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194712 [2018/02/26 01:50]
tyreless
194712 [2018/02/27 02:33]
tyreless
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 For nearly a week we plodded up the now covered mountains and bore down again. Everyone was happy, the days were fine and the snow was good. Despite our generous collection of bruises and many groaning muscles we managed to enjoy ourselves. Evening excursions to the Chalet were becoming more and more popular. Some wanted hair cuts, some wanted to dance, but it did not take long to discover that the bar had an attraction too. For nearly a week we plodded up the now covered mountains and bore down again. Everyone was happy, the days were fine and the snow was good. Despite our generous collection of bruises and many groaning muscles we managed to enjoy ourselves. Evening excursions to the Chalet were becoming more and more popular. Some wanted hair cuts, some wanted to dance, but it did not take long to discover that the bar had an attraction too.
  
-One rornind ​the wind and rain greeted us in very boisterous manner. Everyone thought it delieltful for the first day - it was a grand opportunity for some extra spine-bashing - this skiing is really hard work, don't ever be led to believe it isn't. Climb a few mountains with six or seven feet of board strapped on each foot, then slide swiftly down crashing here and there of course, while the spectators have a little bet on whether you'll be able to rise again under your own steam. After a few days of all this you too would welcome a day of rest.+One morning ​the wind and rain greeted us in very boisterous manner. Everyone thought it delieltful for the first day - it was a grand opportunity for some extra spine-bashing - this skiing is really hard work, don't ever be led to believe it isn't. Climb a few mountains with six or seven feet of board strapped on each foot, then slide swiftly down crashing here and there of course, while the spectators have a little bet on whether you'll be able to rise again under your own steam. After a few days of all this you too would welcome a day of rest.
  
 But alas, next day it rained just as hard and the wind blew even harder. At breakfast that morning someone had a bright idea that we might pack up and go north, to Yamba, where there is a beautiful surfing beach and warm sunshine (someone worked it all out about the sunshine). Six out of the ten of us decided to leave for this charming spot and so all arrangements were made. The other four were to go on to the Chalet for the week. There was much excitement as belongings were thrown into rucksacks and in an amazingly short time all six were set for the track. Just as the party was about to move off the wind screeched loudly and lashed the rain furiously against the first face that emerged from the door. Like a drowning man grasping at a straw he desperately urged a conference, to make sure this really was a sensible move. A round-the-stove conference was held and excitement dissolved into doubt and indecision. Eventually, the wonderful dream of surf and sunshine was put back into its box and the whole party decided to go to the Chalet. All except one, who very much wanted to make the trip and almost slipped out on to the cold, cruel, windswept snow, where she would soon have disappeared into the rain and fog. But we dragged her back and made her count ten. But alas, next day it rained just as hard and the wind blew even harder. At breakfast that morning someone had a bright idea that we might pack up and go north, to Yamba, where there is a beautiful surfing beach and warm sunshine (someone worked it all out about the sunshine). Six out of the ten of us decided to leave for this charming spot and so all arrangements were made. The other four were to go on to the Chalet for the week. There was much excitement as belongings were thrown into rucksacks and in an amazingly short time all six were set for the track. Just as the party was about to move off the wind screeched loudly and lashed the rain furiously against the first face that emerged from the door. Like a drowning man grasping at a straw he desperately urged a conference, to make sure this really was a sensible move. A round-the-stove conference was held and excitement dissolved into doubt and indecision. Eventually, the wonderful dream of surf and sunshine was put back into its box and the whole party decided to go to the Chalet. All except one, who very much wanted to make the trip and almost slipped out on to the cold, cruel, windswept snow, where she would soon have disappeared into the rain and fog. But we dragged her back and made her count ten.
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 The whole area is normally very dry, but water will generally be found in the following places, provided some rain has fallen in previous months. (Refer to Myles Dunphy'​s Warrumbungle National Monument Map.) The whole area is normally very dry, but water will generally be found in the following places, provided some rain has fallen in previous months. (Refer to Myles Dunphy'​s Warrumbungle National Monument Map.)
  
-Near the head of the Castlereagh River, just east Mopera Gap. +  * Near the head of the Castlereagh River, just east Mopera Gap. 
- +  ​* ​Mopera Gap Creek from Mopera Gap down to Wombelong Creek. 
-Mopera Gap Creek from Mopera Gap down to Wombelong Creek. +  ​* ​Wombelong Creek from Mopera Gap Creek junction downstream for about 5 miles or so. These two latter streams give the biggest flow of water this side of the range. 
- +  ​* ​Upper Wombelong Creek is dry except for a small flow at the water tank just below Pincham'​s (good camp spot).
-Wombelong Creek from Mopera Gap Creek junction downstream for about 5 miles or so. These two latter streams give the biggest flow of water this side of the range. +
- +
-Upper Wombelong Creek is dry except for a small flow at the water tank just below Pincham'​s (good camp spot).+
  
 All other creek beds that we examined were very porous and of the storm water channel type, particularly higher up in the mountains. But springs or soaks exist, often high up, such as the remarkably good supply in the gully just above Hurley'​s Base Camp. This spot makes a very good basecarp. Small soaks have also been found in the gullies under the Bluff and the Bread Knife, but they would be difficult to find in emergency. All other creek beds that we examined were very porous and of the storm water channel type, particularly higher up in the mountains. But springs or soaks exist, often high up, such as the remarkably good supply in the gully just above Hurley'​s Base Camp. This spot makes a very good basecarp. Small soaks have also been found in the gullies under the Bluff and the Bread Knife, but they would be difficult to find in emergency.
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 Good trips are as follow: Good trips are as follow:
  
-The Bluff via the high tops above the Broad Knife. +  * The Bluff via the high tops above the Broad Knife. 
- +  ​* ​High Top 3. 
-High Top 3. +  ​* ​Rock Mountain.
- +
-Rock Mountain.+
  
 All the foregoing are readily accessible from Hurley'​s Base Canp. When climbing up around Belougery Spire it is advisable to keep next to the rocky wall. This area encompasses most of the spectacular rock formations. All the foregoing are readily accessible from Hurley'​s Base Canp. When climbing up around Belougery Spire it is advisable to keep next to the rocky wall. This area encompasses most of the spectacular rock formations.
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 |Gap down into Upper Mopera Gap Creek|20 min.| |Gap down into Upper Mopera Gap Creek|20 min.|
 |Creek to top of Woorut|1 1/4 hours| |Creek to top of Woorut|1 1/4 hours|
-Woorut back to Creek|45 min.|+|Woorut back to Creek|45 min.|
 |Creek back to mopera Gap|About 25 min.| |Creek back to mopera Gap|About 25 min.|
-Mopera Gap back to tank at Pincham'​s|45 min.|+|Mopera Gap back to tank at Pincham'​s|45 min.|
  
 ---- ----
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 ---- ----
  
-15. +=====We Went To Press In '37.===== 
-iE ENT, TO PRESS IN '​37 ​+
 by Brian Harvey by Brian Harvey
-October 1937 saw the last., quarterly edition of journal devoted to ,,atters pf interest to the Sydney Bush idlialkers h This particular issue, No. 35 of its ilk, was one of 20 pages,- carercially mimeographed and selling to the news-hun7yy walkers,who eagerly snapped it up,at the exorbitant pre-war price of 1/- a copy - 1/- mark youl! Issues appeared at three or four monthly periods - apparently as sufficient stories of trips cane to hand - September 1936 struggled to reach 10 par.;es!! 
-nyway, in historic 1937 it :was resolvod,to purchase a-duplicator and produce a monthly mamzine by our own fair hands. The illustrious Business'​7anager,​. Bill 7u11ins (since'​ the proud father of twins, we T",;​iht rerark) came to light with a second hand uReliinf;​ton Rapid ,​Rotary"​ machine, known in well4informed office equipment '​circles as the uR.R.R.0 The manufacturers undoubtedly were hurourists, fOr at no stac;e of our early production were our efforts uRapid u and as for "​Rotaryu.- well; we buzzed about in ever increasing circles. 
-Club artist Alan Rigby prouced the bushland scene depicted on the cover within which we still proudly staple ourpages today. 
-decade ago this month, under the baton of the said ,illiam vullins, an imposing array of seven operative uassistantsu made the kitchen of our Hamilton StrKTElubroOr the birthplace of the nonthly magazine now presented on the first Friday of each month. Cur first 13 pages (as a Christmas treat) was a blotchy, unevenly duplicated affair, costing 3d - sone pages as black as the Caves during a power failure,, some faint like a much-worn carbon copy), others a rare cortination of both. Not to mention '​first-copies"​ signed with the indelible black finger prints of the unskilled operators. The unsuitable paper had to be laboriously peeled off the rotary drum, laid out and a square of Sydney Horning Herald"​ -plonked thereOn to absorb excess ink. After drying we udeinterleaved"'​ and Sorted out r'​laF:​azine and uS.v.,​71.''​ - never once making the fatal error of ringing in a page of uGronnyu in mistake. Hands and thoughts were equally black. Haw the Editor, T'arie Byles, tolerated it We donft know, but when she, passed. the blue 13encil on to Dorothy Lawry, after six months, a definite upward trend was in evidence. To brighten up the months our covers, in those days of ample suPplies, appeared in. rotation in blue, yellow, salmon, red and green tones. 
  
-Came Hitler and the "​R.R.R.roved about the suburban homes +October 1937 saw the last quarterly edition of "A journal devoted to matters of interest to the Sydney Bush Walkers."​ This particular issue, No. 35 of its ilk, was one of 20 pages, carercially mimeographed and selling to the news-hungry walkers, who eagerly snapped it up at the exorbitant pre-war price of 1/- a copy - 1/- mark you!! Issues appeared at three or four monthly periods - apparently as sufficient stories of trips came to hand - September 1936 struggled to reach __10__ pages!! 
-of various-operators, finallycoming ​"to rest for a long period with Yvonne Rolfe, who nobly performed the task of duplication,​ at tines unaided. It was practi cally. ​fertLnine ​production by now. Copies were posted to Very roTeber'​of all bushwalking clubs on active service by that fine body,the.Bushwalkers Services Committee. + 
-To conserve ​'paper we correnced ​printing on both sides. Clare Kinsella took over the editorship in June 142, and, owing to rising costs of paper the price rose to 4d. per copy. By midwinter of 1944 the few remaining walkers had to dig deep in pockets and +Anyway, in historic 1937 it was resolved to purchase a duplicator and produce a monthly magazine by our own fair hands. The illustrious Business Manager, Bill Mu11ins (since the proud father of twins, we might remark) came to light with a second hand "​Remington Rapid Rotary"​ machine, known in well-informed office equipment circles as the "​R.R.R."​ The manufacturers undoubtedly were humourists, for at no stage of our early production were our efforts "​Rapid"​ and as for "​Rotary"​ - well, we buzzed about in ever increasing circles. 
-1G. + 
-handbas ​to extract the necessary ​6. wherewith to possess their ragazineHay Kirkby ​ber!ar'​e ​editor the next pri1. This was in the drirk dr yys when the Club had no hoc, and, for a tire, he had +Club artist Alan Rigby produced the bushland scene depicted on the cover within which we still proudly staple our pages today. A decade ago this month, under the baton of the said William Mullins, an imposing array of __seven__ operative "​assistants"​ made the kitchen of our Hamilton Street Clubroom the birthplace of the monthly magazine now presented on the first Friday of each month. Our first 13 pages (as a Christmas treat) was a blotchy, unevenly duplicated affair, costing 3d - some pages as black as the Caves during a power failure,, some faint like a much-worn carbon copy, others a rare combination of both. Not to mention "​first-copies"​ signed with the indelible black finger prints of the unskilled operators. The unsuitable paper had to be laboriously peeled off the rotary drum, laid out and a square of "​Sydney Morning Herald"​ plonked thereon to absorb excess ink. After drying we "​de-interleaved"​ and sorted out magazine and "​S.M.H."​ - never once making the fatal error of ringing in a page of "​Granny"​ in mistake. Hands and thoughts were equally black. How the Editor, Marie Byles, tolerated it we donft know, but when she passed the blue pencil on to Dorothy Lawry, after six months, a definite upward trend was in evidence. To brighten up the months our covers, in those days of ample supplies, appeared in rotation in blue, yellow, salmon, red and green tones. 
-+ 
-ho produce the w-hole naazire hirself ​- even to typino ​the stencils. Ron Knichtley, our first post-ar editor took over in T'​ay ​1946 and carried on till Yarch last year, when the present editor took over. +Came Hitler and the "​R.R.R." ​roved about the suburban homes of various operators, finally coming to rest for a long period with Yvonne Rolfe, who nobly performed the task of duplication,​ at times unaided. It was practically ​feminine ​production by now. Copies were posted to every member ​of all bushwalking clubs on active service by that fine body, the Bushwalkers Services Committee. 
-For our present production we have a newly-apquired highspeed duplic-Ater and an efficient co-ordinfAted ​staff including + 
-Reporter, Illustrationist,​ Business ​Vana6.er, Sales wanager ​and (-nest tr,portanttynistos ​who mat the stencils. ​ill corbine ​to bring you the latest trips, what the well -dressed walker is wearin, conservation, ​naps, Federation notes and club :-;ossipDuo tJc s'​tvin(:​s ​effected in stencil cutting, we are able to allow a concession to those who stabilise our sales - viz the annual subscribers - in that the annual subscription, ​fron 1st. Feb. next,is reduced, to 5/- per annun (postare ​1/6 extra), a saving +To conserve paper we commenced ​printing on both sides. Clare Kinsella took over the editorship in June '42, and, owing to rising costs of paper the price rose to 4d. per copy. By midwinter of 1944 the few remaining walkers had to dig deep in pockets and handbags ​to extract the necessary ​6d. wherewith to possess their magazineRay Kirkby ​became ​editor the next Apri1. This was in the dark days when the Club had no home, and, for a time, he had to produce the whole magazine himself ​- even to typing ​the stencils. Ron Knightley, our first post-war editor took over in May 1946 and carried on till March last year, when the present editor took over. 
-to the thrifty of 1/-. Casual ​cashsales ​rerain at 6d. per copy. + 
-hy not becore ​an Lnnual ​Subscriber and 'make sure of your copy? Fill in the inserted ​forr and hand over to Christa ​C-.11nan ​before another day passes! +For our present production we have a newly-acquired high-speed duplicater ​and an efficient co-ordinated ​staff including ​Walks Reporter, Illustrationist,​ Business ​Manager, Sales Manager ​and (most importanttypistes ​who cut the stencils. ​All combine ​to bring you the latest trips, what the well-dressed walker is wearing, conservation, ​maps, Federation notes and club gossipDue to savings ​effected in stencil cutting, we are able to allow a concession to those who stabilise our sales - viz the annual subscribers - in that the annual subscription, ​from 1st. Feb. next,is reduced, to 5/- per annum (postage ​1/6 extra), a saving to the thrifty of 1/-. Casual ​cash sales rerain at 6d. per copy. 
-Present subscribers should note that current sub. expires with receipt of January ​ragazine. Let us know before 31st Jan. whether you are going to renew, please. + 
-FEDERTION NOTES by Brian Harvey +Why not become ​an Annual ​Subscriber and make sure of your copy? Fill in the inserted ​form and hand over to Christa ​Ca1nan ​before another day passes! 
-Icati_onTrus:t Tederation ​has affiliated. ​InauTu ral Trust reeti'​ng wen' ii:t ten dod and enthusiastic. Hopes raised for our national parks and priritive ​areas. Oliver ​Jyndhan ​our delegate. ​Yarrol;v reck Land) Position to be closely watched but no 3.ove yet. + 
-r. K. Conparsnoni ​appointed ​ClItAr-an ​of Section, rTat i-dirnW-fare ​lookout ​towers ​15 S.D.,nenbers ​have +Present subscribers should note that current sub. expires with receipt of January ​magazine. Let us know before 31st Jan. whether you are going to renew, please. 
-durilv: ​danger period. John Iroble ​convenor. + 
-Blue Gur: Reported ​Muth Hostellers destroyed two tree ferns. ​T"​riici-dhot ​on trail. ​Trore news of this later. +---- 
-KosciuskoTo -oppott ​and 7iss Joscolyn ​Henderson ​norinatod ​by VY(Ter6n ​to fill positions of trustees on proposed enlarged Trust. To represent recreational and grazing interests. ​Arend- lent to Act to 7o before ​Parilarent ​soon. + 
-Riflos: Co-operation of Police Dept. sought on license of guns -6.71---Catrol ​of shooting in bush. Blitz on Sunday shooting. ​Conservation Bureau: Has been re-created and is finding its feet after hibernation during war. Policy to be drawn up. +=====Federation Notes.===== 
-Bundeena: Proposed new road fron top Artillery Hill strongly opposed. + 
-Bushwalkers,​ ear Terorial: be bronze tablet at Splendour +by Brian Harvey 
-:r?o-c-11.-Mciarc-DTE-o-i-r,​-E'​jl;​rvice' ​next Anzac Day. ;C,9 cost to be defrayed + 
-17. +__National Trust__Federation ​has affiliated. ​Inaugural ​Trust meeting well attended ​and enthusiastic. Hopes raised for our national parks and primitive ​areas. Oliver ​Wyndham ​our delegate. 
-by donation. + 
-Wild flowers ​Total prohibition of sale is being sought. Federation now represents 1180 walkers and conservationirtsCairns ​on Peaks Unseenlyco..ment ​in record books deprecated. +__Narrow Neck Land__: ​Position to be closely watched but no move yet. 
-nnuFPrbj ​a,​campl-ete ​social and financial success. + 
-Recent. ​arriv4:ls fromWellington H.S., are Kath Jamieson +__Search and Rescue__: mr. K. Conpagnoni ​appointed ​Chairman ​of Section
-theTararua Trampersand Ray. Larberton ​of Paua Club and Canterbury ​mountainacring ​Club.. Both hav been seen on official walks and we hope to see more of theraS ​their -stay in this countryis indefinite. + 
-0000 Oo..opa.0 0000 +__National Park fire lookout ​towers__: ​15 S.B.Wmembers ​have volunteered to act as watchers at week-end during ​danger period. John Noble S.B.W. ​convenor. 
-The JohnHunters are having ​'a busy time the days extending + 
-hospitality to S.B.W.s.Yarge and Ruby Clarke, Doug Johnstone +__Blue Gum__: Reported ​Youth Hostellers destroyed two tree ferns. ​Trustees hot on trail. ​More news of this later. 
-ano Dave Ingramrecently spent a most enjoyable ​evenin ​with them in their Auckland ​hone, and Kath HardY and Ron Knightlay ​look like + 
-being on the visiting list very soon. It seers that Joan and +__Kosciusko__Tom Moppett ​and Miss Joscelyn ​Henderson ​nominated ​by Federation ​to fill positions of trustees on proposed enlarged Trust. To represent recreational and grazing interests. ​Amendment ​to Act to go before ​Parliament ​soon. 
-+ 
-Junior may be in Sydney some time next year. +__Rifles__: Co-operation of Police Dept. sought on license of guns and control ​of shooting in bush. Blitz on Sunday shooting. 
-0 o 000000 000000 + 
-P,​ip;​gest ​sensation in the "Vonterey' ​since David Stead took in a suitcase-full of snakes was the presentation to 'Bill Horton +__Conservation Bureau__: Has been re-created and is finding its feet after hibernation during war. Policy to be drawn up. 
-of a pair of long; Woollen ​underpants with lace frills and draw(er) cords round the cuffs. On the legs were embroidered in red wool + 
-the names of the lads and lasses who had donated them. In pres- +__Bundeena__: Proposed new road from top Artillery Hill strongly opposed. 
-enting tne woollies, Jim Brown expressed the hope that Bill' ​wouldfeel warrly ​towards his friends ​'​4.bile ​hewas away. Bill sailed + 
-for England on Dec, 41,:​th.: ​and will be away for -six months. He +__Bushwalkers'​ War Memorial__Will be bronze tablet at Splendour ​RockDedication Service ​next Anzac Day. £9 cost to be defrayed by donation. 
-a vary busy ran before he left being Walks Secretary, organiser of the Kiddies'​ Treat and a very usefUl ​worker on' ​the magazine. We hope he has a first rate trip, but it will be a good thing for the Club when he gets back0 + 
- iipos o o +__Wild flowers__: ​Total prohibition of sale is being sought. Federation now represents 1180 walkers and conservationists. 
-Ron Knightley, Kath Hardy and party set off for N.Z. on + 
-3rd Dec. Included in their itinerary is dinner at the Church of +__Cairns ​on Peaks__: Unseemly comment ​in record books deprecated. 
-Christ, Christchurch. Progress reports of the trip are promised + 
-Blue Yountains Yystery: What is a seaplane doing in the gully to the south of the water tanks at Hatoamba9 +__Annual Party__: Was complete ​social and financial success. 
-How long is a wombat ​r3 burrow? + 
-"​Burrows explored ​b7eGpen ​cut" have measured up to a hundred feet long, in some of thew chila might crawl through to the nestingchamber. Unusually extensive burrows may result from long continued use or the joining of an original network.... Burrows in the Tsonaro ​district of New South Wales are noted as being very large but only fray ten to fifteen feet long and usually with a comfortable nest at the end. +---- 
-from Furred Animals of Australia"​ by Ellis Troughton.+ 
 +Recent ​arrivals from Wellington N.Z., are Kath Jamieson ​of the Tararua Trampers and Ray Lamberton ​of Paua Club and Canterbury ​Mountaineering ​Club. Both have been seen on official walks and we hope to see more of them, their stay in this country is indefinite. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +The John Hunters are having a busy time the days extending hospitality to S.B.W.s. ​Marge and Ruby Clarke, Doug Johnstone ​and Dave Ingram recently spent a most enjoyable ​evening ​with them in their Auckland ​home, and Kath Hardy and Ron Knightley ​look like being on the visiting list very soon. It seems that Joan and "Junior" ​may be in Sydney some time next year. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Biggest ​sensation in the "Monterey" ​since David Stead took in a suitcase-full of snakes was the presentation to Bill Horton of a pair of long woollen ​underpants with lace frills and draw(er) cords round the cuffs. On the legs were embroidered in red wool the names of the lads and lasses who had donated them. In presenting the woollies, Jim Brown expressed the hope that Bill would feel warmly ​towards his friends ​while he was away. Bill sailed for England on Dec. 4th., and will be away for six months. He was a vary busy man before he left being Walks Secretary, organiser of the Kiddies'​ Treat and a very useful ​worker on the magazine. We hope he has a first rate trip, but it will be a good thing for the Club when he gets back. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Ron Knightley, Kath Hardy and party set off for N.Z. on 3rd Dec. Included in their itinerary is dinner at the Church of Christ, Christchurch. Progress reports of the trip are promised
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Blue Mountains Mystery: What is a seaplane doing in the gully to the south of the water tanks at Katoomba? 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +How long is a wombat'​s ​burrow? 
 + 
 +"​Burrows explored ​by "​open ​cut" have measured up to a hundred feet long, in some of them child might crawl through to the nesting chamber. Unusually extensive burrows may result from long continued use or the joining of an original network.... Burrows in the Monaro ​district of New South Wales are noted as being very large but only from ten to fifteen feet long and usually with a comfortable nest at the end.
 + 
 +from "Furred Animals of Australia"​ by Ellis Troughton. 
 + 
 +---- 
 BACK7A.RD BUS,​HVA.ALKIT,​T,​G- BACK7A.RD BUS,​HVA.ALKIT,​T,​G-
 Yes, all the babies are doing. well.. Thanks to a few timely showers, all the seedlings are well established and putting on leaf nicely. If they can survive the next six months, they should make a pretty show in the following:​summer. One often sees warnings that native plants shOuld not be water. The fact seems to be that if the ground is well drained, they thrive on an extra ration of water during hot weather. I have a little bed of flannel flowers raised from seea. The soil is almost pure black san.(4.1 which is frequently watered. The flannel floAr plants have raced ahead and on one plant I recently counted over-eighty flowers - not including buds. Yes, all the babies are doing. well.. Thanks to a few timely showers, all the seedlings are well established and putting on leaf nicely. If they can survive the next six months, they should make a pretty show in the following:​summer. One often sees warnings that native plants shOuld not be water. The fact seems to be that if the ground is well drained, they thrive on an extra ration of water during hot weather. I have a little bed of flannel flowers raised from seea. The soil is almost pure black san.(4.1 which is frequently watered. The flannel floAr plants have raced ahead and on one plant I recently counted over-eighty flowers - not including buds.
194712.txt · Last modified: 2018/02/28 02:08 by tyreless