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194712 [2018/02/27 02:33]
tyreless
194712 [2018/02/28 02:08] (current)
tyreless
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 The report of the Ski-ing Sub-Committee was read and its recommendations adopted. The Sub-Committee recommended that a committee consisting of Tom Moppett (Convenor), Len Scotland, Charles Culberg, Frank Leyden, Dot Butler, Phyllis Ratcliffe, Ted Constable, Gordon Ballard, Russell Wilkins and Bert Whillier be elected to organise Club skiing activities. The committee was approved by the meeting and it was resolved that it be appointed annually in November. The objects of the Skiing Committee were published in our last issue. The report of the Ski-ing Sub-Committee was read and its recommendations adopted. The Sub-Committee recommended that a committee consisting of Tom Moppett (Convenor), Len Scotland, Charles Culberg, Frank Leyden, Dot Butler, Phyllis Ratcliffe, Ted Constable, Gordon Ballard, Russell Wilkins and Bert Whillier be elected to organise Club skiing activities. The committee was approved by the meeting and it was resolved that it be appointed annually in November. The objects of the Skiing Committee were published in our last issue.
  
-The Report of the Era Sub-Committee was read (see below). The Sub-Cammittee's recommendations re notices, sanitary arrangements,​ water supply, rubbish, tools and a working bee were adopted. Fifteen of those present were willing to go to the working bee. In accord with the wishes of the subcommittee no decisions were made as to tree planting, but a motion from Mouldy Harrison to the effect that we should ask Alan Rigby to draw up a plan for the block was carried.+The Report of the Era Sub-Committee was read (see below). The Sub-Committee's recommendations re notices, sanitary arrangements,​ water supply, rubbish, tools and a working bee were adopted. Fifteen of those present were willing to go to the working bee. In accord with the wishes of the subcommittee no decisions were made as to tree planting, but a motion from Mouldy Harrison to the effect that we should ask Alan Rigby to draw up a plan for the block was carried.
  
 A long discussion then took place on another motion by Mouldy - "That the meeting deprecates the use of radios and gramaphones (at Era) and that steps be taken to eliminate them". The motion was occasioned by a letter from "​Tod"​ Sloane of the Rucksack Club, who had not been able to hear the lyre birds properly because of the playing of a wireless. When he spoke to the owners of the set they had affirmed their right to play it when and where they liked. Ruby Payne-Scott thought that those who didn't like wireless could keep away from it. Eric Rowen had had a long talk to the players of the set, who had resented Mr. Sloane'​s attitude. Eric had explained the ideals of the S.B.W. in taking over the land and told then they were welcome to camp there. If Mr. Sloane had been less aggressive they would probably have turned the set down. Roy Braithwaite thought that it would be better to encourage newcomers to follow our customs than to impose too many restrictions early. Renee Brown said she had often been annoyed by people making a noise far into the night, but she remembered the day when she liked to do likewise. People who didn't like noise could always carp away, as they did at reunions. Gordon Ballard thought that that was their idea of fun and we should be tolerant. Edna Garrad brought up the point that if there were enough radios all turned down low the cumulative uproar would be considerable. On putting the notion to the vote it was defeated. A long discussion then took place on another motion by Mouldy - "That the meeting deprecates the use of radios and gramaphones (at Era) and that steps be taken to eliminate them". The motion was occasioned by a letter from "​Tod"​ Sloane of the Rucksack Club, who had not been able to hear the lyre birds properly because of the playing of a wireless. When he spoke to the owners of the set they had affirmed their right to play it when and where they liked. Ruby Payne-Scott thought that those who didn't like wireless could keep away from it. Eric Rowen had had a long talk to the players of the set, who had resented Mr. Sloane'​s attitude. Eric had explained the ideals of the S.B.W. in taking over the land and told then they were welcome to camp there. If Mr. Sloane had been less aggressive they would probably have turned the set down. Roy Braithwaite thought that it would be better to encourage newcomers to follow our customs than to impose too many restrictions early. Renee Brown said she had often been annoyed by people making a noise far into the night, but she remembered the day when she liked to do likewise. People who didn't like noise could always carp away, as they did at reunions. Gordon Ballard thought that that was their idea of fun and we should be tolerant. Edna Garrad brought up the point that if there were enough radios all turned down low the cumulative uproar would be considerable. On putting the notion to the vote it was defeated.
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 =====Kosciusko Snow In colour.===== =====Kosciusko Snow In colour.=====
  
-Frank Leyden, assisted by Bill Cosgrove, who operated the lantern, gave us a photographic treat with his coloured slides of the western slopes of the Kosciusko Main Range. During their stay at the Chalet Frank and party had just three fine days and they took full advantage of them. These were the first cloured ​slides we had seen of the western faces of the range - in fact there are probably very few photographs of any sort extant of this region which is inaccessible and usually obscured by mist. The scenes were magnificent and the vivid whites, blues and purples of the Alps showed to perfection. A feature of the evening was Frank'​s interesting commentary - other photographers might well copy on slide nights.+Frank Leyden, assisted by Bill Cosgrove, who operated the lantern, gave us a photographic treat with his coloured slides of the western slopes of the Kosciusko Main Range. During their stay at the Chalet Frank and party had just three fine days and they took full advantage of them. These were the first coloured ​slides we had seen of the western faces of the range - in fact there are probably very few photographs of any sort extant of this region which is inaccessible and usually obscured by mist. The scenes were magnificent and the vivid whites, blues and purples of the Alps showed to perfection. A feature of the evening was Frank'​s interesting commentary - other photographers might well copy on slide nights.
  
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-__New Maps__: Mr. E. Caines Phillips advises that the following maps have nowbeen ​completed and are available for perusal by those interested:​-+__New Maps__: Mr. E. Caines Phillips advises that the following maps have now been completed and are available for perusal by those interested:​-
  
 __No. 42__ Williams River (Bandongrove to Clarencetown) __No. 42__ Williams River (Bandongrove to Clarencetown)
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 ====Dawn At Era.==== ====Dawn At Era.====
  
-As daylight came a voice sounded near my tent "Ow are yer mate?" Someone else woke with a start. "​Strike-no lucky!"​ he said. There followed a cry of "Cop this!" from up the valley, then shouts of "​Order! Order!"​ from the trees opposite. Shortly after this the strains of "​Chattanuga Chu Chu" were wafted into my tent, then the victory theme of the Fifth Syrphony. All very puzzling, until a voice announced from the depths of the up-valley scrub "This programme comes to you by courtesy of Liar Birds Unlimited"​. Sagacious birds, aren't they? - in fact; alrost ​human.+As daylight came a voice sounded near my tent "Ow are yer mate?" Someone else woke with a start. "​Strike-no lucky!"​ he said. There followed a cry of "Cop this!" from up the valley, then shouts of "​Order! Order!"​ from the trees opposite. Shortly after this the strains of "​Chattanuga Chu Chu" were wafted into my tent, then the victory theme of the Fifth Symphony. All very puzzling, until a voice announced from the depths of the up-valley scrub "This programme comes to you by courtesy of Liar Birds Unlimited"​. Sagacious birds, aren't they? - in fact; almost ​human.
  
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 =====Report Of The Era Sub-Committee.===== =====Report Of The Era Sub-Committee.=====
  
-The Era Sub-Corrittee, consisting of Jack Wren (Convenor), Phyllis Ratcliffe, Arthur Gilroy, Ray Kirkby and Edna Garrad, has met twice, once at Era. At the last General meeting its report was presented. The main recommendations were:-+The Era Sub-Committee, consisting of Jack Wren (Convenor), Phyllis Ratcliffe, Arthur Gilroy, Ray Kirkby and Edna Garrad, has met twice, once at Era. At the last General meeting its report was presented. The main recommendations were:-
  
 __Notices__. Suggested wording for a dozen printed calico notices was - __Notices__. Suggested wording for a dozen printed calico notices was -
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 __Rubbish__. A pit for each gully. __Rubbish__. A pit for each gully.
  
-__Planting of trees__. The Forestry ​Departrant ​considered that oak, coastal she oak, broad leafed titree, swamp mahogany, pittosporum undulatun and callistemon balignus would be suitable for the area. Best planting time would be April. It was considered desirable that a competent forestry authority be invited to visit Era and advise us.+__Planting of trees__. The Forestry ​Department ​considered that oak, coastal she oak, broad leafed titree, swamp mahogany, pittosporum undulatun and callistemon balignus would be suitable for the area. Best planting time would be April. It was considered desirable that a competent forestry authority be invited to visit Era and advise us.
  
 There was great diversity of opinion between members of the Sub-Committee on the situations where trees should be planted etc. However it was tentatively suggested that trees be planted: There was great diversity of opinion between members of the Sub-Committee on the situations where trees should be planted etc. However it was tentatively suggested that trees be planted:
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 It is apparent that prevention is better than cure, and now is the time to deal a mortal blow to this pest, before time increases the rate of destruction,​ and the cost of eradication becomes out of all proportion. It is apparent that prevention is better than cure, and now is the time to deal a mortal blow to this pest, before time increases the rate of destruction,​ and the cost of eradication becomes out of all proportion.
  
-It must beemp'​hasised ​that no large scale technigue ​of control has been worked out as yet over extensive areas in New South Wales. The destruction of mistletoe calls for concerted and practical action by the Government and other large interested bodies. The Forestry Advisory Council is urging action in this respect, and is undertaking a publicity campaign to make the general public aware of the danger, and thus to demand an effective campaign of control.+It must be emphasised ​that no large scale technique ​of control has been worked out as yet over extensive areas in New South Wales. The destruction of mistletoe calls for concerted and practical action by the Government and other large interested bodies. The Forestry Advisory Council is urging action in this respect, and is undertaking a publicity campaign to make the general public aware of the danger, and thus to demand an effective campaign of control.
  
 Although much manpower and money is required to really stamp out the mistletoe, nevertheless much can be done by the smaller bodies and individuals in local areas, particularly where mistletoe has only a very slight hold. As a preliminary a survey of the incidence of mistletoe could be carried out in any particular district, the clusters of mistletoe being very easily recognised. Although much manpower and money is required to really stamp out the mistletoe, nevertheless much can be done by the smaller bodies and individuals in local areas, particularly where mistletoe has only a very slight hold. As a preliminary a survey of the incidence of mistletoe could be carried out in any particular district, the clusters of mistletoe being very easily recognised.
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 A more promising approach might be made by encouraging fungus disease or finding some insect which will attack the growth, but clearly this has to be done with caution or it right prove a two-edged sword. At this stage it is apparent that more detailed work is necessary to find what weaknesses the parasite has so that these can be exploited. A more promising approach might be made by encouraging fungus disease or finding some insect which will attack the growth, but clearly this has to be done with caution or it right prove a two-edged sword. At this stage it is apparent that more detailed work is necessary to find what weaknesses the parasite has so that these can be exploited.
  
-The felling or lopping of infected trees is considered by many to be the only practical method of control, but in a badly infected forest this is laborious and time consuming. The Queensland Main Roads Board have a lopping plant in action, which, having lorries with ladders, is particularly suitable for working on roadsides or up to the edge of a forest. Here mistletoe is particularly prevalent, probably due to the high light requirerents ​of the plant, but may be due to the behavibur ​of birds which distribute the seeds.+The felling or lopping of infected trees is considered by many to be the only practical method of control, but in a badly infected forest this is laborious and time consuming. The Queensland Main Roads Board have a lopping plant in action, which, having lorries with ladders, is particularly suitable for working on roadsides or up to the edge of a forest. Here mistletoe is particularly prevalent, probably due to the high light requirements ​of the plant, but may be due to the behaviour ​of birds which distribute the seeds.
  
 On young shade and ornamental trees, branches should be cut off one or more feet below the point of infection as soon as the mistletoe shoots appear. On trees with infection already heavily established the smaller branches should be cut off and the plants should be removed from the larger stems by cutting out the underlying bark and wood for one or more feet each way from the point of attachment. The cut surface should be treated with a disinfectant,​ such as creosote. Simply knocking off mistletoe plants merely results in the development of new shoots over a widening area, although if the successive crops of shoots are in turn removed every year or two the injurious effects of the parasite are reduced. On young shade and ornamental trees, branches should be cut off one or more feet below the point of infection as soon as the mistletoe shoots appear. On trees with infection already heavily established the smaller branches should be cut off and the plants should be removed from the larger stems by cutting out the underlying bark and wood for one or more feet each way from the point of attachment. The cut surface should be treated with a disinfectant,​ such as creosote. Simply knocking off mistletoe plants merely results in the development of new shoots over a widening area, although if the successive crops of shoots are in turn removed every year or two the injurious effects of the parasite are reduced.
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 For nearly a week we plodded up the now covered mountains and bore down again. Everyone was happy, the days were fine and the snow was good. Despite our generous collection of bruises and many groaning muscles we managed to enjoy ourselves. Evening excursions to the Chalet were becoming more and more popular. Some wanted hair cuts, some wanted to dance, but it did not take long to discover that the bar had an attraction too. For nearly a week we plodded up the now covered mountains and bore down again. Everyone was happy, the days were fine and the snow was good. Despite our generous collection of bruises and many groaning muscles we managed to enjoy ourselves. Evening excursions to the Chalet were becoming more and more popular. Some wanted hair cuts, some wanted to dance, but it did not take long to discover that the bar had an attraction too.
  
-One morning the wind and rain greeted us in very boisterous manner. Everyone thought it delieltful ​for the first day - it was a grand opportunity for some extra spine-bashing - this skiing is really hard work, don't ever be led to believe it isn't. Climb a few mountains with six or seven feet of board strapped on each foot, then slide swiftly down crashing here and there of course, while the spectators have a little bet on whether you'll be able to rise again under your own steam. After a few days of all this you too would welcome a day of rest.+One morning the wind and rain greeted us in very boisterous manner. Everyone thought it delightful ​for the first day - it was a grand opportunity for some extra spine-bashing - this skiing is really hard work, don't ever be led to believe it isn't. Climb a few mountains with six or seven feet of board strapped on each foot, then slide swiftly down crashing here and there of course, while the spectators have a little bet on whether you'll be able to rise again under your own steam. After a few days of all this you too would welcome a day of rest.
  
 But alas, next day it rained just as hard and the wind blew even harder. At breakfast that morning someone had a bright idea that we might pack up and go north, to Yamba, where there is a beautiful surfing beach and warm sunshine (someone worked it all out about the sunshine). Six out of the ten of us decided to leave for this charming spot and so all arrangements were made. The other four were to go on to the Chalet for the week. There was much excitement as belongings were thrown into rucksacks and in an amazingly short time all six were set for the track. Just as the party was about to move off the wind screeched loudly and lashed the rain furiously against the first face that emerged from the door. Like a drowning man grasping at a straw he desperately urged a conference, to make sure this really was a sensible move. A round-the-stove conference was held and excitement dissolved into doubt and indecision. Eventually, the wonderful dream of surf and sunshine was put back into its box and the whole party decided to go to the Chalet. All except one, who very much wanted to make the trip and almost slipped out on to the cold, cruel, windswept snow, where she would soon have disappeared into the rain and fog. But we dragged her back and made her count ten. But alas, next day it rained just as hard and the wind blew even harder. At breakfast that morning someone had a bright idea that we might pack up and go north, to Yamba, where there is a beautiful surfing beach and warm sunshine (someone worked it all out about the sunshine). Six out of the ten of us decided to leave for this charming spot and so all arrangements were made. The other four were to go on to the Chalet for the week. There was much excitement as belongings were thrown into rucksacks and in an amazingly short time all six were set for the track. Just as the party was about to move off the wind screeched loudly and lashed the rain furiously against the first face that emerged from the door. Like a drowning man grasping at a straw he desperately urged a conference, to make sure this really was a sensible move. A round-the-stove conference was held and excitement dissolved into doubt and indecision. Eventually, the wonderful dream of surf and sunshine was put back into its box and the whole party decided to go to the Chalet. All except one, who very much wanted to make the trip and almost slipped out on to the cold, cruel, windswept snow, where she would soon have disappeared into the rain and fog. But we dragged her back and made her count ten.
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 One of the visitors at our last Annual Photographic Exhibition was John Houghton, President of the C.M.W., and while chatting we discovered that we were going to Alpine Hut at the same time - in the middle of August. We thereupon decided on a few days touring, and arranged to take the necessary food and equipment. One of the visitors at our last Annual Photographic Exhibition was John Houghton, President of the C.M.W., and while chatting we discovered that we were going to Alpine Hut at the same time - in the middle of August. We thereupon decided on a few days touring, and arranged to take the necessary food and equipment.
  
-During the first week at the Hut snow fell most days, and one day it rained - a most unusual ​occurence ​for that time of the year - definitely not touring weather. But on Friday night the weather conditions and the meteorological report over the radio agreed that Saturday and the following day or two would be good - and they were.+During the first week at the Hut snow fell most days, and one day it rained - a most unusual ​occurrence ​for that time of the year - definitely not touring weather. But on Friday night the weather conditions and the meteorological report over the radio agreed that Saturday and the following day or two would be good - and they were.
  
 On Saturday morning, saying we would be back for dinner Wednesday evening, John and I set off for Grey Mare Hut via Mawson'​s,​ where we lunched. From there we rounded the end of the Kerries and set a westerly course. The day was warm and still, and we passed through several enclosed spots which had been getting the direct rays of the sun, where the air was super heated. We wondered why the snow, and we, didn't melt. On Saturday morning, saying we would be back for dinner Wednesday evening, John and I set off for Grey Mare Hut via Mawson'​s,​ where we lunched. From there we rounded the end of the Kerries and set a westerly course. The day was warm and still, and we passed through several enclosed spots which had been getting the direct rays of the sun, where the air was super heated. We wondered why the snow, and we, didn't melt.
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 The Hut is a couple of hundred yards back from Grey Mare Creek and about 50 feet above it. When approaching from the bed of the creek, it is impossible to see the Hut until right in front of it, as the ends of ridges screen it from up and down stream. The Hut is a couple of hundred yards back from Grey Mare Creek and about 50 feet above it. When approaching from the bed of the creek, it is impossible to see the Hut until right in front of it, as the ends of ridges screen it from up and down stream.
  
-The "Grey Mare Gold Mine", as it says on the door, was originally twice the size, but half was pulled down a few yeas ago by a horse. The exposed end of the hut has been repaired with old sheets of galvanized iron, and it is now a four-roomed,​ lined hut, and seems to be fairly sound. The doors have to be lifted when lookinc ​or unlocking. Snow still gets above the ceiling and on a hot day drips through - one room was quite damp. There are beds for three, a double spring mattress and a single bags-between-poles,​ but there are no kapok mattress or blankets. Equipment includes a shovel and a blunt axe with the handle broken off, and various billies and tins. There is a small creek about twenty ​yads from the door, and there are scattered dead snow gums a hundred yards up behind the hut, but unless these are conserved, it won't be long before wood getting will require a lot of effort.+The "Grey Mare Gold Mine", as it says on the door, was originally twice the size, but half was pulled down a few yeas ago by a horse. The exposed end of the hut has been repaired with old sheets of galvanized iron, and it is now a four-roomed,​ lined hut, and seems to be fairly sound. The doors have to be lifted when locking ​or unlocking. Snow still gets above the ceiling and on a hot day drips through - one room was quite damp. There are beds for three, a double spring mattress and a single bags-between-poles,​ but there are no kapok mattress or blankets. Equipment includes a shovel and a blunt axe with the handle broken off, and various billies and tins. There is a small creek about twenty ​yards from the door, and there are scattered dead snow gums a hundred yards up behind the hut, but unless these are conserved, it won't be long before wood getting will require a lot of effort.
  
 The Hut is well known as a freezer at night, and no wonder - it is right in the middle of a great expanse of bare, cold snow, unprotected by trees or hills. Even on our second night there, when we had every possible piece of clothing under us, we were not quite warm. The Hut is well known as a freezer at night, and no wonder - it is right in the middle of a great expanse of bare, cold snow, unprotected by trees or hills. Even on our second night there, when we had every possible piece of clothing under us, we were not quite warm.
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 Pretty Plains Hut is about 4,400 feet. It is well sheltered and is most attractive, being built of round logs and has a high galvanised iron roof with wide eaves. It has two big rooms, living and bunk, and a small corner room with an outside door only, used for storing feed. There is no ceiling, giving a very roomy effect. The Hut is well equipped and there are a lot of spare bags to help keep the cold out. The bunks, six of them, are of bags slung between poles. It has been kept beautifully clean, as have the two satellite huts up and down stream, and it is a real pleasure to stay there. We spent Tuesday afternoon sitting before the fire in our sleeping bag cushioned chairs, reading. The cook produced a super dinner at his leisure, and then we drowsed in front of the fire until supper. A really enjoyable rest afternoon. Pretty Plains Hut is about 4,400 feet. It is well sheltered and is most attractive, being built of round logs and has a high galvanised iron roof with wide eaves. It has two big rooms, living and bunk, and a small corner room with an outside door only, used for storing feed. There is no ceiling, giving a very roomy effect. The Hut is well equipped and there are a lot of spare bags to help keep the cold out. The bunks, six of them, are of bags slung between poles. It has been kept beautifully clean, as have the two satellite huts up and down stream, and it is a real pleasure to stay there. We spent Tuesday afternoon sitting before the fire in our sleeping bag cushioned chairs, reading. The cook produced a super dinner at his leisure, and then we drowsed in front of the fire until supper. A really enjoyable rest afternoon.
  
-Next day a blizzard was blowing higher up, although it was quiet in the valley. Having cleaned up the hut and made sure the fire was out and some wood left inside, we set off at about 8 a.m. for Alpine Hut, a distance of approxinately ​13 miles. Unfortunately we made a small hole in the cement hearth splitting wood, but a letter of apology to the owner, plus a small sum to cover the damage brought a very friendly reply.+Next day a blizzard was blowing higher up, although it was quiet in the valley. Having cleaned up the hut and made sure the fire was out and some wood left inside, we set off at about 8 a.m. for Alpine Hut, a distance of approximately ​13 miles. Unfortunately we made a small hole in the cement hearth splitting wood, but a letter of apology to the owner, plus a small sum to cover the damage brought a very friendly reply.
  
 As far as Big Bogong and the source of Grey Mare Creek we followed our outward route, but going as straight as possible instead of wandering about learning the country. From there we went ENE, and climbed to the top of the Strumbo Range, at a point from which we could look down the valley of the Tooma. So far, although we were in fairly thick fog part of the time, there were times when we could see quite well. Unfortunately there wasn't only fog and, of course, wind, but some rain, and it had to be at lunch time too. We ate our lunch of biscuits, butter, dates, cheese and peanut butter standing under a snowgum, then got going again as quickly as possible before we froze. As far as Big Bogong and the source of Grey Mare Creek we followed our outward route, but going as straight as possible instead of wandering about learning the country. From there we went ENE, and climbed to the top of the Strumbo Range, at a point from which we could look down the valley of the Tooma. So far, although we were in fairly thick fog part of the time, there were times when we could see quite well. Unfortunately there wasn't only fog and, of course, wind, but some rain, and it had to be at lunch time too. We ate our lunch of biscuits, butter, dates, cheese and peanut butter standing under a snowgum, then got going again as quickly as possible before we froze.
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 (This was written in response to a request for an informative article to assist those planning trips in the future. - Ed.) (This was written in response to a request for an informative article to assist those planning trips in the future. - Ed.)
  
-Gular is on the Coonanble ​line, and 70 miles north of Dubbo. The Coonamble Mail leaves Central 7.25 p.m. in the evening and arrives Gular 10.39 a.m. next morning. On the return, the train leaves Gular 1.56 p.m. in the afternoon and arrives Sydney 5.5 a.m. next morning.+Gular is on the Coonamble ​line, and 70 miles north of Dubbo. The Coonamble Mail leaves Central 7.25 p.m. in the evening and arrives Gular 10.39 a.m. next morning. On the return, the train leaves Gular 1.56 p.m. in the afternoon and arrives Sydney 5.5 a.m. next morning.
  
 The township of Gulargambone is about 2 miles east of the station and a bus to the town meets the train. The proprietor, Joe Donnelly, is very versatile on local information. The township of Gulargambone is about 2 miles east of the station and a bus to the town meets the train. The proprietor, Joe Donnelly, is very versatile on local information.
  
-Our official party, Easter 1947, used truck transport to the 35 miles distant Warrumbungles. The transport was supplied by E.R. Ginty and Company, Garage and Service Station, Gulargambone. Cost for forward and return truck trip was £16. There were 12 in the party, so it worked out at £1: 6: 8d. each. Another firm is Skinner Bros., Motor Garage, Bourbah ​Strebt, and there are several local carriers.+Our official party, Easter 1947, used truck transport to the 35 miles distant Warrumbungles. The transport was supplied by E.R. Ginty and Company, Garage and Service Station, Gulargambone. Cost for forward and return truck trip was £16. There were 12 in the party, so it worked out at £1: 6: 8d. each. Another firm is Skinner Bros., Motor Garage, Bourbah ​Street, and there are several local carriers.
  
 There is a good road for about 25 miles out, but it ray not be passable in very wet weather. The last 10 miles or so is through the foothills and up the Wombelong Creek. From the motor point of view the worst parts of the road are the six or so splash crossings of the creek. The steeply eroded banks were the major difficulty. The driver was expert and the truck powerful so we got to the furthest of the road at Pincham'​s farm. There is a good road for about 25 miles out, but it ray not be passable in very wet weather. The last 10 miles or so is through the foothills and up the Wombelong Creek. From the motor point of view the worst parts of the road are the six or so splash crossings of the creek. The steeply eroded banks were the major difficulty. The driver was expert and the truck powerful so we got to the furthest of the road at Pincham'​s farm.
  
-About 2 riles before coming to Pincham'​s,​ the road passes through Blackman'​s property. As it is necessary to go through both of those properties, it is customary to call in. I wrote to Pincham'​s some weeks ahead for permission to camp on his property, as this is desirable. I received a very courteous and helpful reply. The addness ​is A.J. Pincham, "​Strathmore",​ Upper Wombelong Creek, Warru1bungle Mts., Via Gulargambone. Keith Blackman and his wife were also very helpful with local information.+About 2 riles before coming to Pincham'​s,​ the road passes through Blackman'​s property. As it is necessary to go through both of those properties, it is customary to call in. I wrote to Pincham'​s some weeks ahead for permission to camp on his property, as this is desirable. I received a very courteous and helpful reply. The address ​is A.J. Pincham, "​Strathmore",​ Upper Wombelong Creek, Warru1bungle Mts., Via Gulargambone. Keith Blackman and his wife were also very helpful with local information.
  
 The whole area is normally very dry, but water will generally be found in the following places, provided some rain has fallen in previous months. (Refer to Myles Dunphy'​s Warrumbungle National Monument Map.) The whole area is normally very dry, but water will generally be found in the following places, provided some rain has fallen in previous months. (Refer to Myles Dunphy'​s Warrumbungle National Monument Map.)
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   * Upper Wombelong Creek is dry except for a small flow at the water tank just below Pincham'​s (good camp spot).   * Upper Wombelong Creek is dry except for a small flow at the water tank just below Pincham'​s (good camp spot).
  
-All other creek beds that we examined were very porous and of the storm water channel type, particularly higher up in the mountains. But springs or soaks exist, often high up, such as the remarkably good supply in the gully just above Hurley'​s Base Camp. This spot makes a very good basecarp. Small soaks have also been found in the gullies under the Bluff and the Bread Knife, but they would be difficult to find in emergency.+All other creek beds that we examined were very porous and of the storm water channel type, particularly higher up in the mountains. But springs or soaks exist, often high up, such as the remarkably good supply in the gully just above Hurley'​s Base Camp. This spot makes a very good basecamp. Small soaks have also been found in the gullies under the Bluff and the Bread Knife, but they would be difficult to find in emergency.
  
 Good trips are as follow: Good trips are as follow:
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   * Rock Mountain.   * Rock Mountain.
  
-All the foregoing are readily accessible from Hurley'​s Base Canp. When climbing up around Belougery Spire it is advisable to keep next to the rocky wall. This area encompasses most of the spectacular rock formations.+All the foregoing are readily accessible from Hurley'​s Base Camp. When climbing up around Belougery Spire it is advisable to keep next to the rocky wall. This area encompasses most of the spectacular rock formations.
  
 From camp at the tank just below Pincham'​s,​ the northern side may be explored as follows: From camp at the tank just below Pincham'​s,​ the northern side may be explored as follows:
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 |Creek to top of Woorut|1 1/4 hours| |Creek to top of Woorut|1 1/4 hours|
 |Woorut back to Creek|45 min.| |Woorut back to Creek|45 min.|
-|Creek back to mopera ​Gap|About 25 min.|+|Creek back to Mopera ​Gap|About 25 min.|
 |Mopera Gap back to tank at Pincham'​s|45 min.| |Mopera Gap back to tank at Pincham'​s|45 min.|
  
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 ====Australia Day Weekend Walk, 1948.==== ====Australia Day Weekend Walk, 1948.====
  
-Mr. A. Hardie wishes those desirous of going on his walk (Wingham - Ellenborough Falls - Bulga Ridge - Comboyne Plateau - Upper Lansdowne) to let him knew before the 31st Deccember, 1947, so that he may make arrangements for the necessary motor transport. He also requests the payment of 25/- per head to cover the latter before the same date.+Mr. A. Hardie wishes those desirous of going on his walk (Wingham - Ellenborough Falls - Bulga Ridge - Comboyne Plateau - Upper Lansdowne) to let him knew before the 31st December, 1947, so that he may make arrangements for the necessary motor transport. He also requests the payment of 25/- per head to cover the latter before the same date.
  
 If he cannot make up a party of five or more persons, he reserves the right to cancel the trip. If he cannot make up a party of five or more persons, he reserves the right to cancel the trip.
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 ---- ----
  
-On Bob Eastoe'​s Breakfast Creek trip Ray Kirkby, who was practising cooking and testing his intake in preparation for his Tasmanian trip, delighted the party with his excellent plum pudding. No synthetic product this, but, as he himself put it "made from the raw elements, ​thougth," he added, "I do allow myself the luxury of self-raising flour."​+On Bob Eastoe'​s Breakfast Creek trip Ray Kirkby, who was practising cooking and testing his intake in preparation for his Tasmanian trip, delighted the party with his excellent plum pudding. No synthetic product this, but, as he himself put it "made from the raw elements, ​though," he added, "I do allow myself the luxury of self-raising flour."​
  
 ---- ----
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 by Brian Harvey by Brian Harvey
  
-October 1937 saw the last quarterly edition of "A journal devoted to matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers."​ This particular issue, No. 35 of its ilk, was one of 20 pages, ​carercially ​mimeographed and selling to the news-hungry walkers, who eagerly snapped it up at the exorbitant pre-war price of 1/- a copy - 1/- mark you!! Issues appeared at three or four monthly periods - apparently as sufficient stories of trips came to hand - September 1936 struggled to reach __10__ pages!!+October 1937 saw the last quarterly edition of "A journal devoted to matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers."​ This particular issue, No. 35 of its ilk, was one of 20 pages, ​commercially ​mimeographed and selling to the news-hungry walkers, who eagerly snapped it up at the exorbitant pre-war price of 1/- a copy - 1/- mark you!! Issues appeared at three or four monthly periods - apparently as sufficient stories of trips came to hand - September 1936 struggled to reach __10__ pages!!
  
 Anyway, in historic 1937 it was resolved to purchase a duplicator and produce a monthly magazine by our own fair hands. The illustrious Business Manager, Bill Mu11ins (since the proud father of twins, we might remark) came to light with a second hand "​Remington Rapid Rotary"​ machine, known in well-informed office equipment circles as the "​R.R.R."​ The manufacturers undoubtedly were humourists, for at no stage of our early production were our efforts "​Rapid"​ and as for "​Rotary"​ - well, we buzzed about in ever increasing circles. Anyway, in historic 1937 it was resolved to purchase a duplicator and produce a monthly magazine by our own fair hands. The illustrious Business Manager, Bill Mu11ins (since the proud father of twins, we might remark) came to light with a second hand "​Remington Rapid Rotary"​ machine, known in well-informed office equipment circles as the "​R.R.R."​ The manufacturers undoubtedly were humourists, for at no stage of our early production were our efforts "​Rapid"​ and as for "​Rotary"​ - well, we buzzed about in ever increasing circles.
  
-Club artist Alan Rigby produced the bushland scene depicted on the cover within which we still proudly staple our pages today. A decade ago this month, under the baton of the said William Mullins, an imposing array of __seven__ operative "​assistants"​ made the kitchen of our Hamilton Street Clubroom the birthplace of the monthly magazine now presented on the first Friday of each month. Our first 13 pages (as a Christmas treat) was a blotchy, unevenly duplicated affair, costing 3d - some pages as black as the Caves during a power failure,, some faint like a much-worn carbon copy, others a rare combination of both. Not to mention "​first-copies"​ signed with the indelible black finger prints of the unskilled operators. The unsuitable paper had to be laboriously peeled off the rotary drum, laid out and a square of "​Sydney Morning Herald"​ plonked thereon to absorb excess ink. After drying we "​de-interleaved"​ and sorted out magazine and "​S.M.H."​ - never once making the fatal error of ringing in a page of "​Granny"​ in mistake. Hands and thoughts were equally black. How the Editor, Marie Byles, tolerated it we donft know, but when she passed the blue pencil on to Dorothy Lawry, after six months, a definite upward trend was in evidence. To brighten up the months our covers, in those days of ample supplies, appeared in rotation in blue, yellow, salmon, red and green tones.+Club artist Alan Rigby produced the bushland scene depicted on the cover within which we still proudly staple our pages today. A decade ago this month, under the baton of the said William Mullins, an imposing array of __seven__ operative "​assistants"​ made the kitchen of our Hamilton Street Clubroom the birthplace of the monthly magazine now presented on the first Friday of each month. Our first 13 pages (as a Christmas treat) was a blotchy, unevenly duplicated affair, costing 3d - some pages as black as the Caves during a power failure,, some faint like a much-worn carbon copy, others a rare combination of both. Not to mention "​first-copies"​ signed with the indelible black finger prints of the unskilled operators. The unsuitable paper had to be laboriously peeled off the rotary drum, laid out and a square of "​Sydney Morning Herald"​ plonked thereon to absorb excess ink. After drying we "​de-interleaved"​ and sorted out magazine and "​S.M.H."​ - never once making the fatal error of ringing in a page of "​Granny"​ in mistake. Hands and thoughts were equally black. How the Editor, Marie Byles, tolerated it we don'​t ​know, but when she passed the blue pencil on to Dorothy Lawry, after six months, a definite upward trend was in evidence. To brighten up the months our covers, in those days of ample supplies, appeared in rotation in blue, yellow, salmon, red and green tones.
  
 Came Hitler and the "​R.R.R."​ roved about the suburban homes of various operators, finally coming to rest for a long period with Yvonne Rolfe, who nobly performed the task of duplication,​ at times unaided. It was practically a feminine production by now. Copies were posted to every member of all bushwalking clubs on active service by that fine body, the Bushwalkers Services Committee. Came Hitler and the "​R.R.R."​ roved about the suburban homes of various operators, finally coming to rest for a long period with Yvonne Rolfe, who nobly performed the task of duplication,​ at times unaided. It was practically a feminine production by now. Copies were posted to every member of all bushwalking clubs on active service by that fine body, the Bushwalkers Services Committee.
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 To conserve paper we commenced printing on both sides. Clare Kinsella took over the editorship in June '42, and, owing to rising costs of paper the price rose to 4d. per copy. By midwinter of 1944 the few remaining walkers had to dig deep in pockets and handbags to extract the necessary 6d. wherewith to possess their magazine. Ray Kirkby became editor the next Apri1. This was in the dark days when the Club had no home, and, for a time, he had to produce the whole magazine himself - even to typing the stencils. Ron Knightley, our first post-war editor took over in May 1946 and carried on till March last year, when the present editor took over. To conserve paper we commenced printing on both sides. Clare Kinsella took over the editorship in June '42, and, owing to rising costs of paper the price rose to 4d. per copy. By midwinter of 1944 the few remaining walkers had to dig deep in pockets and handbags to extract the necessary 6d. wherewith to possess their magazine. Ray Kirkby became editor the next Apri1. This was in the dark days when the Club had no home, and, for a time, he had to produce the whole magazine himself - even to typing the stencils. Ron Knightley, our first post-war editor took over in May 1946 and carried on till March last year, when the present editor took over.
  
-For our present production we have a newly-acquired high-speed duplicater and an efficient co-ordinated staff including Walks Reporter, Illustrationist,​ Business Manager, Sales Manager and (most important) typistes who cut the stencils. All combine to bring you the latest trips, what the well-dressed walker is wearing, conservation,​ maps, Federation notes and club gossip. Due to savings effected in stencil cutting, we are able to allow a concession to those who stabilise our sales - viz the annual subscribers - in that the annual subscription,​ from 1st. Feb. next,is reduced, to 5/- per annum (postage 1/6 extra), a saving to the thrifty of 1/-. Casual cash sales rerain ​at 6d. per copy.+For our present production we have a newly-acquired high-speed duplicater and an efficient co-ordinated staff including Walks Reporter, Illustrationist,​ Business Manager, Sales Manager and (most important) typistes who cut the stencils. All combine to bring you the latest trips, what the well-dressed walker is wearing, conservation,​ maps, Federation notes and club gossip. Due to savings effected in stencil cutting, we are able to allow a concession to those who stabilise our sales - viz the annual subscribers - in that the annual subscription,​ from 1st. Feb. next,is reduced, to 5/- per annum (postage 1/6 extra), a saving to the thrifty of 1/-. Casual cash sales remain ​at 6d. per copy.
  
 Why not become an Annual Subscriber and make sure of your copy? Fill in the inserted form and hand over to Christa Ca1nan before another day passes! Why not become an Annual Subscriber and make sure of your copy? Fill in the inserted form and hand over to Christa Ca1nan before another day passes!
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 __Narrow Neck Land__: Position to be closely watched but no move yet. __Narrow Neck Land__: Position to be closely watched but no move yet.
  
-__Search and Rescue__: ​mr. K. Conpagnoni ​appointed Chairman of Section.+__Search and Rescue__: ​Mr. K. Compagnoni ​appointed Chairman of Section.
  
 __National Park fire lookout towers__: 15 S.B.W. members have volunteered to act as watchers at week-end during danger period. John Noble S.B.W. convenor. __National Park fire lookout towers__: 15 S.B.W. members have volunteered to act as watchers at week-end during danger period. John Noble S.B.W. convenor.
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 ---- ----
  
-BACK7A.RD BUS,​HVA.ALKIT,​T,​G- +=====Backyard Bushwalking.=====
-Yes, all the babies are doing. well.. Thanks to a few timely showers, all the seedlings are well established and putting on leaf nicely. If they can survive the next six months, they should make a pretty show in the following:​summer. One often sees warnings that native plants shOuld not be water. The fact seems to be that if the ground is well drained, they thrive on an extra ration of water during hot weather. I have a little bed of flannel flowers raised from seea. The soil is almost pure black san.(4.1 which is frequently watered. The flannel floAr plants have raced ahead and on one plant I recently counted over-eighty flowers - not including buds. +
-xxx xxxxxx-xxxxx IVITAT HAS PADDY GOT? +
-New line Royal Navy disposals. +
-Brand new tropical blankets. These extra large (7! x 5!) blankets only weigh 2,4 lbs. They are a pleasant grey-green '​colour in a good quality sof17,. woven,​fannel. Could be used as a summer camping blanket or an extra for winter trips.. Price 17/6 each. +
-Rucksacks. With or without frames in stock. +
-Billies. Upright rolled edge aluminium billies. 2 Pint 5/- 3- laTit-5/9 +
-Squat billies 1?; Pint 4/6, 2-4 pint 5/6, 3 pint 7/3, 4 pint 8/3 All good wishes for a happy Christmas. +
-.PADDY RALLIN +
-CAMP "GEAR FOR '​WALKERS  +
-Phone 327 George St., E 3101 +
-SYDNEY +
-10.+
  
 +Yes, all the babies are doing well. Thanks to a few timely showers, all the seedlings are well established and putting on leaf nicely. If they can survive the next six months, they should make a pretty show in the following summer. One often sees warnings that native plants should not be watered. The fact seems to be that if the ground is well drained, they thrive on an extra ration of water during hot weather. I have a little bed of flannel flowers raised from seed. The soil is almost pure black sand which is frequently watered. The flannel flower plants have raced ahead and on one plant I recently counted over eighty flowers - not including buds.
 +
 +----
 +
 +====What Has Paddy Got?====
 +
 +__New line - Royal Navy disposals.__
 +
 +Brand new tropical blankets. These extra large (7' x 5') blankets only weigh 2 1/2 lbs. They are a pleasant grey-green colour in a good quality soft woven flannel. Could be used as a summer camping blanket or an extra for winter trips. Price 17/6 each.
 +
 +__Rucksacks.__ With or without frames in stock.
 +
 +__Billies.__ Upright rolled edge aluminium billies. 2 Pint 5/-. 3 Pint 5/9.
 +
 +Squat billies 1 1/2 Pint 4/6, 2 1/2 pint 5/6, 3 pint 7/3, 4 pint 8/3.
 +
 +All good wishes for a happy Christmas.
 +
 +Paddy Pallin. Camp Gear For Walkers.
 + 
 +Phone B 3101. 327 George St., Sydney.
 +
 +----
194712.txt · Last modified: 2018/02/28 02:08 by tyreless