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194707 [2018/02/07 01:45]
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194707 [2018/02/07 02:07] (current)
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 It is good news that the Federal Treasurer has consented to our purchasing lot 7, North Era for £350, thus validating our agreement with the owner. Out efforts to purchase this land have extended over several years while our interest in it is as old as the Club. It is good news that the Federal Treasurer has consented to our purchasing lot 7, North Era for £350, thus validating our agreement with the owner. Out efforts to purchase this land have extended over several years while our interest in it is as old as the Club.
  
-From the earliest days of the S.B.W. members have camped at Era. Till early in the thirties South Era was the most popular camping spot. Other campers followed and shacks appeared in increasing numbers. One windy week-end two well known Bushualkers ​invited some of the other campers to their camp fire - a nice sheltered spot - and the next week-end the guests made a point of arriving early enough to "​bag"​ it for themselves. After that the Bushwalkers moved on to Stockyard Creek, North Era, and, when more people came to camp there they moved on to North North Era, which has been the S.B.W. camp site since about 1935.+From the earliest days of the S.B.W. members have camped at Era. Till early in the thirties South Era was the most popular camping spot. Other campers followed and shacks appeared in increasing numbers. One windy week-end two well known Bushwalkers ​invited some of the other campers to their camp fire - a nice sheltered spot - and the next week-end the guests made a point of arriving early enough to "​bag"​ it for themselves. After that the Bushwalkers moved on to Stockyard Creek, North Era, and, when more people came to camp there they moved on to North North Era, which has been the S.B.W. camp site since about 1935.
  
 About 1937 the possibility of buying lot 7 was mooted, and a rough survey made of the boundaries (This was published in the April, 1947, issue). We could probably have purchased it then on favourable terms, as it belonged to a relative of a member. However the suggestion was not followed up because members had become used to camping there without hindrance and inferred that they would always be able to do so. Shortly after this a man appeared and demanded a camping fee of 1/- a tent. He used to came late at night, flash his torch into tents and wake everyone to demand his fee. It was not until early in 1943 that his right to the fee was questioned and it was ascertained from the owner of the land that he had no right to collect. By this time we had made him a gift of a tidy sum. About 1937 the possibility of buying lot 7 was mooted, and a rough survey made of the boundaries (This was published in the April, 1947, issue). We could probably have purchased it then on favourable terms, as it belonged to a relative of a member. However the suggestion was not followed up because members had become used to camping there without hindrance and inferred that they would always be able to do so. Shortly after this a man appeared and demanded a camping fee of 1/- a tent. He used to came late at night, flash his torch into tents and wake everyone to demand his fee. It was not until early in 1943 that his right to the fee was questioned and it was ascertained from the owner of the land that he had no right to collect. By this time we had made him a gift of a tidy sum.
  
-Early in 1943 it became known that Byrnes'​ Estate was to be sold. This includes most of the land round South Era. Fears were aroused that it might be sold to a land development ​campany. These fears were based on an attempt made in 1927 to float an "Era Development Company."​ The proposed company was to erect a large boarding house or hotel and to instal all the usual holiday facilities. The possibility of another such scheme, coupled with resentment over the camping fees, supplied the needed impetus, and since then constant efforts have been made to preserve North Era as a camping area.+Early in 1943 it became known that Byrnes'​ Estate was to be sold. This includes most of the land round South Era. Fears were aroused that it might be sold to a land development ​company. These fears were based on an attempt made in 1927 to float an "Era Development Company."​ The proposed company was to erect a large boarding house or hotel and to instal all the usual holiday facilities. The possibility of another such scheme, coupled with resentment over the camping fees, supplied the needed impetus, and since then constant efforts have been made to preserve North Era as a camping area.
  
 These efforts took several forms, and, as each met an unsurmountable obstacle, another means was tried. At first the Government was requested, through the Federation, to resume the whole of the privately owned lands between National Park and Garrawarra, a request in which the National Fitness Movement joined. Bushwalkers were a bit apprehensive about this move, but were assured by the National Fitness Movement that North Era would remain as a camping area. The Government would not resume the land, so attention was turned to the possibility of purchasing lot 7. As this lot included all the flat land at North Era it was thought that its acquisition would prevent any development of the surrounding hillsides. A proposal was made to the Federation that it should organise the purchase, but the Federation would not undertake this, though it offered co-operation. After this the Club decided to attempt the purchase. The first step was to test out the financial reactions of members by finding out how much they would be prepared to contribute. It was decided that no special efforts would be made to raise the money, which was expected to be about £400, as it was a large sum to raise, and it was considered that the land was not worth having unless members were sufficiently enthusiastic about it to contribute willingly. In a very short time nearly £200 had been promised. This evidence of substantial and unsolicited support was placed before the half-yearly meeting in September, 1943. The meeting resolved "That the Club devote £100 from its Savings Bank Account towards the purchase of the whole or half of lot 7, North Era, provided the balance of the money required be raised by loan or gift." At the General Meeting in January, 1944, it was decided to accept donations from anyone outside the Club on the understanding that it did not give the donors or any organisation special rights in Era. This proviso was made clear to all non-S.B.W. donors by Edna Garrad, who undertook the collection of funds. These efforts took several forms, and, as each met an unsurmountable obstacle, another means was tried. At first the Government was requested, through the Federation, to resume the whole of the privately owned lands between National Park and Garrawarra, a request in which the National Fitness Movement joined. Bushwalkers were a bit apprehensive about this move, but were assured by the National Fitness Movement that North Era would remain as a camping area. The Government would not resume the land, so attention was turned to the possibility of purchasing lot 7. As this lot included all the flat land at North Era it was thought that its acquisition would prevent any development of the surrounding hillsides. A proposal was made to the Federation that it should organise the purchase, but the Federation would not undertake this, though it offered co-operation. After this the Club decided to attempt the purchase. The first step was to test out the financial reactions of members by finding out how much they would be prepared to contribute. It was decided that no special efforts would be made to raise the money, which was expected to be about £400, as it was a large sum to raise, and it was considered that the land was not worth having unless members were sufficiently enthusiastic about it to contribute willingly. In a very short time nearly £200 had been promised. This evidence of substantial and unsolicited support was placed before the half-yearly meeting in September, 1943. The meeting resolved "That the Club devote £100 from its Savings Bank Account towards the purchase of the whole or half of lot 7, North Era, provided the balance of the money required be raised by loan or gift." At the General Meeting in January, 1944, it was decided to accept donations from anyone outside the Club on the understanding that it did not give the donors or any organisation special rights in Era. This proviso was made clear to all non-S.B.W. donors by Edna Garrad, who undertook the collection of funds.
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 In addition the Wild Life Preservation Society generously offered up to £50 if required, but this amount was not needed. In addition the Wild Life Preservation Society generously offered up to £50 if required, but this amount was not needed.
  
-Now that it is in our hands quite a lot could be done in the way of cleaning up, improving the water supply, and supervising the use of wood and camp etiquette of newcomers. Perhaps in time we could exclude the cattle, start reafforentation ​and stop the sand drift. Unfortunately we have little hope of entirely preventing the use of axes and firearms, or of controlling bush fires in dry times, but, as it is rich volcanic soil, with good rainfall, the grass and herbage is vigorous and green. This means that it will take a tremendous beating. Most sandstone areas, if used as much as Era, would be blackened ruins with large areas of bare, eroded soil. But Era seldom burns out and will never wear out.+Now that it is in our hands quite a lot could be done in the way of cleaning up, improving the water supply, and supervising the use of wood and camp etiquette of newcomers. Perhaps in time we could exclude the cattle, start reafforestation ​and stop the sand drift. Unfortunately we have little hope of entirely preventing the use of axes and firearms, or of controlling bush fires in dry times, but, as it is rich volcanic soil, with good rainfall, the grass and herbage is vigorous and green. This means that it will take a tremendous beating. Most sandstone areas, if used as much as Era, would be blackened ruins with large areas of bare, eroded soil. But Era seldom burns out and will never wear out.
  
 The time may came when shacks and "​development"​ come right to the edge of lot 7, but it will still remain the last convenient beach-side refuge of the bushwalker. The time may came when shacks and "​development"​ come right to the edge of lot 7, but it will still remain the last convenient beach-side refuge of the bushwalker.
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 Te have an area declared a national reserve is the indespensable first step, but then the real work begins. The first step is to minimise the risk of the area being swept by a fire and for this, the boundary firebreak is indispensable. It need not follow the boundary line scrupulously;​ it is far better to run it across the most suitable areas. In heavily timbered areas, with little or no grass, bracken or underbrush, this is often a simple job; all fallen litter is raked into a long line and then lit. As it burns down, the fire is raked forward, a few feet at a time, until a belt some twenty feet wide has been cleared. A small party using ordinary garden rakes can clear a mile or more of break of this type in a weekend. Bracken and underbrush is best cut with a mallee slasher - an implement which is swung like a golf club - heaped into a long ridge and burned when dry. Both these types of break are best done in the autumn. Grass is the hardest to deal with; it has to be burned off under expert supervision late in the spring. It must be born in mind that these breaks will check only a ground fire; nothing short of a clearing a quarter of a mile or more in width can check the real forest blaze, roaring through the treetops. In addition to the break, the whole area must be gone over and all hollow logs - which also harbour rabbits - stumps and dead trees burned completely. Te have an area declared a national reserve is the indespensable first step, but then the real work begins. The first step is to minimise the risk of the area being swept by a fire and for this, the boundary firebreak is indispensable. It need not follow the boundary line scrupulously;​ it is far better to run it across the most suitable areas. In heavily timbered areas, with little or no grass, bracken or underbrush, this is often a simple job; all fallen litter is raked into a long line and then lit. As it burns down, the fire is raked forward, a few feet at a time, until a belt some twenty feet wide has been cleared. A small party using ordinary garden rakes can clear a mile or more of break of this type in a weekend. Bracken and underbrush is best cut with a mallee slasher - an implement which is swung like a golf club - heaped into a long ridge and burned when dry. Both these types of break are best done in the autumn. Grass is the hardest to deal with; it has to be burned off under expert supervision late in the spring. It must be born in mind that these breaks will check only a ground fire; nothing short of a clearing a quarter of a mile or more in width can check the real forest blaze, roaring through the treetops. In addition to the break, the whole area must be gone over and all hollow logs - which also harbour rabbits - stumps and dead trees burned completely.
  
-Next on the list of "​Musts"​ comes the rabbit pest. Every warren and every burrow on the reserve must be located, as well as for half a mile into the surrounding scrub, the rabbits killed by fumigating the burrows and digging them in. Thereafter the sign of as much as a single rabbit inside the reserve must be followed up and the invader dealt with at once. A netting boundary fence is useless unless regularly patrolled and kept in repair. That done, the work of restoration can begin. It is wise to enlist the aid of a botanist at this tage in order to ascertain the species of native flora which used to be found in the area; specimens are often hard to locate but an old bush cemetery whose netting fence has been kept in repair will often prove a happy hunting ground. Another good idea is to enable the flora to "stage a comeback"​ by clearing away an area of very thick underbrush on an open space, away from dense timber, and put a rabbit proof fence around it. In that way seeds which have been long dormant may germinate, and so will those of rare plants which had been growing in the shelter of the brush. Burning a little light rubbish in patches inside the fence also encourages seed germination. It is astonishing how the types of vegetation which appear to have vanished completely from the area will put in an appearance inside some of those enclosures.+Next on the list of "​Musts"​ comes the rabbit pest. Every warren and every burrow on the reserve must be located, as well as for half a mile into the surrounding scrub, the rabbits killed by fumigating the burrows and digging them in. Thereafter the sign of as much as a single rabbit inside the reserve must be followed up and the invader dealt with at once. A netting boundary fence is useless unless regularly patrolled and kept in repair. That done, the work of restoration can begin. It is wise to enlist the aid of a botanist at this stage in order to ascertain the species of native flora which used to be found in the area; specimens are often hard to locate but an old bush cemetery whose netting fence has been kept in repair will often prove a happy hunting ground. Another good idea is to enable the flora to "stage a comeback"​ by clearing away an area of very thick underbrush on an open space, away from dense timber, and put a rabbit proof fence around it. In that way seeds which have been long dormant may germinate, and so will those of rare plants which had been growing in the shelter of the brush. Burning a little light rubbish in patches inside the fence also encourages seed germination. It is astonishing how the types of vegetation which appear to have vanished completely from the area will put in an appearance inside some of those enclosures.
  
 Now make a thorough survey of the reserve with two objects in view - to plan where your paths will run and to decide what timber and undergrowth should be left exactly as it is, and what must come out. It is wrong to think that virgin bushland has no paths on it; I have seen some of the portions of Australia which are untouched by a hoof of domestic stock, and all are criss-crossed by kangaroo and emu pads, and also those made by the Aborigines as they move from one campsite to another, or to hunting and fishing grounds. Plan your paths on a strategic layout, to enable fire-fighters to get to any corner of the reserve, and also to any of those blind spots in the form of crags, thick brush or deep gullies where colonies of rabbits can remain unsuspected until their damage becomes apparent. Now make a thorough survey of the reserve with two objects in view - to plan where your paths will run and to decide what timber and undergrowth should be left exactly as it is, and what must come out. It is wrong to think that virgin bushland has no paths on it; I have seen some of the portions of Australia which are untouched by a hoof of domestic stock, and all are criss-crossed by kangaroo and emu pads, and also those made by the Aborigines as they move from one campsite to another, or to hunting and fishing grounds. Plan your paths on a strategic layout, to enable fire-fighters to get to any corner of the reserve, and also to any of those blind spots in the form of crags, thick brush or deep gullies where colonies of rabbits can remain unsuspected until their damage becomes apparent.
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 I'm not airing theories; the above is all sound and practicable as my wife and I proved when we did it on our own property. Many others have also done it. Admittedly, it involves a 1ot of work, much of which __must__ be done at the right time, but it is indeed labour of love. I'm not airing theories; the above is all sound and practicable as my wife and I proved when we did it on our own property. Many others have also done it. Admittedly, it involves a 1ot of work, much of which __must__ be done at the right time, but it is indeed labour of love.
  
-Your reward comes eventUallyKangarooa ​and wallabies graze throughout the area; birds nest in the hollow limbs. Claw scratches on the bark of trees show that the larger opossums have found a sanctuary; if you use a torch at night when shrubs like the banksia are in flower, you may find that tiny and beautiful creatures like the doormouse opossum and the feather-tailed/​phalanger have also found a safe home. At blossom time birds are thick in the branches above; with every passing year the trees and shrubs which you have replaced grow taller and more sturdy; if you can keep the fires out and do not let up in your ceaseless battle against the rabbits the wildflowers appear in ever-increasing numbers. Then you can look about you and say "Our club has done something worthwhile. This is indeed as it was in the beginning."​+Your reward comes eventuallyKangaroos ​and wallabies graze throughout the area; birds nest in the hollow limbs. Claw scratches on the bark of trees show that the larger opossums have found a sanctuary; if you use a torch at night when shrubs like the banksia are in flower, you may find that tiny and beautiful creatures like the doormouse opossum and the feather-tailed/​phalanger have also found a safe home. At blossom time birds are thick in the branches above; with every passing year the trees and shrubs which you have replaced grow taller and more sturdy; if you can keep the fires out and do not let up in your ceaseless battle against the rabbits the wildflowers appear in ever-increasing numbers. Then you can look about you and say "Our club has done something worthwhile. This is indeed as it was in the beginning."​
  
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 Colin had mapped out three routes to St. Helena. One party to go the quickest route along the Bridle Track and two parties on each of two other routes, one along the creek and the other up the ridge. Ten minutes interval was allowed between the two parties on the last two routes. This doesn'​t seem clear even to me but anyhow I found myself in Party No. 1 with Peg Bransdon, Christa Calnan, Olive Jurd, Chris Gordon, Roley Cotter and Jack Wren. Mainly by a mixture of first class map reading and supernatural walking ability we arrived at St. Helena at 4.30 p.m. and made preparation for the camp. First party to arrive was Luke Priddle, Stan Madden and Bob Palmer. Next came darkness closely followed by Colin Long, Kevin Dean and Len Falls. After another short period, next to salute the Judge was Tom Moppett with Bill Kinley, Ron Stone and Stan Everard. There was a counting of heads and the gathering is one party short, to wit Wal Roots, Ken Smith and Roy Cunningham. Colin had mapped out three routes to St. Helena. One party to go the quickest route along the Bridle Track and two parties on each of two other routes, one along the creek and the other up the ridge. Ten minutes interval was allowed between the two parties on the last two routes. This doesn'​t seem clear even to me but anyhow I found myself in Party No. 1 with Peg Bransdon, Christa Calnan, Olive Jurd, Chris Gordon, Roley Cotter and Jack Wren. Mainly by a mixture of first class map reading and supernatural walking ability we arrived at St. Helena at 4.30 p.m. and made preparation for the camp. First party to arrive was Luke Priddle, Stan Madden and Bob Palmer. Next came darkness closely followed by Colin Long, Kevin Dean and Len Falls. After another short period, next to salute the Judge was Tom Moppett with Bill Kinley, Ron Stone and Stan Everard. There was a counting of heads and the gathering is one party short, to wit Wal Roots, Ken Smith and Roy Cunningham.
  
-We were past the soup and on to the roast duck and green peas when lights flickered down the ridge. No customers, it uas not Wal Roots, but Phil Hall being led, and liking it, by Kath Hardy and Val Downing. They came up on a later train and they had not seen the missing links either. I am assured that wa1 will be O.K. but nevertheless my appetite is affected and I have great difficulty in masticating my third plate of duck, and only for fear of offending Peg do I lap up a small portion of apple and custard. Luke and Colin are also seen dealing with a plum pudding that would have fitted more comfortably in a bucket than a tin.+We were past the soup and on to the roast duck and green peas when lights flickered down the ridge. No customers, it was not Wal Roots, but Phil Hall being led, and liking it, by Kath Hardy and Val Downing. They came up on a later train and they had not seen the missing links either. I am assured that wa1 will be O.K. but nevertheless my appetite is affected and I have great difficulty in masticating my third plate of duck, and only for fear of offending Peg do I lap up a small portion of apple and custard. Luke and Colin are also seen dealing with a plum pudding that would have fitted more comfortably in a bucket than a tin.
  
-A camp fire is a necessity and the party is just warming up when someone introduced Aunt Martha. This person is no lady but purely imaginary and her likes and dislikes give the clues to a little mental problem - Aunt Martha is one of those little mental ​teastrs ​that usually passes the time, and distracts the mind very well in a train, the dentist'​s waiting room or place of torture. On this evening, however, it became an epedemic. There was not a voice raised in song, funny stories were not told, and believe it or not, no one remembered when we were on such and such a walk. Aunt Martha will receive not another line but you can see her damaging influence when I tell you that everyone was abed by 9 p.m. and most were in a state of mental exhaustion.+A camp fire is a necessity and the party is just warming up when someone introduced Aunt Martha. This person is no lady but purely imaginary and her likes and dislikes give the clues to a little mental problem - Aunt Martha is one of those little mental ​testers ​that usually passes the time, and distracts the mind very well in a train, the dentist'​s waiting room or place of torture. On this evening, however, it became an epidemic. There was not a voice raised in song, funny stories were not told, and believe it or not, no one remembered when we were on such and such a walk. Aunt Martha will receive not another line but you can see her damaging influence when I tell you that everyone was abed by 9 p.m. and most were in a state of mental exhaustion.
  
-We did not arise with the lark and the clock showed ten before the crew assebled ​for a first aid talk by Doctor Cotter. Without throwing the big bunch of flowers I consider the Doctor gave the best condensed lecture on the subject that I have ever heard. The talk, illustrated with practical examples and fourteen feet of sticking plaster, lasted one hour and covered just about everything you would wish to know. There was a demonstration of artificial respiration which I consider is of utmost importance to bushwalkers generally.+We did not arise with the lark and the clock showed ten before the crew assembled ​for a first aid talk by Doctor Cotter. Without throwing the big bunch of flowers I consider the Doctor gave the best condensed lecture on the subject that I have ever heard. The talk, illustrated with practical examples and fourteen feet of sticking plaster, lasted one hour and covered just about everything you would wish to know. There was a demonstration of artificial respiration which I consider is of utmost importance to bushwalkers generally.
  
 While in the serious mood I would like to give the general impression of the Instructional Week End. Everyone was satisfied that it was a vast improvement on the Field Week End, as it combined the instructional side with a reasonably hard walk, where prospectives and new members were confronted with the task of leading their parties with the aid of map and compass. While in the serious mood I would like to give the general impression of the Instructional Week End. Everyone was satisfied that it was a vast improvement on the Field Week End, as it combined the instructional side with a reasonably hard walk, where prospectives and new members were confronted with the task of leading their parties with the aid of map and compass.
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 Take one Vigorous Walker. Let It depart from Central at 5.15 p.m. on Friday evening. Motor It in the dark to Fitzroy Falls and dump It in the night. The following day, Saturday is the important day for training. Lead, drive, push, haul and shove It over Mountain Ridges. If a section dashes off and sees goats running wild don't worry. It helps in the sniffing or should we say breathing department. Take one Vigorous Walker. Let It depart from Central at 5.15 p.m. on Friday evening. Motor It in the dark to Fitzroy Falls and dump It in the night. The following day, Saturday is the important day for training. Lead, drive, push, haul and shove It over Mountain Ridges. If a section dashes off and sees goats running wild don't worry. It helps in the sniffing or should we say breathing department.
  
-If you come to a Mountain that looks like Carrialoo, drive the protesting Primadonna as near to the top as possible, then decide It is not ready for the higher spheres. Shoo the protesting Prima D. down and arouna ​the side of Carialoo. It will then make for a gap and flutter almost exhausted to the riverbed.+If you come to a Mountain that looks like Carrialoo, drive the protesting Primadonna as near to the top as possible, then decide It is not ready for the higher spheres. Shoo the protesting Prima D. down and around ​the side of Carialoo. It will then make for a gap and flutter almost exhausted to the riverbed.
  
 A heavy frost lasting until 11 o'​clock in the morning seems to harden the lungs, and give more volume. (Probably through holding the breath for so long trying to keep the cold air out). Good food is required for the proper building of a Primadonna and as much variety as possible is recommended. Before putting to bed a little mature port can be recommended. A heavy frost lasting until 11 o'​clock in the morning seems to harden the lungs, and give more volume. (Probably through holding the breath for so long trying to keep the cold air out). Good food is required for the proper building of a Primadonna and as much variety as possible is recommended. Before putting to bed a little mature port can be recommended.
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 If you can arrange for the Primadonna to tuck all this away, It should then be ready for the recital. If you can arrange for the Primadonna to tuck all this away, It should then be ready for the recital.
  
-This recipe was proved on Bill Hall's Carialoo - Marrunga Creek - Meryla walk, not once, but ten times. Ten Primadonnas of various species with almost identical conditioning were able to completely drown the heavy orchestration provided by Commissioner Hartigan. His symphony of Four Wleels ​played on two rails is a most exacting background for 10 voices. With this modern treatment the voices are able to last for the whole period of 3 hours - at exactly 3 hours to the minute the party could be disgorged from its birdlike box on to the platform, guaranteed to have had every note rung completely from it! - and to have given much joy to those privileged to hear the Recital.+This recipe was proved on Bill Hall's Carialoo - Marrunga Creek - Meryla walk, not once, but ten times. Ten Primadonnas of various species with almost identical conditioning were able to completely drown the heavy orchestration provided by Commissioner Hartigan. His symphony of Four Wheels ​played on two rails is a most exacting background for 10 voices. With this modern treatment the voices are able to last for the whole period of 3 hours - at exactly 3 hours to the minute the party could be disgorged from its birdlike box on to the platform, guaranteed to have had every note rung completely from it! - and to have given much joy to those privileged to hear the Recital.
  
 __Note__: It is hardly necessary to add that good weather considerably aids the Preparation of Primadonnas. __Note__: It is hardly necessary to add that good weather considerably aids the Preparation of Primadonnas.
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 Tall, straight and wonderful they grow; or some\\ Tall, straight and wonderful they grow; or some\\
-From twisted trunks their branches reach, speckled ​uith shadows.\\+From twisted trunks their branches reach, speckled ​with shadows.\\
 Theirs is no sheltered growth in some cool land,\\ Theirs is no sheltered growth in some cool land,\\
 Well watered, gently bred, for they must wrest\\ Well watered, gently bred, for they must wrest\\
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-He must be a clod indeed whose heart does not leap up when he beholds a platypus. This strange little creature with the bill and feet of a duck and the fur of a beaver, that lays eggs and yet suckles its young, is too preposterous to be anything but true. Unlike God, had it not existed no man would have dared to invent it. It is __the__ missing link, complete with refutations. It is the doubter'​s delight, the bewilderlient ​of bishops, a cosmic giggle. Yet it is rare and frail. It could be extirpated in a month. And once it was destroyed who would ever believe it once had been?+He must be a clod indeed whose heart does not leap up when he beholds a platypus. This strange little creature with the bill and feet of a duck and the fur of a beaver, that lays eggs and yet suckles its young, is too preposterous to be anything but true. Unlike God, had it not existed no man would have dared to invent it. It is __the__ missing link, complete with refutations. It is the doubter'​s delight, the bewilderment ​of bishops, a cosmic giggle. Yet it is rare and frail. It could be extirpated in a month. And once it was destroyed who would ever believe it once had been?
  
-Bergen Evans "​Don'​t Monkey with the Platypus", ​Harperts ​Magazine, December 1946.+Bergen Evans "​Don'​t Monkey with the Platypus", ​Harper'​s ​Magazine, December 1946.
  
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-AS'ONE MORON TO ANOTHER. +=====As ​One Moron To Another.=====
-' After, an enjoyable interlude, during which one could look up a train time=table, and find a train and a seat at the place and +
-time indicated, conditions have revertbd to normal and bushwalking +
-is once qore a game of chance But it was nice while it lasted. Most members are probably too, young to remember, but there as a time, back in the thirties, when railway time-tables meant what +
-' they said. If only the miners could be induced to go down their mines oftener ,ind stay there loner, we bushwalkers could enjoy pUr train trips in comfort. , +
-,, Cosgrove, Leyden, & Co. had planned a trip to the Nandewars +
-for Kin6. Birthday week-end, but with the cancellation of trains both going and coming, they ended up doing the Kowmung. +
-Overheard from an old member on a recent Sunday test - "I like tes,t walks - you don't have to use your brains.''​ +
-1hether it was due to the personality of the leader, the '​weather,​ the fact that it was the only walk placed on _the walks' notice board for three weeks, or because it looked easy, will never +
-be known; but 19 members and 3 visitors turned up qn the Gunyah Ba;i. trip on June 7th1 There were 19 on Bill Hall's walk on June 21st. 7o recommend Sunday walks for those who like to know what's going on (use of brains optional). +
-There were 20 at the Chinese Dinner at the Capitol Cafe on +
-June 21st. Seven courses were devoured. They were: Fish Cream SouT); Chicken and Almonds, Fried Rice, Spring Rolls, Fried and Steamed +
-puck with Vegetables, Chicken Chow Mien, and Sweet and Sour +
-Tt tasted as good as it sounds, The Social Secretary seemed to onjcy +
-the change from Terry'​s meal and uncooked vegetables. He got a grip +
-on the tail of the fish during the last course, but as luck would have it, tail and body partad. Some operated with chopsticks, but they weren'​t in the race with Jenny Felshow. +
-Anti-climak to the events described in M. Bacon'​s "​Recipe for a Primadonna"​ was that 5 of the ten P.D.'s got colds. This was +
-because they rasped the lining off thk larynxs and inhaled deeply the germ laden air. Those who heard the uproar were not surprised. ​One at leaSt has sworn off it (i e. singing). +
-Mr: E. Caines Philips (River Canoe Club Topographical section) advises that map No. 40, Hunter River ('​.7est Maitland to Hexham) is now completed and available for inspection. +
-+
-BACKYARD BUSE:​ALKING. +
-A little while ago Paddy was chopping down a tree. Keep your seats folks! It was a casuarina which was being taken out to make way for native shrubs in Paddy'​s backyard. The tree fell with +
-a crash into a small gum tree. It took a few hefty pulls to free the oak tree, but as it came clear what whould fly out of the gum tree but a mopoke. That was sufficient surprise but as the oak crashed to the ground out flew another mopoke. The first one flew right away, but the second one evidently had not had his sleep out and he picked on another tree a few yards away. There he perched on a branch not ten feet from the ground and adopted that ridiculous stiff- necked attitude which these birds use. Under normal circumstances it acts as an almost perfect form of camouflage, making it look like +
--' a stump of a broken off limb. This bird has been the victim of a curious accident of naming. The mopoke does not say umopokeu at all +
-but merely "​oom"​ His relative, the Boobook owl utters that peri- +
-patetic cry of "​mopoke"​. So next time you hear a mopoke say umopokeu you'll know it is not a mopoke at all but a boobook owl, and when you see a mopoke you'll know it doesn'​t uay "​mopokeu but just "​oom"​. That's clear now isn't it? +
-But to return to the garden. Paddy thought he would like to take a snap of the mopoke and hurried to the house for the camera. Several shots were taken with great care to avoid disturbing the bird, but as it turned out there was no need to bother, for he stayed there despite all disturbances of mattocking, digging and rock chopping for the rest of the morning. It was just as well he was with friends because he could have ohite easily been knocked off his perch with a stick. +
-Paddy has in stock: +
-riawIMrrrolr r. MIME r .1.11.01Y +
-Bushwalker steel frame rucksacks. 3/1/- & g2/11/6, +
-Plastic proofed cape groundsheets 6' x 4'. These groundsheets are very compact and light, non-tacky and very durable, 23/7 each. +
-Tents are in short supplymgain. Orders taken 1st. of each month. +
-Plenty of rucksacks without frames from 12/6 to 32/6. Aluminium billies all sizes available 4/6 to 8/3. +
-PADDY PALLIN, +
-CAMP GAR POR WALKERS. 'phone 327 George Street, +
-,B3101 SYDNEY N.S.+
  
 +After an enjoyable interlude, during which one could look up a train time-table, and find a train and a seat at the place and time indicated, conditions have reverted to normal and bushwalking is once more a game of chance. But it was nice while it lasted. Most members are probably too young to remember, but there was a time, back in the thirties, when railway time-tables meant what they said. If only the miners could be induced to go down their mines oftener and stay there longer, we bushwalkers could enjoy our train trips in comfort.
 +
 +Cosgrove, Leyden, & Co. had planned a trip to the Nandewars for Kings Birthday week-end, but with the cancellation of trains both going and coming, they ended up doing the Kowmung.
 +
 +Overheard from an old member on a recent Sunday test - "I like test walks - you don't have to use your brains."​
 +
 +Whether it was due to the personality of the leader, the weather, the fact that it was the only walk placed on the walks' notice board for three weeks, or because it looked easy, will never be known; but 19 members and 3 visitors turned up on the Gunyah Bay trip on June 7th. There were 19 on Bill Hall's walk on June 21st. We recommend Sunday walks for those who like to know what's going on (use of brains optional).
 +
 +There were 20 at the Chinese Dinner at the Capitol Cafe on June 21st. Seven courses were devoured. They were: Fish Cream Soup, Chicken and Almonds, Fried Rice, Spring Rolls, Fried and Steamed Duck with Vegetables, Chicken Chow Mien, and Sweet and Sour Fish. It tasted as good as it sounds. The Social Secretary seemed to enjoy the change from Terry'​s meal and uncooked vegetables. He got a grip on the tail of the fish during the last course, but as luck would have it, tail and body parted. Some operated with chopsticks, but they weren'​t in the race with Jenny Felshow.
 +
 +Anti-climax to the events described in M. Bacon'​s "​Recipe for a Primadonna"​ was that 5 of the ten P.D.'s got colds. This was because they rasped the lining off the larynxs and inhaled deeply the germ laden air. Those who heard the uproar were not surprised. One at least has sworn off it (i.e. singing).
 +
 +----
 +
 +Mr. E. Caines Philips (River Canoe Club Topographical section) advises that map No. 40, Hunter River (West Maitland to Hexham) is now completed and available for inspection.
 +
 +----
 +
 +=====Backyard Bushwalking.=====
 +
 +A little while ago Paddy was chopping down a tree. Keep your seats folks! It was a casuarina which was being taken out to make way for native shrubs in Paddy'​s backyard. The tree fell with a crash into a small gum tree. It took a few hefty pulls to free the oak tree, but as it came clear what should fly out of the gum tree but a mopoke. That was sufficient surprise but as the oak crashed to the ground out flew another mopoke. The first one flew right away, but the second one evidently had not had his sleep out and he picked on another tree a few yards away. There he perched on a branch not ten feet from the ground and adopted that ridiculous stiff-necked attitude which these birds use. Under normal circumstances it acts as an almost perfect form of camouflage, making it look like a stump of a broken off limb. This bird has been the victim of a curious accident of naming. The mopoke does not say "​mopoke"​ at all but merely "​oom"​. His relative, the Boobook owl, utters that peripatetic cry of "​mopoke"​. So next time you hear a mopoke say "​mopoke"​ you'll know it is not a mopoke at all but a boobook owl, and when you see a mopoke you'll know it doesn'​t say "​mopoke"​ but just "​oom"​. That's clear now isn't it?
 +
 +But to return to the garden. Paddy thought he would like to take a snap of the mopoke and hurried to the house for the camera. Several shots were taken with great care to avoid disturbing the bird, but as it turned out there was no need to bother, for he stayed there despite all disturbances of mattocking, digging and rock chopping for the rest of the morning. It was just as well he was with friends because he could have quite easily been knocked off his perch with a stick.
 +
 +----
 +
 +__Paddy has in stock__:
 +
 +Bushwalker steel frame rucksacks. £3/1/- & £2/11/6.
 +
 +Plastic proofed cape groundsheets 6' x 4'. These groundsheets are very compact and light, non-tacky and very durable, 23/- each.
 +
 +Tents are in short supply again. Orders taken 1st. of each month.
 +
 +Plenty of rucksacks without frames from 12/6 to 32/6.
 +
 +Aluminium billies all sizes available 4/6 to 8/3.
 +
 +Paddy Pallin, Camp Gear For Walkers.
 +
 +'phone B3101. 327 George Street, Sydney, N.S.W.
 +
 +----
194707.txt · Last modified: 2018/02/07 02:07 by tyreless