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195001 [2017/07/20 03:21]
tyreless
195001 [2017/07/20 23:38]
tyreless
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 |Newnes, Glen Davis, Mt Uraterer to Capertee and Glen Alice|"​Cerberus"​| 6| |Newnes, Glen Davis, Mt Uraterer to Capertee and Glen Alice|"​Cerberus"​| 6|
 |Now What Are You Really Looking For?|A.L. Wyborn|10| |Now What Are You Really Looking For?|A.L. Wyborn|10|
-|Ode to the Comissioner ​for Railways|W.G.|13|+|Ode to the Commissioner ​for Railways|W.G.|13|
  
 ---- ----
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 ===== Editorial - Conservation Publicity ===== ===== Editorial - Conservation Publicity =====
    
-Two publications on bushland conservation have been printed lately. One of these, the 1949 issue of the Journal of the Wild Life Preservation Society, is, in effect, a summary of the Society'​s past and present activities. The sect1on on sanctuaries and national reserves covers ground familiar to those who take an interest in S.B.W. affairs. But many members gain only a disjointed knowledge of sone of the Club's conservation projects at meetings, and we can recommend a reading of the Society'​s Journal as a means of learning the complete story.+Two publications on bushland conservation have been printed lately. One of these, the 1949 issue of the Journal of the Wild Life Preservation Society, is, in effect, a summary of the Society'​s past and present activities. The sect1on on sanctuaries and national reserves covers ground familiar to those who take an interest in S.B.W. affairs. But many members gain only a disjointed knowledge of some of the Club's conservation projects at meetings, and we can recommend a reading of the Society'​s Journal as a means of learning the complete story.
  
 The National Park has always been in the forefront of the Society'​s interests. Once again there is a disturbing account of encroachments on the parkland for cricket pitches, gravel pits, sewerage dumps etc., while the activities of the Bushcraft Association are deplored. At a meeting convened by the Federation in March last year "to discuss the administration of the National Park," a subcommittee was set up to prepare a draft Bill for submission to the Minister for Lands. The draft Bill was to set out the powers and type of personnel of the Trust thought desirable for the proper administration of a National Park. "​However,"​ the Journal comments, "the Federation has not to date called this committee together and we are beginning to wonder whether it can effectively do so while it refuses to disassociate itself from the Bushcraft Association."​ It is pointed out too that the official organ of the Federation - "The Bushwalker"​ 1947, published an article by the Bushcraft Association. The National Park has always been in the forefront of the Society'​s interests. Once again there is a disturbing account of encroachments on the parkland for cricket pitches, gravel pits, sewerage dumps etc., while the activities of the Bushcraft Association are deplored. At a meeting convened by the Federation in March last year "to discuss the administration of the National Park," a subcommittee was set up to prepare a draft Bill for submission to the Minister for Lands. The draft Bill was to set out the powers and type of personnel of the Trust thought desirable for the proper administration of a National Park. "​However,"​ the Journal comments, "the Federation has not to date called this committee together and we are beginning to wonder whether it can effectively do so while it refuses to disassociate itself from the Bushcraft Association."​ It is pointed out too that the official organ of the Federation - "The Bushwalker"​ 1947, published an article by the Bushcraft Association.
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 and warmed our hearts in kindly comradeship. and warmed our hearts in kindly comradeship.
  
-Now, we doprt; and on the springing turf\\+Now, we depart; and on the springing turf\\
 scarce lingers yet the imprint of our bed.\\ scarce lingers yet the imprint of our bed.\\
 Only a wisp of fern, some blackened stones\\ Only a wisp of fern, some blackened stones\\
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 K.M. K.M.
 +
 +----
  
 ===== Newnes, Glen Davis, Mt Uraterer to Capertee Mt. and Glen Alice ===== ===== Newnes, Glen Davis, Mt Uraterer to Capertee Mt. and Glen Alice =====
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 We headed down into a gully. Unfortunately,​ although we thought ourselves lucky at the time, the final drop was fairly easily made and we entered upon a course of thorny vines of all the worst varieties (except blackberries) that I have ever met, interspersed with giant nettles, all lacing together the fallen trees of the last generation. Have you ever seen the nettles which tower up over you and droop down and dangle in your face? The average height of the mess was from ten to fifteen feet. The language used was much as might be expected, but even with doubling and redoubling the emphasis was often felt to be inadequate, and there were many even more expressive silences. We headed down into a gully. Unfortunately,​ although we thought ourselves lucky at the time, the final drop was fairly easily made and we entered upon a course of thorny vines of all the worst varieties (except blackberries) that I have ever met, interspersed with giant nettles, all lacing together the fallen trees of the last generation. Have you ever seen the nettles which tower up over you and droop down and dangle in your face? The average height of the mess was from ten to fifteen feet. The language used was much as might be expected, but even with doubling and redoubling the emphasis was often felt to be inadequate, and there were many even more expressive silences.
  
-The leader ​ocassionally ​took to the wombat burrows, and in happier circumstances it would have been amusing watching him disappear down a hole in the ground dragging his pack after him.+The leader ​occasionally ​took to the wombat burrows, and in happier circumstances it would have been amusing watching him disappear down a hole in the ground dragging his pack after him.
  
 Lower down there were some magnificent tree ferns and near the beginning was the biggest cedar I have ever seen - there'​d probably be a fortune in it, but it would have to come out by a helicopter. Lower down there were some magnificent tree ferns and near the beginning was the biggest cedar I have ever seen - there'​d probably be a fortune in it, but it would have to come out by a helicopter.
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 by A.L. Wyborn by A.L. Wyborn
  
-Have you ever noticed how a few small names on a map can be the start of a new adventure in walking? ​Ofen buobwaleP.,; ​pore +Have you ever noticed how a few small names on a map can be the start of a new adventure in walking? ​Often busbwalkers ​pore over maps and then take a chance on a certain area not known to other walkers. The fossicking round for information ​sometimes leads to quite surprising discoveries,​ and sometimes ​leads to a dead end.
-over maps and then take a chance on a certain area n:f6 kr,c-wn cffrLe. , +
-walkers. The fossicking round for information ​so-f-cimes '​.;​() +
-quite surprising discoveries,​ and sometimes ​2a to a dead end. +
-We could get very little "​gen"​ about Bajiol,a, S-oiranco,​ +
-so decided to take a risk and go and see for 31,​1.1.:​1-J.As LLiuri e pointed out before we went, the nividing Range +
-and Glen Innes could not be so spectacillar,​ a oi each sLde cf country about.30000 feet, thus leaving only a Y.:C.5e of th:,.,12and feet to the tops of 5,000 feet. +
-MN rOtrfELD +
-471 +
-SUNGULLA+
  
 +We could get very little "​gen"​ about Bajimba, Spirabo, etc., so decided to take a risk and go and see for ourselves. As Laurie pointed out before we went, the Dividing Range between Tenterfield and Glen Innes could not be so spectacular,​ as on each side of it is country about 3,000 feet, thus leaving only a rise of two thousand feet to the tops of 5,000 feet.
  
-+However the uncertainty only served to act as a spur, so Easter Thursday found us on the Brisbane Express, bound for Bluff Rock, two stations before TenterfieldThe station beforeSandy Flat, was to have been our starting point, but the historic interest of Bluff Rock changed our plansThe actual Rock is close to the railway line with the usual type of bluff faceand is easily climbed from the backMany years ago some recalcitrant blacks were driven off the granite Bluff to deaths.
-TER ' 'q 0 '- 13") MAN '2 +
--.::-..0 ::: ,14tt +
-t ".: &​issER ​, +
-DEE _.s: .....+
  
-However the uncertainty only served to ar'.G as a spr, so En,;tr Thursday found us on the Brisbane Exprs, bonc. ;:e-o +Another interesting ​rock is Thunderbolt ​Rock, just alongside the railway track about one quarter of a mile past Bluff Rock station. Although only about 30 feet by 20 feet in size, the celebrated bushranger used it to dodge back from the pursuing troopers.
-two stations bePore Tenterfiold,​ Tjla iic i before. Fiat, +
-was to have been our starir, +
-Bluff-Rock changed our plan, rf e.actoI Ro-2z lc 31e50 to i;:,?P- rail- +
-way line with the usual t145 of bluff face, and to easily +
-from the back. Many years'​ne realciti,​ant blacks were driven off the granite Bluff to Lher +
-Another interesting ​rk is Th1).nderbolt ​Rock, jixt alongside the railway track abol_pl cac quarter of a mile past Bluff Rock station. Although only aout 30 it by 20 feet in s1.2.e ​the celebrated bushranger used it to dodge back from the pursuing troopers+
-While making a few phone calls to recommended "​authoritieson the distic,ict, we me',; burly Reg Irlam, the fettling ganger. +
-'With his huge hairy arms, unshaven face, small eyes and red hair, he was coun:;​e'​ipart of Dobell7a "Billy Boy." After being +
-filled with m'​2.1._k,​ an Tc3ceptig fresh butter and eggs that were +
-literally thrust upon us by olTr friend we started or tough +
-trip - on RegAs motor tricle down the line for several m4.1es0 The rucsacs and I were on the outrigger board *Jim in front of Reg (the driver), and Laurie behind hiii making an unusual load for A railway trike. It was tough going, there 'Doing no windshield! +
-More nebulous advice from a fai,mer friend fRegis and we wero off, under our own power this time, ror the main range about six miles to the east. The range is not; parulaly to +
-approach, as mentioned before, and the tc--)s covered with +
-heavy timber which shields many good panoraE,as :nor,: the walker. On the way across we skirted an isolated hill and were impeded to some extent by many six foot dingo fonces made in two heights of wire netting. The top height was flimsily secured by battens to the sturdy ground posts, and caused some amusement as we swayea back and forth to get over. +
-Jondol was our first mountain, a granite out,crop with views back along the Cottesbrook Creek to Bluff Rock. We camped in +
-a small saddle with clear water at about 4,500 feet, one mile south along the range from Jondol. +
-, The walking next morning was very much up and down ridges, but quite pleasant among open forest lands and grassy tops. Such a top was Coolamangera,​ where the gums rose well over one hundred feet. Another half mile and we were stopped by a gorge about 800 feet deep, which necessitated a wide okLr'​Gir,​g movemen t tc the east Each of several tops we then climbed was upi-,​inAlsicelly Mug nt to be Bajimba, but this we did not reach ti1 13111, and wac no mistaking its unique trig0 post with a 3,1aa) froe alaar +
-usual disc. It was a fitting spot for lunL;​1'​-- hogh a (f,y one, as the views were very good over wide level dfid g-Loric..ls clouds hung in the sky. +
-One of the best glimpt 9 was our nert o '3tive - 12-;.g pirabo +
-1441 +
-framed through a gap in tall-ceb calyptJ ; that had_obviouTJly been cut by surveyors to take s sight on the peak. +
-Going down from Bajimba on hO easteT,n de ef t".,19 we +
-passed through thick !jungle flora, a..cd one,. pc yf +
-another nice view of Big Spi:c,abo tfitst1in !:h:,h 1-pilcac; also, +
-about one mile to the north of +
-At the bottom, amid cool f.:_lrn2 we fron :he +
-clear Five Bull Creek, and =-;:-) +
-road, which e later learned. led a f=r7 -pileo +
-east. We did not follow the road for lcr4s +
-Spirabo early next morning, so we clibe,7, an (JJ!1 +
-gully about 500. ferA tc-) +
-between Big and Littb in a trtkF-t_ +
-ensured a comfortable OEJ-0) +
-We had to wait ;()Illa nT'​1"​ Tz.11:1_ng for ? to lift, +
-thus making the ollmt, of BIg ,.r:rlil-), orao +
-the most spectacular pa.:,A of th.=. a, ifC16 I tO cc,02.:y on +
-top ensured panoramic view9 Bi l'​h-uLc rloaf C:a was +
-plainly visible 60 miles to the while to he ea sG Ecoky +
-River and Clarence River valley:: 3p-aved as a 3C,C.:-; :13 ragged +
-gorges stretching to the coast n,-; m!lse dJ.s tant '​1'​h9 +
-we proposed to climb was Capoompei7a,​ brIt ib did not Lock so spectacular from Big Spirabo, so we decided very little wou2.71 be lost if we did not have time for it up here too, we found trace 2 of 1i-1:​10c-tone in +
-the form of perfectly preserved sea shells, both loo-,;e and :libed--led in rocks. The range is remarkable for its hypes of rocks. Jondol was granite, Bajimba volcanic ,and now limestone. +
-Down from the peak we broke camp and descended a ridge to the op-en Morven Creek. We surprised a black-brushed red fox which went streaking away across the swamp land. Large red-son anftills dotted the flat until we stopped for lunch near a little farmhouse nestling on the hillside. Here much to our disgust, a young flamer was just completing the ringbarking of a huge peppermint eucalypt because - "the roots are stopping the grass from growing"​ - and thus destroyed one ofthe few good hode trees available for his cattle in summer. +
-Clem got hold of the axe while still embeoled in the tree, and, quick as a flash, I had his photo for future propaganda purposes. We learned from the farmer that 'Big Speriby"​ is 5008 fet high, that further down the crook are big waterfalls and good red cedars, and that Capoompeta is known locally as the "​Magistrate."​ +
-Taking a rough road from here we crossed back over to the western side of the Great Divide toward Deepwater River. Tvi, miles from the river, as evening was drawing in o shopped a car r=ing +
-towards Its, and who should it be but Mr. A. Cox, an old +
-I had been referred to as an expert on the eistii He nad just +
-returned from the Royal Show, and not having heard of us:, looked a little scared at being stopped on such a lonely road by three tranp-like specimens, as I 3 er thought we must have appeared. +
-He was definitely an author. on the surrounding co=tz,y, and did be' +
-let us know it! He ridicul ur tale about llmestone and pliocee.+
  
-to give us a treatise about 26 different species of ira;ILhe. To Laurie/s demurrers he replied, ​'lLad, you know nothinr, obollt ​geology," Gradually we pieced together the reasons for his ;​17spn,​s' ​of as. Maps he had just obtained from the Lands Departm- -jIlay Yrieed ​he was trying to lease a certain area of land Deh:'​.7c d "816 F'​Pej:​iby" where one could look up to sloes covered in huge ti-Lt,​evs ​"like a Spanish castle," Apparently it was such an obsession ​-with him at the time that he thought we were after It too +While making a few phone calls to recommended "​authorities"​ on the district, we met burly Reg Irlam, the fettling ganger. With his huge hairy arms, unshaven face, small eyes and red hair, he was counterpart of Dobell'​s "Billy Boy." After being filled with milk, and accepting fresh butter and eggs that were literally thrust upon us by our new friend, we started our tough trip - on Reg's motor tricycle down the line for several mi1es. The rucsacs and I were on the outrigger board, Clem in front of Reg (the driver), and Laurie behind him, making an unusual load for a railway trike. It was tough going, there being no windshield! 
-Much other land he owned in the distrie ared on it ran + 
-Black Poll cattle. Amongst them was the hbes.Ela-AA: ​Poll-in the +More nebulous advice from a farmer friend of Reg's and we were off, under our own power this time, for the main range about six miles to the east. The range is not particularly to approach, as mentioned before, and the tops are mostly covered with heavy timber which shields many good panoramas from the walker. On the way across we skirted an isolated hill and were impeded to some extent by many six foot dingo fences made in two heights of wire netting. The top height was flimsily secured by battens to the sturdy ground posts, and caused some amusement as we swayed back and forth to get over. 
-world, a sister to a champion bull in Chicag, ​Times wei'​e ​now good, but tax was so bad he had out down prer len by f:fty cent. He left us happily9 ​quite convinDed + 
-about everything,"​ but also that We 0,16 .J-41s +Jondol was our first mountain, a granite out,crop with views back along the Cottesbrook Creek to Bluff Rock. We camped in a small saddle with clear water at about 4,500 feet, one mile south along the range from Jondol. 
-That night we camped ​cn Deeowate- flivc.. + 
-a few miles along the unin1;​erestin ​road we cEi e 1,​)!,​ry ​into Deepwater, which was in the midst of barren ​fiat oeunbry. With hours to wait for the bus to Glen innes, 26 miles away, we decided to go by private car, and it was only a few miles along the road before Laurie boarded a modern sedan, while Clem and I had to be content with the back of a utility. However this lift gave us nice time to look around Glen Innes in brilliant sunshine, and see the autumn tints of the many exotic trees.+The walking next morning was very much up and down ridges, but quite pleasant among open forest lands and grassy tops. Such a top was Coolamangera,​ where the gums rose well over one hundred feet. Another half mile and we were stopped by a gorge about 800 feet deep, which necessitated a wide skirting movement to the east. Each of several tops we then climbed was optimistically thought to be Bajimba, but this we did not reach ti1l 1 p.m. and there as no mistaking its unique trig. post with a square frame under the usual disc. It was a fitting spot for lunch though a dry one, as the views were very good over wide level valleys, and glorious clouds hung in the sky. 
 + 
 +One of the best glimpses was our next objective, Big Spirabo, framed through a gap in tall eucalypts, that had obviously been cut by surveyors to take s sight on the peak. 
 + 
 +Going down from Bajimba on the eastern side of the Divide we passed through thick jungle flora, and at one vantage point had another nice view of Big Spirabo, this time with Little Spirabo also, about one mile to the north of it. 
 + 
 +At the bottom, amid cool ferns, we slaked out thirst from the clear Five Bull Creek, and then, surprisingly,​ came on a well-made road, which we later learned led to the Spirabo sawmill a few miles east. We did not follow the road for long as we wanted to scale Big Spirabo early next morning, so we climbed and climbed to a small gully about 500 feet from the top and directly under the saddle between Big and Little Spirabo. Water nearby in a deep grass thicket ensured a comfortable camp spot. 
 + 
 +We had to wait some time next morning for a heavy mist to lift, thus making the climbing of Big Spirabo worth while. It was easily the most spectacular part of the trip, as the huge rocky outcrop on top ensured panoramic views. Bulblair Sugarloaf near Guyra was plainly visible 60 miles to the south, while to the east the Rocky River and Clarence River valleys appeared as a series of wild rugged gorges stretching to the coast 80 miles distant. The next mountain we proposed to climb was Capoompeta, but it did not look so spectacular from Big Spirabo, so we decided very little would be lost if we did not have time for it. Up here too, we found traces of limestone in the form of perfectly preserved sea shells, both loose and embedded in rocks. The range is remarkable for its types of rocks. Jondol was granite, Bajimba volcanic, and now limestone. 
 + 
 +Down from the peak we broke camp and descended a ridge to the open Morven Creek. We surprised a black-brushed red fox which went streaking away across the swamp land. Large red-soil anthills dotted the flat until we stopped for lunch near a little farmhouse nestling on the hillside. Here, much to our disgust, a young flamer was just completing the ringbarking of a huge peppermint eucalypt because - "the roots are stopping the grass from growing"​ - and thus destroyed one of the few good shade trees available for his cattle in summer. Clem got hold of the axe while still embedded in the tree, and, quick as a flash, I had his photo for future propaganda purposes. We learned from the farmer that "Big Speriby"​ is 5008 feet high, that further down the creek are big waterfalls and good red cedars, and that Capoompeta is known locally as the "​Magistrate."​ 
 + 
 +Taking a rough road from here we crossed back over to the western side of the Great Divide toward Deepwater River. Two miles from the river, as evening was drawing in, we stopped a car coming towards us, and who should it be but Mr. A. Cox, an old gentleman I had been referred to as an expert on the district. He had just returned from the Royal Show, and not having heard of us, looked a little scared at being stopped on such a lonely road by three tramp-like specimens, as I later thought we must have appeared. He was definitely an authority on the surrounding country, and did he let us know it! He ridiculed our tale about limestone and proceeded ​to give us a treatise about 26 different species of granite. To Laurie's demurrers he replied, ​"Lad, you know nothing about geology." Gradually we pieced together the reasons for his suspicions ​of us. Maps he had just obtained from the Lands Department in Sydney showed ​he was trying to lease a certain area of land behind ​"Big Speriby" where one could look up to slopes ​covered in huge timbers ​"like a Spanish castle." Apparently it was such an obsession with him at the time that he thought we were after it too
 + 
 +Much other land he owned in the district, and on it ran his Black Poll cattle. Amongst them was the "best Black Poll in the world, a sister to a champion bull in Chicago." ​Times were now good, but tax was so bad he had out down production ​by fifty per cent. He left us happily, ​quite convinced that we knew "​nothing ​about everything,"​ but also that we did not want his last. 
 + 
 +That night we camped ​on Deepwater River, and next morning after a few miles along the uninteresting ​road we caught a lorry into Deepwater, which was in the midst of barren ​flat country. With hours to wait for the bus to Glen Innes, 26 miles away, we decided to go by private car, and it was only a few miles along the road before Laurie boarded a modern sedan, while Clem and I had to be content with the back of a utility. However this lift gave us nice time to look around Glen Innes in brilliant sunshine, and see the autumn tints of the many exotic trees.
  
 The end of the trip had turned but very easy. We had found what we were looking for and added another area of New South Wales to our knowledge, even though it was relatively unspectacular. The end of the trip had turned but very easy. We had found what we were looking for and added another area of New South Wales to our knowledge, even though it was relatively unspectacular.
  
-====== Ode to the Commisioner ​of Railways ​======+===== Ode to the Commissioner ​of Railways =====
  
 Dear Mr. Railway Commissioner,​\\ Dear Mr. Railway Commissioner,​\\
-I see by this morning'​s Gazette, +I see by this morning'​s Gazette,\\ 
-That the start of my doom is approaching, ​VII soon be one with the dead. +That the start of my doom is approaching,​\\ 
-For you in your wrath have decreed +I'​ll ​soon be one with the dead. 
-That "​Week-end Returns"​ are abolilled+ 
-No thought for the weary and ovenaue ​mite,  +For you in your wrath have decreed\\ 
-His hopes of a "​ride ​youYe d_erlhed+That "​Week-end Returns"​ are abolished.\\ 
-If in the fdte f.'​(-,​r ​ticko +No thought for the weary and overdue ​mite,\\ 
-It wont be for a l'​Seoi)nd C1a6H Si;an4ing," "A fare and a third" will be the pap soord To ride on the first class lan:ding.+His hopes of a "ride" you've demolished. 
 + 
 +If in the future for ticket ​ask\\ 
 +It wont be for a "​Second Class Standing,"\\ 
 +"A fare and a third" will be the password\\ 
 +To ride on the first class landing. 
 + 
 +W.G. 
 + 
 +----
195001.txt · Last modified: 2017/07/20 23:39 by tyreless