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194807 [2017/04/06 03:10]
tyreless
194807 [2017/04/07 02:11] (current)
tyreless
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 =====Editorial - Timber.===== =====Editorial - Timber.=====
  
-Perhaps the most lasting damage caused by the war will be, not the loss of life and waste of goods, but the destruction of our last reserves of timber, with consequent erosion and loss of soil. There is not much commercial timber left anywhere near Sydney, and as demand increases, it will pay to remove what remains. Wherever we walk timber is being removed if there is a negotiable route in the vicinity. The bulldozer has hastened and cheaponed ​road construction and will enable the exploitation of timber in hitherto inaccessible places - e.g. above Yeola. Trees have been stolen from private lands and public reserves (a case of timber stealing in Kuringai Chase was reported in our October magazine). Even the Mark Morton Reserve, dedicated as a primitive recreation reserve, is likely to be despoiled of its best trees. No doubt there is an urgent need for timber, but is any attempt being made to conserve its use? The bulk of houses ​beng erected are of timber or timber frame construction. Bricks make a better job, but brick-making is hard work, and this is 1948.+Perhaps the most lasting damage caused by the war will be, not the loss of life and waste of goods, but the destruction of our last reserves of timber, with consequent erosion and loss of soil. There is not much commercial timber left anywhere near Sydney, and as demand increases, it will pay to remove what remains. Wherever we walk timber is being removed if there is a negotiable route in the vicinity. The bulldozer has hastened and cheapened ​road construction and will enable the exploitation of timber in hitherto inaccessible places - e.g. above Yeola. Trees have been stolen from private lands and public reserves (a case of timber stealing in Kuringai Chase was reported in our October magazine). Even the Mark Morton Reserve, dedicated as a primitive recreation reserve, is likely to be despoiled of its best trees. No doubt there is an urgent need for timber, but is any attempt being made to conserve its use? The bulk of houses ​being erected are of timber or timber frame construction. Bricks make a better job, but brick-making is hard work, and this is 1948.
  
-Only a few bushwalkers,​ foresters, naturelovers and others care whether the trees go or not, but the damage goes far beyond the destruction of trees. Recently there have been disastrous floods on the North Coast, an area from which vast quantities of timber have been removed. It is no co-incidence that even more disastrous floods were reported a few weeks ago from the Columbia River in Canada, another timber producing region. The same thing occurred in the Tennessee Valley until a vast scheme of dams and re-afforestation was carried out. The reason for the flooding is simple and direct. Clearing and burning of timber exposes the soil. This increases the surface run-off - particularly on steep hillsides - and the loose earth is carried into the stream-bed or out to sea (air travellers report miles of ruddy sea off the North Coast). Thus more water runs off the land while at the same time the rivers ​becomee ​shallower, resulting in floods. So long as timber is removed without regeneration the floods will get worse. Most of the damage is man-made, and could, by the same token, be prevented by man.+Only a few bushwalkers,​ foresters, naturelovers and others care whether the trees go or not, but the damage goes far beyond the destruction of trees. Recently there have been disastrous floods on the North Coast, an area from which vast quantities of timber have been removed. It is no co-incidence that even more disastrous floods were reported a few weeks ago from the Columbia River in Canada, another timber producing region. The same thing occurred in the Tennessee Valley until a vast scheme of dams and re-afforestation was carried out. The reason for the flooding is simple and direct. Clearing and burning of timber exposes the soil. This increases the surface run-off - particularly on steep hillsides - and the loose earth is carried into the stream-bed or out to sea (air travellers report miles of ruddy sea off the North Coast). Thus more water runs off the land while at the same time the rivers ​become ​shallower, resulting in floods. So long as timber is removed without regeneration the floods will get worse. Most of the damage is man-made, and could, by the same token, be prevented by man.
  
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 The President was in the Chair and there were about 70 members present. The President was in the Chair and there were about 70 members present.
  
-In the correspondence were letters from the Ministers for Lands and Conservation in reply to our letters dated 1st April on the subject of timber cutting in the Mark Morton Primitive Reserve. The Minister for Conservation,​ Mr. Weir, who is advising the Minister for Lands, said that his view was "that it is not impossible to carry out timber operations without despoliation of recreational values, providing a special supervision of the operations is exercised and stringent conditions are attached to any licenses granted to timber getters to operate within the Reserve"​. It was resolved to reply to the Minister for Conservation,​ pointing out that the area must cease to be primitive once timber cutting was allowed. The trees selected would inevitably be the tall straight trees, which were, ipso facto, the most scenically ​attraative ​in the area. Only stumps would remain where the best trees stood. It was also resolved to point to the damage done by timber cutting in  National Park some 40 or 50 years ago. The trees cut then would not be replaced for a long time to come.+In the correspondence were letters from the Ministers for Lands and Conservation in reply to our letters dated 1st April on the subject of timber cutting in the Mark Morton Primitive Reserve. The Minister for Conservation,​ Mr. Weir, who is advising the Minister for Lands, said that his view was "that it is not impossible to carry out timber operations without despoliation of recreational values, providing a special supervision of the operations is exercised and stringent conditions are attached to any licenses granted to timber getters to operate within the Reserve"​. It was resolved to reply to the Minister for Conservation,​ pointing out that the area must cease to be primitive once timber cutting was allowed. The trees selected would inevitably be the tall straight trees, which were, ipso facto, the most scenically ​attractive ​in the area. Only stumps would remain where the best trees stood. It was also resolved to point to the damage done by timber cutting in  National Park some 40 or 50 years ago. The trees cut then would not be replaced for a long time to come.
  
-Also in the correspondehce ​was a letter from Mrs. Vanda Sawtell asking that we should celebrate our twenty-first birthday by donating £10 to the "Save the Children"​ Fund. This was discussed at length. Allan Hardie pointed out that we were not a charitable institution and that such a gift would not come within our Constitution. Marie Byles said that as one of our objects was to help others to enjoy the bush, and as presumably the children saved would enjoy the bush when they got here, therefore it was within the Constitution. Claude Haynes suggested that if we wanted to be charitable, we could start with the devastated areas on the North Coast. Elsa Isaacs, who moved that we donate the £10, thought that the Club had a self-centred outlook and that it was regrettable that we couldn'​t sometimes subscribe to something for somebody else. The motion was defeated and thereupon Phil Hall rose, said he was "just about boiling at the lousy self-centred attitude shown" and that he would take up a subscription himself.+Also in the correspondence ​was a letter from Mrs. Vanda Sawtell asking that we should celebrate our twenty-first birthday by donating £10 to the "Save the Children"​ Fund. This was discussed at length. Allan Hardie pointed out that we were not a charitable institution and that such a gift would not come within our Constitution. Marie Byles said that as one of our objects was to help others to enjoy the bush, and as presumably the children saved would enjoy the bush when they got here, therefore it was within the Constitution. Claude Haynes suggested that if we wanted to be charitable, we could start with the devastated areas on the North Coast. Elsa Isaacs, who moved that we donate the £10, thought that the Club had a self-centred outlook and that it was regrettable that we couldn'​t sometimes subscribe to something for somebody else. The motion was defeated and thereupon Phil Hall rose, said he was "just about boiling at the lousy self-centred attitude shown" and that he would take up a subscription himself.
  
 After this that well chewed bone of contention and procrastination,​ the Narrow Necks land alienation, was dug up once more. The usual people said the usual things and it was resolved, on a motion by Roy Braithwaite,​ that the Federation be approached to request that the Government be contacted with a view to resumption of lots 14 and 15 as a National Park. After this that well chewed bone of contention and procrastination,​ the Narrow Necks land alienation, was dug up once more. The usual people said the usual things and it was resolved, on a motion by Roy Braithwaite,​ that the Federation be approached to request that the Government be contacted with a view to resumption of lots 14 and 15 as a National Park.
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 By "​Prolix"​ By "​Prolix"​
  
-By the time our meal was ready night had come and with it the hazy outline of the moon showed through the passing mist, which now moved higher and imperceptibly across it. Our valley had cleared of mist. Looking up the valley towards the tops we were attracted by the edge of the misty cloud, now moving northward, coming slowly towards us straight edged, as a blind being slowly rolled back and revealing the sky clear, velvety black and studded with innuzierable ​glittering stars. Further and further the veil moved silently overhead and away to the north, admitting the soft clear light of the moon. Very noticeably the air chilled as the sky cleared; dew rapidly settled on everything, hastening our retreat to the bags.+By the time our meal was ready night had come and with it the hazy outline of the moon showed through the passing mist, which now moved higher and imperceptibly across it. Our valley had cleared of mist. Looking up the valley towards the tops we were attracted by the edge of the misty cloud, now moving northward, coming slowly towards us straight edged, as a blind being slowly rolled back and revealing the sky clear, velvety black and studded with innumerable ​glittering stars. Further and further the veil moved silently overhead and away to the north, admitting the soft clear light of the moon. Very noticeably the air chilled as the sky cleared; dew rapidly settled on everything, hastening our retreat to the bags.
  
 Early, very early, next morn with the first glimmer of day I peeped out of the tent. What a sight! I woke Prolixia, quickly donned shorts and boots and took my trusty camera. Early, very early, next morn with the first glimmer of day I peeped out of the tent. What a sight! I woke Prolixia, quickly donned shorts and boots and took my trusty camera.
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 We scrambled up the side of the main range, soaked with dew, to the top and beheld the grandest sight of our lives. Stretching as far as the eye could see north, west and south the great valley was filled and brimming with greyish white mist spilling over at the edges of the Budawang Range and plateaux to the north. The sky was completely devoid of cloud. We scrambled up the side of the main range, soaked with dew, to the top and beheld the grandest sight of our lives. Stretching as far as the eye could see north, west and south the great valley was filled and brimming with greyish white mist spilling over at the edges of the Budawang Range and plateaux to the north. The sky was completely devoid of cloud.
  
-Farr to the west the Main Range reared its bulk out of the white sea as a distant undulating black mass. Apart from one or two isolated high spots the whiteness lay unbroken to the far distance beyond vision. Budawang Range from Wog Wog to Budawang Mountain was the eastern bastion - the highest points between the Main Range and the ocean. To the east the air was clear, with a few wisps of mist in the lower valleys, and the ocean in the distance beyond the rolling Clyde Country and Pigeon House. Far south Dromedary Mountain reared its great hump.+Far to the west the Main Range reared its bulk out of the white sea as a distant undulating black mass. Apart from one or two isolated high spots the whiteness lay unbroken to the far distance beyond vision. Budawang Range from Wog Wog to Budawang Mountain was the eastern bastion - the highest points between the Main Range and the ocean. To the east the air was clear, with a few wisps of mist in the lower valleys, and the ocean in the distance beyond the rolling Clyde Country and Pigeon House. Far south Dromedary Mountain reared its great hump.
  
 From the side of Currockbilly sheer crags drop steeply away to the rough Clyde country. From the side of Currockbilly sheer crags drop steeply away to the rough Clyde country.
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 Great Oaks from little acorns grow and doubtless the L.I.G. will thrive and prosper as more and more members become aware of the advantages offered, but as the total muster was 6 for the initial function, it is assumed that most S.B.W.'​s are fairly affluent at the present time. Future functions might be denoted on the programme by a suitable asterisk for the benefit of the thrifty. What with the expense of Federation Levies, 21st Birthday Celebrations,​ Working Bees, etc. etc., members of the group are confident of a rapid rise in attendances at its functions. Great Oaks from little acorns grow and doubtless the L.I.G. will thrive and prosper as more and more members become aware of the advantages offered, but as the total muster was 6 for the initial function, it is assumed that most S.B.W.'​s are fairly affluent at the present time. Future functions might be denoted on the programme by a suitable asterisk for the benefit of the thrifty. What with the expense of Federation Levies, 21st Birthday Celebrations,​ Working Bees, etc. etc., members of the group are confident of a rapid rise in attendances at its functions.
  
-As to the actual outing - Dormie, Allan, Bill and Jack camped on the Woronora bank on Friday night. Love of my own cot and the excuse that Ray worked late shift on Friday night enabled me to have a comfortable night at home, then meet Ray and join the party about 9 a.m. on Saturday. The move-off was approx. one hour later. The river was running well over the Needles and as he flitted daintily between the rapids, Jack had the misfortune to step on a log which rolled. He prescribed a graceful arc, landing in a pool, where a weighty pack ensured his innersion ​right up to the neck. After a change of costume he rejoined the party to proceed along Old Illawarra Road at a reasonable speed.+As to the actual outing - Dormie, Allan, Bill and Jack camped on the Woronora bank on Friday night. Love of my own cot and the excuse that Ray worked late shift on Friday night enabled me to have a comfortable night at home, then meet Ray and join the party about 9 a.m. on Saturday. The move-off was approx. one hour later. The river was running well over the Needles and as he flitted daintily between the rapids, Jack had the misfortune to step on a log which rolled. He prescribed a graceful arc, landing in a pool, where a weighty pack ensured his immersion ​right up to the neck. After a change of costume he rejoined the party to proceed along Old Illawarra Road at a reasonable speed.
  
 Once or twice during the morning timber and other tracks caused momentary hesitation, but Camden Military Map soon had us on the right track again, until hunger forced a halt about 1.30 p.m. We could have been at Eckersley or a couple of miles from it, but a '​reccie'​ after lunch located the site of Eckersley P.O., with well and cellar still intact. The ruin is famous as having been visited by one Allan Hardie - now leader of the present party - 20 years ago. Once or twice during the morning timber and other tracks caused momentary hesitation, but Camden Military Map soon had us on the right track again, until hunger forced a halt about 1.30 p.m. We could have been at Eckersley or a couple of miles from it, but a '​reccie'​ after lunch located the site of Eckersley P.O., with well and cellar still intact. The ruin is famous as having been visited by one Allan Hardie - now leader of the present party - 20 years ago.
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 Point 13. Vary your life as much as possible. Point 13. Vary your life as much as possible.
  
-Point 14.  Live toughly, dangerously,​ excitingly, ​exhiliaratingly ​and simply.+Point 14.  Live toughly, dangerously,​ excitingly, ​exhilaratingly ​and simply.
  
 Point 15. Remember the past and try to profit by its lessons; live in the past and prepare for the future. Point 15. Remember the past and try to profit by its lessons; live in the past and prepare for the future.
  
-How remarkable! These exhortations could almost be taken from a hand book for Walkers. It's just what most of us do anyhow, even though the predominant moronic element can scarecely ​be expected to observe Point 15.+How remarkable! These exhortations could almost be taken from a hand book for Walkers. It's just what most of us do anyhow, even though the predominant moronic element can scarcely ​be expected to observe Point 15.
  
-Of course Point 11 ("Cut your possessions to a ninimum") is directed to the heavyweight walker.+Of course Point 11 ("Cut your possessions to a minimum") is directed to the heavyweight walker.
  
 Point 12 says: "If you are a woman, give way to your harmless, rational, material impulses and emotions - but a man, must restrain all these."​ Comment: Well, well. Is that fair to men? Point 12 says: "If you are a woman, give way to your harmless, rational, material impulses and emotions - but a man, must restrain all these."​ Comment: Well, well. Is that fair to men?
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 __Ira Butler__: Work technically beautiful, but seemed somehow to get away from the bushwalking atmosphere. The etching-like photograph of a snow gun was admirable, also his marine subject (seagull from low-flying plane) while the study of an iron urn and a teapot was a novelty. The work was characterised by perfect technique and embodies a beautiful tonal range which would carry his work through in any company. __Ira Butler__: Work technically beautiful, but seemed somehow to get away from the bushwalking atmosphere. The etching-like photograph of a snow gun was admirable, also his marine subject (seagull from low-flying plane) while the study of an iron urn and a teapot was a novelty. The work was characterised by perfect technique and embodies a beautiful tonal range which would carry his work through in any company.
  
-__Allan Wyborn__: His sttdies ​of trees were very fair, but there were hardly enough to judge. His panel of general work was good though the technique was a little soft.+__Allan Wyborn__: His studies ​of trees were very fair, but there were hardly enough to judge. His panel of general work was good though the technique was a little soft.
  
 __David Stead__: His "​Burragorang Valley"​ was particularly good. It was the best study of Burragorang he (Mr. Burke) had seen. "Late Breakfast"​ and "​Kowmung Capers"​ were good in that they captured the spirit of bushwalking. In this regard Mr. Stead'​s work was the most satisfying in the exhibition. __David Stead__: His "​Burragorang Valley"​ was particularly good. It was the best study of Burragorang he (Mr. Burke) had seen. "Late Breakfast"​ and "​Kowmung Capers"​ were good in that they captured the spirit of bushwalking. In this regard Mr. Stead'​s work was the most satisfying in the exhibition.
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 __Arthur Gilroy__: A beautiful panel showing perfect general landscape technique, though more pictures of bushwalking interest might have been included. __Arthur Gilroy__: A beautiful panel showing perfect general landscape technique, though more pictures of bushwalking interest might have been included.
  
-__Malcolm McGregor__: Technique and presentation good, but many of the pohtographs ​would be capable of improved arrangement and care for form. This particularly applied to his foreground interest.+__Malcolm McGregor__: Technique and presentation good, but many of the photographs ​would be capable of improved arrangement and care for form. This particularly applied to his foreground interest.
  
 __Phil Hall__: His "​Cradle Mountain and Dove Lake" was the best of the Tasmanian Lake scenes. It had beautiful tonal range and good foreground interest. __Phil Hall__: His "​Cradle Mountain and Dove Lake" was the best of the Tasmanian Lake scenes. It had beautiful tonal range and good foreground interest.
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 And the rain-drenched third, and the Moppett bird,\\ And the rain-drenched third, and the Moppett bird,\\
 But our hopes remain we will try again\\ But our hopes remain we will try again\\
-To climb the rock, that lies to the south of Nawra.+To climb the rock, that lies to the south of Nowra.
  
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 | |10.15 am|Springwood to Mt. Victoria| | |10.15 am|Springwood to Mt. Victoria|
 | |1.25 pm|Emu Plains to Mt. Victoria| | |1.25 pm|Emu Plains to Mt. Victoria|
-| |8.55 am|Emu Plains to Mt. Victoriq|+| |8.55 am|Emu Plains to Mt. Victoria|
 |__Northern Line__| | | |__Northern Line__| | |
 |Fri.|5. 7 pm|Gosford Wyong N'​castle Area (Booking compulsory)| |Fri.|5. 7 pm|Gosford Wyong N'​castle Area (Booking compulsory)|
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 | |5.35 ex Goulburn all to Mittagong| | |5.35 ex Goulburn all to Mittagong|
 |__Western__|3.38 ex Mt. Victoria - all to Penrith| |__Western__|3.38 ex Mt. Victoria - all to Penrith|
-| |5.45 ex. Lithgew ​- all to Emu Plains|+| |5.45 ex. Lithgow ​- all to Emu Plains|
 |__Northern__|5.55 Wyong all to Asquith| |__Northern__|5.55 Wyong all to Asquith|
 | |4.52 ex Newcastle. All to Gosford, then Woy Woy and Hawkesbury River| | |4.52 ex Newcastle. All to Gosford, then Woy Woy and Hawkesbury River|
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 The film night arranged in conjunction with the National Trust was attended by about 30 walkers. The film night arranged in conjunction with the National Trust was attended by about 30 walkers.
  
-Mr. Graves is takihg ​up certain complaints about parties of Rover Scouts direct with the parties concerned. He would like to mention any praiseworthy activities of scouts and the Federation Secretary would like information of any such activities.+Mr. Graves is taking ​up certain complaints about parties of Rover Scouts direct with the parties concerned. He would like to mention any praiseworthy activities of scouts and the Federation Secretary would like information of any such activities.
  
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-CAMP FIRES +=====Camp Fires.===== 
 Last month we were discussing camp fires and their importance to the enjoyment of camping. There are many ways of enjoying a camp fire. With a small group of people things can be quite informal. Yarns, arguments, discussions and songs can ebb and flow as the group pleases, but as the size of the crowd increases so does it become more necessary for a certain amount of organisation and control. Whatever the number of folks around a fire however, the chap or the girl who can lead a few songs is always welcome and an asset. Last month we were discussing camp fires and their importance to the enjoyment of camping. There are many ways of enjoying a camp fire. With a small group of people things can be quite informal. Yarns, arguments, discussions and songs can ebb and flow as the group pleases, but as the size of the crowd increases so does it become more necessary for a certain amount of organisation and control. Whatever the number of folks around a fire however, the chap or the girl who can lead a few songs is always welcome and an asset.
-The choice of song is-important. Not every song is suitable for open air singing by average voices. Quite frequently requests are hoard at camp fires for some song heard on the air. In the majority of cases these songs are flops when attempted as chorus items. Only when there is a person with a good voice, and stated ​to the song in question can most of these songs be enjoyed at a camp fire. Every once in a while, a song canes along which has the makings of a camp fire song and those are generally grabbed and frequently apt parodies are written.+ 
 +The choice of song is important. Not every song is suitable for open air singing by average voices. Quite frequently requests are heard at camp fires for some song heard on the air. In the majority of cases these songs are flops when attempted as chorus items. Only when there is a person with a good voice, and suited ​to the song in question can most of these songs be enjoyed at a camp fire. Every once in a while, a song comes along which has the makings of a camp fire song and those are generally grabbed and frequently apt parodies are written. 
 By and large however, the mainstays of any camp fire sing song are the old and tried favourites. Songs (like furniture) are old because they are good, not because they are old. If a song hasn't got something it is soon forgotten whilst the worth while ones keep on keeping on (like Berger'​s paint). By and large however, the mainstays of any camp fire sing song are the old and tried favourites. Songs (like furniture) are old because they are good, not because they are old. If a song hasn't got something it is soon forgotten whilst the worth while ones keep on keeping on (like Berger'​s paint).
-In singing a song there are three important points to bear in mind, words, tune and pitch. The successful leader must know the words of his songs and it is a good plan to have a little book in which to collect songs and stunts encountered from time to time. Nevertheless this book should only be used as aremindor; a song sung from a book is not half a song. The leader should be able to sing in tune. This does not mean he should have a first class voice. + 
-As a matter of fact, people with really good voices seldom make song leaders. +In singing a song there are three important points to bear in mind, words, tune and pitch. The successful leader must know the words of his songs and it is a good plan to have a little book in which to collect songs and stunts encountered from time to time. Nevertheless this book should only be used as a reminder; a song sung from a book is not half a song. The leader should be able to sing in tune. This does not mean he should have a first class voice. As a matter of fact, people with really good voices seldom make song leaders. If possible, however, I think that an aspiring leader should try out his favourite songs accompanied by a piano, for too often do we hear would be songsters who iron out the liveliest songs to little more than a monotone. Having mastered the words and music there remains only the pitch. This detail is the most frequently forgotten, but bad pitch ruins more songs than almost any other factor. The campfire leader must know on what note to start any particular song, to enable average folks to sing its highest and lowest notes in comfort. The faculty of striking the right pitch is only learnt ​from experience, but an average person can soon master this art if he expressly watches this angle of singing. 
-If possible, however, I think that an aspiring leader should try out his favourite songs accompanied by a piano,for too often do we hear would be songsters +
-who iron out the liveliest songs to little more than a monotone. Having mastered the words and music there remains only the pitch. This detail is the most frequently forgotten, but bad pitch ruins more songs than almost any other fctor. The campfire leader must know on what note to start any particular song, to enable average folks to sing its highest and lowest notes in comfort. The faculty of striking the right pitch is onlylearnt ​from experience, but an average person can soon master this art if he expressly watches this angle of singing.+
 Hope I'm not boring you folks. Hope I'm not boring you folks.
 +
 More next month. More next month.
-X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X + 
-What has Paddy got?+__What ​has Paddy got?__ 
 Full range of aluminium billies. Full range of aluminium billies.
-Full range of steel frame rucksacks, and rucksacks without frames. Groundsheets rubberised and proofed nylon.+ 
 +Full range of steel frame rucksacks, and rucksacks without frames. 
 + 
 +Groundsheets rubberised and proofed nylon. 
 Next date for sleeping bag orders, Monday 2nd. August. Regret no mail orders. Next date for sleeping bag orders, Monday 2nd. August. Regret no mail orders.
-PADDY PALLIN 
-Paddymade Camp Gear for Talkers Phone BX3595 327 George St., SYDNEY. 
  
 +Paddy Pallin. Paddymade Camp Gear for Walkers.
 +
 +Phone BX3595. 327 George St., Sydney.
 +
 +----
194807.txt · Last modified: 2017/04/07 02:11 by tyreless