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 |Editorial - Skiing for the Bushwalker| | 1| |Editorial - Skiing for the Bushwalker| | 1|
-|Objects of Proposed Skiing ​Conrittee| | 2|+|Objects of Proposed Skiing ​Committee| | 2|
 |Social Notes for November| | 3| |Social Notes for November| | 3|
 |At Our October Meeting| |3| |At Our October Meeting| |3|
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 =====Objects Of Proposed Skiing Committee.===== =====Objects Of Proposed Skiing Committee.=====
  
-(Extract from report of sub-committee appointed to investigate ​formastion ​of Club skiing section.)+(Extract from report of sub-committee appointed to investigate ​formation ​of Club skiing section.)
  
   - Generally organise skiing in the Club with the main object of assisting those members who wish to become ski-tourers.   - Generally organise skiing in the Club with the main object of assisting those members who wish to become ski-tourers.
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-=====Social Notes For Nobember.=====+=====Social Notes For November.=====
  
 In order that everyone may attend the Federation Party on the 21st. November, this evening will be a free night at our Club. In order that everyone may attend the Federation Party on the 21st. November, this evening will be a free night at our Club.
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 =====At Our October Meeting.===== =====At Our October Meeting.=====
  
-Members were surprised when, instead of the usual thumping of the bone, they were sumnoned ​to the meeting by the beating of a most elegant brass gong, hung, appropriately enough, on a framework of brass sticks. We later learned that it had been donated to the Club by the President, who felt that the bone needed more gentle treatment as it grew older. The bone itself, we are glad to announce, reposed on its stand, its beautiful curves not even dented by the recent accident. For this we have to thank Dennis Gittoes.+Members were surprised when, instead of the usual thumping of the bone, they were summoned ​to the meeting by the beating of a most elegant brass gong, hung, appropriately enough, on a framework of brass sticks. We later learned that it had been donated to the Club by the President, who felt that the bone needed more gentle treatment as it grew older. The bone itself, we are glad to announce, reposed on its stand, its beautiful curves not even dented by the recent accident. For this we have to thank Dennis Gittoes.
  
 First business of the evening was the welcoming of a new member, Fred Doutch. First business of the evening was the welcoming of a new member, Fred Doutch.
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 Several species of mistletoe (Loranthaceae sp.) are found on gum trees. It is a hemi-parasite,​ i.e. it lives partly by synthesising its own food material and partly in its host plant. It is this parasitic function that makes mistletoe such a menace, causing as it does disfigurement of ornamental trees and stunting and ultimate killing of forest trees. Several species of mistletoe (Loranthaceae sp.) are found on gum trees. It is a hemi-parasite,​ i.e. it lives partly by synthesising its own food material and partly in its host plant. It is this parasitic function that makes mistletoe such a menace, causing as it does disfigurement of ornamental trees and stunting and ultimate killing of forest trees.
  
-The raveges ​of mistletoe are reaching alarming proportions,​ and it is the duty of all foresters, beekeepers, etc. to strive towards its elimination. Although millions of our trees have been destroyed by this pest, it is not too late to do something about it. There is in addition, evidence to suggest that mistletoe has an indirect harmful effect by leaving the way open for an infection of the tree by fungi and insect pests.+The ravages ​of mistletoe are reaching alarming proportions,​ and it is the duty of all foresters, beekeepers, etc. to strive towards its elimination. Although millions of our trees have been destroyed by this pest, it is not too late to do something about it. There is in addition, evidence to suggest that mistletoe has an indirect harmful effect by leaving the way open for an infection of the tree by fungi and insect pests.
  
 The seeds of mistletoes are generally surrounded by a viscid gum. This sticky gum enables the seed to adhere closely to the bark of trees. The adhering seeds soon germinate and send suckers (haustoria) through the bark of the host tree into its living tissues. From the living tissues of the host the parasite derives nourishment,​ as it has no roots of its own in contact with the soil. It seems most likely that birds convey the seeds of the parasite from tree to tree, after having eaten the sweet gummy fruits. The seeds of mistletoes are generally surrounded by a viscid gum. This sticky gum enables the seed to adhere closely to the bark of trees. The adhering seeds soon germinate and send suckers (haustoria) through the bark of the host tree into its living tissues. From the living tissues of the host the parasite derives nourishment,​ as it has no roots of its own in contact with the soil. It seems most likely that birds convey the seeds of the parasite from tree to tree, after having eaten the sweet gummy fruits.
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 Of the coastal species Eucalyptus tereticornis (Blue Gum) is considered the most susceptible to mistletoe attack, and of the western species the most susceptible are Eucalyptus rostrata (River Red Gum), and the Boxes: Eucalyptus pilligaenis (Narrow Leaved Box), and Eucalyptus hamiphloia (Grey Ironbox). For some years past reports have been received from districts through which the Condamine River flows, to the effect that there has been a large increase in the mistletoes on the gum trees on the banks of the river. Of the coastal species Eucalyptus tereticornis (Blue Gum) is considered the most susceptible to mistletoe attack, and of the western species the most susceptible are Eucalyptus rostrata (River Red Gum), and the Boxes: Eucalyptus pilligaenis (Narrow Leaved Box), and Eucalyptus hamiphloia (Grey Ironbox). For some years past reports have been received from districts through which the Condamine River flows, to the effect that there has been a large increase in the mistletoes on the gum trees on the banks of the river.
  
-Many of the trees are so closely infested by the parasite that they are threatened with destruction. It has also been reported that opossuns ​keep the mistletoe in check, and that after the opossums are thinned out by trapping and shooting, there is a dangerous increase in mistletoes parasiting the gum trees. This seems reasonable, for opossums certainly play their part in keeping the balance of nature.+Many of the trees are so closely infested by the parasite that they are threatened with destruction. It has also been reported that opossums ​keep the mistletoe in check, and that after the opossums are thinned out by trapping and shooting, there is a dangerous increase in mistletoes parasiting the gum trees. This seems reasonable, for opossums certainly play their part in keeping the balance of nature.
  
 Some mistletoe are particular as to their host. Loranthus pendulus mostly occurs on eucalyptus, L. Bidwillii grows only on Cypress Pines and L. linophyllus on She-oaks. Some are common on many trees but prefer a particular kind, thus L. vitellinus is especially abundant on the Swamp Mahogany, L. congener on She-oaks and Notothixos incanus on Ti-trees. N. Subaureus always grows on other mistletoes, instead of direct on to a host tree. Some mistletoes are indifferent as to their host and grow on many shrub and forest trees. Some mistletoe are particular as to their host. Loranthus pendulus mostly occurs on eucalyptus, L. Bidwillii grows only on Cypress Pines and L. linophyllus on She-oaks. Some are common on many trees but prefer a particular kind, thus L. vitellinus is especially abundant on the Swamp Mahogany, L. congener on She-oaks and Notothixos incanus on Ti-trees. N. Subaureus always grows on other mistletoes, instead of direct on to a host tree. Some mistletoes are indifferent as to their host and grow on many shrub and forest trees.
    
-Since mistletoe requires much light, reasonably dense stands suffer little, but mistletoe is most severe on trees occupying poor sites where it is difficult or inpossible ​to maintain adequate density.+Since mistletoe requires much light, reasonably dense stands suffer little, but mistletoe is most severe on trees occupying poor sites where it is difficult or impossible ​to maintain adequate density.
  
 (In the next issue Mr. Wyborn will describe methods of mistletoe control.) (In the next issue Mr. Wyborn will describe methods of mistletoe control.)
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 Lecture by Mr. Kingsmill, Executive Officer of the Bus Fires Advisory Council, on 26th September. Lecture by Mr. Kingsmill, Executive Officer of the Bus Fires Advisory Council, on 26th September.
  
-Mr. Kingsmill commenced by stating that probably we could give him some points on bushfire prevention, but that he was very glad of the opoortunity ​to meet is and let us know what the Council is doing.+Mr. Kingsmill commenced by stating that probably we could give him some points on bushfire prevention, but that he was very glad of the opportunity ​to meet is and let us know what the Council is doing.
  
 His first point was that the general public does not realise the great loss caused by bushfires. During fires in Victoria in 1944/5 70 people lost their lives and in 1939 50 people died in four or five days. Also in the U.S.A. the cost to the nation of forest and other fires was greater than the entire war damage in England. His first point was that the general public does not realise the great loss caused by bushfires. During fires in Victoria in 1944/5 70 people lost their lives and in 1939 50 people died in four or five days. Also in the U.S.A. the cost to the nation of forest and other fires was greater than the entire war damage in England.
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 warnings are based on weather Bureau advice. When the apparent danger has passed a notice is placed in the papers repealing the regulations. The intention is to use Radio Stations, just after the 7 p.m. news on Fridays (also to advise Paddy Pallin) to broadcast fire lighting banning and repeal. warnings are based on weather Bureau advice. When the apparent danger has passed a notice is placed in the papers repealing the regulations. The intention is to use Radio Stations, just after the 7 p.m. news on Fridays (also to advise Paddy Pallin) to broadcast fire lighting banning and repeal.
  
-The Council insists that in Parks, Reserves and open Bushland only properly constructed fireplaces be used, all inflannable ​material being cleared for 10 ft. around. Failing the use of a properly constructed fireplace, care should be taken to see that the fire is not built near a log or stump, and all inflammable material for 25 ft. around should be cleared.+The Council insists that in Parks, Reserves and open Bushland only properly constructed fireplaces be used, all inflammable ​material being cleared for 10 ft. around. Failing the use of a properly constructed fireplace, care should be taken to see that the fire is not built near a log or stump, and all inflammable material for 25 ft. around should be cleared.
  
 The best protection for the bush is proper fireplaces, fire trails, and adequate fire fighting equipment. The best protection for the bush is proper fireplaces, fire trails, and adequate fire fighting equipment.
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 At last the great night arrived and a slight panic was created by one of the party, Stan, who turned up about 10 minutes later than the scheduled meeting tine. However, all were present when the train departed. At last the great night arrived and a slight panic was created by one of the party, Stan, who turned up about 10 minutes later than the scheduled meeting tine. However, all were present when the train departed.
  
-We arrived at Katoonba ​and departed from the station by other means than the barrier (to save time of course) and straight into a car which took us out to the beginning of the Narrow Necks. After peeling off we set out for Splendour Rook, wearing shorts and boots only. Our first stop was at Diamond Falls, and we set off again laughing, joking, and talking of past experiences to pass the time away - walking along the Narrow Necks being very monotonous, as most bushwalkers know. We had chosen this particular weekend because of the full moon, so torches were seldom used. We dropped off Clear Hill and then rounded the bottom of Mt. Mouin, arriving at Spendour Rock at 12.30 a.m. and so to bed.+We arrived at Katoomba ​and departed from the station by other means than the barrier (to save time of course) and straight into a car which took us out to the beginning of the Narrow Necks. After peeling off we set out for Splendour Rook, wearing shorts and boots only. Our first stop was at Diamond Falls, and we set off again laughing, joking, and talking of past experiences to pass the time away - walking along the Narrow Necks being very monotonous, as most bushwalkers know. We had chosen this particular weekend because of the full moon, so torches were seldom used. We dropped off Clear Hill and then rounded the bottom of Mt. Mouin, arriving at Spendour Rock at 12.30 a.m. and so to bed.
  
 We were up and away before sunrise the next morning and down to the Cox River for breakfast which, by the way, consisted of goulash - something after the style of food which our rabid vegetarian friend Clem Hallstrom eats, only slightly more flavoured with raw peanuts and dates. All meals for the trip consisted of this tacky substance. We were up and away before sunrise the next morning and down to the Cox River for breakfast which, by the way, consisted of goulash - something after the style of food which our rabid vegetarian friend Clem Hallstrom eats, only slightly more flavoured with raw peanuts and dates. All meals for the trip consisted of this tacky substance.
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 We reached Kanangra somewhere about 5 o'​clock that afternoon, and after a drink and a spell we set off again that night for the Kowmung River via the Gingera Range. For a large part of the way down this range there is a good stock-route which made the going a lot easier and faster. However, when this branched off we dropped down into the Gingera Creek - quite accidentally,​ of course. We reached Kanangra somewhere about 5 o'​clock that afternoon, and after a drink and a spell we set off again that night for the Kowmung River via the Gingera Range. For a large part of the way down this range there is a good stock-route which made the going a lot easier and faster. However, when this branched off we dropped down into the Gingera Creek - quite accidentally,​ of course.
  
-Parts of the old Cedar Road can be seen on this creek, and there are grassy flats all the way down to the Kownung ​River. Walking down these out of the way creeks at night is very interesting,​ as all the wild-life - wallabies and wombats, etc. - came down for a drink and dash off for their lives when they hear something coming. A startled wombat charged one of our members (of St. George Club) who suddenly woke up and dived to one side, the wombat rushing past and just brushing his legs. (A peculiar thing about this weekend was that three members of the St. George Club had decided to do the very same trip as us on that weekend so we all went along together.) At ten o'​clock we stopped walking, lit a fire to sleep by and then slept till dawn.+Parts of the old Cedar Road can be seen on this creek, and there are grassy flats all the way down to the Kowmung ​River. Walking down these out of the way creeks at night is very interesting,​ as all the wild-life - wallabies and wombats, etc. - came down for a drink and dash off for their lives when they hear something coming. A startled wombat charged one of our members (of St. George Club) who suddenly woke up and dived to one side, the wombat rushing past and just brushing his legs. (A peculiar thing about this weekend was that three members of the St. George Club had decided to do the very same trip as us on that weekend so we all went along together.) At ten o'​clock we stopped walking, lit a fire to sleep by and then slept till dawn.
  
 We moved off early again the next morning, reaching the Kowmung a mile further down. We moved off early again the next morning, reaching the Kowmung a mile further down.
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 We left the Cox and headed up White Dog, which is the easiest of all the "​Dogs"​ to climb, and which brought us to the bottom of Mt. Mouin. Incidentally,​ we stopped on White Dog to repair Stan's feet, the heels and soles of which were one big mass of sticking plaster. We left the Cox and headed up White Dog, which is the easiest of all the "​Dogs"​ to climb, and which brought us to the bottom of Mt. Mouin. Incidentally,​ we stopped on White Dog to repair Stan's feet, the heels and soles of which were one big mass of sticking plaster.
  
-After clinbing ​Debert'​s Knob and Clear Hill we stopped at Glenraphael where we finished off the remains of our food with a good drink of water, the first since the Cox River.+After climbing ​Debert'​s Knob and Clear Hill we stopped at Glenraphael where we finished off the remains of our food with a good drink of water, the first since the Cox River.
  
 No sooner had we departed for Diamond Falls than it began to rain like cats and dogs. Formally we would have cursed the rain, but all were glad to see it this time as it refreshed our bodies and minds, as well as enabling us to keep up a good pace to Diamond Falls. It took us an hour and a half from Glenraphael to Diamond Falls, which was fairly fast going. No sooner had we departed for Diamond Falls than it began to rain like cats and dogs. Formally we would have cursed the rain, but all were glad to see it this time as it refreshed our bodies and minds, as well as enabling us to keep up a good pace to Diamond Falls. It took us an hour and a half from Glenraphael to Diamond Falls, which was fairly fast going.
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 It had taken us less than forty-five hours to do the whole trip which was approximately 80 miles. It had taken us less than forty-five hours to do the whole trip which was approximately 80 miles.
  
-Although at the time I was thinking it was goiig to be the last walk I'd ever do, on looking back it was an experience none would have missed, and at the same time I say that our next trip there will be by car all the way there and back.+Although at the time I was thinking it was going to be the last walk I'd ever do, on looking back it was an experience none would have missed, and at the same time I say that our next trip there will be by car all the way there and back.
  
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 And so on to the next day which was like all the others except that we covered twice as much ground and only one river. Here we were on the Hunter Range following the route of the old cattle duffers who lifted their pocket money from Putty and took it to Rylstone, where somebody else generally lifted it and took it over Nullo Mt. to Denman. All went well this day and we followed the range fifteen miles, past the twin basaltic peaks and high sandstone cliffy lump of the three Kekeelbon Mts., getting lost on Mt. Brown further on, until we got to Coricudgy. From the Kekeelbons a cattle pad winds its way to Mt. Coricudgy, but it disappeared here and there gremlin like and only came to light on narrow saddles where it just couldn'​t help it. And so on to the next day which was like all the others except that we covered twice as much ground and only one river. Here we were on the Hunter Range following the route of the old cattle duffers who lifted their pocket money from Putty and took it to Rylstone, where somebody else generally lifted it and took it over Nullo Mt. to Denman. All went well this day and we followed the range fifteen miles, past the twin basaltic peaks and high sandstone cliffy lump of the three Kekeelbon Mts., getting lost on Mt. Brown further on, until we got to Coricudgy. From the Kekeelbons a cattle pad winds its way to Mt. Coricudgy, but it disappeared here and there gremlin like and only came to light on narrow saddles where it just couldn'​t help it.
  
-Around Coricudgy the scenery changed, what with hungry cattle and the effects of bushfires, and timber getters. I redict ​a fine flurry of conservationism when the place becames ​more popular with bushwalkers,​ because although at the moment the fine timber on top of these basalt capped mountains is a bit out of the way, timber shortages may eventually lead to heavy inroads on these natural resources.+Around Coricudgy the scenery changed, what with hungry cattle and the effects of bushfires, and timber getters. I predict ​a fine flurry of conservationism when the place becomes ​more popular with bushwalkers,​ because although at the moment the fine timber on top of these basalt capped mountains is a bit out of the way, timber shortages may eventually lead to heavy inroads on these natural resources.
  
 On the flanks of Coricudgy the track became a road which led out into The Ovens on the head of the Cudgegong River. Max Gentle knows this country and can tell you all about the road there from Kandos. So will I if you want to know, and more, but suffice to say we reached Rylstone two days later, after numerous friendly clashes with very interesting locals, a story unto itself. On the flanks of Coricudgy the track became a road which led out into The Ovens on the head of the Cudgegong River. Max Gentle knows this country and can tell you all about the road there from Kandos. So will I if you want to know, and more, but suffice to say we reached Rylstone two days later, after numerous friendly clashes with very interesting locals, a story unto itself.
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 =====S.B.W. Night Of Plays.===== =====S.B.W. Night Of Plays.=====
  
-Not since pre-war years has the Dramatic Group been able to hire a hall and put on a full night of plays, though we have had some very enjoyable club-room entertainments. This time they put on four plays. In the first, "A narrative of nerves, nurses and nitwits",​ entitled "The Rest Cure", Ray Kirkby, looking convincingly debilitated,​ took part of the neurotic patient. Joan Savage took the part of his happy wife - happy because he couldn'​t get out of hospital for at least a month - while Betty Hurley and Betty Rose took the parts of "Dark Cat" and "Fair Cat" the unfeeling nurses. Edna Stretton, was the confiding hospital domestic who cheered Clarence the patient with tales of the sufferings ​df the patients and hints on how to tell when they were really sick.+Not since pre-war years has the Dramatic Group been able to hire a hall and put on a full night of plays, though we have had some very enjoyable club-room entertainments. This time they put on four plays. In the first, "A narrative of nerves, nurses and nitwits",​ entitled "The Rest Cure", Ray Kirkby, looking convincingly debilitated,​ took part of the neurotic patient. Joan Savage took the part of his happy wife - happy because he couldn'​t get out of hospital for at least a month - while Betty Hurley and Betty Rose took the parts of "Dark Cat" and "Fair Cat" the unfeeling nurses. Edna Stretton, was the confiding hospital domestic who cheered Clarence the patient with tales of the sufferings ​of the patients and hints on how to tell when they were really sick.
  
-Thb second was "Poor Old Sam" - "A pathetic pastoral pantomime"​ in which Sam, acted by Kevin Ardill, who has been fired from job for umpteenth time, decides to put on a hanging scene for the benefit of his nagging wife Martha (part taken by Dorothy Lawry). There was some very amusing by-play between Sam and Daffydill, a bloodthirsty maiden from nearby (part by Joan Savage) and, of course, in the middle of it in wander a cheerful couple (Betty Hurley and Jack Wren) who must have a cup of tea. The hanging wasn't at all successful and "Poor Old Sam" went back to work rather than help his wife with the launderihg ​business.+The second was "Poor Old Sam" - "A pathetic pastoral pantomime"​ in which Sam, acted by Kevin Ardill, who has been fired from job for umpteenth time, decides to put on a hanging scene for the benefit of his nagging wife Martha (part taken by Dorothy Lawry). There was some very amusing by-play between Sam and Daffydill, a bloodthirsty maiden from nearby (part by Joan Savage) and, of course, in the middle of it in wander a cheerful couple (Betty Hurley and Jack Wren) who must have a cup of tea. The hanging wasn't at all successful and "Poor Old Sam" went back to work rather than help his wife with the laundering ​business.
  
 "The Poison Party" - "A tragedy of questionable origin and definitely doubtful period"​ was very well cast. Doreen Harris took the part of the Queen Mother, who offered the poisoned tarts to the wicked damsel Denise de Beaujolis (Grace Jolly) who was seducing her son, King Charles (Jack Wren) and to her father Monsieur de Beaujolis (Kevin Ardill). Richard Croker was a very convincing Cardinal who was gratified to find he was to have one of the unpoisoned tarts. Things reach a climax when, due to the King eating all the unpoisoned tarts before the party started, it is discovered that only poisoned tarts remained and they have all had one. However, the status quo is restored when it is found that the king's rabbit ate the poisoned dish of dainties and exploded shortly after, the cook substituting another dish. "The Poison Party" - "A tragedy of questionable origin and definitely doubtful period"​ was very well cast. Doreen Harris took the part of the Queen Mother, who offered the poisoned tarts to the wicked damsel Denise de Beaujolis (Grace Jolly) who was seducing her son, King Charles (Jack Wren) and to her father Monsieur de Beaujolis (Kevin Ardill). Richard Croker was a very convincing Cardinal who was gratified to find he was to have one of the unpoisoned tarts. Things reach a climax when, due to the King eating all the unpoisoned tarts before the party started, it is discovered that only poisoned tarts remained and they have all had one. However, the status quo is restored when it is found that the king's rabbit ate the poisoned dish of dainties and exploded shortly after, the cook substituting another dish.
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 It was very entertaining to see our old favourites on the stage once more and good to see that new talent has been discovered. Joan deserves great credit for her production. It is not often, for instance, that an amateur show starts on time. This one did. Everything ran smoothly; the casting was good and the players practically word perfect. Joan must have worked like a Trojan to organise everything so well. It was very entertaining to see our old favourites on the stage once more and good to see that new talent has been discovered. Joan deserves great credit for her production. It is not often, for instance, that an amateur show starts on time. This one did. Everything ran smoothly; the casting was good and the players practically word perfect. Joan must have worked like a Trojan to organise everything so well.
  
-As a reault ​of the production the Federation will gain about £20 which will be used for the Health Meek Exhibition.+As a result ​of the production the Federation will gain about £20 which will be used for the Health Meek Exhibition.
  
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 The Railway Dept. threw a little light on one party of walkers recently. This could easily provide a sketch for next play night. Scene 1: Train pulls into station. Two First Class carriages are in darkness. Naturally the walkers entered the darkened boxes and secured seats. Enter one Railway porter, who after trying to switch on lights without success, shoots out again amid sighs of relief. The Railway Dept. threw a little light on one party of walkers recently. This could easily provide a sketch for next play night. Scene 1: Train pulls into station. Two First Class carriages are in darkness. Naturally the walkers entered the darkened boxes and secured seats. Enter one Railway porter, who after trying to switch on lights without success, shoots out again amid sighs of relief.
  
-Scene 2: Enter two ticket examiners, a quick flick of the wrist and lo, there is light, also panic. Half the party had paid the difference in fares when out went the light again. After several futile attempts to light up, the examiners retired in disgust. The only happy part of the story is that the half of the party who evaded payment was corprised ​of prospective members. They should be given membership status immediately.+Scene 2: Enter two ticket examiners, a quick flick of the wrist and lo, there is light, also panic. Half the party had paid the difference in fares when out went the light again. After several futile attempts to light up, the examiners retired in disgust. The only happy part of the story is that the half of the party who evaded payment was comprised ​of prospective members. They should be given membership status immediately.
  
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-17. +=====Walks Leadership.=====
-WALKS TFADERSHIP Allen Strom writes: +
-? 'Your editorial was timely and necessitous;​ I hope it will promote discussion and action and not remain a few lines in a magazine. +
-Prospectivos are an extremely important body of people even though the S.B.0i. is not anxious to take new members. But if we are conscientious about our pastime, if we believe that it will moan something to future generations,​ theh obviously we must be doing for the 1,11D and coining.'​ Despite other conceptions,​ I am of the belief that the S.B.vu. are ideally suited to the development of worthwhileness amongst beginners because this club has in its ranks large numbers of experienced and natured peoples highly capable in the passing on of knowledge and attitudes; furthermore the financial establishment of the S.B.itv. is such as to allow a stability to Bushwalking Education.''​ +
-The greatest danger to the prospective problar rests at present with tho Walks Programme and the demand upon physical endurance. Walks Programmes are not suited in a general fashion to the beginner and there is a preponderance of walks led by inexperienced peo- +
-ples in the field of walker-training;​ and worse still, their attitude towards beginners is, for many reasons, unsatisfactory. It +
-would appear that the unorganised choice of leaders for walks is a very poor and dangerous method of compiling a programme, particularly when people new to bushwalking are thrown against it. There is a most undesirable accent upon long endurance tests rather than an emphasis upon a broadened conception of walking as a con- +
-tact with the Natural Australia. Walks that look easy are shunned, any activity that proposes to teach is ridiculed and gradually we are breeding the notion that bushwalkers are a species of race +
-horses who visualise the bush as an impediment symbolic with a necessary evil. Maybe we should came off our pedestal and mix with the young people to hear just how they conceive walking. +
-Still, an entrance qualification which demands speed and endurance as the end-all will not serve to encourage those who are most desired. If the most difflibillt walks are always test walks, +
-. we will always find i-lexperienced people trying to do them; and when +
-walks are difficult they allow little time for leaders to contact beginners and to offer all the advice you suggest. Furthermore,​ the riew-chum''​ soon slips into the ranks of the bragger or leaves +
-walking altogether. Hero-worship attitude towards activities of extreme strain and dangerous mishap is very dangerous and obviously a setback to the development of the kind of person that your editorial suggests. Beginners should be protected from its influence and walks involved kept strictly from the programme. +
-All this seems to point towards a greater check on Prospectives and a closer watch on typos of people who lead the walks that they attend. If we are to achieve the attention you desire, then the present haphazard choice of walks is thoroughly unsatisfactory. A better scheme would involve the use of a special panel of leaders for prospectives and a set of walks and standards that would involve a broadened conception of walking.'​ +
-13. +
-:BA CKIARD 3IT5.ILL1LKING +
-There'​s groat activity going on. Seeds collected fror places as far afield as Beocroft Peninsula and Barrington Tops with lots of places in between, have been planted and arc now sturdy young seedlings. They arc crying to be planted out into their future hones ah d.the warm days have given a note of ur7oncy to the ratter for the tender youngsters would fare if a hot soaring westerly struck them before they got fully established. Already the garden is dotted with sticks and +
-labels and there arc dozans more to core. Lots --e the weather is kind and we ard vo,lchsafed a fcw refreshing showers which arc so much more a6coptable than the 1.1(-)so. +
-Three year old Pultenaea Stipularis plants bloomed for the first time and what a brave show they put on! P. Daphnoides was pretty and' tho Golden Poa bushes were a splendid sight. +
-They have finished now but thc flannel flowers arc now revelling in the warp sunshine. +
-.JAPARA. .There'​s a glirper Of hope. Things- look a-littic, mere ii."​-0-Era.:​ Paddy hopes to haii-c abottershowing of sleeping bags arid tents next yea:r... +
-ruck-. +
-ALUMINIUM BiLLIES. Conel'​e te. range of !s4uat ta:nd upright typos +
- ​1-1Firralo-ro:​ i um .fry pans 'in stock, +
-Plcttic proofed'​ ground'​s/​loots going veil. +
-' Paddy, Pa +
- 327 '​George Street Phone B SYDNEY +
-CAYP .livALEERS. +
-+
-STEEL FRaME 1iUCKSAC'​KS'​in_s Ok and a cOrIplete range+
  
 +Allen Strom writes:
 +
 +"Your editorial was timely and necessitous;​ I hope it will promote discussion and action and not remain a few lines in a magazine.
 +
 +Prospectives are an extremely important body of people even though the S.B.W. is not anxious to take new members. But if we are conscientious about our pastime, if we believe that it will mean something to future generations,​ then obviously we must be doing for the "up and coming."​ Despite other conceptions,​ I am of the belief that the S.B.W. are ideally suited to the development of worthwhileness amongst beginners because this club has in its ranks large numbers of experienced and natured peoples highly capable in the passing on of knowledge and attitudes; furthermore the financial establishment of the S.B.W. is such as to allow a stability to Bushwalking Education."​
 +
 +The greatest danger to the prospective problem rests at present with the Walks Programme and the demand upon physical endurance. Walks Programmes are not suited in a general fashion to the beginner and there is a preponderance of walks led by inexperienced peoples in the field of walker-training;​ and worse still, their attitude towards beginners is, for many reasons, unsatisfactory. It would appear that the unorganised choice of leaders for walks is a very poor and dangerous method of compiling a programme, particularly when people new to bushwalking are thrown against it. There is a most undesirable accent upon long endurance tests rather than an emphasis upon a broadened conception of walking as a contact with the Natural Australia. Walks that look easy are shunned, any activity that proposes to teach is ridiculed and gradually we are breeding the notion that bushwalkers are a species of race horses who visualise the bush as an impediment symbolic with a necessary evil. Maybe we should come off our pedestal and mix with the young people to hear just how they conceive walking.
 +
 +Still, an entrance qualification which demands speed and endurance as the end-all will not serve to encourage those who are most desired. If the most difficult walks are always test walks, we will always find inexperienced people trying to do them; and when walks are difficult they allow little time for leaders to contact beginners and to offer all the advice you suggest. Furthermore,​ the "​new-chum"​ soon slips into the ranks of the bragger or leaves walking altogether. Hero-worship attitude towards activities of extreme strain and dangerous mishap is very dangerous and obviously a setback to the development of the kind of person that your editorial suggests. Beginners should be protected from its influence and walks involved kept strictly from the programme.
 +
 +All this seems to point towards a greater check on Prospectives and a closer watch on types of people who lead the walks that they attend. If we are to achieve the attention you desire, then the present haphazard choice of walks is thoroughly unsatisfactory. A better scheme would involve the use of a special panel of leaders for prospectives and a set of walks and standards that would involve a broadened conception of walking."​
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====Backyard Bushwalking.=====
 +
 +There'​s great activity going on. Seeds collected from places as far afield as Beecroft Peninsula and Barrington Tops with lots of places in between, have been planted and are now sturdy young seedlings. They are crying to be planted out into their future homes and the warm days have given a note of urgency to the matter for the tender youngsters would fare if a hot searing westerly struck them before they got fully established. Already the garden is dotted with sticks and labels and there are dozens more to come. Let's hope the weather is kind and we are vouchsafed a few refreshing showers which are so much more acceptable than the hose.
 +
 +Three year old Pultenaea Stipularis plants bloomed for the first time and what a brave show they put on! P. Daphnoides was pretty and the Golden Pea bushes were a splendid sight. They have finished now but the flannel flowers are now revelling in the warm sunshine.
 +
 +----
 +
 +__Japara__. There'​s a glimmer of hope. Things look a little more hopeful. Paddy hopes to have a better showing of sleeping bags and tents next year.
 +
 +__Steel frame rucksacks__ in stock and a complete range of rucksacks without frames.
 +
 +__Aluminium billies__. Complete range of squat and upright types available. Aluminium fry pans in stock.
 +
 +Plastic proofed groundsheets going well.
 +
 +Paddy Pallin. Camp Gear For Walkers.
 +
 +327 George Street, Sydney. Phone B 3101.
 +
 +----
194711.txt · Last modified: 2018/02/21 23:52 by tyreless