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194909 [2016/02/18 05:29]
kennettj [At Our August Meeting]
194909 [2016/02/18 05:39] (current)
kennettj
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-=====Editorial=====+===== Editorial ​- Club Meetings ​=====
  
-**Club Meetings** 
  
 Every month since the Club began there has been a meeting of members. In the early days many of the members were experienced speakers well versed in the rules of debate. They were individualists who firmly believed in the practice of free speech and were very ernest in their task of establishing Sydney'​s first mixed recreational walking club. Consequently the debates were often intense, though by no means lacking in humour. Many meetings were spent in deciding the name of the Club and in discussing the constitution. Sometimes things got too serious. On one famous occasion the meeting was divided into the ayes one side of the room and the noes on the other, in order to satisfy everyone that the count was correct. Then there was the famous hatchet burying ceremony at a subsequent reunion. ​ Every month since the Club began there has been a meeting of members. In the early days many of the members were experienced speakers well versed in the rules of debate. They were individualists who firmly believed in the practice of free speech and were very ernest in their task of establishing Sydney'​s first mixed recreational walking club. Consequently the debates were often intense, though by no means lacking in humour. Many meetings were spent in deciding the name of the Club and in discussing the constitution. Sometimes things got too serious. On one famous occasion the meeting was divided into the ayes one side of the room and the noes on the other, in order to satisfy everyone that the count was correct. Then there was the famous hatchet burying ceremony at a subsequent reunion. ​
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 As a rider to his report Myles added that he had heard from Frank Adams of the Rucsac Club, who was bitterly opposed to resumption in any for, that the shack owners had not been consulted, that they would fight to hold their tenancies, and implied that the Rucsac club was not committed by the statements of Federation delegates to the Minister for Lands. As a rider to his report Myles added that he had heard from Frank Adams of the Rucsac Club, who was bitterly opposed to resumption in any for, that the shack owners had not been consulted, that they would fight to hold their tenancies, and implied that the Rucsac club was not committed by the statements of Federation delegates to the Minister for Lands.
  
-Marie Byles continued the Era debate with a history of the efforts to have the area resumed: she related now the resumption had been budgeted for in 1944, 1945 and 1946, but each time the ideal had not been realised. About that date (1946) the Recreational Areas Committee of National Fitness became interested„ primarily with the object of assisting the Bushwalkers. The Federation had written to the Minister for Education supporting a resumption through the Recreational Areas Committee. Marie doubted whether the County Council, or the Lands Department would be prepared to cause hardship to the shack owners, and moved that we write to Gordon Young, advising him that our duputation ​to the Under Secretary for Lands had brought no concrete results, and we therefore hoped that he would forgive our vacillating tendency, and continue with his project for Era resumption. ​+Marie Byles continued the Era debate with a history of the efforts to have the area resumed: she related now the resumption had been budgeted for in 1944, 1945 and 1946, but each time the ideal had not been realised. About that date (1946) the Recreational Areas Committee of National Fitness became interested„ primarily with the object of assisting the Bushwalkers. The Federation had written to the Minister for Education supporting a resumption through the Recreational Areas Committee. Marie doubted whether the County Council, or the Lands Department would be prepared to cause hardship to the shack owners, and moved that we write to Gordon Young, advising him that our deputation ​to the Under Secretary for Lands had brought no concrete results, and we therefore hoped that he would forgive our vacillating tendency, and continue with his project for Era resumption. ​
  
 Allan Hardie promptly gave his support. He was glad, he said, to see Marie Byles. and Myles Dunphy present at the one time, so that we may hear both sides of the case presented at the one meeting. This would "apply the acid bath to the nigger in the woodpile"​. ​ He now revealed that National Fitness was Australia'​s secret weapon, devised as a democratic answer to the Youth Leagues of Hitler'​s Germany; this was our way of keeping the young people fit, of making our cannon fodder tough and resilient. More, National Fitness was a body with kindred ideals to Bushwalkers,​ and we should welcome this chance of cooperation with them. Allan Hardie promptly gave his support. He was glad, he said, to see Marie Byles. and Myles Dunphy present at the one time, so that we may hear both sides of the case presented at the one meeting. This would "apply the acid bath to the nigger in the woodpile"​. ​ He now revealed that National Fitness was Australia'​s secret weapon, devised as a democratic answer to the Youth Leagues of Hitler'​s Germany; this was our way of keeping the young people fit, of making our cannon fodder tough and resilient. More, National Fitness was a body with kindred ideals to Bushwalkers,​ and we should welcome this chance of cooperation with them.
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 Myles Dunphy answered with some doubt about the future of Era in the hands of National Fitness, and observed that the control of the area would be in the hands of that Council'​s Trustees. Bushwalkers would have little say in its management, and the policy of that management may change over a period of time. He opposed the motion strongly; we should not change our minds, but should persevere with the approach to the Minister for Lands. Myles Dunphy answered with some doubt about the future of Era in the hands of National Fitness, and observed that the control of the area would be in the hands of that Council'​s Trustees. Bushwalkers would have little say in its management, and the policy of that management may change over a period of time. He opposed the motion strongly; we should not change our minds, but should persevere with the approach to the Minister for Lands.
  
-Herb Morris supported Myles, and was developing his argument along similar lineswhen the gag was applied. The motion was put and lost.+Herb Morris supported Myles, and was developing his argument along similar lines when the gag was applied. The motion was put and lost.
  
-In the brief ensuing business, Joand Herb Morris were elected Federation Re-union camp delegates, and Arthur Gilroy as a Trustee for Garawarra Park.+In the brief ensuing business, Jo and Herb Morris were elected Federation Re-union camp delegates, and Arthur Gilroy as a Trustee for Garawarra Park.
  
 Alan Wyborn read a resume of the meetings of the Forestry Advisory Council, but at about 10 p.m the lamps faded into sullen smoky darkness, and the Bone was put into its cupboard for another month. Alan Wyborn read a resume of the meetings of the Forestry Advisory Council, but at about 10 p.m the lamps faded into sullen smoky darkness, and the Bone was put into its cupboard for another month.
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 Apart from the motions inspired by the S.B,W, there was a resolution passed which stated that in view of the fact that our forests and bush lands are a vital moral and national asset, the Government be urged to set aside considerable areas free from all exploitation as national reserves, the said reserves to be closed sanctuaries for our unique flora and fauna. That in view of the opening up of many forested districts for timber getting, the above resolution is one of particular urgency. Several other specific projects were urged, including a sanctuary in the Delegate district, a national Botanic Garden at Warrah Reserve, a National Park on the Blue Mountains and the reservation of the Hawkesbury River from Windsor to the seaboard. Apart from the motions inspired by the S.B,W, there was a resolution passed which stated that in view of the fact that our forests and bush lands are a vital moral and national asset, the Government be urged to set aside considerable areas free from all exploitation as national reserves, the said reserves to be closed sanctuaries for our unique flora and fauna. That in view of the opening up of many forested districts for timber getting, the above resolution is one of particular urgency. Several other specific projects were urged, including a sanctuary in the Delegate district, a national Botanic Garden at Warrah Reserve, a National Park on the Blue Mountains and the reservation of the Hawkesbury River from Windsor to the seaboard.
  
-Mr. R.F. Boyer, Chairman of the A.B.C., expressed some interesting and practical views in his address to the Conference. He said ".. I speak, not as chairman of the Broadcasting Commission but as one who has lived almost all his life in the West, as one of the army of graziers about whom hard things have been said and who have in their lifetime destroyed a considerable amount of timber. We should think twice before changing some of our finest ​beaties. One can get no greater thrill than to see untouched primitive beauty in its most glorious form. My greatest thrill when I first went to the far West was in entering country that had never been occupied. An area of 150 square miles had never had an axe in it and was as God had left it. I was at heart conservative - I hated to think of roads being run through it or stock being placed upon it, of its being shapened by the hand of man. Yet I have learned, and all eho tackle the forestry problem must learn, that radicalism and change must go hand in hand with conservation The idea is not merely to retain tracts of land but the establishment of national parks so that those who come after us can see what the country looked like before man put his hand to it. This is our country and we have much to learn about It. We must do more in the preparation of tho land for the growth of food. We cannot afford to keep large tracts of food land covered with timber,​simply because it is timber. It must be measured with the problem of the world'​s need of food. We have an international obligation in the production of food that we must, at our peril, achieve. These matters,in good faith and good will, must be considered in their relation to the whole problem of conservation and reforestation. There is no greater pleasure to me, nothing more aesthetically appealing, than to be lost in a great forest midst all the primaeval beauty that takes one back into the dim recesses of the past. The first task of the soil and conservation experts in this country is to see that timber is retained in areas where it is of economic value and productive of primaeval beauty for posterity....."​+Mr. R.F. Boyer, Chairman of the A.B.C., expressed some interesting and practical views in his address to the Conference. He said ".. I speak, not as chairman of the Broadcasting Commission but as one who has lived almost all his life in the West, as one of the army of graziers about whom hard things have been said and who have in their lifetime destroyed a considerable amount of timber. We should think twice before changing some of our finest ​beauties. One can get no greater thrill than to see untouched primitive beauty in its most glorious form. My greatest thrill when I first went to the far West was in entering country that had never been occupied. An area of 150 square miles had never had an axe in it and was as God had left it. I was at heart conservative - I hated to think of roads being run through it or stock being placed upon it, of its being shapened by the hand of man. Yet I have learned, and all who tackle the forestry problem must learn, that radicalism and change must go hand in hand with conservationThe idea is not merely to retain tracts of land but the establishment of national parks so that those who come after us can see what the country looked like before man put his hand to it. This is our country and we have much to learn about It. We must do more in the preparation of tho land for the growth of food. We cannot afford to keep large tracts of food land covered with timber,​simply because it is timber. It must be measured with the problem of the world'​s need of food. We have an international obligation in the production of food that we must, at our peril, achieve. These matters,in good faith and good will, must be considered in their relation to the whole problem of conservation and reforestation. There is no greater pleasure to me, nothing more aesthetically appealing, than to be lost in a great forest midst all the primaeval beauty that takes one back into the dim recesses of the past. The first task of the soil and conservation experts in this country is to see that timber is retained in areas where it is of economic value and productive of primaeval beauty for posterity....."​ 
  
  
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 by Laurie Raynor Winning photograph at our Annual Exhibition by Laurie Raynor Winning photograph at our Annual Exhibition
  
-The judge, Mr. Eade, described this photograph as excellently turned out and technically faultless. The tonal quality was true without and the arrangement plain. There was a nice dark area in the front, while the mountains beyond and in the background gave a three dimensional effect. The white patch of snow in the middle foreground was a little too obvious and might have been lowered in tone. The interest of the photograph centred on the mountain at the back+The judge, Mr. Eade, described this photograph as excellently turned out and technically faultless. The tonal quality was true without and the arrangement plain. There was a nice dark area in the front, while the mountains beyond and in the background gave a three dimensional effect. The white patch of snow in the middle foreground was a little too obvious and might have been lowered in tone. The interest of the photograph centred on the mountain at the back.
  
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-Aircraft steel frame 2i lb, -24/​5/​- Stan'​ial'​d 4 poctt steel frame 411-). E4/4/- 
-Ot her rucksacks from 19/ Ne w mIlitary pa,*s 2/3 
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-Military Survey •Haps •1" - 1 miae. Sheets for an aap9d. .areas now a-xailable for walkers. Price 2/2 j...c,r oheet 
-Water Buckets rubberised fabric 1 gall wt. 4 oz. 4/9 Knife, fo-22;​.spoon combination sets, •aluminium 8 ozs. 7/6 
-Write for mail order price lists. Cash with order. Add exchange to country and iterFtate cheques. Mail or Dept. - 
-DADDY PALLIN, 
-327 George 846,, ,syftuEcy-, 
-N.S.W, 
-Australia 
-% Phone BX3595 
194909.1455773396.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/02/18 05:29 by kennettj