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194903 [2018/05/21 03:05]
tyreless
194903 [2018/05/22 03:28]
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 After announcement that the late Photo Section was going to rise Phoenix-like as a Federation-wide activity, the meeting closed in moderating climatic conditions at 9.25 p.m. After announcement that the late Photo Section was going to rise Phoenix-like as a Federation-wide activity, the meeting closed in moderating climatic conditions at 9.25 p.m.
 +
 +----
  
 ===== Social Notes for March. ===== ===== Social Notes for March. =====
Line 97: Line 99:
 Some documentary films, by courtesy W.E.A., will be shown on 18th March. The reels will be carefully selected and are bound to be of interest to Bushwalkers. Some documentary films, by courtesy W.E.A., will be shown on 18th March. The reels will be carefully selected and are bound to be of interest to Bushwalkers.
  
-Mr. Walter Gruse has some interesting slides to show us on 25th March. His topic- "​Kosciusko and Burragorang"​.+Mr. Walter Gruse has some interesting slides to show us on 25th March. His topic - "​Kosciusko and Burragorang"​. 
 + 
 +The lecture set down for 29th April has now been arranged. Mr. Alan Strom will give a talk "​Geology and the Bushwalker"​
  
-The lecture set down for 29th April has now been arraned. Mr. Alan Strom will give a talk "​Geology and the Bushwalker"​ 
-. 
 - Edna Stretton, Social Secretary. - Edna Stretton, Social Secretary.
  
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 ---- ----
  
 +===== Apsley - Tia - Yarrowitch. =====
  
 +By A.L. Wyborn.
  
-APSLEY-TIA- YARROWITCH.+(For location of main points of interest see Max Gentle'​s map on Page 9.)
  
-By A.LWyborn.+The Oxley Highway runs inland from Wauchope on the North Coast past Walcha and TamworthThe first portion follows the Hastings River closely through very fertile country, in fact the Upper Hastings National Forest contains perhaps the most magnificent reserve of timber in AustraliaAfter leaving the Hastings the highway gradually ascends to plateau like country over 3,000 feet high, which is rent by very deep gorges. 
 + 
 +It was to this region that the "​Anniversary Official"​ was making in a very slow bus from Wauchope on the Saturday morning. After going 95 miles in five and a half hours we thankfully left the bus at Apsley Falls turnoff, with a rousing farewell from all the other passengers, Some of whom had to sit out another hundred miles of journey. 
 + 
 +The leader, Alan Hardie, knew what to expect, but Clem Hallstrom and myself were amazed at the sheer gorge into which the Apsley Falls dropped at least 700 feet. Above the falls the river flowed placidly through a gentle colourful vale, then suddenly toppled over into this huge chasm, which gave no indication of its presence from only a few yards away. The volcanic walls went down into ominously dark pools, which wound their way through narrow walls. Steps and ladder'​s to the bottom have long since fallen into disrepair, and would now be dangerous, and this was as well for us as we had little time, and must push on. 
 + 
 +Our route lay roughly east between the Apsley Gorge to the North, and the Oxley Highway. There were no tracks but the open country made easy going as we crossed Rocky, Tiara and Bullock Creeks, then Green Gully, to camp on Stockyard Creek just as darkness descended. Several times on the way across we came on a huge brown old man 'roo over seven feet high, accompanied by light grey kangaroos. 
 + 
 +The camp turned out to be the last water before Tia Falls, and was on the tops close to the junction of the Apsley and Tia Gorges. Having covered eight miles in hot weather, after travelling by train all the previous night, we were soon abed, but rose next morning before daybreak. Looking over into the Apsley Gorge early in the morning, I was reminded of the drop from Kanangra Walls, with similar rock formations to the Spires and the wooded slopes below. I wondered if anyone had ever climbed into the gorge back at Apsley Falls and followed it through to the Macleay River. It would be a long and dangerous feat with very little chance of climbing out anythere - in country far worse than the Morong Deeps and about fifteen times as long; and then it would include that mysterious "​Apsley River Gorge" shown on the North Eastern Tourist Map about thirty miles downstream from where we stood. Surely that gorge could not be as spectacular as the part of the Apsley near the falls, which is not even mentioned on the map. 
 + 
 +Leaving camp we soon came to the western side of the Tia Gorge, which, although as deep as the Apsley has accessible heavily timbered sides. We were following the edge south to Tia Falls, when I almost trod on a large black snake, which, being poised to strike, caused me to beat a hasty retreat. However C1em came from the rear with a loud whoop and dispatched it with a lucky hit from a dead stick. Soon the falls came into view up in the corner of the gorge, and this method of approach proved to be a good one, as we had increasingly close vistas of the falls, which cascade down through a narrow cleft in the rook walls to a large pool below. Above the falls we found a delightfully cool rock pool where we disported for some time, always being careful not to risk being sucked over the edge by the strong flow. Then on again along the opposite side of the Tia Gorge as we had much ground to cover if we wanted to reach Yarrowitch Falls that night. Heading N.E. just after lunch we reached the top of Mt. Trinidad, one of the highest points around, from which we had a very good cycloramic view of the plateau country. Fifty miles to the north was Point Lookout in the New England National Park. Further east was Anderson'​s Sugarloaf and the lonely Mt. Banda Banda at 4,200 feet. From the top we checked our next direction, and started off for the Yarrowitch River. 
 + 
 +Peter'​s Creek was negotiated and a track on the opposite side ridge was followed north toward the junction of Peter'​s Creek and Deep Creek. This went for at least a mile and a half before reaching a practical way to the bottom of Deep Creek, about 1,000 feet below. Just before going down the track became very steep and winding near where an old mine was reputed to be, and a signboard wittily declared "slow down to 30, curves!"​ 
 + 
 +From here we caught a glimpse of Garibaldi Rock protruding from the side of Deep Creek a few miles downstream, a remarkable square pyramid of basalt. Standing on the ridge between the two creeks, we noticed how thickly wooded was the narrow Peter'​s Creek valley, in contrast with the relatively bare sides of the wide Deep Creek. One particular patch of trees was literally festooned with vivid orange mistletoe, gleaming in the late afternoon sunlight. 
 + 
 +The bottom of Deep Creek was reached after a steep descent, to find the water in stagnant pools, and overall a hot oppressive stillness. Those things made us only too anxious to press on, even though we faced a 1,000 feet climb and a further four miles of walking. At 7.30 p.m. we made camp about 1/4 mile above the Yarrowitch Falls, right on darkness again, having covered 22 miles in hot January weether.
  
-(Oor, location of rain points of interest see - Max Gentle'​S'​Imap-on Page- 9 
-TheOkley Highway runs inland from Wauchope on the North Coast past-Walcha and TamwOrth. The first portion follows the Hastings River closely through verTfertilecountry,​ in fact the Upper Hastings National Forest contains perhaps the most magnificent reserve 
-of timber in Australia. After leaving the Hastings the highway gradually ascends. to plateau like '​country over 39,000 feet high,. which is rent by very deep' gorges. 
- It was to this region that the.."​Anniversary. Official"​ was making in a very slow bus from Wauchope on the Saturday morning. After going. 95 miles,in five and a half hours we thankfully left the bus at ApsleY Falls turnoff, with a: rousing farewell from all- the oth6r. passengers, Sopeot'​whom:​ had to' Sit out another hundred miles of journey. 
-The leader, '​Alan'​ Hardie, knew-what-ta eXpect,'​but'​Clem HalIstrom and myself were amazed at the sheer gorge into whiCh the Apsley Falls '​dropped at least 700 feet. Above the Palls the river flowed placidly througa a gentle colourful vale, then suddenly toppled over into this huge dhasM, which gave no, indication of its presence from only a few 
-yards away. ,The volcanic walls, went down into Ominously dark pools, which wound their 'way through narrovp:​vails. Steps, and ladder'​s to the bottom have long since fallen ih to disrepair, and would now be dangerous, and this was as well for us as We hadlittle tim6, and must push -on. 
- . 
-Our route lay roughly east. betWeen the Apsley Gorge to the North, and tteOxley-Highway. -There were'​no '​tracks but the open country made easy 'going as we crosSed Rocky, "Tiara and Bullock'​ Creeks, then Green Gully, ta camp:on Stockyard Creek :just as darkness descended. Several time&​-onthe way acrass we came on a huge IorOWn 
-old man troo over seven feet high, accompanied by light grey kangaroos. 
-The camp '​turned out to be. the ,last water before Tia and was on the tOps close 'to the junction'​ of the Apsley and Tia Gorges. Having covered'​ eight miles in ,hot weather, 'after travelling by train all the previous- night,,​we-were sOon'​abedi-but rose next morning before daybreak.. Lookingover into the Apslpy ,Gorge early in the morning, I was reminded of the drop from Kanangra Walls, with similar rock formations to the Spires,and the wooded slopes below. I wondered if anyone had ever climbed into the gorge back at Apsley Falls and followed it through to the Macleay. River. , It would be a long and dangerous feat 'with very little chance of climbing'​ out anythere - in country far worse thanthe, MOrong Peeps and about fifteen times as long; and then it 'would include that mysterious Apsley River Gorge" shown on tte.North EasternylibUriSt Map-about thirty miles downstream from where we stood. Surel that gorge could not,be as 
-8 
-spectacular as the part of the Apsley near the falls, which is not even m entioned on he map. 
-Leaving camp we soon came to the western side of the Tia Gorge, which, although as deep as the Apsley has accessible heavily timbered sides. We were following the edge south to Tia Palls, When I almost trod on a large black snake, which, being poised to strike, caused me to beat a hasty retreat. However (.1em came from the rear with a loud whoop and dispatched it with a lucky hit from a dead stick. Soon the falls came into view up in the corner of the gorge, ad this method of approach proved to be a good one, as we had increasingly close vistas of the falls, which cascade down through a narrow cleft in the rook walls to a large pool below. Above the. falls we found a delightfully cool rock pool where we disported for some time, always being careful not to risk being sucked over the edge by the strong flow. Then on again along the opposite side of the Tic. Gorge as we had much greund to cover if we,wanted to reach Yarrowitch Falls that night. Heading N.E. just after lunch we reached the top of 1At. Trinidad, one of the highest points around, from which we had a very good cycloramic view of the plateau country. Fifty miles to the north was Point Lookout in the New England National Park. Further east was Anderson'​s Sugarloaf and the lonely ht. 3anda Banda at 4,200 feet. From the top we checked our next direction, and started off for the Yarrowitch River. 
-Peter'​s Creek was negotiated and a track on the opposite side ridge was followed north toward the junction of Peter'​s Creek and Deep Creek. This went for at least a mile and a half before reaching a practical way to the bottom of Deep Creek, about 1,000 feet below. Just before going down the track became very steep and winding near mihere an old mine was reputed to be, and a signboard wittily declared "slow down to 30, curves!"​ 
-From here we cow. t a glimpse of Garibaldi Rock protruding from the side of Deep Creek a few miles downstream, a remarkable square pyramid of basalt. Standing on the ridge between the two creeks, we noticed how thickly wooded was the narrow Peter'​s Creek ralley,'​ in contrast with the relatively bare sides of the wide Deep Creek. One particular patch of trees was literally festooned with vivid orange mistletoe, gleaming in the late afternoon sunlight, 
-The bottom of Deep Creek was reached after a steep deseent, to find the water in stagnant pools, and overall a hot oppree,sive stillness. Those things made us only too anxious to press on, even though we faced a 1,000 feet climb and a further four miles of walking. At 7.30 p m. we made camp about T: mile above the Yarrowitch Palls, right on darkness again, having covered 22 miles in hot January weether. 
 We went round on the ridge opposite the falls early next morning to appreciate the fine setting of the twin cascades, dropping an estimated 600 feet into a large amphitheatre. Above the falls the placid river meandered through light green grassy paddocks, and dark green coppices of eucalypts, and was edged with laden blackberry bushes, their roots deep in the water. We went round on the ridge opposite the falls early next morning to appreciate the fine setting of the twin cascades, dropping an estimated 600 feet into a large amphitheatre. Above the falls the placid river meandered through light green grassy paddocks, and dark green coppices of eucalypts, and was edged with laden blackberry bushes, their roots deep in the water.
-0 
-It was six miles of dreary road bashing then in the hot sun, back to the Oxley Highway, ti-ere to wait one and a half hours under a mailbox for the charabfJne back to the coast. The less said about this part of the trip the better, as the charabanc was crowded and the lcurney was slow. Children were everywhere; Clem and I shared one sturdy lad on our knees for most of the way, and I sat on a case of peaches - so enjoyable; 
-On arrival at Wauchope Station we found we had time on our hands, so continued twelve riles in the conveyance to have a hasty look at Port Macquarie township. I was not very impressed, as everything-was on the holiday resort commercialised style, ;Ind the surroundings were very flat. As I gazed on the large number of auto tents huudierl on the black soil behind the breakwater, I thought of other camp spots, pleasant and quiet, above the Apsley, Tia and Yarrowitch Falls. 
  
-ON THE ROAD TO AFFIDALE +It was six miles of dreary road bashing then in the hot sun, back to the Oxley Highway, there to wait one and a half hours under a mailbox for the charabanc back to the coast. The less said about this part of the trip the better, as the charabanc was crowded and the journey was slow. Children were everywhere; Clem and I shared one sturdy lad on our knees for most of the way, and I sat on a case of peaches - so enjoyable! 
-P7 Max Gentle. + 
-Sunlight, mountains, a road, a bicycle, a re'​stful ​countryside,​ forest clad hills, rich meadows - what more could any man want? Such was my plan for a Xtas cycling tour - on the road to Armidale. +On arrival at Wauchope Station we found we had time on our hands, so continued twelve miles in the conveyance to have a hasty look at Port Macquarie township. I was not very impressed, as everything was on the holiday resort commercialised style, and the surroundings were very flat. As I gazed on the large number of auto tents huddled on the black soil behind the breakwater, I thought of other camp spots, pleasant and quiet, above the Apsley, Tia and Yarrowitch Falls. 
-Beyond Singleton, I peddled through pouring rain to Muswellbrook + 
-which slowed me consider- +---- 
-ably. Next day, when + 
-crossing the Liverpool +===== On The Road To Armidale. ===== 
-L.,..0moms ______zaapz___1 + 
- ​I ​Range, the aforementioned+By Max Gentle. 
-serer- 1 sunlight appeared, to aft + 
-l',// \ s -%, +Sunlight, mountains, a road, a bicycle, a restful ​countryside,​ forest clad hills, rich meadows - what more could any man want? Such was my plan for a Xmas cycling tour - on the road to Armidale. 
-ty + 
-VI, +Beyond Singleton, I peddled through pouring rain to Muswellbrook which slowed me considerably. Next day, when crossing the Liverpool Range, the aforementioned sunlight appeared, to reveal a fine panorama, looking eastward over the Mount Royal Range and Barrington Tops. 
-+ 
-P,​........ +I had a feeling of satisfaction at having defeated the elements, and was able to appreciate the next stage of the journey through rich meadows, ​between ​forest clad hills, ​then the willow lined Peel River at Tamworth, the boulder strewn ridges of Moonbi Range and the willow lined river at Bendemeer. 
-/​10,​1613VCC1N + 
- ​HEADS ​reveal a fine panorama, +I left the New England Highway at Bendemeer, and followed ​the Oxley Highway eastward to Walcha Road Railway Station, and then crossed the Main Dividing Range at an altitude ​of 4,000 feet. 
-41,,oci ---1.. ​lookingeastward over the + 
-Be NI? +A number of tableland streams were to be seen, winding through grazing properties on their way eastward, to form the Apsley ​River. They are said to be stocked with troutTwelve miles east of Walcha town, the Apsley Gorge appears with frightening suddenness. The actual height of the waterfall was disappointing,​ but it holds historic interest, having been seen by explorer Oxley, in 1818. 
-Mount Royal Range and + 
-t \ +A few miles further on I nade a side trip to view the Tia Falls in a very rugged setting, and to adnire the swimming pool under the cascades at the top. 
-A-4 4( < + 
-7 J-1* 1 1 Barrington Tops. +Further east, the highway crosses a range of hills on to the watershed of the Hastings, there the coastal and easterly ​influence ​is at once apparent. Here the forest timbers are intermingled with a rich growth of tree ferns. 
-p5 Y ti  + 
-+Grand mountain scenery unfolds while descending to the Hastings ​River, and beyond MtSeaview the road follows the southern bank of the river down to Wauchope. 
-L401>E + 
-IfIArity tpZ C.+"Cp N +followed the coast road north over the Macleay River at Kempsey, and just beyond there obtained a striking view of Mt. Banda Banda to the southwest. 
-VP + 
-1CP .10 as +After passing through dairying and tomato growing land along Warrel Creek, the popular ​tourist ​resort at Nambucca ​Heads was reached. A full day at the surf was found quite enjoyable there, the water being much warmer than at Era the previous week. 
-ce. + 
--..,.. P115) 1 +The next morning I swam at the Bellingen mouth at Urunga, then followed that river upstream to Thora, its fresh water pools providing ​some excellent swimming as a change from the surf. 
-+ 
-?" 4- ...--po C? 7 ST EPAZNZ +The road up Dorrigo Mountain is characterised by magnificent mountain scenery, and maybe its main attraction is where it passes under Newell waterfall. The dairying and potato growing land of Dorrigo plateau later gave way to forest clad hills, as the road climbed to Ebor. 
-p...k. L + 
-,...., +Beyond Ebor Falls, there is something about the look of the forest which indicates a high altitude above sea level. The trees are mainly of those Eucalyptus species, ​popularly ​known as the "Messmate" and "Blackbutt" ​of New England. It is not surprising ​to read on a signboard there - "The Snowy Range - 5,000 feet". As this point was the highest reached on the tour, the downgrades ​beyond were much appreciated. Presently, a side road turned off to Point Lookout, 9 miles away. 
-+ 
-SAIze +The road to Armidale brought me to the village and store at Wollomombi. The Wollomombi Falls, 28 miles from Armidale, make a sheer plunge of 1,100 feet, and then surge down a steep slope into a great ravine, from whose floor rises a rock of immense size - it is said to be 600 feet high. Two rivers meet below the falls, their combined waters plunging down a chasm, whose sheer cliffs exceed 1,600 feet in height. 
-I.had a feeling of satisfaction at having defeated the elements, and was able to appreciate the next stage of the journey through ​'rich meadows, +
-oetween ​forest clad +
-then the willow lined Peel River at Tamworth, the boulder strewn ridges of Moonbi Range laci the willowlined river at Dendemeer+
-I left the New England Highway at Bendomeer, and +
-10 +
-, A '. . t  I +
-Efollowed ​the Oxley Highway eastward to WalCha.ROad-RailwayStatiOn, +
- , . , +
-and then crossed the Main Dividing Range at an,​altl,​tude. ​of 4,000 +
-feeti, +
-A number of tableland streams were to be seen,​winding through grazing properties on their way eastWard, to form th e Apaley ​River. They are said to be stocked with trout Twelve miles east of Walcha town, the Apsley Gorge appears with frightening suddenness. The actual height of the waterfall was disappointing,​ but it holds historic interest, having been seen by ,explorer Oxley, in 1818. +
-A few miles further on I nade a side' ​tripto view the Tia Falls in a very rugged setting, and to adnire the swimming pool under the cascades at the top. +
-Further east, the highway crosses a range of hills on to the watershed of the Hastings, there the coastal and easterly ​influenge ​is at once apparent. Here the forest timbers are intermingled with a rich growth of tree ferns. +
-Grand mountain scenery unfolds while descending to the Hastings ​nil/Pr, and beyond MtSeaview the road follows the southern bank of the river down to Wauchope. +
-.1. followed the coast road north over the Macleay River at +
-Kempey,.and just beyond there obtained a striking view of Mt. Banda Banda to the southwest. +
-After passing through dairying andtomato growing land along Warrel Creek, the popular ​touxist ​resort at tNarnbucca ​Heads was reached. A full day at the surf was found quite enjoyable there, the water being much warmer than at Era the previous week. +
-The next morning I swam at the Bellingen ​'mouth at Drunga, then +
-followed that river upstream to Thora, its fresh water pools provid +
-,- +
-ing some excellent swimming as a change from the surf.+
-The road up Dorrigo Mountain is-characterised by magnificent mountain scenery, and maybe its main attraction is whereit ​passes under Newell waterfall. The dairying and potato growing land of Dorrigo plateau later gave way to forest clad hills, as the road climbed to Ebor. +
-, +
-Beyond,.Ebor Falls, there is something about the look of the +
-+
-forest which indicates a high altitude above sea level. The trees are mainlyof ​those Eucalyptus species, ​pop& ly known as the "Mess- mate" and "Blackbuttn ​of New England. It is not s-urprising ​to +
-on +
-read a signboard there - "The SnowyRange - 5,000 feet". As +
-this point was the highest reached on the tour, the downgrade'​s ​beyond were much appreciated. Presently, a side road turned off to Point +
-Lookoat, 9 miles away+
-I I +
-The road to Armidale brought me te'the village and store at Wollomombi. The Wollomombi Falls, 28 miles from Armidale2 the a +
-11 +
-sheer plunge of 1,100 feet, and then surge down a steep slope into a great ravine, from whose floor rises a rock of immense size - it is said to be 600 feet high. Two rivers ​,meet below the falls, their combined waters plunging down a chasm, whose sheer cliffs exceed 1,600 feet in height.+
 From Wollomombi, I peddled along the road to Armidale, to complete a 530 miles tour in 10 days. From Wollomombi, I peddled along the road to Armidale, to complete a 530 miles tour in 10 days.
-ffliame. am.+ 
 +----
  
 ===== What Every Young Mugger Should Know. ===== ===== What Every Young Mugger Should Know. =====
  
-By Jim grown.+By Jim Brown.
  
-Sometimes I wish I could have been a walker in those far-off days when a bushwalker was a curiosity and his gear a miscellany of oddments of his own devising. For there'​s no doubt about it, standardisation is infiltrating into perhaps the most individualistic ​Sport in the world, ​se that anything other than a Paddymade pack, sleeping bag,, tent and grounasheet approaches rank heresy. +Sometimes I wish I could have been a walker in those far-off days when a bushwalker was a curiosity and his gear a miscellany of oddments of his own devising. For there'​s no doubt about it, standardisation is infiltrating into perhaps the most individualistic ​sport in the world, ​so that anything other than a Paddymade pack, sleeping bag, tent and grounasheet approaches rank heresy. 
-So it's a good thing that walkershave ​not become entirely uniformit's well that we still dress in-various degrees of disreputability, ​that_we ​still have different schools of thought about billy hooks and,blackfellow'​s fires, that we have frame pack enthusiasts and supporters of the filletted ​ruesac; sneaker addicts and confirmed beetlecrushers:​ not to mention big muggers and little muggers. Or rather, I grust mention them, for this is mostly about them. + 
-Early in his/her career the prospective must make up his/her hind. The decision need not be irrevocableis-c ​it isn't necessary to lose sleep over the,issue, but if you are one of those impossible people who determine something ​a4-71d ​stick resolutely to it fair Or foul, then you ,should consider this parting of the ways, this crossroads in your walking career. For, understandthere is no mean. You are either a big m4gger_or ​a little-mugger. You-maybe ​a large big mugger or a small little_ ​mugger, but you can t be a-medium mugger Why? Because ​inobody,-makes medium mugs. Either you get your pint or something like a,g111+So it's a good thing that walkers have not become entirely uniformit's well that we still dress in various degrees of disreputability, ​that we still have different schools of thought about billy hooks and blackfellow'​s fires, that we have frame pack enthusiasts and supporters of the filletted ​rucsac; sneaker addicts and confirmed beetlecrushers:​ not to mention big muggers and little muggers. Or rather, I must mention them, for this is mostly about them. 
-Now let us suppose you are a light drinker and decide to be a little mugger.At your firt-hal t Tqu- Proudly ​produce your natty, + 
-Pannikin, to find it surrounded ​bya-Motley* ​collection ​pf,seedy-l_ookOagt u4wa-sh,Ot =lovely, chipped ​batl-p-tubsr. +Early in his/her career the prospective must make up his/her hind. The decision need not be irrevocable,​ so it isn't necessary to lose sleep over the issue, but if you are one of those impossible people who determine something ​and stick resolutely to it fair or foul, then you should consider this parting of the ways, this crossroads in your walking career. For, understandthere is no mean. You are either a big mugger or a little mugger. You may be a large big mugger or a small little ​mugger, but you can't be a medium muggerWhy? Because ​nobody ​makes medium mugs. Either you get your pint or something like a gill. 
-last 701/ know what is meant by "​everything except the kit; + 
-isprenser ​of the brew says, "​I'​m ​atraicl'Youen!'"​ , +Now let us suppose you are a light drinker and decide to be a little mugger. At your first halt you proudly ​produce your natty, ​Persil-washed,​ little pannikin, to find it surrounded ​by a motley ​collection ​of seedy-lookingunwashed, unlovely, chipped ​bath-tubsAt last you know what is meant by "​everything except the kithen sink". the disprenser ​of the brew says, "​I'​m ​afraid you won't get your fair share", and this absolves him from any attempt at equal division of the spoils. You get your small mug filled and you'll be very lucky to organise a return, or if you do, you collect some slightly diluted tannic acid, or the coffee grounds
-101-111 ​fair, sbar ", and this absolves him from ay attempt at eciaa.1 + 
-diviEtioa ​of ,th -q1)0,11s-Tatzrne t_yswr small m lqull/ +Occasionally ​of course you'll strick a fairminded brewer. Schollastic leanings prompt him [illegible] ion the drink equally. He will use your pannikin as a measurelook dismayed at the miserable swill on the deck of the big mugs and promptly top them up. Ahyes but he has used your little mug as a measure. Has he also used it as a dipper? Is it cocoa you are drinking? If so, you will have to wash the __outside__ of your pannikin too. Tough on the little mugger, ain't it? 
-be Very lucky', ​o organ-lsera'return, or if you o,--,you-4-c-oltongeslightly dilaitied tannic.'acid.-_oi -the aoffee-grbunds+ 
-Gccasio nally of course you 'II stpt f airmincted brewer +There one fairly sure way to discourage the use of your little mug as a ladle: place it in a prominent position on top of a deposit of cow dung (it is almost certain there will be some, especially if you are camped at Era.) But careful! Don't do this if it is nightfor the brewer's eyes may be dimmed by smokeand he may still use your pannikin. 
--vocaaliStic leanings prompt burr ion the drink equally+ 
 +How do I know all this? By bitter experience, my dears! I have in my time been a little mugger. It was not always so. In my earliest walking days I carried a military monstrosity of metal which swallowed 1 1/2 pints without effort. This forsook when about to do a very tough trip, acquiring instead an absurd little thimble of aluminium. Don't let them do this to you! The aluminium burns your lips and fingers. The only way of al1eviating the position is to put some sticking plaster around the rim and handle. Use three diefferent strips on the rim, and mark them "​coffee",​ "​tea"​ and "​Cocoa"​ and then wait for someone to make soup. By drinking, say, coffee over the cocoa strip and so on, you can add infinite variety to your drinks. By the way, I am now a reformed character with a normal big mug. I say again, WITH a big mug. 
 + 
 +Of course, you can go super lightweight and take no mug at all, drinking out of a plate or billy, but if you are a fastidious type who doesn'​t approve of oddments of spud or custard in the teayou must wash your improvised pannikin between course, and washing up before tea is most distressing. Or should I say, washing up is distressing,​ full stop? 
 + 
 +Just lately we had a non-walker away with us one weekend. When the brew was ready for pouringI pointed a finger at her and said laconically,​ "​Pannikin"​. It took some little time before she realised I wanted her "​cup"​. I have since been thankful that I didn't simply gesture towards her and say "​mug"​. People have been dragged before the courts for that. 
 + 
 +Well, thank you for your tolerance if you have tolerated me so far. All I really want to say is the little mugger is a silly mugger. Thank you. 
 + 
 +---
 + 
 +==== Kurnell Peninsula: ==== 
 + 
 +Very good news comes from our Parks and Playgrounds Movement delegateMrsHilda StoddartThe Minister for Lands has approved of action being taken to reserve an area of 970 acres on the Peninsula for public recreation. In addition the Minister for Lands has approached the Minister for Conservation with a view to appropriate action being taken to prevent any further erosion or the area. It is the first instance we know where official action has been contemplated to stop erosion on a public reserve
 + 
 +The campaign for the reservation ​of this area has been going for 30 years. 
 + 
 +==== Narrow Necks and Ruined Castle: ==== 
 + 
 +In a letter read before ​the last meeting Marie Byles reported that both the City of Blue Mountains and the Parks and Playgrounds Movement had written to the Lands Department about shouldering half the cost of the two freehold portions on the Narrow Necks which were recently sold: no reply had been received. The Parks and Playgrounds Movement had written to both the City of Blue Mountains and the Lands Department about resuming the surface only of the Mining Conditional Lease portions, but so far no answer had been obtained. The Director of Tourist and Immigration Activities was interviewed and expressed himself wholeheartedly behind keeping the area in its natural state, and promised to write to the Lands Department about this, and about the resumption. The Federation had written to the Lands Department and the City of Blue Mountains about keeping the area roadless, but the City Council refused to commit itself, saying that it might want to put a scenic road on Narrow Necks one day. The portions marked "​classification area" were within the jutisdiction of the Warragamba Catchment area, and the Water Board did not wish to have them converted to recreational areas, but stated that it did not expect to use them otherwise than for recreational purposes. 
 + 
 +Marie would be pleased to have some good prints of photos of the Narrow Necks so that she could write an article for the "​Katoomba Echo"​. 
 + 
 +----
  
-12 ( 
-He will use your pannikin as a measure, look dismayed at the miserable on the deck of -the big mugs and promptly ,top them 
-up. Ah, yes - butjhe has used your little mug as a measure. Has he also used it as a dipper? Is it cocoa you are drinking? If so, you will have to wash the- outside of your pannikin too. 'Tough on the little mugger, ain't 
-There one fairly sure way t,o discourage the use of your little mug as a ladle: place-it 1n ,a prominent position on top of a deposit of cow dung (it is almost certain there will- be some, especially if you are camped at Era.) But careful:- Don't do this if it is night, for the breWerls eyes may be dimmed by smoke, and he may still use your pannikin. 
-How do I know all this By bitter experience, my dears I I have in my time been a little-mugger. It was'. nvt always so. In my earliest walking day b- I carried a /military _monstrosity of metal which swallowed 1-1-g pints without effort, This '​forsook when-about to do a very tough trip, acquiring instead an absUrd. little thimble of aluminium. Don't let them do this to you: _The valuminium burns your lips and fingers., The -only way of gl16"​veleutirtg'​ the -poSitivn is to 'put some sticking plaster around the' rim and handl-e. Use three diefferent_ strips on the rim, and mark them "​coffee",​ "​tea"​ and "​Cocoa"​ and then wait for someone to make soup. _ By drinking, say, Coffee over the cocoa strip and so on, you can add infinite variety to your drinks. By the way, am now a reformed character with a 
-normal big mug. I say again, luau a -big mug. 
-Of course, you can go super lightweight and take no mug at all, drinking out of a caate or billy, but if you are a fastidious type who doesn'​t approve of oddments of spud or custard in the tea, you must wash your improvised pannikin between course, and washing up before tea is most distressing. Or should I say, washing up is distressing,​ full stop? 
-Just lately we had a non-walker away with us one weekend. When the brew was ready for pouring, I pointed-a finger at her and said laconically,​ "​Pannikin"​. It took some little time before she realised I wanted her "​cup"​. I have since been thankful that I didn't simply gesture tariards her and say "​mug"​. People have been dragged before the courts for that. 
-Well, thank you for your tolerance if you have tolerated me so far. All I really want to say is the little mugger is a silly_ mugger. Thank you. 
-KLTRNELL PENINSULA: \Aery good news comes from. our Panics and Playgrot-r-nisTroWirja-delegater Mrs. Hilda Stodda-rt. The '​Minister for Lands has approved of action being faken to reserve ail area of' 970 acres on the Peninsula, for public recreation. In addi tion the. Minister for Lands --mached the Minister. for ConSle-rvation 
-a view to appropriatt,​ being token to prevent an fare' 
-erosion or the area. the first instance we lc,- 
-13 
-officin.1 action has been. contbcrIplated to stop erosion on a public reserve. 
-The campaign for the reserv:​ation of this area has been going for 30 years. 
-7ARRCW EOKS AYD RUINED CASTLE: In a letter read beforc last nre-ei-.-ii-is'​7,​-,​-a-r-re---1311.-e-s-o-r-f r;d7-th at both the City of Blue Mountains and 'fihe Parks and Playgrounds ;f ovement had written to the Lands Departnent about shouldering half the cost of tl_e t-(,o freehold pcs rtions on' the Narrow !(.4cks'​w}--.ich were recr:ntly sold: no reply had been received. The Parks and Playgrounds Lovement had written to both the City of Blue.Mountains and itho a nds Departm-mt about resuming the surface only of the -Mining Conditional Lef;.se portione, but so ftr no answer had beon obtained. The Director of Tourist and. Infiigration Activities was interviewed and expresser'​) himself wholeheartedly behind keeping. the area in its' natural statfi, and promised to write to the Lands Department about this, 'and about the resumption. The Federation had' written- to the LLnds Department and the City of Blue Mountains about keeping the area roarlless, but the City Council refused to coranit itse-lft saying fhat it night want to put a scenic 
-road on Narrotr-Necks One The portions narked "​classificat ion area" were within the jutisdiction of, thr: WarragrAmba Catchment area, and the 1,'​Jater Board did not riisla to hav-e them converted to re,​creatlanai areas, but stated that it did not expect to use them otherwise than for recreational Purposes. 
-arie would be pleaSed to /ha-ve some good prints of photos of 
-the '​Yarrow Necks so that he could write an article for the: "​Katoomba Echo'. 
  , ​ III 1 NMI  , ​ III 1 NMI
  "​DEVELOPING"​ NATIONAL PAF.K.  "​DEVELOPING"​ NATIONAL PAF.K.
194903.txt · Last modified: 2018/05/23 03:59 by tyreless