ​of the Tennessee Valley, the loss in production in Argentina, the reduced fertility and productivity of our own soils, and the use of our timber resources at a rate that is at least three times greater than our ability to replace them. Increasing population meant further inroads into virgin country as the old lands became unable to support their own population. More homes were required. This meant more timber, bigger cities, improved transport, and loss of isolation. Closer settlement brought an urgent clash with our wild life in the back-country. There was a constant war between domestic and native animals in their demand for sustenance. Bigger cities were trampling out the wild things from around them, the fate of our National Park and the Kuring-gai Chase were examples that improved transport left no land as a safe wildlife sanctuary. The existence of Australia'​s ​native plants and animals hung delicately on a balance that had been built up over thousands of years of isolation. ​The balance ​was upset by the advance of the white man, by the animals he introduced (such as rabbits, foxes, dogs and cats), and by the careless use of fire. 
-Any scheme that attempted to give adequate protection to our natural resources required an international understanding on the ability of our land to meet the demands thrust upon it. The urgency for birth control in the lands where increasing population was beyond the bounds of food supply ​mast be realised. There nust also be an international effort towards a better understanding of nature ​protebtion ​- an appreciation that the features that comprise any land are the possession of no race- in particular. A pooling of world knowledge would stimulate backward governments,​ while without a spread of preservation consciousness throughout the world, we could never hope to bring enlightenment to the land hungry eyes of the multitudes. A world survey was needed to determine productive capacity in each country ​ard what porulation ​the world could carry. + 
-In Australia a land usage survey was both a possibility and a necessitySuch a survey would provide a basis for estimating which land were suitable for rural pursuits, primitive areas, ​industrialisas1 tion, urban living, ​cote. Within ​th(.: primitive lands our concern for the wild things would be uppermost. Some of these lands would be designed to protect the headwaters of our strems, some as orest reserves, some as anti-erosion bands, some for pleasure grounds. Flora and fauna reserves would need be large self-contained areas, containing possibly millions of acres, wherein ​tbe ecological balance was complete. They would need to be well-serviced and well policed. Exotic animals, bushfires and indiscriminate access by the public would have to be rigidly controlled. These reserves would be a national possession ​:tnd not the plaything of an inconsiderate +Any scheme that attempted to give adequate protection to our natural resources required an international understanding on the ability of our land to meet the demands thrust upon it. The urgency for birth control in the lands where increasing population was beyond the bounds of food supply ​must be realised. There must also be an international effort towards a better understanding of nature ​protection ​- an appreciation that the features that comprise any land are the possession of no race- in particular. A pooling of world knowledge would stimulate backward governments,​ while without a spread of preservation consciousness throughout the world, we could never hope to bring enlightenment to the land hungry eyes of the multitudes. A world survey was needed to determine productive capacity in each country ​and what population ​the world could carry. 
-16. + 
-population. Outside these areas, animals and plants of economic ​Importance ​would be given protection. +In Australia a land usage survey was both a possibility and a necessitySuch a survey would provide a basis for estimating which land were suitable for rural pursuits, primitive areas, ​industrialisation, urban living, ​etc. Within ​the primitive lands our concern for the wild things would be uppermost. Some of these lands would be designed to protect the headwaters of our streams, some as forest ​reserves, some as anti-erosion bands, some for pleasure grounds. Flora and fauna reserves would need to be large self-contained areas, containing possibly millions of acres, wherein ​the ecological balance was complete. They would need to be well-serviced and well policed. Exotic animals, bushfires and indiscriminate access by the public would have to be rigidly controlled. These reserves would be a national possession ​and not the plaything of an inconsiderate population. Outside these areas, animals and plants of economic ​importance ​would be given protection. 
-To make our primitive lands effective the land usage sur:​vey ​would have to include an assessment of our stocks of native animals. The Koala surVey ​demonstrated that we had very little idea of where, or to what extent, our native animals exist. + 
-There was lack of uniformity in the attitude of our States, and often State political boundaries cut across wild life habitats. The southern boundary of the Kosciusko State Park, for instance, did not mark any geographical difference between the Park and the landto the South. A Commonwealth Co-ordinating body was necessary for increasing knowledge, securing co-operation,​ stimulating interest, and motivating education for preservation consciousness. Natural History ​Clubsl-Bushwalking Clubs, and similar organisations that served to bring the public, particularly the adolescent, into contact with the bushlands, should be encouraged not only to continue their activities, but to experiment in membership training in the problems of nature protection. From an innate interest in the wild there might arise a desire to protect and understand. Technical Colleges might make facilities available for this work The innate desire of the primary school child for knowledge of nature ​proided ​a golden opportunity to fix a desire for nature protection, but the path was via the teacher. Camps and tours should be arranged for s enior secondary.School ​pupils, TeachersCollege students, and University students, so as to teach them preservation and show them national attempts to protect nature. +To make our primitive lands effective the land usage survey ​would have to include an assessment of our stocks of native animals. The Koala survey ​demonstrated that we had very little idea of where, or to what extent, our native animals exist. 
-The *hole plat for nature protection could be summarised as follows + 
-(1) Stabilising our own and the worldls pupulation ​at a figure which allows for the use of the renewable natural resources at a rate loss than the maximum +There was lack of uniformity in the attitude of our States, and often State political boundaries cut across wild life habitats. The southern boundary of the Kosciusko State Park, for instance, did not mark any geographical difference between the Park and the land to the South. A Commonwealth Co-ordinating body was necessary for increasing knowledge, securing co-operation,​ stimulating interest, and motivating education for preservation consciousness. Natural History ​Clubs, ​Bushwalking Clubs, and similar organisations that served to bring the public, particularly the adolescent, into contact with the bushlands, should be encouraged not only to continue their activities, but to experiment in membership training in the problems of nature protection. From an innate interest in the wild there might arise a desire to protect and understand. Technical Colleges might make facilities available for this workThe innate desire of the primary school child for knowledge of nature ​provided ​a golden opportunity to fix a desire for nature protection, but the path was via the teacher. Camps and tours should be arranged for senior ​secondary ​school ​pupils, Teachers' ​College students, and University students, so as to teach them preservation and show them national attempts to protect nature. 
-safety limit; such limit to be the rate of natural ​regeneration. + 
-(2) The establishment of an effectiVe ​international body that will serve to expedite (1), to disseminate accurate knowledge on the true value of the resources of the various countries, and generally act as a storehouse of knowledge on matters of nature protection. +The whole plat for nature protection could be summarised as follows
-(3) The establishment of a Commonwealth Co-ordinating Body whose function would be + 
-(a) To organise a land usage survey and biological investigation leading, inter alja, to the establishment of numerous large primitive areas, representing various plant and animal ecological groups, designed to 'satisfy the triple needs of nature protection - economic, scientific and cultural. +(1) Stabilising our own and the world'​s population ​at a figure which allows for the use of the renewable natural resources at a rate less than the maximum safety limit; such limit to be the rate of natural regeneration. 
-17. + 
-(b) To co-ordinate State policies and thus largely eliminate artificial political boundaries fromnature protection ​administrtion+(2) The establishment of an effective ​international body that will serve to expedite (1), to disseminate accurate knowledge on the true value of the resources of the various countries, and generally act as a storehouse of knowledge on matters of nature protection. 
-(c) To foster education for-preserwItion ​consciousness. + 
-Some progress had already been made along these lines. Birth control is at least discussed. U.N.E.3.C.0. has sponsored an InternatiorDIJnion ​for the Protection of Nature. At homePthe ​C.S.1.R.O. has set up a wild lifo section whose first task is the elimintion ​of the rabbit. Victoria has established a reserve of 138,000 acres in the Malice ​country. +(3) The establishment of a Commonwealth Co-ordinating Body whose function would be
-The stage was set for the development of the plan, but the + 
-power to give it actuality was lacking, +(a) To organise a land usage survey and biological investigation leading, inter alia, to the establishment of numerous large primitive areas, representing various plant and animal ecological groups, designed to satisfy the triple needs of nature protection - economic, scientific and cultural. 
-The wide interest ​wIsi. Allenls ​lecture aroused was shown by + 
-the range of questions he was asked at the end - qi,​lestions ​on AustraliaTs ​population potential, the extension of irrigation, +(b) To co-ordinate State policies and thus largely eliminate artificial political boundaries from nature protection ​administration. 
-alkalinity in irrigated ​sails, the use of trace elements in increasing soil fertility, the Koala sanctuary, the Tennessee Valley, and many others. Claude Haynes thought that what was wanted was + 
-more people with more guns to shoot more pests, while Dill Cosgrove +( c ) To foster education for preservation ​consciousness. 
-despaired of any progress under the prbsent ​form of government. In + 
-all a stimulating ​eveningls ​cogitation, which puts our ideas on conservation in political, economic and biological perspective. +Some progress had already been made along these lines. Birth control is at least discussed. U.N.E.S.C.O. has sponsored an International Union for the Protection of Nature. At home the C.S.1.R.O. has set up a wild life section whose first task is the elimination ​of the rabbit. Victoria has established a reserve of 138,000 acres in the Mallee ​country. 
-FEDERTION NOTES+ 
 +The stage was set for the development of the plan, but the power to give it actuality was lacking
 + 
 +The wide interest ​which Allen'​s ​lecture aroused was shown by the range of questions he was asked at the end - questions ​on Australia'​s ​population potential, the extension of irrigation, alkalinity in irrigated ​soils, the use of trace elements in increasing soil fertility, the Koala sanctuary, the Tennessee Valley, and many others. Claude Haynes thought that what was wanted was more people with more guns to shoot more pests, while Bill Cosgrove despaired of any progress under the present ​form of government. In all a stimulating ​evening'​s ​cogitation, which puts our ideas on conservation in political, economic and biological perspective. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Federation Notes.===== 
 by Brian G. Harvey by Brian G. Harvey
-THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING was held on 18th July and the following ​Office-Fswei-eecre-C-16d7=-Pres ont: Mr. Paul Barnes, Senior Vice- + 
-President: Mr. Frank Peters,-Junior Vice-President:​ Mr. Allen Strom, Hon. Secretary: Mr. Stan Cattier, Hon Asst. Soc. Miss Elaine Jackson, Hon. Treasurer: ​Mis s Jeanne Golding. +===The Annual General Meeting:​=== 
-The Financial Report indicated a mall deficit of 18 duo mainly + 
-to printing expenses. The loss on the publication of no. 11 Bush- Walker" has been reduced to 2,5. Trust Funds stand atGarawarra 2,39, Garawarra Fence 0, Maitland Bay 2,32, Search and Rescue ​43, Conservation Bureau ​2,130+Was held on 18th July and the following ​Officers were elected:President: Mr. Paul Barnes, Senior Vice-President:​ Mr. Frank Peters, Junior Vice-President:​ Mr. Allen Strom, Hon. Secretary: Mr. Stan Cattier, Hon Asst. Soc. Miss Elaine Jackson, Hon. Treasurer: ​Miss Jeanne Golding. 
-The Annual Report did not contain any record of outstanding conservational achievements. The Information Bureau ​deely deplored the lack of information supplied to it corvc2ning ​new country traversed, changes in transport facilities, etc. + 
-About 25 delegates out of a possible 40 odd were present, ​demon- +The Financial Report indicated a small deficit of £18 due mainly to printing expenses. The loss on the publication of no. 11 "​Bushwalker" has been reduced to £5. Trust Funds stand at: Garawarra £39, Garawarra Fence £7, Maitland Bay £32, Search and Rescue ​£43, Conservation Bureau ​£130. 
-, strating ​the lack of interest displayed by some of thu affiliated clubs. + 
-THE JULY MONTHLY MEETING opencd ​with Mr. Paul Barnes in the Chair. +The Annual Report did not contain any record of outstanding conservational achievements. The Information Bureau ​deeply ​deplored the lack of information supplied to it concerning ​new country traversed, changes in transport facilities, etc. 
-... _,- JA,Mwa + 
-BOUDDI NATURAL PARK ANNUAL REPORT disclosed ​timber-thieving had occurred and that the hut at Maitlarg-Yhi Was burnt down. The shelter shed and water-tank had been repaired during the year. A Working ​Dee will be +About 25 delegates out of a possible 40 odd were present, ​demonstrating ​the lack of interest displayed by some of the affiliated clubs. 
-held on October 28/29 to remedy track erosion. + 
-NEW AUSTRALIANS: Federation will approach the Minister for immigration , with a ifF-UE-6 ​acquainting New Australians of our fauna and flora +===The July General Meeting:​=== 
-18+ 
-DOCUMENTARY FILM ON BUSHWALKING in being prepared by the Department ​-o-f-YEd"​--1-hterr6l-ro-ro-ve-H-sd1ni-fribution. Mr. Stan Cottle', ​is a cting on behalf of Federation in technical advisory capacity. +Opened ​with Mr. Paul Barnes in the Chair. 
-THE SEARCH PD RESCUE SECTION was requested to draw up z, code of YafJbj-Fri;​sf-icuI-e:​-sOE-rrn7F ​similar to the Code of Ethics. + 
-FEDERATION BALL was mooted and clubs w ere asked to submit ​TE-Zi7riows ​and report back. It was suggested that a 'dress optional ​cbarct-style dance be held in some large city ballroom, like in the good old days of yore +===Bouddi Natural Park Annual Report:​=== 
-KURING-0A1 CHLSE TRUST w as assured of Federationts ​and Clubst 7-67p76-rt-frithds-u pros-Zion ​of wild-flower picking, and any move + 
-to ban the sale of wild flowers in entirety, in response to an appeal in the ''​Herald' ​by the President of the Chase. ​R:​ngers ​please note. +Disclosed ​timber-thieving had occurred and that the hut at Maitland Bay was burnt down. The shelter shed and water-tank had been repaired during the year. A Working ​Bee will be held on October 28/29 to remedy track erosion. 
-BLUE MOUNTAINS COAL: The Sydney County Council responded with inTOrthafra'​ thnf-T-E-67 ​did not intend to nroceed ​with mining projects in Govettts ​Leap and other locations. + 
-ANNUAL CONFERENCE: A suggestion was made in the nnnual ​Report that 171176-cdifiaTi ​should ​bo ressurccted ​to iron out and discuss +===New Australians:=== 
-contentious ​bushwnlking ​matters. The las t Conference was attended by about 12 walkers. Clubs are requested to instruct delegates. + 
-NEW FEDERATION SECRETARY'S ADDRESS:Mr. Stan Cottier, 287 Forest Rd., Kirawee. Phone F51642 ​(between 8 and 4.15 weekdays.) Stan to be congratulated and thanked for his untiring interest in the Federation. +Federation will approach the Minister for immigration , with a view to acquainting New Australians of our fauna and flora [illegible]
-Frank Leyden is now staying near Chelmsford (30 miles north- + 
-east of London). After climbing several more mountains in +===A documentary Film On Bushwalking:​=== 
-Switzerland he went on to Tirano, in Italy, where the first person + 
-he met was a timber-getter who had worked in the Sober mines. ​Frark was most imp ressed ​by the binexhaustiblo troLl surcs of art scripturearchitectureetQ. He found Rome most impressive of all. Then he spent a week in Paris,where he saw most of the famous landmarks. He has collected 1,000 negatives and kodachromes (Social Secplease note.) +Is being prepared by the Department ​of the Interior for overseas distribution. Mr. Stan Cottier ​is acting ​on behalf of Federation in technical advisory capacity. 
-ConglIttlations ​and best wishes to Mary Macdonald and Roy Briathwaite, who have announced their engagement. + 
-Wear e glad to hear that Kevin nrdill ​has recovered from the +===The Search And Rescue Section:​=== 
-indigestion which as sailed ​him after his self-contained trip with with Jim Brown. It just goes to show that it pays to take a good cook_ + 
-LET THERE BE LIGHT +Was requested to draw up code of Safety First rules on lines similar to the Code of Ethics. 
-Pressure lamps for sale.+ 
 +===Federation Ball:=== 
 + 
 +Was mooted and clubs were asked to submit ​their views and report back. It was suggested that a "dress optional" cabaret-style dance be held in some large city ballroom, like in the good old days of yore. 
 + 
 +===Ku-ring-gai Chase Trust:=== 
 + 
 +Was assured of Federation'​s ​and Clubs' support in the suppression ​of wild-flower picking, and any move to ban the sale of wild flowers in entirety, in response to an appeal in the "Herald" ​by the President of the Chase. ​Rangers ​please note. 
 + 
 +===Blue Mountains Coal:=== 
 + 
 +The Sydney County Council responded with information that they did not intend to proceed ​with mining projects in Govett'​s ​Leap and other locations. 
 + 
 +===Annual conference:=== 
 + 
 +A suggestion was made in the Annual ​Report that this congregation ​should ​be resurrected ​to iron out and discuss contentious ​bushwalking ​matters. The last Conference was attended by about 12 walkers. Clubs are requested to instruct delegates. 
 + 
 +===New Federation Secretary's Address:=== 
 + 
 +Mr. Stan Cottier, 287 Forest Rd., Kirrawee. Phone FJ1642 ​(between 8 and 4.15 weekdays.) Stan to be congratulated and thanked for his untiring interest in the Federation. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Frank Leyden is now staying near Chelmsford (30 miles north-east of London). After climbing several more mountains in Switzerland he went on to Tirano, in Italy, where the first person he met was a timber-getter who had worked in the Cobar mines. ​Frank was most impressed ​by the "​inexhaustible treasures ​of art, sculpture, architecture"​ etc. He found Rome most impressive of all. Then he spent a week in Paris, where he saw most of the famous landmarks. He has collected 1,000 negatives and kodachromes (Social Secplease note.) 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Congratulations ​and best wishes to Mary Macdonald and Roy Braithwaite, who have announced their engagement. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +We are glad to hear that Kevin Ardill ​has recovered from the indigestion which assailed ​him after his self-contained trip with with Jim Brown. It just goes to show that it pays to take a good cook. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====Let There Be Light.===== 
 + 
 +===Pressure lamps for sale.=== 
 Paddy is not suggesting that you go all pansy and buy pressure lamps to dispel the murky darkness in your week-end jaunts into the bush. Nevertheless maybe even bushwalkers are inconvenienced by the blackness which descends on our homes from time to time, and if their thoughts run to purchasing a pressure lamp maybe a glance over Paddy'​s stock would be worth while. Paddy is not suggesting that you go all pansy and buy pressure lamps to dispel the murky darkness in your week-end jaunts into the bush. Nevertheless maybe even bushwalkers are inconvenienced by the blackness which descends on our homes from time to time, and if their thoughts run to purchasing a pressure lamp maybe a glance over Paddy'​s stock would be worth while.
-Australian Aladdin lamps ZE/9/9 + 
-English Tilley lamps',4/10/- +Australian Aladdin lamps £5/9/9 
-Italian ​_Sol ox lamps + 
-100 candle power +English Tilley lamps £4/10/- 
-+ 
- 200 u 17 f,5/12/6 +Italian ​Solex lamps: 
- ​300 ​- 17 i7 5/19/6 + 
- .200 f7 17 rapid lighting (no moths) +  * 100 candle power £4/15/- 
-6/17/6 +  ​* ​200 candle power £5/12/6 
-N.B. Paddy still has +  ​* ​300 candle power £5/19/6 
-CADIP SEAR FORWnLKERS+  ​* ​200 candle power rapid lighting (no meths£6/17/6 
 + 
 +N.B. Paddy still has Camp Gear For Walkers. 
 + 
 Paddy Pallin, Paddy Pallin,
-327 George St., EX 3595 SYDNEY 
-19, 
  
 +327 George St., Sydney. Phone BX 3595.
 +
 +----
195008.txt · Last modified: 2017/08/23 01:06 by tyreless