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194612 [2016/05/27 00:00]
tyreless
194612 [2016/05/27 01:51]
tyreless
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 The zest of health and strength,\\ The zest of health and strength,\\
 And academic honours -\\ And academic honours -\\
-They all must aass at length.+They all must pass at length.
  
 And you? You chose the mountains,​\\ And you? You chose the mountains,​\\
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 You grandly thought your pastime\\ You grandly thought your pastime\\
-Was better than the reat.\\+Was better than the rest.\\
 'Twas only better really\\ 'Twas only better really\\
 If dropped at Time's behest. If dropped at Time's behest.
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 One proud mother stood before The Exhibit in the Health Week exhibition, and was heard to remark to her companion: One proud mother stood before The Exhibit in the Health Week exhibition, and was heard to remark to her companion:
  
-"The Bushwalkers! Oh, Bob's in this. He's a guide. He taks the lead."+"The Bushwalkers! Oh, Bob's in this. He's a guide. He takes the lead."
  
 ---- ----
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 As slowly gathers light of rising day\\ As slowly gathers light of rising day\\
 To show this traveller o'er the ancient way,\\ To show this traveller o'er the ancient way,\\
-Its riqhtful ​owners deep instincts obey\\+Its rightful ​owners deep instincts obey\\
 And life begins again.\\ And life begins again.\\
 The traveller to his burden turns once more,\\ The traveller to his burden turns once more,\\
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 "​Frailty,​ thy name is Woman!"​.... did someone murmur, "Two men, to every girl...! "​Frailty,​ thy name is Woman!"​.... did someone murmur, "Two men, to every girl...!
  
-And when Shakespeare wrote, "a long-tongued,​ babbling gossip"​... was he thinking of the official ​Reorter?+And when Shakespeare wrote, "a long-tongued,​ babbling gossip"​... was he thinking of the official ​Reporter?
  
 ---- ----
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 That a Prospective recently cooked the Leader'​s breakfast? Imagine that! That a Prospective recently cooked the Leader'​s breakfast? Imagine that!
  
-That a walk last month was patronised exclusively by women? ​Wuld this be called a hens' convention?+That a walk last month was patronised exclusively by women? ​Would this be called a hens' convention?
  
 ---- ----
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 Everyone was there, of course. Me, I come trundling down the hill, late on Sunday morning, delayed by having taken the wrong track. The others went over the cliff and down by some rope attachment, but not me. At bottom of said rope was a pile of floor-boards to be carted through muck and mud to the scene of construction. No, not me -- I went the long way round. Everyone was there, of course. Me, I come trundling down the hill, late on Sunday morning, delayed by having taken the wrong track. The others went over the cliff and down by some rope attachment, but not me. At bottom of said rope was a pile of floor-boards to be carted through muck and mud to the scene of construction. No, not me -- I went the long way round.
  
-Down by the bottom of the track, I saw en apprirition: a lurching pair of shorts, a stumbling pair of legs, a billowing blouse, and a banging and clattering emanating from two huge planks of timber. Yes, the floorboards. To my improper and entirely involuntary shriek of laughter, the apparition turned -- a face, with long hair falling over it. Gosh! a woman. Unknown to me, so must be a prospective.+Down by the bottom of the track, I saw an apparition: a lurching pair of shorts, a stumbling pair of legs, a billowing blouse, and a banging and clattering emanating from two huge planks of timber. Yes, the floorboards. To my improper and entirely involuntary shriek of laughter, the apparition turned -- a face, with long hair falling over it. Gosh! a woman. Unknown to me, so must be a prospective.
  
 Ten yards further -- two more girls bouncing along under floorboards. No, no! -- the floor-boards were doing the bouncing. More Prospectives. Ten yards further -- two more girls bouncing along under floorboards. No, no! -- the floor-boards were doing the bouncing. More Prospectives.
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 There then smote upon my ears a sound of hammering, and in my telepathic brain rang curses. Hm! -- men. More Prospects? Then did I see a male form upon an upper member of what they called "the Roof," belting into a hunk of iron like a veritable demented hen burrowing for worms. Bob Eastoe -- Ah! a Member at last! There then smote upon my ears a sound of hammering, and in my telepathic brain rang curses. Hm! -- men. More Prospects? Then did I see a male form upon an upper member of what they called "the Roof," belting into a hunk of iron like a veritable demented hen burrowing for worms. Bob Eastoe -- Ah! a Member at last!
  
-Imagine the scene -- Prospectives wielding tools with all the zeal of eager youth; and here and there a Member, smoking! A tall, slim being greeted me with, "Hiya, Kid." Naturally, from the familiarity of the greeting, I must know the being. Yet the only clues I had were shape, for all semblance of face was blotted out by splashes from the ten-inch brush of creosote he/she was wielding. "Hiya, Frankenstein",​ I called back quite innocently. Intrigued, I enquired of the nearest bystander (a Member naturally -- all the Prospectives were working), but he also was nonplussed, and subjected me to a lengthy soliloquy: "​Arthur - up there, the one smoking; John Connor - over there; Jess - that one; Doug - eating; Alex - talking to Dorothy; and so on... There'​s only Hilma left. Ohl! why, of course! it's Hilma."​ I retracted the Frankenstein.+Imagine the scene -- Prospectives wielding tools with all the zeal of eager youth; and here and there a Member, smoking! A tall, slim being greeted me with, "Hiya, Kid." Naturally, from the familiarity of the greeting, I must know the being. Yet the only clues I had were shape, for all semblance of face was blotted out by splashes from the ten-inch brush of creosote he/she was wielding. "Hiya, Frankenstein",​ I called back quite innocently. Intrigued, I enquired of the nearest bystander (a Member naturally -- all the Prospectives were working), but he also was nonplussed, and subjected me to a lengthy soliloquy: "​Arthur - up there, the one smoking; John Connor - over there; Jess - that one; Doug - eating; Alex - talking to Dorothy; and so on... There'​s only Hilma left. Oh! why, of course! it's Hilma."​ I retracted the Frankenstein.
  
 Just what happened next is quite obscure, until that moment when I found myself sitting back, sucking a painful thumb, and cursing myself for mishitting, only to hear apologies in my ear. Now, I ask you - a bloke doesn'​t mind missing the nail and hitting his thumb, really; but when a bloke misses the nail and clonks someone else's appendage, is that cricket? Just what happened next is quite obscure, until that moment when I found myself sitting back, sucking a painful thumb, and cursing myself for mishitting, only to hear apologies in my ear. Now, I ask you - a bloke doesn'​t mind missing the nail and hitting his thumb, really; but when a bloke misses the nail and clonks someone else's appendage, is that cricket?
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 Very unbushwalker-like we slept in Bodalla Hotel in order to arise in time for a possible lift per truck. Enquiries of our host the previous evening had resulted in an early approach to the milk truck driver, (during his breakfast), who could take us part of the way. Very unbushwalker-like we slept in Bodalla Hotel in order to arise in time for a possible lift per truck. Enquiries of our host the previous evening had resulted in an early approach to the milk truck driver, (during his breakfast), who could take us part of the way.
  
-After making his acquaintance and receiving consent to travel we returnod ​to collect some bread, meat and other essentials and dumped them beside his large V8 truck. A much smaller truck of older vintage then drew up and conversation with its owner changed our plans as he would be only too happy to take us right into Nerrigundah. Thus, in typical style we were soon on our way in clear frosty morning.+After making his acquaintance and receiving consent to travel we returned ​to collect some bread, meat and other essentials and dumped them beside his large V8 truck. A much smaller truck of older vintage then drew up and conversation with its owner changed our plans as he would be only too happy to take us right into Nerrigundah. Thus, in typical style we were soon on our way in clear frosty morning.
  
 Our first real glimpse of the Tuross River came shortly after our departure, at the crossing below Eurobodalla and prior to ascending the range. The Tuross is typical of most coastal rivers, fairly wide, bordered by casuarinas and wide strips of gleaming sand which also beds the river making it shallow and wider than would be the case without this evidence Of man's destructiveness. Our first real glimpse of the Tuross River came shortly after our departure, at the crossing below Eurobodalla and prior to ascending the range. The Tuross is typical of most coastal rivers, fairly wide, bordered by casuarinas and wide strips of gleaming sand which also beds the river making it shallow and wider than would be the case without this evidence Of man's destructiveness.
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 The following day, fine weather still prevailing and, as the reader will have already guessed, we, not breaking any records, found the river more interesting as it passed through tall timber, comparatively deep cuttings in the hills, shady casuarinas, sparkling pools and the ever recurring pebbly crossings. Shortly the first real sign of civilization was noted in the form of a well made dirt road following the river - and not on the map. In the picturesque surroundings it was a welcome change to follow, giving frequent glimpses of the delightful river bends shaded with tall trees and splashed with clean sandy.banks. As our road cut a wide bend in the river and rose to negotiate the ridge we were rewarded with our first glimpse of the Mountain Ranges east of Cooma, a near deep green peak picturesquely placed in the scene as a distant interest (and one which predominated the landscape for the following 2 days) through the winding gorge below and the sparkle of the Tuross threading its way in the lower foreground. ​ The following day, fine weather still prevailing and, as the reader will have already guessed, we, not breaking any records, found the river more interesting as it passed through tall timber, comparatively deep cuttings in the hills, shady casuarinas, sparkling pools and the ever recurring pebbly crossings. Shortly the first real sign of civilization was noted in the form of a well made dirt road following the river - and not on the map. In the picturesque surroundings it was a welcome change to follow, giving frequent glimpses of the delightful river bends shaded with tall trees and splashed with clean sandy.banks. As our road cut a wide bend in the river and rose to negotiate the ridge we were rewarded with our first glimpse of the Mountain Ranges east of Cooma, a near deep green peak picturesquely placed in the scene as a distant interest (and one which predominated the landscape for the following 2 days) through the winding gorge below and the sparkle of the Tuross threading its way in the lower foreground. ​
  
-The Tuross begins in the plateau on the ranges, flows through the mountains and here is still quite wide, swift flowing and crystal clear, this latter a very noticable ​feature. It was evening and as the banks were grassy below under the Casuarinas we decided to camp- the choicest camp spot of the trip with the merry sound of water passing over pebbles. At this spot the river formed an "​S"​ bend with the ridge behind us and a creamy curve of sand at the opposite bank. Here were surroundings from which we had to tear ourselves away the following morning.+The Tuross begins in the plateau on the ranges, flows through the mountains and here is still quite wide, swift flowing and crystal clear, this latter a very noticeable ​feature. It was evening and as the banks were grassy below under the Casuarinas we decided to camp- the choicest camp spot of the trip with the merry sound of water passing over pebbles. At this spot the river formed an "​S"​ bend with the ridge behind us and a creamy curve of sand at the opposite bank. Here were surroundings from which we had to tear ourselves away the following morning.
  
 Clear and bright the second last day dawned. Fed and washed we reluctantly made for the road above. It was not long before the landscape changed completely as we rounded a bend and beheld through a thin curtain of trees undulating grass-covered country, obviously a large property. All hills and ridges were left tree covered, presenting a deep green soft woolly appearance, as were many of the slopes. Clear and bright the second last day dawned. Fed and washed we reluctantly made for the road above. It was not long before the landscape changed completely as we rounded a bend and beheld through a thin curtain of trees undulating grass-covered country, obviously a large property. All hills and ridges were left tree covered, presenting a deep green soft woolly appearance, as were many of the slopes.
  
-Passing through a gateway the road continued, winding over the grassy slopes and to a farm house, to which this road provided vehicular access - I think also for strategic purposes, as it was in excellent repair throughout. It was our good fortitne ​to be hailed by a utility truck driver who took us the remaining few hundred yards to the house, which proved to be the station manager'​s home. The station, Bellowrie, 20,000 acres of marvellous country is surely in the finest setting to be found, surrounded by high hills and mountains, part of which are within the boundary, the green slopes stretching along the Tuross and side creeks, between wooded hills and extending over the ridges beyond eyesight. The station homestead was somewhere to the North about 6 miles away.+Passing through a gateway the road continued, winding over the grassy slopes and to a farm house, to which this road provided vehicular access - I think also for strategic purposes, as it was in excellent repair throughout. It was our good fortune ​to be hailed by a utility truck driver who took us the remaining few hundred yards to the house, which proved to be the station manager'​s home. The station, Bellowrie, 20,000 acres of marvellous country is surely in the finest setting to be found, surrounded by high hills and mountains, part of which are within the boundary, the green slopes stretching along the Tuross and side creeks, between wooded hills and extending over the ridges beyond eyesight. The station homestead was somewhere to the North about 6 miles away.
  
 Surely few men are rewarded with such fine surroundings as those here, and the innumerable Hereford cattle raised thereon. I wish I was a Hereford "​cattle"​. Surely few men are rewarded with such fine surroundings as those here, and the innumerable Hereford cattle raised thereon. I wish I was a Hereford "​cattle"​.
  
-Permission to camp by the river was readily given, and likewise to spend the afternoon climbing the nearby mountain - one of those on the property. The long climb - best part of 1,000 feet - was rewarded by a wonderful panorama of the station pattern below. To the South and Easterly the Tuross and country beyond, whilst to the West, South and North the Mountain ranges were outlined against the afternoon sky. Some peaks are near the 5,000 ft. mark and to the North West Bald Mountain stood out boldly. Below and to the West the Tuross River disappeared in a desep gorge and was lost in the Mountains. Lining the river and dotted about, the gums had a lovely rounded shape more like English trees than Australian. This rare spot will live long in our memories.+Permission to camp by the river was readily given, and likewise to spend the afternoon climbing the nearby mountain - one of those on the property. The long climb - best part of 1,000 feet - was rewarded by a wonderful panorama of the station pattern below. To the South and Easterly the Tuross and country beyond, whilst to the West, South and North the Mountain ranges were outlined against the afternoon sky. Some peaks are near the 5,000 ft. mark and to the North West Bald Mountain stood out boldly. Below and to the West the Tuross River disappeared in a deep gorge and was lost in the Mountains. Lining the river and dotted about, the gums had a lovely rounded shape more like English trees than Australian. This rare spot will live long in our memories.
  
-Next morning we left very early in order to make our truck of the first day and hence Nerrigundah,​ 15 miles away, by 4 p.m., not relishing the extra 13 miles to Bodalla in one day. The morning at Bellowrie was cold, crisp and beautiful. Mists rising from the lowlands against the sun, grass beaded with dew drops and ourselves emitting ​minature ​mists at every breath. Just before leaving we enjoyed a fine sight and sound - of milling young cattle being rounded up by dogs and man on horseback in the early morning sun and mist. All participants seemed equally fresh and full of healthy vigour. All this and yet to-morrow we were to be speeding back to Sydney.+Next morning we left very early in order to make our truck of the first day and hence Nerrigundah,​ 15 miles away, by 4 p.m., not relishing the extra 13 miles to Bodalla in one day. The morning at Bellowrie was cold, crisp and beautiful. Mists rising from the lowlands against the sun, grass beaded with dew drops and ourselves emitting ​miniature ​mists at every breath. Just before leaving we enjoyed a fine sight and sound - of milling young cattle being rounded up by dogs and man on horseback in the early morning sun and mist. All participants seemed equally fresh and full of healthy vigour. All this and yet to-morrow we were to be speeding back to Sydney.
  
 With the sound of activity behind we were about to leave the station when a movement caught our eye. With the sound of activity behind we were about to leave the station when a movement caught our eye.
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 Released and uncovered the fox seemed non-plussed,​ then limped quickly some 10 yards, stopped, looked back at us as though in thanks and quickly disappeared. Released and uncovered the fox seemed non-plussed,​ then limped quickly some 10 yards, stopped, looked back at us as though in thanks and quickly disappeared.
  
-The road by which we arrived was followed to Belimbla Creek and over a flood bridge. Up and up following the ridge to the top of the hwooded ​range the road led us, till at last, the crest reached, we were able to look back on the scene of the previous day, our mountain easily visible against the main ranges behind.+The road by which we arrived was followed to Belimbla Creek and over a flood bridge. Up and up following the ridge to the top of the wooded ​range the road led us, till at last, the crest reached, we were able to look back on the scene of the previous day, our mountain easily visible against the main ranges behind.
  
 For some miles the road gave us changing glimpses of this scene as the afternoon sun moved down from its zenith. Occasionally to the East the distant coast and ocean stretched for miles to either hand with the huge double hump of Mount Dromedary, 2,700 ft. dominating and hiding part of the coast line. In the centre distance we could see Montague Island and its white lighthouse bathed in sunshine. For some miles the road gave us changing glimpses of this scene as the afternoon sun moved down from its zenith. Occasionally to the East the distant coast and ocean stretched for miles to either hand with the huge double hump of Mount Dromedary, 2,700 ft. dominating and hiding part of the coast line. In the centre distance we could see Montague Island and its white lighthouse bathed in sunshine.
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 Soon we dropped down into Nerrigundah - which is well nigh ringed with mountains - and thence, after farewelling some of the crew, back to Bodalla at dusk to thank our good friend for his kindness. His occupation was distilling essential eucalypt oils back in the hills where we saw his truck. Soon we dropped down into Nerrigundah - which is well nigh ringed with mountains - and thence, after farewelling some of the crew, back to Bodalla at dusk to thank our good friend for his kindness. His occupation was distilling essential eucalypt oils back in the hills where we saw his truck.
  
-On a rise in and overlooking Bodalla, under huge trees and on an old leaf covered road which showed ​ag a gap through the trees we camped the night and arose early to be sure of catching the mail coach which leaves about 8 a.m.+On a rise in and overlooking Bodalla, under huge trees and on an old leaf covered road which showed ​as a gap through the trees we camped the night and arose early to be sure of catching the mail coach which leaves about 8 a.m.
  
 True to form the locals had learned of our venture as several enquired of our trip "up the river"​. True to form the locals had learned of our venture as several enquired of our trip "up the river"​.
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 by Ray Kirkby. by Ray Kirkby.
  
-"Sweet Tevioton thy silver tide +"Sweet Tevioton thy silver tide\\ 
-The glaring bale-fires blaze no more  +The glaring bale-fires blaze no more..." 
-(Any conn014.07a ​between the subject and this quotationis entirely ​ooinc.L.dental.) + 
-This, I believe, is a Xmas Number. Pardon me while I shudder - I hate Xmas. What happens? All the year your mother-in-law has been brow-beating you, has been domineering her daughter instead of letting you do it, spoiling the baby and leaving as soon as it startg - to play up, getting coupons out of you, cadging your smokes, ​dr1n1-6 ​your beer and then on Xmas morning ​he turns up and has the "hide4 to say "Merry Xmas" to you - right to your face to6Which id of course an impossibility from the moment she puts in an appearance although she does try not to be openly sarcastic - and partly succeeds - but makes more veiled and subtle sallies insteadThen the next day she restimes ​her habitual nastiness perhaps even at a minute past twelve midnight if you should have the misfortune to have her with you still, which ism6st ​unlikely ​a. presence during the day has so enraged you thatyou ​eat and drink all sorts of awful combinations ​whioh are calculated to certainly ​,(and I'm splitting the infinitive on purpose) to certainly make you ill early in the evening ​zo that you have to go to bed or if this little plan doesn'​t work you invent a pain anyway. +(Any connection ​between the subject and this quotation is entirely ​coincidental.) 
-So you see this good-will-to=nien stunt is very overdone and think that if a person cannot bear me good will all the year round then I'll risk not having it on Xmas Day and stay indoors all day and not issue forth until Boxing Day so that he cannot do me any hurt, more than usual. And as the reaction sets in on Boxing Day during ​whict day and the following 363 days and 364 days in a leap year one can hate one's neighbour at leisure I intend to have my reaction now fore the good will sets in for if the whole world were affected by guod will aimu1ti34,​141.0usly ​the effect would be so maddeningly and mano tonoualy ​sweet and idyllic that one would wonder ​vlasth er one were in Russia, or, on an ofri01441 ​walk 4,​-0=p:​reed-AntAre- ly of prospectives.+ 
 +This, I believe, is a Xmas Number. Pardon me while I shudder - I hate Xmas. What happens? All the year your mother-in-law has been brow-beating you, has been domineering her daughter instead of letting you do it, spoiling the baby and leaving as soon as it starts ​to play up, getting coupons out of you, cadging your smokes, ​drinking ​your beer and then on Xmas morning ​she turns up and has the "hide" ​to say "Merry Xmas" to you - right to your face too which is of course an impossibility from the moment she puts in an appearance although she does try not to be openly sarcastic - and partly succeeds - but makes more veiled and subtle sallies insteadThen the next day she resumes ​her habitual nastiness perhaps even at a minute past twelve midnight if you should have the misfortune to have her with you still, which is most unlikely ​as her presence during the day has so enraged you that you eat and drink all sorts of awful combinations ​which are calculated to certainly (and I'm splitting the infinitive on purpose) to certainly make you ill early in the evening ​so that you have to go to bed or if this little plan doesn'​t work you invent a pain anyway. 
 + 
 +So you see this good-will-to-men stunt is very overdone and think that if a person cannot bear me good will all the year round then I'll risk not having it on Xmas Day and stay indoors all day and not issue forth until Boxing Day so that he cannot do me any hurt, more than usual. And as the reaction sets in on Boxing Day during ​which day and the following 363 days and 364 days in a leap year one can hate one's neighbour at leisure I intend to have my reaction now before ​the good will sets in for if the whole world were affected by good will simultaneously ​the effect would be so maddeningly and monotonously ​sweet and idyllic that one would wonder ​whether ​one were in Russia, or, on an official ​walk composed entirely ​of prospectives. 
 My motto therefore is, "Have a bite for Xmas - out of your neighbour."​ My motto therefore is, "Have a bite for Xmas - out of your neighbour."​
-But on looking around for something to bite, I find it is not easy. Everything has its uses - "Sweet are the uses of advsraity."​ Strikes give the strikers a holiday and the slums impa3.-1 a feeling of wellbeing to the affluent. In our club the critical faculty _AB even more taxed. Unieba I can think of somo deficiency in ten minutes this article is finished, SeVon . Eight eo* Nine Ah, yes. 
-77a1s committee Seems to have sol*Te d. the difficulty of the 
-_:​_narity'​ms43t1_nsm whlph noca to 000ur 011 gen, l-al maGting 
-rs look like the-arch when the builder'​s have got to the middle 
-4re. a bit doubtful whether the law of gravity can stand much 
-of it. Or like a ruined Roman aquedudt. They are not sure 
-4ther'​they want to be bipeds or quadrupeds, whether they are going 
-pin their faith to creation or evolution. Of course they are Jimo-et inaudible for as they descend in a shrinking oUrve they mu leak down lest they take a bite out of the permanent Wave in tront or smash their teeth on the chairs* 
-Chairs? What, Chairs'?​ I am not going to digress on the people who lean on the furniture as they speak. This ha9it is so prevalent that it is doubtfill if it will ever be eradicated. Indeed it might be A kindness to invent a modern, up-to-date "​leaner"​ which oould be passed aroilnd to speakert. One would need a oushioned part to lean against gith hand relate for the tired arms, also a ..... whatts that? You cantt hrqlr? Well; 1111 try both nostrils and see if that le any better 
-.........- 
-A REVIEW OF lAUSTRALIAN WILD LIFE" - JOURNAL OF THE WILD E pR T 0 SO I 0 
-Alex Colley. 
-This Journal is a most comprehensive review of conservation activities of recent years; and it is gratifying to note that is oget much of its inspiration to members of the Society who are Club members. _The Editor-is our past president; David Stead. '​Dorothy Lawry is. a member of the Council; ecd Doris E. Stead Adsistant Secretary. And HOn. Treasurer;. 
-The first part of the Journal is the report of the Society for the years 1939-1945. The report covers the main conservation projects of recent years* All Club members could learn much of conservation from it and the newer members in particular might be surprised to learn how,​much,​conservation work has been done by the 
-.Items of particular interest t_o_Bush Walkers are the 
-. sections on Era Lands,. Garawarra, 'Grose River, The Greater Blue llountains National Park, Kosciusko State Park and Warra Reserve. 
-The sections on; Flora and Fauna preservation raise many issues which have not perhaps received the attention they deserve from our move- 
-., -ment;:​but,​I was :rather disappointed to find that no mention is made of. the Wild Flower petition organised by Rae Birt. 
-The brief section on National Parks in Victoria quotes a most revealing report by Mr. G. Campbell. He states that "​Wilsonts Promontory, for ten years or molie, has been leased to cattle grazlersfor about 300 per annum, burned from top to toe under alleged control and is no longer a "​national park" but a national pasturage - and a podrLiooking one at that .... The place lies uin ruinst all for a matter of 300 per annum."​ I hope the Kosciusko Trustees ar awarP of thin. 
-The rest of the Journal - 39 pages - s devoted to "The Tragic 
-nights. But has the millenium arrived? Not sir. It may have around the corner but ithas unfortunately'​ been beaten up, bash garotted. One expects sweet interchange of voices now a soprah now a basso, the violins answering the trumpets, the nightingale a then the jackdaw. One expects. 
-I cannot hope to describe all our types of speakers nor shall I attempt to 'do so. There may, for example have been lots of inaudible speakers at various tires but, of course, I haven'​t heard ,them. The man ,standing up may have been looking for a friend or he may have been trying to get a cramp' out of his leg far all I know. 
-.There is a type, of person who sits in practically the front. row and directs himself to the President (quite rightly) but,in such a confidential tone that scarcely anyone else can hear. This is wicked waste of time as the President has to repeat the whole think. Such person should at least give credit where credit is due and address the chair something like this. "Mr. President, would you be so kind as to do me a delayed broadcast on your network?"​ 
  
-Of the distracting mannerisms of the '​1etiie ​only one. he puts her hands on her hips. You being a mere male hear something like this. "​Therefore I think that lighting fires in +But on looking around for something to bite, I find it is not easy. Everything has its uses - "Sweet are the uses of adversity."​ Strikes give the strikers a holiday and the slums impart a feeling of wellbeing to the affluent. In our club the critical faculty is even more taxed. Unless I can think of some deficiency in ten minutes this article is finished. Seven... Eight... Nine... Ah, yes. 
-the open she has got rather nice hips  I. remember now on that last walk- when she was in that neat pairof shortgAlow'​mice ​she looked ..mmmmthmmmmm; ​I don't think she has any attachments All those in favour say "​Aye"​. You lookaround. Wildlywandwr ​what it is all about,'​SaY ​"ASI.e" and for all 3i'ou knOW you may be voting for your own expulsion. + 
- +This committee seems to have solved the difficulty of the minority meetings which used to occur on general meeting nights. But has the millenium arrived? No! sir. It may have been around the corner but it has unfortunately been beaten up, bashed, garotted. One expects sweet interchange of voices now a soprano, now a basso, the violins answering the trumpets, the nightingale a then the jackdaw. One expects. 
-During a debate a "​murmurer"​ will suddenlyshoot a remark at someone a tew seats away. This perSon ​will feel'it inCUMbent ​on him to reply and everyone ​withinearshot ​will soon teinthe-fraywith the circle of."​murmurers"​zetting ​larger.. Only the originalspeaker knows the originalremark ​but eadh Succedsiire'​hearer ​disttorts ​theargument until finally, nutherous, ​small soriMmages'​on different subjects are going on in differentparts of-the meeting. Sometimes they dIea natural death but often they linger+ 
-one debater having been worsted ​'​In ​his argument ​Calls Tor4roisrout ​of spite. ​' -  +I cannot hope to describe all our types of speakers nor shall I attempt to do so. There may, for example, have been lots of inaudible speakers at various times but, of course, I haven'​t heard them. The man standing up may have been looking for a friend or he may have been trying to get a cramp out of his leg for all I know. 
-One type of speaker could be calledthe"​parabola"​ becausethis is the shape he finally assumed. He or 'she seems:to' ​be '​Suffering ​from curvature of the spine. But it could be a'dozen oranges, a baked rabbit and a halfknitted ​comforter in the This speaker catches the president'​s eye when he (the speaker) has his body at about45 degrees to the flOor. As he prooeeds ​the becomes more and more Acute Until finally,upon sitting down, he 'almost apologises to his Stomach ​for putting his face into. it: have 'often wondered how they build brick'arches. Do they stick_ ​the bricks on to one another with less and less underneath hoping ​,all the time that they will stay up long enough ​far something to + 
-' ​be propped up-under the other side? ,Well, if they do, these +There is a type of person who sits in practically the front row and directs himself to the President (quite rightly) but in such a confidential tone that scarcely anyone else can hear. This is wicked waste of time as the President has to repeat the whole thing. Such person should at least give credit where credit is due and address the chair something like this. "Mr. President, would you be so kind as to do me a delayed broadcast on your network?"​ 
-21.. + 
-Story of National Park" by David G. Stead, who was an Honorary Member of the This it a harrowing account contrasting pious "​confessions of faith" by the Park Trust with actions in direct contradiction. The chronicle of despoliation is full of useful data, but I feel that the emphasis is misplaced in two directions. Firstly I think that the main fault of the Trust is one of omission. The Trust has taken no effective steps to controlfires. If a fraction of the money spent on laevelopment" and road work had been used to metal an efficient fire control service the park would not today be such a sorry waste of scribbly dead limbs and nfeatherduster" trees. ​Ome fire does more damage to the flora and fauna than 50 years of "​development"​. I was flattered to find that Mr. Stead had used a cutting I made from the S.M.H. as his main line of argument, but at the same time I feel convinced that the disappearance of so much of the park's flora and fauna, for which he blames the actions of the Trust, is really due to its lack of action regarding fires. In the second-place I think he fails to appreciate that the park-is there to be enjoyed by the people: and, since it is on the edge of a city of nearly l million ​pecple ​it must cater for 'thousands of visitors weekly. Roads are necessary for the majority and cleared picnic grounds and other amenities a necessity. Unless we are to be voices crying, literally, in thewilderness, we must take account of these facts. It is also a pity that Mr. Stead does not carry the argument to a conclusion as regards what action conservationists should take. Should they ask, for example, that-trustees be appointed to represent them? should ​they petition for a new Parliamentary Charter? Should they just go on protesting, as they have for the last 50 years? These and other possible lines of action require careful consideration before any effective action can betaken. The matters I have raised, however, are secondary to what I interpret as his main thesis that what the Trust should provide is not sporting facilities, ​'or cleared recreation areas, but bushldnd ​in its natural state. With this I agree wholeheartedly. +Of the distracting mannerisms of the hands let us choose ​only one. She puts her hands on her hips. You being a mere male hear something like this. "​Therefore I think that lighting fires in the open ... she has got rather nice hips ... I remember now on that last walk-when she was in that neat pair of shorts how nice she looked ... mmmmmmmmm, ​I don't think she has any attachments... All those in favour say "​Aye"​. You look around ​wildly, wonder ​what it is all about, ​say "Aye" and for all you know you may be voting for your own expulsion. 
-The Journal is obtainable from the Wild Lire Preservation Society, ​Scienoe ​House, Gloucester Street, Sydney, for 1/3 plus + 
-postage.,+During a debate a "​murmurer"​ will suddenly shoot a remark at someone a few seats away. This person ​will feel it incumbent ​on him to reply and everyone ​within earshot ​will soon be in the fray with the circle of "​murmurers" ​getting ​larger. Only the original speaker knows the original remark ​but each successive ​hearer ​distorts ​the argument until finally ​numerous ​small scrimmages ​on different subjects are going on in different parts of the meeting. Sometimes they die a natural death but often they linger ​until one debater having been worsted ​in his argument ​calls for order out of spite. 
 + 
 +One type of speaker could be called the "​parabola"​ because this is the shape he finally assumed. He or she seems to be suffering ​from curvature of the spine. But it could be a dozen oranges, a baked rabbit and a half-knitted ​comforter in the lap. This speaker catches the president'​s eye when he (the speaker) has his body at about 45 degrees to the floor. As he proceeds ​the angle becomes more and more acute until finally, upon sitting down, he almost apologises to his stomach ​for putting his face into ithave often wondered how they build brick arches. Do they stick the bricks on to one another with less and less underneath hoping all the time that they will stay up long enough ​for something to be propped up under the other side? Well, if they do, these speakers look like the arch when the builder'​s have got to the middle but are a bit doubtful whether the law of gravity can stand much more of it. Or like a ruined Roman aqueduct. They are not sure whether they want to be bipeds or quadrupeds, whether they are going to pin their faith to creation or evolution. Of course they are almost inaudible for as they descend in a shrinking curve they must look down lest they take a bite out of the permanent wave in front or smash their teeth on the chairs. 
 + 
 +Chairs? What, chairs? I am not going to digress on the people who lean on the furniture as they speakThis habit is so prevalent that it is doubtful if it will ever be eradicated. Indeed it might be a kindness to invent a modern, up-to-date "​leaner"​ which could be passed around to speakers. One would need a cushioned part to lean against with hand rests for the tired arms, also a ..... what's that? You can't hear? Well, I'll try both nostrils and see if that is any better
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====A Review of "​Australian Wild Life" - Journal of the Wild Life Preservation Society of Australia.===== 
 + 
 +By Alex Colley. 
 + 
 +This Journal is a most comprehensive review of conservation activities of recent years, and it is gratifying to note that it owes much of its inspiration to members of the Society who are Club members. The Editor is our past president, David Stead. Dorothy Lawry is a member of the Council, and Doris E. Stead Assistant Secretary and Hon. Treasurer. 
 + 
 +The first part of the Journal is the report of the Society for the years 1939-1945. The report covers the main conservation projects of recent years. All Club members could learn much of conservation from it and the newer members in particular might be surprised to learn how much conservation work has been done by the S.B.W. Items of particular interest to Bush Walkers are the sections on Era Lands, Garrawarra, Grose River, The Greater Blue Mountains National Park, Kosciusko State Park and Warra Reserve. The sections on Flora and Fauna preservation raise many issues which have not perhaps received the attention they deserve from our movement, but I was rather disappointed to find that no mention is made of the Wild Flower petition organised by Rae Birt. 
 + 
 +The brief section on National Parks in Victoria quotes a most revealing report by Mr. G. Campbell. He states that "​Wilson'​s Promontory, for ten years or more, has been leased to cattle graziers for about £300 per annum, burned from top to toe under alleged control and is no longer a "​national park" but a national pasturage - and a poor-looking one at that.... The place lies "in ruins" ... all for a matter of £300 per annum."​ I hope the Kosciusko Trustees are aware of this. 
 + 
 +The rest of the Journal - 39 pages - s devoted to "The Tragic ​Story of National Park" by David G. Stead, who was an Honorary Member of the [illegible]. ​This it a harrowing account contrasting pious "​confessions of faith" by the Park Trust with actions in direct contradiction. The chronicle of despoliation is full of useful data, but I feel that the emphasis is misplaced in two directions. Firstly I think that the main fault of the Trust is one of omission. The Trust has taken no effective steps to control fires. If a fraction of the money spent on "​development" and road work had been used to install ​an efficient fire control service the park would not today be such a sorry waste of scribbly dead limbs and "​feather-duster" trees. ​One fire does more damage to the flora and fauna than 50 years of "​development"​. I was flattered to find that Mr. Stead had used a cutting I made from the S.M.H. as his main line of argument, but at the same time I feel convinced that the disappearance of so much of the park's flora and fauna, for which he blames the actions of the Trust, is really due to its lack of action regarding fires. In the second place I think he fails to appreciate that the park is there to be enjoyed by the people: and, since it is on the edge of a city of nearly l 1/2 million ​people ​it must cater for thousands of visitors weekly. Roads are necessary for the majority and cleared picnic grounds and other amenities a necessity. Unless we are to be voices crying, literally, in the wilderness, we must take account of these facts. It is also a pity that Mr. Stead does not carry the argument to a conclusion as regards what action conservationists should take. Should they ask, for example, that trustees be appointed to represent them? Should ​they petition for a new Parliamentary Charter? Should they just go on protesting, as they have for the last 50 years? These and other possible lines of action require careful consideration before any effective action can be taken. The matters I have raised, however, are secondary to what I interpret as his main thesis ​that what the Trust should provide is not sporting facilities, or cleared recreation areas, but bushland ​in its natural state. With this I agree wholeheartedly. 
 + 
 +The Journal is obtainable from the Wild Life Preservation Society, ​Science ​House, Gloucester Street, Sydney, for 1/3 plus postage. 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +Peggy Bransdon claims a near record for an official walkon which she had thirteen members and two prospectives! No, No! -- it's not the numbers that tickles us, but the fact that none of the members got lost. 
 + 
 +It would seem, too, that one of the Club's Respectable Bachelors has a most convenient set-up, in that he was to co-tent with two of the Club's Loveliest Ladies (this is all from hearsay, and I can't guarantee verification on every point). However the competition was too keen -- aren't some women fickle? (Or maybe men are cads?). 
 + 
 +---- 
 + 
 +=====What Has Paddy Got Now?===== 
 + 
 +Paddy is pleased to report that things are gradually improving. 
 + 
 +Here's how things stand. 
 + 
 +Let's get the bad news out of the way first. 
 + 
 +__Steel Frame Rucksacks.__ Owing to the shipping position, steel tubing which was due to arrive months ago is still on the wharf at Adelaide. Hence no steel frames. 
 + 
 +__Rucksacks Without Frames.__ All stock patterns available in a good range of colours. 
 + 
 +__Groundsheets and Cape Groundsheets.__ Good stock on hand. 
 + 
 +__Tents.__ All stock patterns available. 
 + 
 +__Military Maps.__ All published l" = 1 mile maps from N.S.W. constantly on hand. A set is available for inspection. 
 + 
 +__Prismatic Compasses.__ (reconditioned). Price £2/-/-, leather cases 5/-. 
 + 
 +__Knife Fork and Spoon Sets.__ Lighter, brighter and better than ever. English make 6/-. (a useful Xmas gift). 
 + 
 +__Housewives.__ Light and compact. Wools, thread, needles, buttons and thimble. Price 6d. 
 + 
 +__Stop Press.__ (What'​s cooking?) 
 + 
 +Aluminium squat type billies now on sale. 
 + 
 +1 1/2 pint 4/6.\\ 
 +2 1/2 pint 5/6.\\ 
 +3 pint 7/3.\\ 
 +4 Pint 8/3.\\
  
-Peggy Bransdon claims a nearrecord for an official walk, on which she had thirteen members and two prospectiveet No, Not -- itts not the numbers that tickles us, but the fact that none of the members got lost. 
-It would seem, too, that one of the Clubts Respectable Bachelors has a most convenient setup, in that he was to cotent with two of the Clubts Loveliest Ladies (this is all from hearsay, and I cantt guarantee verification on every point). H9wevor the competition was too keen -- aren't aome Vomon floucca:T (Or maybe men are cads?), 
-- 
-WHAT HAS PADDY GOT NOW? 
-Paddy is pleased to reportthat things are gradually improving. Here's how things stand. 
-Let's get the bad news out of the way first, 
-Steel Frame Rucksacks. Owing to the shipping position, steel tubing which was due to arrive months ago is still on the wharf at Adelaide. Hence no steel frames. 
-Rucksacks Without Frames. All stock patterns available in a good range of colours. 
-Groundsheets and Case Groundsheets. Good stock on hand. Tents. All stock patterns available. 
-Military...Maks. All published lll = 1 mile maps from N.S.W. constantly on hand. A set is available for inspection. 
-Prismatic Compasses (reconditioned). Price 2//, leather cases 
-Knife Fork and Spoon Sets. Lighter, brighter and better than ever. English make 67. useful Xmas gift). 
-Housewives. Light and compact. Wools, thread, needles, buttons and thimble. Price 6d. 
-STOP PRESS. (What'​s cooing?) 
-Aluminium squat typ-a- billies now on sale. 
-11 pint 4/6. ay pint 5/6. 
-3 pint 7/3; 
-4 Pint 8/3- 
 8" fry Pans. 4/9. 8" fry Pans. 4/9.
-Mouulto ​and sand fly reDellent.+ 
 +__Mosquito ​and sand fly repellent.__ 
 1/9 per 4 oz. bottle. 1/9 per 4 oz. bottle.
-PADDY PALLIN 
-Ph2n2.11121. 
-Cc3aeftv for Walkers. :X47 ckaorge 
-arDwrzi. 
  
 +Paddy Pallin. Camp Gear For Walkers. Phone B3101.
 +
 +327 George Street, Sydney.
194612.txt · Last modified: 2016/05/27 01:51 by tyreless