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194606 [2016/04/28 05:17]
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194606 [2016/04/28 22:45]
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-|Warragambe-Wollindilly Wanderings|"​Wombat"​| 1|+|Warragamba-Wollindilly Wanderings|"​Wombat"​| 1|
 |Evolution of a Bush Walker|"​Trouper B.C."| 5| |Evolution of a Bush Walker|"​Trouper B.C."| 5|
-|Bushwalker'​s War Memorral|Jeane Manell| 6|+|Bushwalker'​s War Memorial|Jeane Manell| 6|
 |Saving Lives or Saving Flowers|"​Bona Dea"| 7| |Saving Lives or Saving Flowers|"​Bona Dea"| 7|
 |Hot News!!|"​Thistle Rockyer"​| 8| |Hot News!!|"​Thistle Rockyer"​| 8|
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 |It's Goodman'​s| |12| |It's Goodman'​s| |12|
  
-=====Warragambe-Wollondilly Week-End Wanderings - Part 1.=====+=====Warragamba-Wollondilly Week-End Wanderings - Part 1.=====
  
 by "​Wombat"​. by "​Wombat"​.
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 Seeking out Ron and telling him all, I soon have him dazzled by dreams of lazy affluence (an attractive vision, to a Public Servant!) It is easy to list the articles we can jettison from our packs to make room for the treasure, and we do a slight moan that Paddy packs were built for only about 70-80 lbs., wondering meanwhile if our backs will take the strain, even at umpteen pounds an ounce. Gold - and all we have to do is find those bars, and sit on our haunches, panning. Seeking out Ron and telling him all, I soon have him dazzled by dreams of lazy affluence (an attractive vision, to a Public Servant!) It is easy to list the articles we can jettison from our packs to make room for the treasure, and we do a slight moan that Paddy packs were built for only about 70-80 lbs., wondering meanwhile if our backs will take the strain, even at umpteen pounds an ounce. Gold - and all we have to do is find those bars, and sit on our haunches, panning.
  
-We decide to risk letting others in on the secret, wherefore we invite Mavis and Betty to accompany us. "​Purely out of the kindness of our hearts",​ we say, "​You'​ll'​ love the Warragamha". In reality, of course, we want cooks and porters, and some attractive bait for potential hitch-hiking on the Warragamba-Silverdale road on Friday night! ​+We decide to risk letting others in on the secret, wherefore we invite Mavis and Betty to accompany us. "​Purely out of the kindness of our hearts",​ we say, "​You'​ll'​ love the Warragamba". In reality, of course, we want cooks and porters, and some attractive bait for potential hitch-hiking on the Warragamba-Silverdale road on Friday night! ​
  
 The scene it set, and we are about to depart for our present-day Aladdin'​s cave. The scene it set, and we are about to depart for our present-day Aladdin'​s cave.
  
-====Part I. - Some Bait Is Lousy - Really Lousey.====+====Part I. - Some Bait Is Lousey ​- Really Lousey.====
  
 As with all zero days, this particular Friday dawns fine and clear; and so does it remain until a ring from Betty, saying that she cannot come because she has to work on Saturday morning, Then a later ring to say her charms have clicked, so that she is not working after all, and will meet us at Penrith by a later train. We other three board the scheduled loco, bemoaning our fate at having to wait at Penrith, in lieu of moving immediately towards our golden glory. However, just after leaving Blacktown, a huge rucsac comes wandering down the corridor, and who should be struggling behind it but the self-same Betty! On leaving work, she has rushed home to Cremorne and back to Central in 45 minutes (no, not walking all the way) to catch the train, but not knowing we are on it, has remained (and recovered) in another carriage. Being a true Bushwalker, her time has not been wasted, for she has shelled the peas, assisted by a volunteering stranger who fell for the age-old gag. As with all zero days, this particular Friday dawns fine and clear; and so does it remain until a ring from Betty, saying that she cannot come because she has to work on Saturday morning, Then a later ring to say her charms have clicked, so that she is not working after all, and will meet us at Penrith by a later train. We other three board the scheduled loco, bemoaning our fate at having to wait at Penrith, in lieu of moving immediately towards our golden glory. However, just after leaving Blacktown, a huge rucsac comes wandering down the corridor, and who should be struggling behind it but the self-same Betty! On leaving work, she has rushed home to Cremorne and back to Central in 45 minutes (no, not walking all the way) to catch the train, but not knowing we are on it, has remained (and recovered) in another carriage. Being a true Bushwalker, her time has not been wasted, for she has shelled the peas, assisted by a volunteering stranger who fell for the age-old gag.
  
-The bus roars out of Penrith with the whole quartet aboard. At Wallacia, we are prevailed upon to partake of a meal, just to be sociable with the metber ​who hasn't eaten for two days, or so her story runs. This over, we at last hit the road. All around the undulating pasture land is bathed in gentle moonlight and our eager glances reveal our interest in the scene, especially in the road behind us. When about mid-way, our backward glances are rewarded; headlights on the skyline! Quickly, we exhort the girls to do their best - or else! They stand by the road with bewitching smiles, leaning somewhat forward as if their packs were heavy; doing their best to look demure whilst adroitly looking captivating. Yet all their charms are shown in vain, and oh! you should hear the epithets as the vehicle - a utility, mind you, just built for four, and empty at that - whizzes by unheeding! The air is thick with dust, but thicker still with vehement ​invetive.+The bus roars out of Penrith with the whole quartet aboard. At Wallacia, we are prevailed upon to partake of a meal, just to be sociable with the member ​who hasn't eaten for two days, or so her story runs. This over, we at last hit the road. All around the undulating pasture land is bathed in gentle moonlight and our eager glances reveal our interest in the scene, especially in the road behind us. When about mid-way, our backward glances are rewarded; headlights on the skyline! Quickly, we exhort the girls to do their best - or else! They stand by the road with bewitching smiles, leaning somewhat forward as if their packs were heavy; doing their best to look demure whilst adroitly looking captivating. Yet all their charms are shown in vain, and oh! you should hear the epithets as the vehicle - a utility, mind you, just built for four, and empty at that - whizzes by unheeding! The air is thick with dust, but thicker still with vehement ​invective.
  
 Midnight finds us entering Silverdale, an attractive little hamlet, in scattered seclusion on a ridge-top bathed in moonlight. The plan is to take the track which leads down to he junction of Monkey Ck. and the Warragamba, another three miles, but to find the track from the village seems a problem. Our hopes rise when down the road we hear voices, raised in song, albeit unmelodious. We stop the party and then step back - we require respite from the barrage of liquor fumes surrounding them! Our questioning is met with drunken laughter "What! Go down to Monkey Creek? Tonight? You can't do that, even in daylight. There just isn't any track!"​ With bushwalker'​s superciliousness we assure them of our supernatural powers, until one of them is able to volunteer moderately coherent information as to how we must proceed. Midnight finds us entering Silverdale, an attractive little hamlet, in scattered seclusion on a ridge-top bathed in moonlight. The plan is to take the track which leads down to he junction of Monkey Ck. and the Warragamba, another three miles, but to find the track from the village seems a problem. Our hopes rise when down the road we hear voices, raised in song, albeit unmelodious. We stop the party and then step back - we require respite from the barrage of liquor fumes surrounding them! Our questioning is met with drunken laughter "What! Go down to Monkey Creek? Tonight? You can't do that, even in daylight. There just isn't any track!"​ With bushwalker'​s superciliousness we assure them of our supernatural powers, until one of them is able to volunteer moderately coherent information as to how we must proceed.
  
-This we do forthwith, our ardour for the gold untramelled by their assuranced ​of the impossibility of our plans. At the local hall, we fill the buckets and after wandering through someone'​s back yard, passing through sliprails galore, and finally meandering across the golf links, we find ourselves on the track to "The Look-out"​ - oh, yes, even Silverdale has a "​Lookout"​. Some time after midnight, somewhere near said lookout, we lay out our sleeping bags by the roadeide. Glorious sleep, too deep for a light shower of rain to interrupt.+This we do forthwith, our ardour for the gold untramelled by their assurances ​of the impossibility of our plans. At the local hall, we fill the buckets and after wandering through someone'​s back yard, passing through sliprails galore, and finally meandering across the golf links, we find ourselves on the track to "The Look-out"​ - oh, yes, even Silverdale has a "​Lookout"​. Some time after midnight, somewhere near said lookout, we lay out our sleeping bags by the roadside. Glorious sleep, too deep for a light shower of rain to interrupt.
  
 Next morning, we have a lazy awakening, followed by a late start - why should prospective millionaires waste energy on an early getaway. Down at the Junction, we find the camp site as bad as its reputation, but as this is to be our fixed camp for the weekend we endeavour to make ourselves comfortable. The river is very low, and very muddy, but being full of the latest issue of the mag. with its article on how to catch perch without effort, we immediately set the line. Thereafter, every hour, we replace the ever missing bait. We begin to wonder whether we read the article aright; were the fish to feed us, or were we to feed the fish? Eventual conclusion is that this bait is as futile as last night'​s hitchhiking bait. Next morning, we have a lazy awakening, followed by a late start - why should prospective millionaires waste energy on an early getaway. Down at the Junction, we find the camp site as bad as its reputation, but as this is to be our fixed camp for the weekend we endeavour to make ourselves comfortable. The river is very low, and very muddy, but being full of the latest issue of the mag. with its article on how to catch perch without effort, we immediately set the line. Thereafter, every hour, we replace the ever missing bait. We begin to wonder whether we read the article aright; were the fish to feed us, or were we to feed the fish? Eventual conclusion is that this bait is as futile as last night'​s hitchhiking bait.
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 ====River Canoe Club - Topographical Section.==== ====River Canoe Club - Topographical Section.====
  
-Mr. Ted Caines Phillips, 39 Silver Street, St. Peters, convenor of the above section, advises that the following map is now on dislay ​at Paddy'​s:​+Mr. Ted Caines Phillips, 39 Silver Street, St. Peters, convenor of the above section, advises that the following map is now on display ​at Paddy'​s:​
  
 Patonga Creek (Lower Hawkesbury River). Patonga Creek (Lower Hawkesbury River).
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 ====1. Sunday Hiker:==== ====1. Sunday Hiker:====
  
-His luv' for the bus hwith a woman under one arm, a bottle of fizz(?) in the other, two Sunday papers characteristically scattered as though a paper chase were the order of the day - and, note, rarely more than 1/2 mile from the nearest railway station.+His luv' for the bush with a woman under one arm, a bottle of fizz(?) in the other, two Sunday papers characteristically scattered as though a paper chase were the order of the day - and, note, rarely more than 1/2 mile from the nearest railway station.
  
 ====2. Bushwalker:​==== ====2. Bushwalker:​====
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 Not being the artist of the cartoon aside, I am privileged to say it is inadequate. No sketch can portray the madness of the game! The climber surveys the rock face for suitable finger holds and after becoming entangled in rope a various stages, sometimes reaches the top. "​Philosophical relaxation",​ or somethin',​ is his supposed reason for such activity. Not being the artist of the cartoon aside, I am privileged to say it is inadequate. No sketch can portray the madness of the game! The climber surveys the rock face for suitable finger holds and after becoming entangled in rope a various stages, sometimes reaches the top. "​Philosophical relaxation",​ or somethin',​ is his supposed reason for such activity.
  
-====4. ​Moutaineer:====+====4. ​Mountaineer:====
  
 Imagine being encased in 16 suits of clothing, attaching steel spikes 10" long to your boots, and then enjoying the scenerY at 20,​000'​ with no oxygen. Imagine being encased in 16 suits of clothing, attaching steel spikes 10" long to your boots, and then enjoying the scenerY at 20,​000'​ with no oxygen.
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 When you read in the daily papers of the millions of people in the world who are slowly dying through lack of food, have you ever wondered whether we ought to turn from our work of preserving the bush to the work of preserving men? When you read in the daily papers of the millions of people in the world who are slowly dying through lack of food, have you ever wondered whether we ought to turn from our work of preserving the bush to the work of preserving men?
  
-Probably many humantitarians ​get impatient when they hear of our deputations to save our wild flowers, and think we would be much better employed assisting to send food and clothing to destitute and starving people.+Probably many humanitarians ​get impatient when they hear of our deputations to save our wild flowers, and think we would be much better employed assisting to send food and clothing to destitute and starving people.
  
-And yet, is any life, even that of trees and flowers, to be despised? Albert Schweitzer, one of the greatest living humanitarians,​ would say "​No",​ for it was he who conceived the idea of reverence for all life. He himself gave up a world famous musical career as the interpreter of Bach, and also an honoured place in the theological and academic world to bury himself in Africa as a humble doctor trying to make amends to the coloured people for the wrongs the whites had done them. But though his own work was the saving of men, he insists that all life is sacred. It is true there cannot be existence without some destruction,​ but that destruction,​ must be reduced to the minimum. You may cut the poppies in the field to save the wheat, but you musst be doubly careful going home that you do not knock off a single poppy head by the road side. That is his idea and he would certainly approve of our efforts to preserve the bushlands, even though there is terribly urgent need to preserve the starving peoples of Europe, China and India.+And yet, is any life, even that of trees and flowers, to be despised? Albert Schweitzer, one of the greatest living humanitarians,​ would say "​No",​ for it was he who conceived the idea of reverence for all life. He himself gave up a world famous musical career as the interpreter of Bach, and also an honoured place in the theological and academic world to bury himself in Africa as a humble doctor trying to make amends to the coloured people for the wrongs the whites had done them. But though his own work was the saving of men, he insists that all life is sacred. It is true there cannot be existence without some destruction,​ but that destruction,​ must be reduced to the minimum. You may cut the poppies in the field to save the wheat, but you must be doubly careful going home that you do not knock off a single poppy head by the road side. That is his idea and he would certainly approve of our efforts to preserve the bushlands, even though there is terribly urgent need to preserve the starving peoples of Europe, China and India.
  
-There is a rather lovely myth current in eastern Asia which illustrates the same idea that even the life of the vegetable kingdom is to be held sacred. It turns around the Bodhisattvas,​ as they are called, beings who have been re-incarnated over and over again, gradually rising in the scale of existence till at last they have won the right to Buddahood, that is, the right to rest from their labours and return no more to this world of pain and suffering. But they renounce that right, and return to the sorrows of earth again and again in order that they may help every being upwards, until "the last blade of grass is raisd to Buddhahood."​ A myth, it is true, but again embodying the truth that all life is worthy of preservation.+There is a rather lovely myth current in eastern Asia which illustrates the same idea that even the life of the vegetable kingdom is to be held sacred. It turns around the Bodhisattvas,​ as they are called, beings who have been re-incarnated over and over again, gradually rising in the scale of existence till at last they have won the right to Buddahood, that is, the right to rest from their labours and return no more to this world of pain and suffering. But they renounce that right, and return to the sorrows of earth again and again in order that they may help every being upwards, until "the last blade of grass is raised ​to Buddhahood."​ A myth, it is true, but again embodying the truth that all life is worthy of preservation.
  
 Our work of conserving the bush may be a lesser work than of those who are working to save people death by starvation. But it is not work to be despised, and, if we do the work that lies nearest us, we have done what we can to help rebuild the world after the most terribly destructive of all wars. Our work of conserving the bush may be a lesser work than of those who are working to save people death by starvation. But it is not work to be despised, and, if we do the work that lies nearest us, we have done what we can to help rebuild the world after the most terribly destructive of all wars.
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 ====Scene on Central:​==== ====Scene on Central:​====
  
-Mavis Jeanes, fresh from brides-maiding her sister, Betty, haunted the ticket windows in the late hours, with prospective,​ Geoff Bradley in tow (or towing, we're not quite sure). With intentions of conoeing ​the Kangaroo R., they had prayed for rain. And how their prayers were answered! So much so that they paddled right out of it and finished up - walking!+Mavis Jeanes, fresh from brides-maiding her sister, Betty, haunted the ticket windows in the late hours, with prospective,​ Geoff Bradley in tow (or towing, we're not quite sure). With intentions of canoeing ​the Kangaroo R., they had prayed for rain. And how their prayers were answered! So much so that they paddled right out of it and finished up - walking!
  
 ====Barrington News:==== ====Barrington News:====
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 ====Yarrangobilly-Brindabella Trip:==== ====Yarrangobilly-Brindabella Trip:====
  
-Both porters and drivers on Central co-operated in delaying departure for 1 1/2 hrs. to ensure that all of Ray Kirkby'​s crowd were on board. In the midst of the waiting, Allan Hardie took it upon himself to use his pack in sweeping a man from the platform onto the ralls. Whilst lumbering engines shunted round him, he leisurely and unconcernedly picked himself up, dusted himself off, and climbed back to the platform. Apparently said man was so relieved at surviving a blow from Dorman'​s pack that oncoming locomotives held no fears at all!+Both porters and drivers on Central co-operated in delaying departure for 1 1/2 hrs. to ensure that all of Ray Kirkby'​s crowd were on board. In the midst of the waiting, Allan Hardie took it upon himself to use his pack in sweeping a man from the platform onto the rails. Whilst lumbering engines shunted round him, he leisurely and unconcernedly picked himself up, dusted himself off, and climbed back to the platform. Apparently said man was so relieved at surviving a blow from Dorman'​s pack that oncoming locomotives held no fears at all!
  
 ---- ----
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 He heard me and froze in his tracks, waiting for what might befall. I stooped and armed with my leather gloves tried to pick him up but no limpet on its rock clung more firmly than he to Mother Earth. In fact, he not only clung but appeared to be submerging in the soil. He heard me and froze in his tracks, waiting for what might befall. I stooped and armed with my leather gloves tried to pick him up but no limpet on its rock clung more firmly than he to Mother Earth. In fact, he not only clung but appeared to be submerging in the soil.
  
-I pulled and heaved and managed to get a good look at his moist earth-sprinkled nose - or rather bill, flat and broad like that of a platypus - and at the claws, wide and horny capable, they tell us, of scraping their way through concrete, given a crack to start on. With these he dug so firmly into the earth that not all my efforts could dislodge him. My gloves, thick though they were, were not proof ragainst ​his sharp quills, and at last I gave up the struggle.+I pulled and heaved and managed to get a good look at his moist earth-sprinkled nose - or rather bill, flat and broad like that of a platypus - and at the claws, wide and horny capable, they tell us, of scraping their way through concrete, given a crack to start on. With these he dug so firmly into the earth that not all my efforts could dislodge him. My gloves, thick though they were, were not proof against ​his sharp quills, and at last I gave up the struggle.
  
 A long time we waited in silence, I not moving a muscle and hardly daring to breathe. I wanted to see him in action, and feared that if I startled him he would burrow into the earth and vanish right under my nose. A long time we waited in silence, I not moving a muscle and hardly daring to breathe. I wanted to see him in action, and feared that if I startled him he would burrow into the earth and vanish right under my nose.
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 ---- ----
  
-10, +=====Easter Again.===== 
-EASTER AGAIN + 
 By Ray Kirkby. By Ray Kirkby.
-Easter and Tumut? Wrong', there were twenty mutts. But no, they were not mutts for at Tumut there-had been no rain and there was no rain - just lovely sunny days. It is not possibleete) ​say that our train was late leaving Central ​be6ause ​people arrived at Coota off 'three different trains all having various-degrees of lateness. From Coota the fact that there Was only one train kept us together. But not at night - Oh no - not at night. There was always one section camped on a mountainside and one in a creek, or therewere two sections divided by a swamp, - + 
-At Tumut, Joyce Marchant'​s sister met us bearing a hamper for Joyce which, fortunately,​ was too lerge for her. There worethree ​baked rabbits; 7 a pot of jam, a large slab of cake and numerous ​appl6s. We did not arrive' ​at Yarramgobilly for lunch until about 3 o'​clock so it was not unusual to find one of the girls in her less aesthetic moments tearing apart a rabbit and gnawing a leg. +Easter and Tumut? Wrong, there were twenty mutts. But no, they were not mutts for at Tumut there had been no rain and there was no rain - just lovely sunny days. It is not possible to say that our train was late leaving Central ​because ​people arrived at Coota off three different trains all having various degrees of lateness. From Coota the fact that there was only one train kept us together. But not at night - Oh no - not at night. There was always one section camped on a mountainside and one in a creek, or there were two sections divided by a swamp
-Our lorry haulted ​a while at Talbingo and we discovered later that the honeymooning MacGregors were camped only an old shoe toss away. They said they did not hearus but, had we been more Obscrvent, we probably ​wotildhave ​seen them crawling rapidly away through the grass, + 
- +At Tumut, Joyce Marchant'​s sister met us bearing a hamper for Joyce which, fortunately,​ was too large for her. There were three baked rabbitsa pot of jam, a large slab of cake and numerous ​apples. We did not arrive at Yarramgobilly for lunch until about 3 o'​clock so it was not unusual to find one of the girls in her less aesthetic moments tearing apart a rabbit and gnawing a leg. 
-Our Ex Air Force driver from Brindabella drove up' ​the steep hair pin bends with such abandon that he had to be restrained. If he had insured us as our first driver had done we should not have minded. For who would not-die gladly, clutching a third party risk policy in his hand?+ 
 +Our lorry halted ​a while at Talbingo and we discovered later that the honeymooning MacGregors were camped only an old shoe toss away. They said they did not hear us but, had we been more observant, we probably ​would have seen them crawling rapidly away through the grass. 
 + 
 +Our Ex Air Force driver from Brindabella drove up the steep hair pin bends with such abandon that he had to be restrained. If he had insured us as our first driver had done we should not have minded. For who would not die gladly, clutching a third party risk policy in his hand?
    
- +=====Limelight On Everest.===== 
-. . , LIMELLIET ON E'​REREST + 
-The year's scoop is presented to you per medium of the Bushwalkerr- ​the fight for Everest is on again! +The year's scoop is presented to you per medium of the Bushwalker: ​the fight for Everest is on again! 
-Eric Shipton, English mountaineer ​who_canprobably elaim more Himalayan + 
-. . _ . +Eric Shipton, English mountaineer ​who can probably claim more Himalayan ​experience ​than any other man is planning the sixth attempt upon the highest summit in the world. He will lead a party of six climbers, early in 1947. Bushwalkers generally ​appear ​to take some interest in climbing, and for this reason we present to you the salient features of Everest history, with an elaboration of Shipton'​s achievements
-+ 
-eXperienee ​than any other man is planning the sixth attempt upon the highest summit in the world. He will lead a party of six climbers, early in 1947. Bushwalkers generally ​eeppear ​to take some interest in climbing, and for this reason we present to you the salient features of Everest history, with an elaboration of'Shipton'​s achievements: +Mount Everest ​was "discovered"​ by the Great Trigonometrical Survey ​of India in 1852, its height being given as 29,​002 ​feet, but not until 1921 did the first expedition set out. This venture, of a purely exploratory nature, paved the way for the First Attempt, in 1922Although climbing no higher than 27,​300' ​the expedition gave much information of value when the Second Attempt began in 1924
-Mount Eleerest ​was udiscovered"eby-the Great Trigonometrical Survey ​India in 18.721 ​its height being given as 29f002 ​feet, but not until 1921 did the -first expedition set out. T4ts venture, of a purely exploratory nature, paved the way for the First Attempt, in 1922 Although climbing no higher than ,27;3001 the expedition gave much information of value when the -Second Attempt began in '1924, + 
-They gavefor example, details of the climbing to be expected on the final hbiglls. Across the face of 'Everest, roughly a thousand feet below the summit, ​&​re ​two horizontal bands of-limeStane ​with nearly vertical faces. These two races, the _First ​Step (16Wer)and Second Step (Upper) have proved the stumbling block of all future expeditions. ​- +They gavefor example, details of the climbing to be expected on the final heights. Across the face of Everest, roughly a thousand feet below the summit, ​are two horizontal bands of limestone ​with nearly vertical faces. These two faces, the First Step (lower) and Second Step (Upper) have proved the stumbling block of all future expeditions. 
-In 1924, two climbers mere abit to b1tch the First 'Step, but were drivem ​back by thn Second. A few days' lhtbr,'-two other climbers ​s'​et ​out and were seen-above the First Step, at a height of over 28,0001 After that the + 
-11. +In 1924, two climbers mere able to breach ​the First Step, but were driven ​back by the Second. A few days later, two other climbers ​set out and were seen above the First Step, at a height of over 28,000! After that the mountain mists closed about them, and of their subsequent fate nothing is known. 
-mountain mists closed about them, and of their subsequent fate nothing is known. + 
-This upper band of limestone ​hat callcd ​a halt to all climbers since then. Men have conquered the question-of existence in the rarefied air; they have been able to live at those freezing heights waiting for the one +This upper band of limestone ​has called ​a halt to all climbers since then. Men have conquered the question of existence in the rarefied air; they have been able to live at those freezing heightswaiting for the one or two calm days in the year which may or may not come; waited whilst snow obscured the rocks, hoping that it would not be there on the one or two days when the blizzards might sleep - they have suffered hardship only to be driven back again and again by those few feet of rock, the Second Step. 
-or two calm 'days in ti'le-year which may or may not come; waited whilst snow + 
-obscured the rocks, hoping that it would not be there on the one or two deTL when the blizzards might sleep - they have suffered hardship only to be +Nine years later, in 1933, the Third Attempt was launched, yet it achieved no more than the 1924 climbers, except to add to the knowledge of what not to do about that band of limestone. The second assault party of this expedition comprised Frank Smythe, conqueror of Kamet, with Eric Shipton as his climbing partner. Shipton ​turned ​back because of stomach troubleand Smythe continued alone, only to retreat before the Second Step. 
-driven back again and again by those few feet of rock, the Second Step. + 
-Nine years later, in 1933, the Third Attempt was launched, yet it achieved no more than the 1924 climbers, except to ado to the knowledge of what not to do about that band of limestone. The second assault party of +Prior to this, Shipton was a farmer in Kenya; just a plain bloke like you or me, who could see Mt. Kenya from the farm on which he worked. Because he had done some climbing ​in Europe, he made trips to Mts. Kenya and Kilimanjaro,​ in much the same spirit as you or I should make a walking trip to Kosciusko or the Warrumbungles. Frank Smythe heard of his climbing ​prowess, and invited him on his Kamet conquest ​in 1931. As a direct consequence of this expedition, he was included in the 1933 Everest personnel. 
-this expedition comprised Frank Smythe, conqueror of Kamet, with Eric + 
-Shipton as his climbing partner. Shipton ​turncd ​back because of stomach troubleand Smythe continued alone, only to retreat before the Second Step. +To return to farming after this was loathsome; Shipton had come to love the mountains, and he determined to live amongst them. He conceived the idea of running small, lightweight parties to unmapped parts of the Himalayas. The 1933 Everest show had cost £10,000 and contained 16 climbing personnel. Too costly and too cumbersome was Shipton'​s ​verdict. He was no scientist, and he had no financial background; yet he and a farmer ​friend, Tilman, planned a two-man expedition to the unmapped Nanda Devi basin. A 6-month'​s ​sojourn at a cost, not of thousands, but £300, including boat fares to India and porters' ​wages. ​£150 apiece for two farmers, both of whom were to become Everest leaders
-Prior to this, Shipton was a farmer in Kenya; just a plain bloke like + 
-you or me, who could see Mt. Kenya from the farm on which he worked. Because he had done some climbing ​inEurope, he made trips to Mts.Kenya and Kilimanjaro,​ in much the same spirit as you or I should make a walking trip to Kosciusko +That Shipton'​s ​ideas of light-weight and compactness had a profound effect upon mountaineering thought is shown by every subsequent Everest attempt, in all of which he has figured prominently. 
-or the Warrumbungles. Frank Smythe heard of his climbing ​proWess, and invited him on his Kamet coneuest ​in 1931. As a direct consequence of this expedition, he was included in the 1933 Everest personnel. + 
-To return to farming after this was loathsome; Shipton had come to +The mountain was next in the news in 1935. Shipton was back, with a party comprising six climbers and a surveyor. Their object was reconnaissance:​ to examine the possibilities of climbing during the periods of monsoonal snows, and to explore the north-western and western approaches, paving the way for another attempt in 1936. This, the fourth assault expedition, was placed under the 1933 leader, Hugh RuttledgeRuttledge ​did not agree with Shipton'​s ​ideas that small lightweight expeditions were most efficient; and yet, in the face of the latter'​s ​achievements elsewhere in the Himalayas, he had to modify his ideas, and only 12 climbers were taken, as against 16 in '33. Heavy snows on the mountain drove them back without even attempting ​the final climb. 
-love the mountains, and he determined to live amongst them. He conceived the idea of running small, lightweight parties,to unmapped parts of the + 
-Himalayas. The 1933 Everest show had cost 110,000 and contained 16 climbing +In 1938, the Fifth Attempt was carried out, with Tilman as leader and Shipton as a climber. This expedition was the first really light-weight ​assault, with only seven in the climbing party. Once more they pit their strengths against the rock and ice; once more they retreated below the Second Step. 
-personnel. Too costly and toa cumbersome was Shiptonls ​verdict. He was no scientist, and he had no financial background; yet ho and a fermer ​friend, Tilman, planned a two-man expedition to the unmapped Nanda Devi basin. A + 
-64monthts ​sojourn at a cost, not of thoisands, but 1300,including boat fares to India and porterst ​wages. ​1150 apiece for two farmers, both of whom were to become Everest leaders/ +War interrupted Shipton'​s plans, but now that the war is over, he is returning again. True to his unconventional ideas, only six climbers will take part, and there will be a new innovation, in the form of lightweight stretchers. Will he succeed? No-one can forecast ​his chances. Success will see his greatest dream come true; failure will be but a stigma to return once more to the mountain of his heart'​s ​desire ​- Everest. 
-That Shiptonls ​ideas of light-weight and compactness had a profound effect upon mountaineering thought is shown by every subsequent Everest attempt, in all of which he has figured prominently. + 
-The mountain was next in the newsin 1935. Shipton was beck, with a +---- 
-party comprising six climbers and a surveyor. Their object was reconnaissance:​ to examine the possibilities of climbing during the periods of monsoonal snows, and to explore the noi-th-western and westernapproaches, paving the + 
-way for another attempt in 1936. 'This, the fourth assault expedition, was placed under the 1933 leader, Hugh Ru-diedgeRuttlodge ​did not agree with Shiptonls ​ideas that small lightweight expeditions were most efficient; and +====Wedding Bells:==== 
-yet, in the face of the lattor1s ​achievements elsewhere in the Himalayas, he had to modify his ideas, and only 12 climbers were taken, as against + 
-16 in 133. Heavy snows on the mountain drove them back without even attempting ​thu final climb. +Those who have wondered at the absence of Betty Jeanes now have their answer in the fact that, on Thursday, 18th April, she became Mrs. Hilary Mannes. We extend ​the club's best wishes to our erstwhile Social Secretary.
-In 1938, the Fifth Attempt was carried out, with Tilman as leader and Shipton as a climber. This expedition was the first really light-weight +
-12. +
-Assault, with only seven in the climbing party. Once more they pit their strengths against the rock and ice; once more they retreated below the Second Step. +
-War interrupted Shipton'​s plans, but now that the war is over, he is returning again. True to his unconventional-ideas, only six climbers will take part, and there will be a new innovation, in the form of lightweight stretchers. Will he succeed? No-one can forecaSt ​his ch,ncos. Success will see his greatest dream come true; failure will be but a stigma to return once more to the mountain of his heart'​s ​dc,​sire ​- Everest. +
-WEDDING BELLS: Those who have wondered at the absence of Betty Jeanes now have their answer in the fact that, on Thursday, 18th April, +
-she became Mrs. Hilary Mannes. We extond ​the club's best wishes to our erstwhile Social Secretary+
-Statistics show that the number of McGregors in the club has doubled, whilst the Isaacs have been halved. This change in the status quo occurred on Saturday Anril 13th, when Elsa Isaacs became Mrs. Malcom McG. Congrats to Malcom, and felicitations to the now member of the clan. +
-+
-P. GOODMAN,  +
-Optometrist and Optician 20 Hunter Street, SYDNEY. +
-Tel; B3438 +
- ​Fixing an aPpointmont will facilitate the reservation of time for giving you proper attention, but should you be unable to. ring us beforehand, your visit will be welcpme at any time you may choose to call. +
-8;214@@ct (-)Wrq@@(. g-Dc_j.,​c-r@ge.)g,​a'​arey,​Cd@Car.:​Cati ciOgik ag.--z;​ak,​ +
-YOUR PT pm T R I S  +
-Modern methods of eye examination and Eye Training. +
-+
-+
-Careful Spectacle Fitting +
-I III* ssps.+
  
 +Statistics show that the number of McGregors in the club has doubled, whilst the Isaacs have been halved. This change in the status quo occurred on Saturday April 13th, when Elsa Isaacs became Mrs. Malcom McG. Congrats to Malcom, and felicitations to the new member of the clan.
194606.txt · Last modified: 2016/04/28 22:45 by tyreless